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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 19, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at 11am. many are feared dead after a hotel in central italy was hit by an avalanche. rescuers say up to 30 people are missing. theresa may outlines her vision of a "truly global britain" to business leaders at the world economic forum in switzerland. gambia's rosamund pike expects to be sworn in despite the defeated president refusing to stand down. —— 0ur closest biological relatives are facing extinction. 60% of the world's primates — from gorillas to lemurs — are now said to be under threat because of human activity. british supermarket shelves are running low on courgettes and other vegetables after the cold weather on the continent hit suppliers. good morning.
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it's thursday 19 january. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. several people have been killed and many are missing after a hotel was hit by an avalanche in central italy. up to 30 guests and staff we re italy. up to 30 guests and staff were in the rigopiano hotel in the abruzzo region at the time. a major rescue operation is underway. frankie mccamley reports. buried in snow, barely visible, this is the hotel hit by last night's avalanche. inside the extent of the damage is becoming clear. what looks like a reception leading to corridors now unrecognisable, full of snow and debris. up to 20 people
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we re of snow and debris. up to 20 people were staying in the hotel rigopiano hotel along with seven members of staff, but bad weather meant a difficult overnight rescue operation. translation: the hotel was reached at 4:30am by courageous men who faced up variable situations. they saved two people, they are working to bring the means of transport that are difficult to bring. on skis in the early hours of this morning rescue teams faced snowstorms to get to the area hit. with roads blocked, to emergency vehicles, only manpower could save those trapped. one man is led to safety. nearby relatives faced an agonising wait for news. translation: they are extracting them can be hotel and bringing them to hospitals i think but i don't know because it is impossible for us to go up. others text alone for dons inside urging them to stay calm.
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this morning conditions in a region already fragile after being hit by a series of earthquakes has begun to ease. but rescuers believed up to 30 people are still missing as the extent of this tragedy begins to unfold. on the line is giovanni grezzi from the agence france—presse news agency. he's in the amatrice region, about 50 km from the town of farindola. thank you forjoining us. those pictures of the hotel show it swamped by the snow from that avalanche. what is the very latest on the fate of those who are inside? we are fearing here in italy that there should be at least 20 people dead, there were kids, families, stuff from the hotel. —— staff. we feared the worst here in italy and
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the region. tell us more about where this hotel is situated and the difficulty of rescuers. this is a region that is very popular for ski lovers, not very far from rome, region that is very popular for ski lovers, not very farfrom rome, two hours. this area particularly there has been historic snowfall, two or three metres of snow around. so of course it is very difficult to reach this area. this region particularly was hit in the last year, many earthquakes. 2009, and now this year again, the economy of the region was very fragile. this last tragedy can only worsen things. and of course there are so many hotels, so many
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homes and other buildings and businesses in this region. despite the earthquakes yesterday, it would be impossible to predict, wooded, where avalanches might strike? of course, because we know now the avalanches originated from the earthquake yesterday morning, so if there are other earthquakes in the next hour or day, with the huge snowfall that we had, they could have been more and more avalanches, so have been more and more avalanches, so the authorities now are very careful with this kind of thing. so the authorities now are very careful with this kind of thinglj was careful with this kind of thing.” was there any warnings going out to people staying and living in the area? is there any sense that they need to be moving away from this region at least temporarily? yeah, i mean, the people in the area, they are saying to the people coming for
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tourism or outside, not to go anywhere unless it is necessary to move around, so that is the warning we have right now. so, back to the rescue effort from the hotel rigopiano hotel what are the rescue teams saying about what they are doing precisely now? sorry? can you hear me? i can hear you now. i was just asking, returning to the rigopiano hotel, but a rescue was saying about what they are doing right now? they went inside the hotel and they are exploring every pa rt hotel and they are exploring every part of the hotel to see if there is a chance to find any survivors, but i think also the main road is still blocked. rescuers, they have got, as you said and your report, skis, and
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now there are helicopters getting to the region to see if there is anyone in need of any medical assistance. we are looking at some pictures now ofa man we are looking at some pictures now of a man being led from the hotel and we know that a couple of people have been airlifted to hospital, so still hope there. yes, we hope that some people can survive, because they spent at least 20 hours under they spent at least 20 hours under the snow, so this is a big risk of hypothermia, of course, so the time is very sensitive at this moment, but we always hope for the best. jiovanni grezzi, thank you very much. thank you. the time is seven minutes past 11. some news coming into us of a referendum that is going to be happening in surrey. a referendum on the issue of putting
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up referendum on the issue of putting up council tax in surrey by 15%. it would take a typical council tax build there to around £1500. the cou nty build there to around £1500. the county council is concerned, as indeed authorities are in many places, at the costs of adult social ca re places, at the costs of adult social care and also providing enough school places. bbc surrey understands the vote would be held across surrey including in runnymede and weybridge, they consist —— constituency of the chancellor for apartment. there is to be a referendum in surrey on putting up council tax by 15%. no details yet on council tax by 15%. no details yet o n exa ctly council tax by 15%. no details yet on exactly that will be held. —— chancellor philip hammond. theresa may has outlined her vision of a "truly global britain" to business leaders at the world economic forum in switzerland. the prime minister said the uk would step up as an advocate for business and free trade after brexit, but said the government needed to respond to the concerns of citizens who felt left behind by the pace of economic change. she said britain faced an uncertain road ahead and would need to forge a new role in the wider world.
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the united kingdom, a country that has so often been at the forefront of economic and social change, will step up to a new leadership role as the strongest and most forceful advocate for business, free markets and free trade anywhere in the world. for that is the unique opportunity that britain now has. i speak to you this morning as the prime minister of a country that faces the future with confidence. for a little over six months ago, millions of my fellow citizens upset the odds of voting with determination and quiet resolve to leave the european union and embrace the world. let us not underestimate the magnitude of that decision. it means britain must face up to a period of momentous change. it means we must go through a tough
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negotiation and forge a new role for ourselves in the world. it means accepting that the road ahead will be uncertain at times, but believing that it leads towards a brighter future for our country's children and grandchildren too. so while it would have been easy for the british people to shy away from taking such a path, they fixed their eyes on that brighter future and chose a bold, ambitious course instead. they chose to build a truly global britain. theresa may said britain wanted a "bold and ambitious" trade agreement with the eu — but would also pursue other deals with countries outside the bloc. we seek the freedom to strike new trade deals with old friends and new allies right around the world as well. i am pleased that we have already started discussions on future trade
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ties with countries like australia, new zealand and india. while countries including china, brazil and the gulf states have already expressed their interest in striking trade deals with us. it is about embracing genuine free trade, because that is the basis of our prosperity, but also the best way to cement the multilateral partnerships and cooperation that help to build a better world. for the challenges we face, like terrorism, climate change and modern slavery, don't stop at national borders, nor do they stop at the borders of continents. the challenges and opportunities before us require us to look outwards in a spirit of cooperation and partnership. that is why, as i said in my speech on tuesday, i want the uk to emerge from this period of change as a truly global britain.
