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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 19, 2017 9:30pm-10:00pm GMT

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hello, there's only one place to begin this half—hour, washington, dc. a concert is underway, as you can see. these are live pictures from the lincoln memorial. this is the make america great again concert on the eve of donald trump's inauguration. this time tomorrow, he will be president. senegalese troops have entered the gambia after the new president was sworn in in a ceremony in senegal. the man who lost the election, the current president, is refusing to stand down. the vendee globe has finished after a thrilling race. we will have a full report from the coast of france. and as you are watching, if you have questions, some of you have been getting in touch. i will do my best to a nswer getting in touch. i will do my best to answer you as we go along.
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i think the actorjon voight is currently on stage during the make america great again concert in washington. ‘s have a look at the pictures and see what's negatiuewm—f we... negative lies 7 a»- negative lies1 111 mr negative lies = mr trump, the negative lies against mr trump, whose only desire... cheering and applause whose only desire was to make america great again. cheering and applause he certainly didn't need this job. and, yes, yes, god answered all our
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prayers. because here it is. we will be part of history. all of us. and president lincoln, who sits here with us, i'm sure is smiling, knowing america will be saved by an honest and good man who will work for all the people, no matter their creed or colour. cheering and applause so, my friends, let us rejoice in knowing that from this time on, we will see a renewed america. the spirit of america is perhaps best ca ptu red spirit of america is perhaps best captured by one of our country's most beloved patriotic songs, written over a century ago. america the beautiful. and here to perform
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his own version of this truly american classic is a grammy award—winning rock and roll hall of fame member and a soul music legend, and it gives me great honour to introduce the legendary sam moore. cheering and applause that's jon voight, the cheering and applause that'sjon voight, the actor, who said donald trump is an honest man and didn't need thejob of said donald trump is an honest man and didn't need the job of president and didn't need the job of president and only sort it for one reason, not for himself, but to make america great again. we will come away from those pictures just for a moment. great again. we will come away from those picturesjust for a moment. we might go back again before the end of the programme. and it is striking, isn't it? the formalities before the inauguration begins. many separate events happen on the day is self building up to the oath of office. you can't help but, once
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again, reflect on the enormity and improbability of what donald trump has achieved. we've been speaking about this with the bbc north america editor, john sobel. about this with the bbc north america editor, john sobelm about this with the bbc north america editor, john sobel. if we had been talking a year ago, two yea rs had been talking a year ago, two years ago, we would have said, you know what? on january 20, 2017, years ago, we would have said, you know what? onjanuary 20, 2017, we would be witnessing the election of president—elect trump, our viewers would have thought we had taken leave of all of our senses. it is an extraordinary moment, and if you look back at the process, from george washington onwards, there's been a sense of continuity, democrat to do much —— democrat republican, republican and democrat, i think the 45t h republican and democrat, i think the 45th president of the united states represents a break from some of that, because what he has done, he has upended political normality in the way he has campaigned and in the way he has been since he won that
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election last november, and i think we are in for a very unpredictable time. he talks about draining the swamp of washington, changing the way everything works, and it's like a disruptor is going to take over the keys of the white house and no one is quite sure what that means in terms of policy, whether domestically or internationally. and i guess all incoming presidents have to go from talking the talk to walking the walk, and listening to mike pence this afternoon, he was emphasising how much they want to get done quickly. do you think the transition team is in good nick to do that? well, i mean, if you listen to mike pence, an awful lot of people have taken up key positions and they say the transition is on schedule and under budget, and they we re schedule and under budget, and they were obviously making the rhetorical point, as you would expect, that's what we're going to do for the country. deliver things on time that we promised that might be costing an awful lot less than had been the
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case before that. and also questions about what the tone will be of the inaugural address. we are being expected not to expect a big policy document but much more of a philosophical argument from donald trump about what it means to be an american, the role of citizen, the role of the state, we're told it will be personal, we are told it will be personal, we are told it will be personal, we are told it will be sincere, and that i think will be sincere, and that i think will be sincere, and that i think will be the tone he tries to set. he needs to unify america after what was the most fractious and bitter election campaign and he's going to have his work cut to do that. and we will have extensive coverage of the inauguration day on the bbc news channel or elsewhere on bbc world news. time for some sport, and let's go back to a story we've been covering all week. a frenchman has won this yea r‘s all week. a frenchman has won this year's vendee globe yacht race, around the world, and it took him 711
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days. he was run in very close. after ten unpredictable weeks in the world's most inhospitable seas, a frenchman celebrating victory was a well told story. what wasn't was the plucky yachtsmen who gave him a run for his money. the three—month alex thompson has battled everything the ocean has thrown at him, eaten only freeze dried noodles and jelly and survived on as little as 20 minutes sleep every few hours. at stake, his life's obsession. to win the around the world race. he set off from here on the 6th of november, heading out of the bay of biscay and into the south atlantic. he headed around antarctica under the cape of good hope and passed around australasia, across the south pacific, where he passed point nemo, the furthest
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point from civilisation on earth, and then back up the atlantic around cape horn, and when he arrives back home, you will have notched up something between 20000 and 30,000 nautical miles. for alex, there have been good moments... bad moments... ido been good moments... bad moments... i do wonder why i do it sometimes! and moments over christmas where his family worried he was going slightly mad. #jingle bells, alex mad. # jingle bells, alex sayles, mad. #jingle bells, alex sayles, round the world he goes! his wife is desperate to get him home. i have spoken to him and been in contact but seeing him is totally home. i have spoken to him and been in contact i ut seeing him is totally home. i have spoken to him and been in contact i can't sing him is totally home. i have spoken to him and been in contact i can't wait. iiiti is totally home. i have spoken to him and been in contact i can't wait. just 5 totally home. i have spoken to him and been in contact i can't wait. just two ally different. i can't wait. just two weeks into the race, his boat got so badly damaged it hugely affected his speed, but he still smashed the world record for the greatest distance sailed solo in 211 hours.
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but what perhaps is better than a record after three months at sea, his team promised to have on hand a hot burger and a cold beer! you might have seen this already. novak djokovic is out of the australian open. he lost in the second round. that doesn't happen often. he lost to the world number 117, dennis is stunning. this is the assessment of the two—time wimbledon schenkel —— two—time wimbledon champion from pat cash. it is incredible to think he couldn't get through. normally this time last year, we would have said, straight sets, wouldn't take much more than an hourand a sets, wouldn't take much more than an hour and a half. sets, wouldn't take much more than an hourand a half. it sets, wouldn't take much more than an hour and a half. itjust shows novak has lost his edge. no doubt about that. if we were doubting that before, we are certainly confirmed that he is not the same player he was six months ago. deloitte has released its annual report into the world's richest football clu bs.
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report into the world's richest football clubs. ollie foster at bbc sport has read it so you don't have to! let me find you. there you are. got you at last! manchester united top, aren't they? i saw the headline. they are indeed. after11 yea rs, headline. they are indeed. after11 years, real madrid have been knocked off the top spot. manchester united are off the top spot. manchester united a re really off the top spot. manchester united are really going to worry the rest of the premier league this season but at least their accountants and their money men can take some pride in the fact that they are top of this mini league table. delight, they reveal this, they've done over they reveal this, they've done over the last 20 years or so. —— deloitte. man united were top on £88 million a few years ago. £515 million! the first time the club went over the £500 million mark. real madrid have moved down to third, with barcelona just above
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them with .1 of £1 million between them. manchester city on the up. this was last season, when they were in the champions league. deloitte to say they have phenomenal commercial revenue growth, and they say that they secured commercial partnerships in excess of that achievable by their peers. but don't expect manchester united to stay there, because when they look at this season, man united haven't been in the champions league, there's brexit, sterling has fallen against the euro and all those other big clu bs the euro and all those other big clubs as well, they will be saying, look at those kit deals and the commercial deals manchester united have achieved. in that last season. we wa nt have achieved. in that last season. we want a deal as big a fact as well. so united back to the top but you can imagine real madrid returning there next year. thank you. thanks for putting that in context ross. all week we've been following the