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the best friend and neighbour to our european partners, but a country that reaches beyond the borders of europe too. a country that gets out into the world to build relationships with old friends and new allies alike. and that is exactly what we are going to do. in a moment will take to our assistant political editor norman smith who's in westminster, but first to our business correspondent tanya beckett who's in davos. after theresa may's brexit speech on tuesday, was there much in this speech that was different and what is the reaction there so far? madrid the much in terms of flesh on the bones, but what she is doing is addressing a very different audience and that audience is a committed to capitalism and free trade obviously, it is the heartbeat, the world
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economic forum of exactly that. it was very interesting that what she did what she said it is not about us leaving a trading relationship, it is about is getting out of the european union so that we as britain are able to embrace wider global trading relationships. she talked about globalisation is the foundation of prosperity and that britain was therefore going to lead the role in pursuing globalisation. but she then of course went on to say was, look, there is this dilemma that voters are very clearly saying, the spoils of globalisation are not being equally divided. and she said how we got round the problem was the burden must fall on governments and companies to make sure that did happen. a little light on detail but what i think she was trying to say is this is the blueprint for globalisation going forward, and it isa globalisation going forward, and it is a question that people have been asking themselves here and i think she was trying to put herself at the very forefront of that thinking. century much. to westminster then
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and are assistant political editor norman smith. this seemed to be a speech with pretty broad brush strokes, as tania was saying, not a lot of detail, but if theresa may was trying to influence, persuade, how did she do on that?” was trying to influence, persuade, how did she do on that? i am not sure she will have shifted much opinion if i am honest, because certainly there was no detail and at the end of the day what business wa nts the end of the day what business wants is clarity, certainty, but on the two critical areas, what sort of trading relationship we're going to have once we leave the single market, nothing at all, immigration likewise, with concerns in the business community about whether they will still be able to attract talent and to recruit again, no clarity on that. one thing i did think interesting though is mrs may made no reference to the threat she issued at the start of the week, that we don't get a deal, we will walk away, in other words we are quite happy to rely on world trade organisation rules, she made no
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mention of that. and why that is interesting, i think that prospect probably alarms a good segment business, about what the implications will be in terms of potential tariffs, and also if we don't get a deal on the customs union, what that will mean on tariff free trade within europe, the potential impact on supply chains. striking relief that she did not temper her criticism which has become a hallmark of her leadership, on, if you like, the international elite, saying in effect you have got to change your ways, many of you are not playing by the rules of the game when it comes to tax, when it comes to sharing the benefits of growth and profits, and that many people feel left behind, communities feel diminished. in other words saying pretty much eyeball to eyeball to the people in the audience, things have got to change. so, will she have got to change. so, will she have reassured the business
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community? i suspect only to a very limited degree and i suspect many of them will have left still pretty nervous about what brexit means. ok, thank you very much. norman smith at westminster. a number of firefighters have been trapped, after a fire caused a high—storey building in the iranian capital tehran to collapse. around 70 people were injured in the blaze, at the 17—storey plasco building, which hosts a shopping centre. state tv showed the moment when the building — in the centre of the city — came down. the headlines... at least one person has been killed and 30 are missing after an avalanche struck a hotel in after an avalanche struck a hotel in a mountain resort in central italy. theresa may declares that britain wa nts to theresa may declares that britain wants to become the strongest advocate for business, free markets and free trade in the world. as troops massed on the gambia's
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border, the country's president—elect says he will be sworn in at the gambian embassy in neighbouring senegal. and in a moment, no courgettes, broccoli or spinach on your supermarket shop. we will explain wider is a supply shortage of their profession was in a moment. and in sport... novak djokovic is out of the australian open. the defending champion was beaten in five sets by world number 117 denis istomin from ukbekistan british number one johanna konta is through to the third round. she beatjapan's naomi osaka in straight sets and will face caroline wozniacki next. heather watson and kyle edmund are both out. and after three early wickets england's bowlers fight to contain india's batsmen in the second one—day international in pune. i'll be back with more on those stories. the latest crime figures for england and wales show
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there were 3.6 million cases of fraud and two million computer misuse offences in the 12 months to end of september 2016. the latest crime figures for england and wales show it's the first full year when the offences have been included in the crime survey. our home affairs correspondent danny shaw is here. let's talk about those fraud figures first of all. 3.6 million cases in the 12 months to the end of last september. yes, this is the first time we have had an annualfigure forfraud time we have had an annualfigure for fraud offences estimated by the survey, for fraud offences estimated by the survey, a for fraud offences estimated by the survey, a survey of householders in england and wales. these include offences which are not reported to police. we cannot say whether that is an increase on the previous year 01’ is an increase on the previous year or five years before that, because frauds were included in the survey previously, so it is very difficult to say what the trend is, but think we can certainly make an inference
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that this large number of fraud offences includes many offences committed online and clearly the prevalence of the internet compared with five or ten years ago would suggest the number is increasing. whether it is displacing other types of traditional crimes such as burglaries, thefts and so on, again thatis burglaries, thefts and so on, again that is the realms of speculation but it is quite possible that as those offences have been going down, burglary, theft and so on, criminals are moving online. we are mainly talking about financial fraud, aren't we? yes, credit card fraud, but also scans of the internet where people log on to websites and find that they buy something and it's never arrives, the money is gone, that kind of thing. you mentioned more traditional types of crime or measures of crime. we always look at the violent crime figures. what does this report say? on the survey data they are showing no great change in
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they are showing no great change in the levels of violence year on year, but when we come to the police figures, crimes that are reported to police and recorded by police in england and wales, there are some quite significant increases. overall violence was up 22%. within that that will include some crimes where the recording practices have changed, so it is not a real increase, its because the way the police recording new offences is different from what it used to be. also we are seeing what appeared to be genuine increases in violence. homicides are there was an increase there, significant increase, that includes some of the hillsborough cases because of the inquests verdicts, but excluding that, 29 more homicides year—on—year, a 5% rise, attempted murder is up 22%, knife crime up 11%, gun crime up 7%. but the statisticians are saying is that if knife crime and growing crime, there are genuine increases going on because it is matched by
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data from the nhs, from hospital admissions. so some real worrying signs there i think and four police and terms of the public and also the government in terms of violent crime. thank you for that. a british man who travelled to america to have sex with boys has been sentenced to 13 years in a us prison. 70—year—old paul charles wilkins, who's from cambridgeshire, flew to california in january 2016 and was caught in an undercover sting operation. bomb disposal teams were called out to almost 600 schools in the wake of government advice about a potentially hazardous chemical. the warning about stocks of the chemical 2,4—dnph — used in chemistry lessons — sparked several calls to the army, which carried out hundreds of controlled explosions between october and december last year. there are reports of troops from senegal entering the gambia, as the political crisis there escalates. the defeated president yayha jammeh has ignored a midnight deadline to give way to the winner of last month's election, adama barrow.
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a thousand british holidaymakers have returned home from gambia with the foreign office advising against all but essential travel there. greg dawson reports. back home sooner than they thought, but relieved to be safe. these passengers landed at manchester in the early hours, and thousands more will fly home today after their holidays ended with the threat of a violent conflict. it was very scary and the local people were crying and worried about their children. my family is still there. my daughter with three months old baby, my first daughter. they are not the only ones who have left. over 25,000 citizens have fled to neighbouring senegal as the threat of a military invasion looms. my total rejection of election results. this crisis centres on one man refusing to buckle to pressure from a regional alliance now surrounding his tiny nation. yahya jammeh initially conceded defeat in last month's election after 22 years in power,
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but he changed his mind, claiming the vote had been fraudulent. the man who beat him, adama barrow, fled to senegal but remains confident he will sworn in later today. troops from senegal and ghana are now gathered along the gambian border, and nigeria has sent fighterjets and a warship to the area. they have asked for un permission to intervene, now the deadline for the president to step down expired. while gambians hope for a peaceful solution, thousands of tourists have an anxious wait to leave the country. the time is 11:23am. the cost of imported vegetables such as courgettes, lettuce, and broccoli is going up because of bad weather in europe. supermarkets have also told the bbc that there are concerns over the supply of fresh food. our correspondent, dan johnson, has been at new covent garden market in central london to get a sense of how and why prices
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are being affected. this is it wholesale market that serves most of london, serving caterers and serves most of london, serving caterers a nd restau ra nts serves most of london, serving caterers and restaurants supplying them with fresh fruit and veg and it is the sort of thing that they can't get hold of right now. courgettes are an example, of vegetables that are an example, of vegetables that are imported from southern europe, italy, spain. because of the weather conditions they just italy, spain. because of the weather conditions theyjust can't get hold of another of these and that is why the price of a cred that has gone up from £6 a year ago to today selling for £24. that's how high the demand is and why some of the supermarkets don't have products like courgettes and broccoli. well, with me here this morning is adam leyland, editor of grocer magazine. and julie riehl who speaks for a charity called sustain, talking about sustainable food production. adam, how bad has the problem been this winter? it's a real problem, it started just before christmas. there's been terrible weather in southern spain, particularly flooding and so forth. but right across the whole of southern europe, there's been snow, very cold weather right now. these are terrible conditions in which to grow, even inside poly tunnels.
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so, for the consumer, there's real shortages across many of the supermarkets, not universal, you can get it but you have to pay for it. in the case of the supermarkets, they‘ re not necessarily charging more because they spread it out, they spread the cost out over the course of the year, that is what you will see if there is some forms of inflation in fresh produce caused by this shortage in the mediterranean produce category. are there other options for sourcing produce like that? well, you can go to america, of course, but that is really desperate and you're going to have to pay a tariff for that, frankly. yes, people are pursuing that as options. it's i can't recall ever having seen that before but these are sort of terrible times for growing and it could well last a while yet and in fact there are some people saying that it could have a knock—on effect until later in the year in terms of growing. what's that going to do for people in the grocery business? well, you have to sort of spread your produce, encourage people to go in other areas but it will result in yet more of that inflation that is starting to creep in because you
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can't. .. you don't want to but the price up on these sorts of items so you will spread out, there will be less promotions on other areas that aren't effectively affected. so hopefully you'll have to try different options but also there is some availability if you look hard enough. 0k. julia, i assume you would say this is a reality check. it tells us that these are the sorts of products that we can't rely on having because we can't grow them in country. absolutely. we can grow them in this country but in season and courgettes and pepper and the mediterranean diet, it will be a summer diet. so eat them in season but right now, there's lots of gorgeous things that are in season in the uk, grown even as close as in london and they are delicious. they're healthy as well so if people are going for the craze of courgetti, that can be replaced with season vegetables that are delicious that won't have flown from far—away like... this sort of thing? amazing. so this is a savoy cabbage
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growing in lincolnshire and cabbage like this are completely in season, they can be shredded to mimic courgetti and taste even better. but you can also have kale, carrot, onion, lots of other things are still very much in season right now. do you think we just need to accept that we can't have these products all year round? i think everyone needs to think a little bit more about seasonality for sure. because it is important to support the local farmer and the vegetable will be tastier and healthier if they come from close and they haven't travelled miles. and so support your local farmers, eat locally, learn how to cook because it's not that difficult and enjoy excellent produce right now. thank you very much. well, it does look like this could be a problem that we are going to put up with for some time yet. the traders here who are speaking to farmers over in southern europe say that the conditions have been so bad that they're expecting supply problems for another month, maybe two months yet. let's find out the weather.
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quite a contrast in temperatures this morning. southern counties really cold, 15 degrees higher than that in the western isles at nine celsius. but once change over the next few hours. some breaks towards the north—east of scotland and east of england. top temperature is around five celsius. in norwich. in stornoway. the frost returning to lead of the southern counties are bingham. cloud further north keeping temperatures up at six or seven celsius. maybe a bit of drizzle. clear skies further south. a chilly start to the day once again in the south but tomorrow more sunshine through the midlands, parts of wales, northern scotland also. in between a fair bit of cloud but little rain. top temperatures down a notch or two on today. seven or eight typical. down a little bit
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again on saturday but lots of dry weather to start the weekend. a fair bit of cloud and also a bit of sunshine. all good 11:30. officials in italy say 30 people are missing after an avalanche engulfed a hotel in the central abruzzo province. rescue efforts are underway. theresa may has outlined her vision of a "truly global britain", during an address to business leaders at the world economic forum in davos. the prime minister said the uk was facing a period of momentous change and must forge a new role in the world. reports suggest troops from senegal have entered the gambia to enforce the transfer of power. the winner of the gambian election adama barrow says he expects to be sworn in this afternoon in neighbouring senegal. and english county council is good to have other referendum on raising
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council tax. it would take the typical council tax bill in surrey to £1500. 60% of the primates in the world a re to £1500. 60% of the primates in the world are said to be under threat of extension. research published in the journal, science advances, says that humans are largely to blame. over to the bbc sports centre now for the latest headlines. here's hugh. there's been a huge shock at the australian open this morning. six—times champion and world number two novak djokovic has been knocked out in the second round by the unseeded denis istomin from uzbekistan. jim lumsden reports. one of the biggest upsets in australian open history, the defending champion ousted by a world cup. the 12 time grand slam winner was packing his bags. from the start
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the omens were not good for istomin. he took the next set, 7—5, 6—2, but the uzbek had never gone past the tournament at this stage and he levelled at 2—2. djokovic was rattled as a remarkable resilience of istomin shone through and he played shots more usually seen from the racket of his opponent. the resista nce the racket of his opponent. the resistance from the world number two came to an end as istomin, who played like a man possessed, completed a memorable victory. it was a special moment to savour, for him. for some, it was a special moment to savour, for him. forsome, it was was a special moment to savour, for him. for some, it was a time to lie down ina him. for some, it was a time to lie down in a darkroom at the curtains close, for others, not so much. down in a darkroom at the curtains close, for others, not so muchm is just close, for others, not so muchm isjust one of close, for others, not so muchm is just one of these days when, those days when you don't feel that great on the court and you don't have much rhythm, and a player you are playing against is hitting the ball very well, so that sport. him
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playing this well, it's amazing. he played obviously above his level but you have got to give him credit for that. many things came together for him today, and he was a well—deserved winner. kyle edmund is also out. britain's number two lost in straight sets to spain's pablo carreno busta. edmund made too many errors and couldn't match the power of his opponent's serve, losing injust an hour and 46 minutes. in the women's draw britain's johanna konta will face former world number one caroline wozniaki in the third round. number nine seed konta eased to victory over naomi osaka ofjapan in straight sets. the british number one had few problems with the big—serving19—year—old, securing her tenth victory so far this year. i definitely look to make my stamp
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on the match from the very beginning and look to dictate and impose myself on her. i knew that if i was going to give her any breathing room 01’ going to give her any breathing room orany going to give her any breathing room or any opportunity she was going to become more and more dangerous, so i did try my best to not let that happen and getting that break in the first set, i did a good job of running her down. british number two heather watson is out. she squandered five match points before losing her second round match tojennifer brady of the united states, 2—1. england's bowlers have struggled to contain india's batsmen, despite getting off to a great start in the second one day international in puni. chris woakes ran through india's the top order early on. his wickets included india's in—form star virat kohli woakes struck again to reduce india to 25 for three but yuvraj singh and skipper ms dhoni have staged a great
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recovery for the hosts. yuvraj went for 150 with, dhoni on 112. india were 311—4 with five overs remaining. it's a match england must win if they're to stay in the series. britain's alex thomson looks certain to finish runner up in the vendee solo round the world yacht race. thomson was within 33 nautical miles of the leader armel le clayche of france yesterday. this morning though le clayche had considerably extended his lead and he's on course to smash the world record. thomson is expected cross the finish line some four hours after the frenchman and arrive back in the early hours of tomorrow morning. that's all sport for now. we will be back with more in the next hour. more from you and others while. —— more from hugh.
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scientists are working to deal with three diseases which they fear could cause global health emergencies. a group of charities and governments has committed more than £370 million to develop vaccines for middle east respiratory syndrome, and the lassa and nipah viruses. these majestic creatures are believed to be spreading middle east respiratory syndrome, or mers. the virus was first identified in saudi arabia in 2012. around a third of those infected die. this lab in oxford is developing a vaccine to protect people against mers. it is one of the most advanced versions out there. if this vaccine does work, it could still take a decade to get it to those who need it. historically, money for these obscure vaccines has not been forthcoming. the regulatory process is long and
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complex. nipah virus has killed a hundred people in bangladesh, and lassa fever kills 5000 in west africa every year. the research charity the wellcome trust is part of this new coalition which aims to develop and test vaccines for these viruses within the next five years. we have got lucky so far, but the world has major gaps for infections that we know about which could cause ebola—like events that could spread faster around the world. that puts the world in a very vulnerable place. there is no way of knowing which virus will strike next, but it is hoped that putting time into money into vaccines now could stop the next small outbreak becoming a global health emergency. joining us is dr derek gatherer, a virologist at lancaster university. thank you very much for your time today. the aim is to have experimental vaccines ready for each
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of these diseases in five years, which is about half the time it normally takes to develop vaccines. can that be done? it depends on the individual cases. you can't really tell how long it will take to develop a vaccine. for instance, dengue fever, which is a major disease across the tropical world with millions of cases annually, something that we have long wanted a vaccine against, for various technical reasons it has been hard to develop a vaccine for it. we don't know if these viruses will prove to be more difficult or easy. evenif prove to be more difficult or easy. even if they are easy, five years is fast or developing a vaccine from scratch, we got an ebola virus vaccine developed quickly but that was based on the fact that there had been some previous vaccine development in the 1990s. when you are starting from zero, it will take longer. the ambition is obviously good. is there much interest from
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pharmaceutical companies in trying to invest in these programmes or, indeed, to develop vaccines themselves? when i worked in the pharmaceutical industry, over ten yea rs pharmaceutical industry, over ten years ago now, the figure that was quoted was a building us dollars to develop a drug or vaccine and bringing market. because the investment is so large, both for research and development, and in the regulatory pipeline, pharmaceutical companies have to be able to get some guarantee that they will be able to recoup their investment or else they will go out of business, and isa else they will go out of business, and is a sad fact that for many tropical diseases, the people most likely to be affected simply cannot afford treatments, so there is no incentive for the private sector to invest in these things. this is where like the gates foundation and the wellcome trust have to step in. it is up to philanthropists to look ahead and try to develop a level of preparedness, then? yes, the three
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viruses are affected for different reasons. the lassa virus is an ongoing serious nuisance in west africa and kills a couple of thousand people at least, every year. mers has had big outbreaks in the middle east and in korea couple of summers ago. if it can colonise the korean hospital system, which is quite an advanced one, then it can come to hospital systems in europe and north america. the nipah virus has been confined to a few sporadic outbreaks in bangladesh, india and malaysia, and we are in the situation that we were in with the bowler virus prior to the big outbreak, it is on the radar of virology spot it has not cause any major devastation so we have to make sure that the nipah virus is not the next it will virus and if it causes a wider outbreak, then we need to be
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ready with a vaccine. —— the next available iris. more now on the italian rescuers are trying to reach around 30 people missing after an avalanche hit a mountain hotel. emergency teams are searching for survivors after an avalanche hit a hotel in central italy. it was triggered by a series of earthquakes in the abruzzo region yesterday followed by heavy snow. let's speak to tommaso della longa from the italian red cross — who are supporting emergency services at the scene of the avalanche. thank you very much for your time today. what are your team is telling you from the scene? the situation is changing. in the last minutes there are several such a rescue teams that are several such a rescue teams that are working on the scene and still trying to find survivors. generally speaking the areas hit by earthquakes. the red cross is supporting the operation, mainly the people that are isolated after the earthquake yesterday, but then because there has been heavy snow
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there are other emergencies in the area. we have heard about the hotel. have any other buildings and properties in the immediate area being affected as well? actually, there are are at least two regions affected by the earthquake yesterday, mainly, you have to imagine that this area in italy are between mountains and valleys, so we are speaking about small villages. so after the earthquake and because of the snow, these are several hard to reach areas. so for instance, the red cross is trying since yesterday to get their, to help the population and this is something that we are doing since yesterday after the earthquake. we mustn't forget you're dealing with the aftermath of the earthquake, the earth tremors yesterday, in addition to this avalanche. if the rescue teams are
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engaged in that primary search for survivors, you are trying to help people who clearly are living in a very uncertain situation, helping them, perhaps, with food and other basic needs. yes, sure. the main issue now for this population as we understand it is that the earthquake that started last august, 2016, so that started last august, 2016, so that the problem is also the panic and the psychological side. obviously, also, sending special health assistance for elderly people. there are several needs on the ground that are becoming even more urgent. but mainly it is the snow and the severe winter. back to the search of the rigopiano hotel.
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is there any hope of finding more survivors? we know that some people we re survivors? we know that some people were brought out. is there any chance that others could be surviving inside what is left of that hotel? the hope is always there. as always, after every natural disaster, we are always trying and hoping to find someone thatis trying and hoping to find someone that is alive and mainly the specialised search and rescue team will continue to work until they have found the last person, even dead or alive, so yes, we still hope that someone is alive. thank you very much for your time. thank you. can donald trump deliver the jobs and trade he has promised?