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squash tournament of champions that ta kes pla ce squash tournament of champions that takes place in new york's grand central station. i've been picking up central station. i've been picking upa central station. i've been picking up a rally each day of the week. here's another one for you featuring two giants of the game. some of these rallies went on for so long, you can really put the kettle on, talk to your friends, and the rally will go on till it gets to the sharp end of things. this was actually a five set thriller. gauthier won. very injured at one stage in the match. another match featuring laura massaro. she is in the final later today. unfortunately, technical details in new york, not the bbc, but in new york, the organisers, meani but in new york, the organisers, mean i cannot show you how game, which is a shame because it was a great performance. you can get clips on our facebook page. i've talked all this way and still i can show you the end of the rally! can't believe how tight they are hitting
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it! brilliant! he's made the error! there it is. fist pumps! very impressive from both of them. gauthier is in the final later on. let me pick up the feed of the concert going on by the washington memorial. this is the make america great again concert. let's have a listen. band music plays. cheering and applause that's what is happening in washington at the moment. i've just had a message from christina saying can you update us on what is happening in italy? a terrible avalanche by the hotel. we will
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cover this injust a avalanche by the hotel. we will cover this in just a few minutes. a british local authority is to hold a referendum on whether to increase council tax by 15% to pay for essential services which it says are at risk due to a funding shortfall. surrey county council, which is controlled by the conservative party, says it has a huge gap in its budget and needs the extra money to fund improved social care for the elderly, services for those with disabilities and for children. you don't get a choice about getting old, but how to pay the huge bills for care? councils pay most of it and now one authority has had enough of government cuts and paying for more and more with less and less. surrey is asking council tax payers, yes or no, to a 15% increase for social care. i think it's important that politicians stand up and tell the truth and be honest with the
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residents and tell them what it costs to run these services. we have to pay for these services! is not easy finding people here who are pay what will be nearly £2000 more than on an average home, though nobody could call surrey hard up.|j on an average home, though nobody could call surrey hard up. i heard it on the one o'clock news today. they want more of the money for social care. certainly not. that's totally obscene. there's lots of money in surrey but it doesn't mean we are going to accept a 15% increase. it's not on. i think it's a very bad idea. i can't afford to pay because my pension is frozen. more council tax to pay for social care. do you fancy that? i'm up for it. i think we live in a very affluent it. i think we live in a very afflu e nt area it. i think we live in a very affluent area and i think we can all afford it. i know lots of people around who need it more than we do. iagree. i around who need it more than we do.
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i agree. i think that's right. is the side of a civilised society, one that looks after and cares for its older people responsibly, and i think it's a problem that will escalate over the years. it's not going to go away and we have to address it. the labour leader also agrees we should bear the rising costs of social care. it is not right which cross the social care crisis on local authorities, all of whom have different levels of income over the country. its central government responsibility and the central government should face up to its responsibility. —— it is a central government responsibility. in several votes over the last few yea rs on in several votes over the last few years on whether to raise council tax, the answer was no. we live in the bbc newsroom in outside source. events have begun in washington leading up to the inauguration of donald trump on friday. earlier he appeared at arlington cemetery to honour those
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who lost their lives serving in the american military. this is what is coming up after outside source. if you are watching outside of the uk, it is world news america. as you can imagine, they have plenty on donald trump, looking at his relations, including with vladimir putin. next in the uk, we have the news at ten with hugh edwards. local officials in italy are saying between 30 and 35 people are still missing after an avalanche hit a hotel. we know there were four earthquakes in quick succession in and around the region and they are thought to be the cause of what happened. rescuers worked through the night to reach the hotel to see if they could find survivors. it was incredibly hard to get there because all the roads were blocked. as you will see in this report. at night, the quickest way through
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the wall of snow was on skis. these rescu e rs the wall of snow was on skis. these rescuers are amongst the most experienced in europe. even they struggled to move forward. step—by—step, they shovelled their way up towards the rigopiano hotel. shouting. finally, they made it. the hotel was silent. inside, rescuers found this man. they went further in, and came to where the avalanche hit. a six—foot—high wall of snow and rock broke through the building's walls. several miles away, a father waited for news of his daughter up in the hotel. straight after yesterday's earthquakes, they texted each other. "stay calm," he wrote. "you can come down tomorrow."