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preparations are in full swing — but can he deliver the jobs and trade that he promised? this week we've been taking a road trip through the heart of america on route a5. today, jon kay meets the residents of tupelo, mississippi — the birthplace of elvis presley — and hears their hopes for the next four years. marching band plays one last practice before heading to washington. tonight, the tupelo high school band will be travelling 900 miles, from mississippi to the capital, to play at president trump's inauguration. your face is going to ache. yeah, i think so! what are you most excited about? just marching in the parade in getting to see washington for the first time. what you think of your new president, trump? erm... donald trump got 60% of the votes in the state. the students might be playing
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for him, but that doesn't mean they're all fans of the new man in the white house. and down! if you had been able to vote, put your hands up if you would have voted for donald trump? not exactly overwhelming. three. i think some of his ideas are pretty great, and i think he actually can make america great again, wejust have to believe in him and see what happens. you didn't put your hand up? no. why not? i don't like him. you're about to go and play for him? but, like, i'm forced to. i like washington, i don't like him. you're going for the trip, yeah? basically. lots of celebrities said no, didn't they, to performing at the inauguration. why did you say yes? i'm not really a fan of trump, but i'm going for the experience and for my band. i'm not going for him, i'm going for me. music matters in this
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small, southern town. in fact, it put tupelo on the map. just off route 45 is the tiny house where elvis presley was born. but we're not here to talk about the king. we want to talk about the new president. because as well as producing rock ‘n' roll stars, tupelo produces cars. look at this — 1957 chevrolet. i wish we'd hired one of these for our road trip. donald trump has promised a return to the heyday of american manufacturing. he says he'll create jobs and improve trade deals. this local steel company supplies the car industry. they believe the new president will cut red tape, cut taxes and boost growth. i feel very optimistic. the boss here hopes donald trump can fill his government with tough business people. and in the end, if they don't do it, he'll fire ‘em!
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but it's not the apprentice, is it? it's more complicated, it's more nuanced. is he going to be able to cope with the political, diplomatic challenges? that remains to be seen. i think he is introducing something into the political landscape that's never been done before. anything that you take to the parade is subject to being searched. the students are ready to go. tomorrow, they will perform outside the white house, and this nation will have to march to a very different beat. and tomorrow, on the final part of his journey down route a5, jon kay will report from washington county in alabama, where he'll be speaking to people who feel left out of politics. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live. at least one person has been killed and 30 are missing after an avalanche struck a hotel in a
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mountain resort in central italy. theresa may declares that britain wants to become the strongest advocate for business, free markets and free trade in the world. an english county council will have a referendum on raising council tax by 15%. it would take the typical council tax bill in surrey to £1500. and now the business news. let's ta ke let's take a look at the headlines. london will continue to be the financial lungs of europe even after the uk leaves the eu — that's according to barclays chief executive jes staley. while he admits the bank may have to move some activities to bases in dublin or germany, he believes that most of their european banking business can continue to be done from the uk. members of the royal institution of chartered surveyors have downgraded their outlook for uk property sales in the year ahead. the number of surveyors expecting sales to increase over the next three months has fallen significantly, according
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to the latest rics survey. the report was also more gloomy about the final three months of 2016. manchester united generated the most revenue of any football club in the world last season, according to a report published by deloitte. united dethroned real madrid — who held top spot for 11 years — after accumulating a record revenue of £515 million during the last season. let's pick up on theresa may's speech. she's been addressing the world economic forum after her address in london earlier this week, setting out a bit more clarity about the uk's departure from the eu. some of the political reactions have been pretty tense. earlier, the bbc‘s kamal ahmed sat down with pierre moscovici — the european commissioner for economic affairs. he told us the commission was looking for a constructive relationship with the eu but warned that the uk cannot keep all the benefits of membership once it has left the eu. it's not about punishment.
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i said that we need to find a balanced and positive agreement, and that we are friends, we must work together. and that's certainly presidentjuncker‘s will. that's what he said in the european parliament this morning, here in davos. we must be clear — you cannot have all the advantages of being a member of the club, when you're out of the club. i think our british friends, who invented clubs, can understand that. if you're in, you're in, if you're out, you're out. it's not free access, it's not free lunch. so the future relationship between britain and the eu remains unclear. that raises questions for several sectors, not least the city of london. over the past few days, we've been hearing how several financialfirms are planning to move some jobs out of the uk. hsbc and ubs have both confirmed around 1000 jobs will leave london.
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goldman sachs and jp morgan might also be moving jobs abroad. so what does this mean for the future of the city? simonjack has been speaking tojes staley, the chief executive of barclays. he says that london will remain the financial centre of europe. i don't believe that the european financial system, or centre, will leave the city of london. all sorts of reasons why. also, i think the uk will continue to be the financial lungs for europe. we may have to move certain activities, we may have to change the legal structure that we use to operate in europe, but i think it's going to be at the margin, and will be manageable. well, the message that finance will continue to play a european role from london is one that is welcomed by the mayor of london, sadiq khan. he told our economics editor that london will remain open for business after britain leaves the eu. london has been open to trade for people and ideas for more than 1000 years.
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the key thing that i'm impressing upon chief executives, not just those in the financial sector, but the tech sector and others, is that london is open. we're going to carry on being a place that attracts talent and a place we can have access to a massive market. that's why it's important our prime minister and our government understands the importance of privileged access to a single market. let's ta ke let's take a look at the markets. all eyes tomorrow or on the inauguration of president elect donald trump. royal mail shares are down 5.5% because you're not sending ina down 5.5% because you're not sending in a post—! down 5.5% because you're not sending in a post-! revenue falling on the domestic market for the mail. that's
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all the business news for now. i'll see you soon. an international survey led by british scientists has found that 60% of primates are now threatened with extinction because of human activities. the researchers say without urgent action, our closest biological relatives face an extinction crisis. the findings are published in the journal, science advances. victoria gill has more. our closest biological relatives. but while the human population continues to grow, most of our fellow primates are now sliding towards extinction. this international team of scientists trawled through the data on more than 500 primate species, revealing a looming extinction crisis. they estimate that 60% of primate species are now threatened with extinction, and 75% have populations that are in decline. these guys are ring—tailed lemurs, and they are just one of the primate species that's been assessed in this new global study. and as nice as it is to see them thriving here in captivity, their natural habitat is disappearing fast.
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and its human activity that's driving that. forest habitat that these animals rely on is being destroyed, primarily for agriculture and logging. the animals are also hunted, particularly for their meat, at a rate that's faster than populations can recover. while all of this most acutely affects our primate relatives, destroying their habitat is something scientists say we just cannot afford to do. these forests provide essential services for people. they help mitigate climate change by being carbon stops. they help in providing clear water for people, pollination services, so people can grow their crops. reversing these declines means looking closely at where we source products like timber, palm oil and meat, making sure destruction of tropical forests is not part of their production process. because our current, very human demands, are coming at the costs of very many human—like wild animals.
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the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. thanks. it certainly was a cold start for the southern half of the uk today. it's a quiet day out there with high pressure in charge. keeping things pretty quite. this weather front is producing some cloud across a central swathe of the uk. we have some sunshine today on the eastern side of scotland. for some of us it was a grey old start. this was the view in derbyshire. thanks to our weather watchers were sending those pictures in. the best of the sunshine is across southern counties and here we saw the lowest temperatures this morning of —5, —6, getting up to plus five or six in the afternoon. all in all, a decent winters they hear. further north,
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into that area of cloud, even if you are quite cloudy, there is not much in the way of rain. most places will be fine and dry. some cloud on the eastern side of scotland. there may be some rain towards the northern and western isles, but most of western scotland is dry. it's going to be mild, at around western scotland is dry. it's going to be mild, ataround nine, 10 celsius. again mild through northern ireland, daring speak of in northern ireland, daring speak of in northern ireland, and most of wales seeing a fair bit of cloud but very little rain. we might see the odd spot of light rain or drizzle in the north of england in the evening but the further south you are, skies will be clear whether prost setting in once again. rural spots in the south of england will be a few degrees below freezing once again. a big range in those temperatures once again overnight tonight. tomorrow, we're going to see or in a way of sunshine developing across the midlands and across much of wales as well. some sunny spells, too, across the north of scotland, but in between, a fair
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bit of cloud, but again very little rain to speak of. it will be cloudy. in scotland, northern england and northern ireland. temperatures at their peak, a little bit down on the values today, at around seven celsius, but with light winds and sunshine in the south of the uk, pretty decent day. for the first pa rt pretty decent day. for the first part of the weekend, looking pretty quite, and also the second part of the "high pressure dominating across the "high pressure dominating across the near continent. that breeze dragging in some slightly colder air. temperatures peaking at around six celsius. driver the most part, quite a bit of cloud at times and maybe a bit of sunshine as well. —— drive for the most part. pretty quite weather for most of us. if you need more details, you can visit the bbc weather website. goodbye for now. this is bbc news — and these are the top stories developing at midday. one person is killed and many more are missing after a hotel in central
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italy was hit by an avalanche. theresa may promises business leaders a vision of a "truly global britain" at the world economic forum. residents in one english county face a council tax bill increase of 15% — surrey council will hold a referendum on the rise, which is to pay for social care. also... our closest biological relatives are facing extinction. 60% of the world's primates — from gorillas to lemurs — are now said to be under threat because of human activity. british supermarket shelves are running low on courgettes, broccoli and other vegetables after the cold weather across europe hit suppliers. good afternoon.
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it's thursday 19 january. i'm annita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. at least 30 people are missing after a hotel was buried by an avalanche in central italy. up to 30 guests and staff were in the regal you and 0 would tell in the brits are region at the time. a major rescue operation is underway. this report... —— abruzzo region. buried in snow, barely visible, this is the hotel hit by last night's avalanche. inside the extent of the damage is becoming clear. what looks like a reception leading to corridors now unrecognisable, full of snow and debris. up to 20 people were staying in the hotel rigopiano along with seven members of staff, but bad weather meant a difficult overnight rescue operation. translation: the hotel was reached
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at 4:30am by courageous men who faced unbearable situations. they saved two people, they are working to bring the means of transport that are difficult to bring. on skis in the early hours of this morning, rescue teams faced snowstorms to get to the area hit. with roads blocked to emergency vehicles, only manpower could save those trapped. one man is led to safety. nearby relatives faced an agonising wait for news. translation: they are extracting them from the hotel and bringing them to hospitals i think, but i don't know because it is impossible for us to go up. others text loved ones inside urging them to stay calm. this morning conditions in a region already fragile after being hit by a series of earthquakes have begun to ease. but rescuers believe up to 30 people are still missing as the extent
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of this tragedy begins to unfold. joining me now from edinburgh is dr margarita segou, an earthquake seismologist from the british geological survey. thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us. there has been so much seismic activity in recent yea rs so much seismic activity in recent years and indeed this year alone. it is perhaps no surprise that following those earthquakes yesterday this avalanche has happened. yes, indeed, so we are observing a very active ongoing earthquake sequence which i have to remind you started last august with a 6.2 devastating one and continued in october with 6.5, so yesterday in the morning we think in four hours
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we got for events at magnitude five. these were treated southern to amatrice village close to the avalanche and spanning an area of approximately 15 commenters. so, these earthquakes combined with what we hear has been particularly heavy snowfall, but obviously create a hazardous situation? yes, indeed. from observations of our italian colleagues, they are already in the field, we are listening but it is quite heavy snow, but they are expecting the next few days the conditions to improve. at this point i have to save the british geological survey team will actually go on the field and we will personally be on the ground for the next few days checking that all of
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our stations that have been just deployed from late august are working fine and they will help us in the future improve our scientific response. i was about to ask what the british geological survey would be directly doing, but let me ask you, do you expect there to be more earthquakes and after—shocks in this region? what is happening exactly is that from august we know that after—shocks continued to occur they will be widely distributed in space. in this region of the apennines, there aren't many neighbouring fa u lts there aren't many neighbouring faults —— there are. we know they are quite active. we are observing that some of the neighbouring faults are triggered and they give us, they could give us potentially some large events like what happened yesterday. these events can be widely felt in
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the broader region. is it at all possible to extrapolate, if there is an earthquake, an after—shock in a particular area where there is a lot of snow, how that might have an impact in terms of the sort of activity we have seen damaging this hotel, avalanche is happening as a result of earthquakes? it is quite complicated, the procedure. we are not sure at the moment. we can only have publicised where the next after—shocks will be located. this creates an uncertain environment —— hypothesise. your question is directly related with how avalanches will react to that, so we cannot offer a scientific guess over that, but we could say that from our knowledge the activated region in
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the apennines from yesterday spans more than 60 kilometres and we know that all of this region is covered with snow. dr margarita segou, thank you very much, from the british geological survey. theresa may has outlined her vision of a "truly global britain" to business leaders at the world economic forum in switzerland. the prime minister said the uk would step up as an advocate for business and free trade after brexit, but said the government — and businesses — need to respond to the concerns of citizens who felt left behind by the pace of economic change. she said britain faced an uncertain road ahead — and would need to forge a new role in the wider world. the united kingdom, a country that has so often been at the forefront of economic and social change, will step up to a new leadership role as the strongest and most forceful advocate for business, free markets and free trade anywhere in the world. for that is the unique opportunity that britain now has. i speak to you this morning
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as the prime minister of a country that faces the future with confidence. for a little over six months ago, millions of my fellow citizens upset the odds by voting with determination and quiet resolve to leave the european union and embrace the world. let us not underestimate the magnitude of that decision. it means britain must face up to a period of momentous change. it means we must go through a tough negotiation and forge a new role for ourselves in the world. it means accepting that the road ahead will be uncertain at times, but believing that it leads towards a brighter future for our country's children and grandchildren too. so while it would have been easy for the british people to shy away from taking such a path, they fixed their eyes on that
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brighter future and chose a bold, ambitious course instead. they chose to build a truly global britain. theresa may said britain wanted a "bold and ambitious" trade agreement with the eu — but would also pursue other deals with countries outside the bloc. we seek the freedom to strike new trade deals with old friends and new allies right around the world as well. i am pleased that we have already started discussions on future trade ties with countries like australia, new zealand and india. while countries including china, brazil and the gulf states have already expressed their interest in striking trade deals with us. let's speak to our business correspondent tanya beckett who's in davos. give us a sense of what reaction
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there has been there to theresa may's speech. if business leaders we re may's speech. if business leaders were looking for the nuts and bolts and more clarity of the deal she was looking to strike with the eu they would have been disappointed. that is what they desperately want, anything that gives them some sort of certainty so they know what to do about things like extending leases, hiring people and training their staff. they didn't get any of that but it's possible that might be too much to expect at this stage given that she hasn't engaged properly in negotiations with eu counterparts. and anyway if were about to do that she wouldn't want to reveal the details of the cards she felt she was holding. however one has to remind oneself she is talking to an audience, the heartbeat of free trade and globalisation. they had just received a bit of a kicking because what voters in parts of europe and also the us are saying is we don't feel this is a win—win
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situation for us so they are trying to marry those two narratives and she was trying to put some sort of thread through all of it and say globalisation continues to be a good thing, wejust globalisation continues to be a good thing, we just have to globalisation continues to be a good thing, wejust have to manage it properly. i think what she was trying to do there is say we understand what voters are saying because we are at the centre of it, this does not say... stop globalisation. we will provide a blueprint for the rest of the world is an outward looking united kingdom as to how trade should be done, so i think they would have been encouraged, respect she had to say, but it doesn't offer much short—term clarity. thank you very much. iranian state media are reporting that 30 firefighters have been killed after a high—storey building in the capital tehran collapsed. around 75 people were injured in the blaze, at the 17—storey plasco building, which hosts a shopping centre. state tv showed the moment when the building — in the centre of the city — came down.
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a local authority is to hold a referendum on plans to putting up council tax by 15%. surrey county council say they will ask people if they support the increase which would take a typical bill in the county to around £1500 a year. asimilar bill in the county to around £1500 a year. a similar referendum on council tax was held in bedfordshire in 2015 where residents rejected a planned increase. councils across england and expressed concern over recent months about the spiralling cost of adult social care. the school of westminster and our assista nt school of westminster and our assistant political editor norman smith. i understand any money raised by this increase if it is agreed in a referendum would be ring fenced for social care? that really is the significance, because it is further signs of the real pressure on social ca re signs of the real pressure on social care services, but here you have a
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council asking its electorate to stomach a 15% increase in debt cancelled tax bill, not a —— in their council tax bill. we're talking about a big increase because of the strain on social care services. the council are saying they are facing a huge gap in funding this year and to add to the significance of this it is a true blue conservative run council which clearly has simply run out of patience with the government's effo rts patience with the government's efforts to try and resolve the difficulties social care is facing, because when you talk to local council tax leaders they are deeply unimpressed with the response they have had so far and regarded as inadequate because we heard from the government a few weeks ago about a £900 million package of extra funding but when you strip that down it is by and large funny money. a
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lot of it is just cash which local councils have been allowed to bring forward to spend and the rest of it is just savings achieved elsewhere which have been given back to them. it is not new money. what surrey seemed to be suggesting is they simply cannot carry on like this. they are going to have to raise the money locally. the council leader david hodge, we have a statement from him which said we had to set a budget that will protect vital services. we have no choice but to propose this increase in council tax. just to add to the significance of this, who do you suppose are amongst the 11 conservative mps in that surrey local authority? yes, the chancellor philip hammond and the chancellor philip hammond and the man in charge of the health servicejeremy the man in charge of the health service jeremy hunt. two the man in charge of the health servicejeremy hunt. two pivotal figures in the whole debate about social care will be able to take pa rt social care will be able to take part in that referendum. that is
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interesting. just briefly, i suppose how this boat goes will be absolutely fascinating, will people vote for self—interest and money in their pocket or will they choose to make a statement to the government about the social care crisis?” think there are two things which give this broader significance. one is other councils, will they follow if surrey gets this huge increase in council tax? this is a sort of litmus test case for many local authorities about whether they can go for big council tax increases. the second thing it is reality time. people talk about wanting more funding for social care. now they have to put their money where their mouth is, at least in surrey. we will see whether people really are truly prepared to stomach a big increase in council tax. one caveat, surrey is a fairly wealthy part of the country, so inevitably it is
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much easierfor people the country, so inevitably it is much easier for people there to stomach a big increase in council tax than it will be in more deprived areas. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc newsroom live... at least one person has been killed and 30 are missing after an avalanche struck a hotel in a mountain resort in central italy. theresa may declares that britain wants to become the strongest advocate for business, free markets and free trade in the world. an english county council is going to have a referendum on raising council tax by 15%. the spike would take a typical council tax bill in surrey to around £1500. time for sport. more on that interesting defeat in the tennis. that huge shock at the australian open this morning. the world number two n ova k open this morning. the world number two novak djokovic knocked out in
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the second round by the unseeded denis istomin from uzbekistan. six time winner djokovic struggled for a rhythm and lost in five sets, it took four hours and 48 minutes. rhythm and lost in five sets, it took four hours and 48 minutesm is one of these days when you don't feel that great on the court and don't have much rhythm. the player you are playing against is feeling the ball very well. so that is sport. him playing this well, it is amazing. he played obviously above his level, but you have to give him credit for that. many things came together for credit for that. many things came togetherfor him credit for that. many things came together for him today and he is a well—deserved winner. together for him today and he is a well-deserved winner. there were mixed fortunes for the british players overnight. kyle edmund and heather watson are both out but the number nine seed johanna konta is safely through. she beat naomi saga of japan safely through. she beat naomi saga ofjapan in straight sets to
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safely through. she beat naomi saga of japan in straight sets to set safely through. she beat naomi saga ofjapan in straight sets to set up a third—round match with former world number one caroline was the key. -- was naked. i definitely looked to lead my stamp on the match from the very beginning and that to dictate and impose myself on her. if i was giving her any breathing room or opportunity she was going to become more and more dangerous so i tried to make sure that didn't happen. after getting the break in the first set i did a good job and the first set i did a good job and the moment i'm a bit. england have been set a target of 382 to win the second one—day international against india. fast bowler chris woakes reduced india to 25—3. but singh and ms dhoni staged a superb recovery for the hosts. at one stage things we re for the hosts. at one stage things were heavily in england's favour. it is now down to the batsmen if england are to avoid a series
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defeat. but‘s alex thompson looks certain to finish as runner—up in the round the world yacht race. thompson was 1033 nautical miles of the leader yesterday. —— within 33. he extended his lead and is on course to smash the world record and finish at around 3pm this afternoon. thompson is expected to cross the finish line some hours later. that is all the sport. back for more just after 1:30pm. thank you. gambia's president—elect adama barrow says his swearing—in ceremony will take place as scheduled today but will be in neighbouring senegal. there are also reports of troops from senegal entering gambia, as the political crisis there escalates. the defeated president yayha jammeh has ignored a midnight deadline to give way to the winner of last month's election, adama barrow. meanwhile, 1000 british holidaymakers have returned home from gambia with the foreign office advising against all but essential travel there. on the line isjeanette mccartan,
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a british tourist from chester, who is currently in the gambia. tell us exactly where you are. we are actually add code to beach at the moment. are you currently -- cocoa beach. you currently trying to get back to the uk? we have made contact with thomas cook and we have a confirmed flight tomorrow at 2:30pm. the only way —— no way of getting to the airport though. how concerned are you at the moment of the last 48 hours or so we had interviews with tourists, some saying it was an overreaction and that they were being told they needed to return to the uk, but are you feeling quite concerned at the moment? i am not concerned about staying where i am. i am more concerned about going to the airport. we are safe as we are and where we are at the moment, a secure
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compound, but the area up to the airport is unsettling everyone. how do you suppose you're going to get there or do you know how you were going to get the? the locals that are working here have not getting diesel and they can take us. we have been told the locals can't get taxis so thomas cook are advising us to phone the airport to send a taxi to pick this up but we have had no guarantees that they will turn up. so that is the advice from thomas cook, to phone the airport. by day, as far as you are aware, doing anything else to try to you from a to b? no, nothing. we have had to chase them every step of the way. how far chase them every step of the way. howfarare chase them every step of the way. how far are you away from the airport? about 40 minutes away. what are the gambian staff at the hotel
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complex where you are saying about the situation? do they sound worried? we are actually staying with friends, so all the hotels in the local area are shot or chatting and all the staff have been either sacked or laid off —— shot for shouting. —— shutti or shutting. -- shutti or shutting. he had been trying to speak to the staff at the airport, is that anything else you can do to try to guarantee that they can do to try to guarantee that they can get from where you are staying to the airport tomorrow? the only other option is the taxi drivers are charging tripled the normal rate to try to get tourists back to the airport. that is the only option. you going to take that the?”
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personally don't want to travel to the airport, but if our insurance is going to be and validated when thomas cook don't —— we don't leave when they tell us. is it because it will be quick word you want to stay on holiday and you want to stay where you are? i think we will be left at the airports to be honest. we feel really safe where we are out of the chaos at the airport yesterday, we just don't know what is going to happen tomorrow. thank you very much for talking to us. we may keep in touch with you to find out how you get on with the journey. joining me on the line is freelance journalist colin freeman who is in the gambia as well. i hope you were able to hear the tourist we were speaking to. she is unsure how she is going to get from where she staying to the airport tomorrow. is
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that a situation that other tourists are finding themselves in? there are are finding themselves in? there are a few tourists staying where i am staying are waiting for transport at the country. are in concerned about getting out in case the airport ended up being shut for several days or other problems. driving around town this morning, itjust very quiet. hardly any shops open. relatively little sign of any security forces anywhere, a lot of police checkpoints seem to be emptied. certainly a sense of growing tension on the streets. we had heard that troops who were massed on gambia's borders, but some of those may have moved into gambia. how much worry is there that there could be violence? i think people are certainly anticipating that the
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security force might have to remove yayha jammeh by force because he has had repeated warnings over the last week but have escalated in the seriousness of the deadline to step down, it came and went last night. however security forces coming i think they will concentrate purely on yayha jammeh. he is in the presidential palace. where it come toa presidential palace. where it come to a battle, it would be focused around the storming of that one building. but is there any sense that any trips coming into gambia —— troops, that they would remain loyal to mrjammeh or would they allow
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other trips to come in and allowed the new president elect to actually ta ke the new president elect to actually take power? bat troops. the gambian forces don't run to more than 2000. 85% we are told have no interest in sticking up for mrjammeh. whether they would choose to click on a much biggerforce of they would choose to click on a much bigger force of senegalese trips batch —— backed by a regional mandate seems unlikely. some of the diplomats we have been speaking to seem diplomats we have been speaking to seem to think that one possibility is that if troops do march on the capital across the border, mr jammeh's forces may just capital across the border, mr jammeh's forces mayjust decide to ta ke jammeh's forces mayjust decide to take a short cut to peace and put him under house arrest, or i have heard people saying they mightjust put a bullet in his back. i think
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that might be a little melodramatic but they might choose to put him under house arrest and bring this situation to a peaceful resolution. thank you for your thoughts. a pedestrian has died after being hit by a fire engine that lost control and overturned while on a 999 call. police are investigating the crash, which happened on a roundabout at the junction of york way and old north road in royston, hertfordshire, last night. the vehicle was turning right when "for reasons unknown" when it lost control and hit the pedestrian. officers said the four firefighters involved were left with minor injuries. a british man who travelled to america to have sex with boys has been sentenced to 13 years in a us prison. 70—year—old paul charles wilkins, who's from cambridgeshire, flew to california in january 2016 and was caught in an undercover sting operation. bomb disposal teams were called out to almost 600 schools in the wake of government advice about a potentially hazardous chemical. the warning about stocks of the chemical — which is used in chemistry lessons — sparked several calls to the army, which carried out hundreds
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of controlled explosions between october and december last year. scientists are working to deal with three diseases which they fear could cause global health emergencies. a group of charities and governments has committed more than £370 million to develop vaccines for middle east respiratory syndrome, and the lassa and nipah viruses — as our global health correspondent tulip mazumdar reports. these majestic creatures are believed to be spreading middle east respiratory syndrome, or mers. the virus was first identified in saudi arabia in 2012. around a third of those infected die. this lab in oxford is developing a vaccine to protect people against mers. it is one of the most advanced versions out there. if this vaccine does work, it could still take a decade to get it to those who need it. historically, money for these obscure illness vaccines has not been forthcoming. deregulatory process is long and
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complex. nipah has killed a hundred people in bangladesh, and lassa fever kills 5000 in west africa every year. they are already developing vaccines. the research charity the wellcome trust is part of this new coalition which aims to develop and test vaccines for these viruses within the next five years. we have got lucky so far, but the world has major gaps for viruses that we know about which could cause ebola—like viruses that could spread faster around the world. there is no way of knowing which virus will strike next, but it is hoped that putting time into money into vaccines now could stop the next small outbreak becoming a global health emergency. time for the weather. hello. quite a
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contrast in the temperatures throughout the uk. as low as minus six to start with some parts of england but plus nine in the west of scotland. quite a bit of cloud across central parts of the uk. not much rain to speak of. a few breaks to the east of scotland and north east are going tom temperatures in the western isles around 10 celsius. in the south five, six or seven. dropping away quickly this evening. frost returning to southern counties of england and maybe into south wales as well. chilly in the north—east of scotland but underneath clubca rd in north—east of scotland but underneath clubcard in central parts better. some sunshine filtering north into the midlands and parts of wales. northern scotland should do quite well. very little rain to speak of. top temperatures around seven or eight. into the start of the weekend top temperatures only
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five or six. driver the most part with theirfair bit five or six. driver the most part with their fair bit of cloud and a little bit of sunshine. this is bbc newsroom live with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines atjust after 12:30pm. 30 people are missing after an avalanche engulfed a hotel in the abruzzo province of central italy. one person has been confirmed dead. rescue efforts are under way. theresa may has outlined her vision of a "truly global britain", during an address to business leaders at the world economic forum in davos. the prime minister said the uk is facing a period of momentous change and must forge a new role in the world. troops from senegal are reported to have entered the gambia to enforce the transfer of power. the winner of the gambian election, adama barrow, says he'll now be sworn in this afternoon in the capital of senegal, dakar. an english county council is going to have a referendum on raising council tax by 15%.
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the spike would take a typical council tax bill in surrey to around £1,500. 60% of the world's primates are said to be under threat of extinction. research — published in the journal, science advances — says humans are largely to blame. british supermarkets are struggling to stock fresh courgettes, spinach and other vegetables after a big freeze in parts of europe hit harvests in italy and spain. more now on our top story. one person has died after an avalanche hit a mountain hotel in central italy. 30 people are missing and blizzards are slowing down efforts to rescue
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them. the situation is changing. in the last minutes there are several such a rescue teams that are working on the scene and still trying to find survivors. generally speaking the areas hit by earthquakes. the red cross is supporting the operation, mainly the people that are isolated after the earthquake yesterday, but then because there has been heavy snow there are other emergencies in the area. we have heard about the hotel. have any other buildings and properties in the immediate area been affected as well? actually, there are are at least two regions affected by the earthquake
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yesterday, mainly, you have to imagine that this area in italy are between mountains and valleys, so we are speaking about small villages. so after the earthquake and because of the snow, these are several hard to reach areas. so for instance, the red cross is trying since yesterday to get there, to help the population with special vehicles and this is something that we are doing since yesterday after the earthquake. we mustn't forget you're dealing with the aftermath of the earthquake, the earth tremors yesterday, in addition to this avalanche. if the rescue teams are engaged in that primary search for survivors, you are trying to help people who clearly are living in a very uncertain situation, helping them, perhaps, with food and other basic needs. yes, sure. the main issue now for this population as you can understand is that the earthquake that started last august, 2016, so that the problem is also the panic and the psychological side.
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obviously, also, the part of special health assistance for elderly people. there are several needs on the ground that are becoming even worse. but mainly it is the snow and the severe wintertime. back to the search of the rigopiano hotel. is there any hope of finding more survivors? we know that some people were brought out. is there any chance that others could be surviving inside what is left of that hotel? the hope is always there. as always, after every natural disaster, we are always trying and hoping to find someone that is alive and mainly the specialised search and rescue team will continue to work until they have found the last person, even dead or alive, so yes, we still hope that someone is alive.
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that was the latest update we had on the situation in italy following that avalanche. a special adviser to the northern ireland economy minister is stepping aside from any future involvement in the controversial green energy scheme after failing to declare our family link. it has emerged thatjohn robinson's father—in—law receives payments from the scheme, the energy initiative, which cause the collapse of stormont ‘s power—sharing arrangement earlier this week. we're joined by our correspondent, chris page. can you tell us more about this particular individual and how this particular individual and how this links to the bigger picture of what is going on in northern ireland? the political crisis was brought about earlier this week, the downfall of the devolved government. it is all centred around this green
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energy scheme, the renewable heat incentive. it was set up back in 2012. arlene foster, the minister who set it up is now the leader of the dup and is now out of office after the fall of the stormont executive. this energy scheme essentially was to encourage businesses to switch from fossil fuels to more environmentally friendly energy celsius but there was a massive overspend. —— energy sources. the subsidies were very generous. it was overspent by almost half £1 billion over 20 years. the economy minister has been working on a plan which, he says, will reduce that overspend, to zero. his special adviser isjohn that overspend, to zero. his special adviser is john robinson. john robinson is not very well—known in northern ireland, let alone anywhere else, but certainly be online to journalists and politicians at
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stormont, because he was for many yea rs stormont, because he was for many years in charge of the dup press office at stormont. he has been appointed as a special adviser to the economy minister. he has decided to set—aside —— step aside from his special adviser duties, particularly the duties he would have had advising the minister on this plan to reduce the overspent on the green energy scheme, because it has emerged that mr robinson's father—in—law has two boilers, to biomass boilers which are in this green energy scheme. he had not declared that interest. he has taken the decision to stand aside. it is another story in this drip of revelations that has been dominating the news in northern ireland for so long. how will this and all the other fallout from it affect arlene foster and her partly the dup, as they go into this election campaign? —— her party. the dup say that they are not sure it is going to affect
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them very much, actually. the dup and sinn fein are by far the biggest political parties in northern ireland on the basis of the last stormont assembly elections and it would take a major turnaround for any other parties to overtake them. the dup has set up a plan to deal with the rhi and the other parties in this campaign will come very strong on to the dup, and make the dup be partly to blame for that £500 million overspend. an international survey led by british scientists has found that 60% of primates are now threatened with extinction because of human activities. the researchers say without urgent action, our closest biological relatives face an extinction crisis. the findings are published in the journal, science advances. victoria gill has more. our closest biological relatives. but while the human population continues to grow, most of our fellow primates are now sliding towards extinction. this international team
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of scientists trawled through the data on more than 500 primate species, revealing a looming extinction crisis. they estimate that 60% of primate species are now threatened with extinction, and 75% have populations that are in decline. these guys are ring—tailed lemurs, and they are just one of the primate species that's been assessed in this new global study. and as nice as it is to see them thriving here in captivity, their natural habitat is disappearing fast. and its human activity that's driving that. forest habitat that these animals rely on is being destroyed, primarily for agriculture and logging. the animals are also hunted, particularly for their meat, at a rate that's faster than populations can recover. while all of this most acutely affects our primate relatives, destroying their habitat is something scientists say we just cannot afford to do. these forests provide essential services for people. they help mitigate climate change
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by being carbon stocks. they help in providing clear water for people, pollination services, so people can grow their crops. reversing these declines means looking closely at where we source products like timber, palm oil and meat, making sure destruction of tropical forests is not part of their production process. because our current, very human demands, are coming at the costs of very many human—like wild animals. joining us from durham university is professorjo setchell, a primatologist who worked on the research. professor, thank you very much for your time today. we've heard some of theissues your time today. we've heard some of the issues in that report, but if you could put it in a nutshell what do you think is the key threats facing primates today? the one
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biggest threat is habitat destruction, destruction of the ra i nfo rest. destruction, destruction of the rainforest. and what is being done about that, to try to counter that and get the message across about the threat? at the local level, countering legal and illegal logging in the rainforest and more importantly at a global level, we need to increase our actions to stop deforestation. which species are most under threat? which are in the most under threat? which are in the most grave danger? and what sort of time frames are we talking about before some of these primates are extinct? the species in the gravest danger others in madagascar. that is all of the lemurs, 87% of the lemurs are under threat of extinction, followed by asia, which is also very
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high, and in the tropics and africa which are a little bit lower but still of major concern. and in terms of the time frame i was mentioning how many years before some of these species are potentially wiped out? within the next 20—25 years. to put that in perspective that is within my career. obviously that means action is needed right now, not at some point in the future. yes, i think we're at a tipping point right now where we have to take action, and the reason for that is that if we don't, we will lose not only those species but deforestation and the other effects are accelerating, so we the other effects are accelerating, so we will lose more if we don't action now. we are actually in a pretty good place right now because we have not yet least recently lost any primates to extinction, so if we act now, we can avoid doing so. what do you think is the message that we should take away from this, if we
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are prepared to create situations where groups of our closest biological relatives are under threat of extinction? i think the key m essa g e threat of extinction? i think the key message is that we must learn to share our planet, so we must share it with other species like the primates, and we must share it equally and fairly amongst ourselves, as humans. for biodiversity. i know that there was a problem with the line. we appreciate your time today. apologies, there was, as you could hear, some delay on the line, so the professor, it took her some time to hear my questions. local authority will hold a referendum on plans to raise council tax by 15%. surrey cou nty raise council tax by 15%. surrey county council says it will ask local people whether they support
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the increase which would take a typical council tax bill in the cou nty to typical council tax bill in the county to around £1500 per year. a similar referendum was held in bedfordshire in 2015 and local residents rejected a planned increase. councils across england have expressed concern about the spiralling costs of adult social care. spiralling costs of adult social ca re. let's spiralling costs of adult social care. let's go live to westminster and our political —— assistant political editor, norman smith. this will be a really interesting vote. this goes to the heart of the controversy surrounding social care. what will be fascinating is whether voters in surrey are prepared to pay more, specifically for social care, because this extra cash, this 15% council tax rise, the money from that will be ring fenced and two, whether other local authorities will decide to follow suit, in other words, whether other local councils decide they cannot hang around waiting for the government to sort this out, it is so serious, we are going to have to act. i'm joined by the lib dems health spokesman norman
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lamb, who has been central to the debate about social care. do you welcome this or are you uneasy at the local council proposing the sort of increase? many councils are caught between a rock and a hard place. they are seeing in their own areas, things happening, increasing numbers of elderly people and indeed younger people not getting access to the care and support they need, because of these reductions in funding. iadmire, because of these reductions in funding. i admire, in because of these reductions in funding. iadmire, in many because of these reductions in funding. i admire, in many respects, then deciding to do this, but it is not the solution to the crisis that we face. it is an unfair tax. it affects people on lower incomes higher that —— harder than people on higher that —— harder than people on higher incomes, and it will increase the inequality between wealthier parts of the country who will raise far more from this, in surrey, for example, than they will in liverpool. you cannot tolerate a situation where people in need of ca re situation where people in need of care in liverpool go without because they are not able to raise the money. you could argue that this is
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showtime, it is a litmus test for whether voters by your argument that people should and would be prepared to pay for a hypothecated tax for social care. absolutely. i make that case, that we will have to pay more, i want to do it in the fairest way possible, by way of a progressive tax, not this on their tax, but it will be a test and the polling shows that the public are prepared to pay more. both for the that the public are prepared to pay more. both forthe nhs that the public are prepared to pay more. both for the nhs and social care. but fundamentally, the government has got to confront this. and that is why last week i make this call, together with labour and conservative mps, this call, together with labour and conservative mp5, for the prime minister to establish an nhs and ca re minister to establish an nhs and care convention. we need to engage with the public, level with the public, be honest with them about the scale of the challenge, and the consequences of not acting, because they are dreadful, and very vulnerable people will lose out dreadfully. isn't there a possibility the government will
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suddenly rub their hands and say, good, excellent, local councils will ta ke good, excellent, local councils will take the heat, we can just sit back and leave it to local authorities. that may well be what they do. they decentralise blame, in a way. it would be very haphazard what happens. in surrey, the conservatives have a big majority. they will not be challenged for power by anybody else. the opposition parties will wait to see how they respond, but they may not be confronted by any enormous challenge. it is much harder when there is a very close balance of power in the locality and where you can raise much less from the council tax. it will be some areas of the country will end up with well funded social care as a result of this whilst other areas, the decline will just set to continue, and that, for me, is unacceptable. the government argument is that provision of social ca re argument is that provision of social care varies from local authority to local authority. the implication is that some are managing it well because they are better run, they
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have a better grip on the situation. in other words, it is badly run local authorities who are, in part, to blame for the problems of social care, not government funding. there will always be variation in the quality of local councils, just as there is across the country, in a performance of hospitals, gp surgeries and all the rest. it is quite seductive to say that if everyone could get up to the standard of the best we would solve the problem. you never achieved that. the government knows that. you have to recognise that, whilst we should absolutely focus on improving the efficiency of the system, as a country, we are choosing to spend significantly lower share of our national income compared to countries like france, germany and there are consequences to that. the strip referendum was done by the bedfordshire police and crime commission when he wanted to rise as
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all tax and he was defeated by 76%, all tax and he was defeated by 76%, a crashing majority against. one last thing. two of the mps in the surrey local authority area are, yes, the chancellor, philip hammond, and health secretaryjeremy hunt, two of the absolutely pivotal figures in the whole debate about social care. i wonder how they will vote ? social care. i wonder how they will vote? it is an interesting vignette. this is the final day in office for barack obama as donald trump prepares to be sworn in as the 45th president. in his last news conference as president, barack obama said he looked forward to spending more time with his wife, michelle, and his two daughters. me and my daughters are something. they just surprise and enchant and impress mini more and more every
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single day, as they grow up. the man tipped to be the us ambassador to the eu, professor ted malloch, has told the bbc a bust of winston churchill will be put back into the oval office by donald trump. president obama had replaced the bust since the us—uk special relationship is a part of our history, as it is a part of your history, i can tell you first hand winston churchill will be going back into the oval office in the form of his bust, and that solid relationship is important to the global economy. it's important to the transatlantic alliance, and is also the case that donald trump has origins in the united kingdom and he's very well disposed towards the relationship of the english—speaking peoples. you can watch coverage of the
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inauguration of donald trump as the 44th president of the us tomorrow. coverage comes live from washington with the new president due to be sworn in at 5pm uk time. the cost of imported vegetables such as courgettes, lettuce, and broccoli is going up because of bad weather across southern europe. supermarkets have told the bbc there are concerns over the supply of fresh food. our correspondent dan johnson, has been at new covent garden market in london to get a sense of how prices are being affected. well, this is the wholesale market that serves most of london, serving caterers and restaurants, supplying them with fresh fruit and veg, and it's this sort of thing that they can't get hold of right now. courgettes are an example of vegetables that are imported from southern europe, italy and spain and because of the weather conditions there,
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theyjust can't get hold of enough of these and that's why the price of a crate like that has gone up from £6 a year ago to, today, selling for £24. that's how high the demand is and why some of the supermarkets don't have products like courgettes and broccoli. well, with me here this morning is adam leyland, editor of grocer magazine and julie riehl who speaks for a charity called sustain, talking about sustainable food production. adam, how bad has the problem been this winter? it's a real problem. it started just before christmas. there's been terrible weather in southern spain, particularly flooding and so forth. but right across the whole of southern europe, there's been snow, very cold weather right now. these are terrible conditions in which to grow, even inside poly tunnels. so, for the consumer, there's real shortages across many of the supermarkets, not universal, you can get it but you have to pay for it. in the case of the supermarkets, they're not necessarily charging more because they spread it out, they spread the cost out over the course of the year,
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but what you will see is some forms of inflation in fresh produce caused by this shortage in the mediterranean produce category. are there other options for sourcing produce like that? well, you can go to america, of course, but that is really desperate and you're going to have to pay a tariff for that, frankly. yes, people are pursuing that as options. it's i can't recall ever having seen that before, but these are sort of terrible times for growing and it could well last a while yet and in fact there are some people saying that it could have a knock—on effect until later in the year in terms of growing. what's that going to do for people in the grocery business? well, you have to sort of spread your produce, encourage people to go in other areas but it will result in yet more of that inflation that is starting to creep in because you can't... you don't want to put the price up on these sorts of items so you will spread out, there will be less promotions on other areas that aren't effectively affected. so hopefully you'll have to try different options but also there is some availability if you look hard enough.
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julie, i assume you would say this is a reality check. it tells us that these are the sorts of products that we can't rely on having because we can't grow them in this country. absolutely. we can grow them in this country but in season and courgettes and pepper and the mediterranean diet, it will be a summer diet. so eat them in season but right now, there's lots of gorgeous things that are in season in the uk, grown even as close as in london and they are delicious. they're healthy as well so if people are going for the craze of courgetti, that can be replaced with seasonal vegetables that are delicious that won't have flown from far—away like... this sort of thing? amazing. so this is a savoy cabbage grown in lincolnshire and cabbage like this are completely in season, they can be shredded to mimic courgetti and taste even better. but you can also have kale, carrot, onion, lots of other things are still very much in season right now. do you think we just need to accept that we can't have these products all year round?
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i think everyone needs to think a little bit more about seasonality for sure. because it is important to support the local farmer and the vegetable will be tastier and healthier if they come from close and they haven't travelled miles. and so support your local farmers, eat locally, learn how to cook because it's not that difficult and enjoy excellent produce right now. thank you very much. well, it does look like this could be a problem that we are going to put up with for some time yet. the traders here who are speaking to farmers over in southern europe say that the conditions have been so bad that they're expecting supply problems for another month, maybe two months yet. in a moment the news at one with simon mccoy. first the weather with jay wynne. this quiet spell of weather looks set to continue. we have high pressure in charge, keeping things quiet. there is a lot of cloud out
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there but there is some sunshine to be had on the eastern side of scotland. we have a lovely view from one of our weather watchers sent in earlier on today. in between, there isafair earlier on today. in between, there is a fair bit of cloud, it has been a misty start here in derbyshire. the best of the sunshine this afternoon across southernmost counties of england. after a cold, frosty start we will see some lengthy spells of sunshine, with temperatures at around five celsius. a decent afternoon for getting out and about. heading further north, much more cloud for the midlands, up into northern ireland. the odd spot of rain but most places will be fine and dry. you will see on the eastern side of scotland, at least some brea ks side of scotland, at least some breaks in the cloud. and temperatures around nine, 10 degrees towards the western isles. drive for northern ireland, cloudy, about seven celsius, a reasonable afternoon, and across wales, loss of cloud, not much rain to speak of and the wind quite like as well. ‘s this
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evening falling away where you have clear skies with frost returning to southern counties of england and then to south wales, the south midlands as well. well we have the cloud, temperatures will hold up at around 5—7d, but under this clearer skies, pretty close to freezing, round about freezing in london and not too far away from that in plymouth and in the north east of scotland. tomorrow, or in a way of sunshine across wales and the south midlands. northern scotland doing quite well with a good deal of sunshine. in between, a fairly great start, some low cloud, mist and fog, keeping that cloud into the afternoon, but also places like birmingham and cardiff will see lots of sunshine but temperatures round about seven celsius. down on values today but a decent day across the board. into the start of the beacon, lots of fine weather to be had. for the second part of the beacon, looking good for most places, with just the far north at risk of rain.
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saturday and sunday, lots of cloud, some breaks here and there, some sunshine and temperatures a little bit down on today. theresa may warns that britain is facing a period of momentous change after brexit and needs to forge a new role in the world. she tells the world economic forum that global companies also need to change the way they do things. we must heed the underlying feeling that there are some companies, particularly those with a global reach, who are playing by a different set of rules to ordinary working people. we will have reaction to her speech in davos live. also this lunchtime, desperate search for survivors after a hotel in italy was hit by an avalanche, many people feared dead. home safe, the british tourists fleeing the political turmoil in the gambia.
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a crunch time for the courgette, as cold weather in europe means empty vegetable shelves
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