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"calm, that's hard," she replied. "i think the worst has already happened," he reassured her. "what's going on? " he then asked. he got no reply. his daughter, and many other people, may be trapped underneath these tonnes of snow. these pictures, filmed after daybreak, show the rigopiano hotel swept away by the avalanche. do you think it's possible to find more people alive? for sure, yes. sure, yes. in the past, we found people after three days or something like this. and especially in this case, there could be some room under the snow. rescuers are helped by the fact that conditions here have improved. we haven't felt any more earthquakes or tremors. relief workers a few miles up the hill, will hope the snow holds
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the hill will hope the snow holds off, allowing them to keep digging. and those rescuers continue on their path to and from the destroyed hotel, searching for survivors or bodies. james reynolds, bbc news, penne, central italy. of course people all over the world will be watching donald trump's inauguration as president of the us, but perhaps people in mexico will be paying more attention than most. he's been very critical of the trading relationship between mexico and the us and of the immigration setup. he wants to build that wall, which he's talked about a lot. you may have recently seen ford withdrew a significant investment in mexico. we've been looking at that issue. this places a world away from the spectacle on capitol hill. the dry
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valleys a nd spectacle on capitol hill. the dry valleys and desert landscape could and contrast more sharply with the glitz of the presidential inauguration ceremony in washington, dc. and yet since donald trump was elected, the two places are now inexorably linked. this dusty corner of central mexico felt perhaps the first blow of mr tron's aggressive brand of economic protectionism. faced with threats of higher border taxes, the car giant ford decided to pull out of $1.6 billion car assembly plant it was building here and invest at least part of the money in michigan instead. —— mr tron ‘s aggressive brand. the suggestion was that the next four yea rs suggestion was that the next four years would be tougher than he had hoped. he had worked on the site for the six months when the entire workforce was told out of the blue they were fired. he now harvests ca ctuses to they were fired. he now harvests cactuses to make a living. translation: i would ask him to play fair with us translation: i would ask him to play fairwith us and translation: i would ask him to play fair with us and lend us a hand. we need jobs here, too. we need work. i
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think that's where delinquency and crime come from. no work. the authorities here admit ford's decision has hurt their economic forecast. it is a worry and i can tell you that the worst thing that is happening is that we don't have the rules yet. we don't know how he's going to play the rules in the economy or the platform he's going to plan for the next months. automobiles and agriculture are the mainstay of the local economy here, but as more us carfirms mainstay of the local economy here, but as more us car firms choose michigan over this town, desert towns and villages are finding themselves on the of donald trump's economic conflict with mexico. these people are some of its first casualties. and it comes at a particularly volatile time for the mexican economy, too. many furious at a government imposed fuel price hike, with some protest bubbling over into looting and clashes with riot
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of living in about the rising cost of living in mexico and the overall direction of the economy. especially the community of around 500 families that lies behind ford's abandoned construction. the community leader, known locally as don corleone, fears that in the absence of stable work, young people will head north, exacerbating the very problem donald trump has vowed to tackle — illegal immigration. as the factory sits gathering dust in the desert, the ford name has already been taken off the billboard. what began as a shining example of cross—border free trade is now an eerie monument to us protectionism. i was going to bring in the feed of this concert taking place in washington, dc anyway, but i think my timing might be good here, because... lets see you has come on the stage. i think president—elect
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donald trump has done. —— let's see who has come. cheering and applause you'll never break this heart of stone, sings mick jagger you'll never break this heart of stone, sings mickjagger in that trap, as the president—elect of america greets his supporters in washington. tomorrow he will become the president. goodbye. hello. if you were watching
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yesterday evening, i was telling you about how quiet the weather picture is at the moment. this will stay with us certainly for the next six days and for some, beyond that as well. we have that harsh winter cold weather across continental europe and that has been creeping into the uk, and that process will continue over the next few days, but with it we've seen lovely sunshine, crisp weather, as you saw in london, but weather, as you saw in london, but we have a weak weather front across the country, so some contrast, for example, in derbyshire. whether cloud breaks, perhaps across the vale of york and east, there will be a harsh frost. —— where the cloud breaks. we will have fog but once it clears, the sunshine looks more abundant on friday morning. do watch out for some freezing fog across the south—east but the chance of brighter weather for northern ireland, wales, lincolnshire, northern scotland, but not warm.
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five or 6 degrees only generally. we are pulling in that cold continental air, so again, friday into saturday looks cold, with the risk of freezing patchy fog. little wind to clear it but it should eventually do so, and then some sunshine, but that wea k so, and then some sunshine, but that weak weather front still with us through the weekend, and that could give us some sleet and snow, just a few flurries, just letting us know winter is still here! no significant amount but it will be a cold weekend. but usable weekend because it should be mainly dry with some sunshine. but chilly by day and by night. and that's the way we start the new week. but we are moistening up the new week. but we are moistening up the air is somewhat through the weekend and the early part of the week, so fog is likely to be more of an issue in time for the return to work on monday for the rush—hour! we could have some dense and fairly widespread patches of fog. freezing
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fog, of course, because we have those frosts by night. those temperatures still pretty nippy at four or five. still the same across the bulk of the uk on tuesday. more cloud, mild allen to care and some rain, but it doesn't amount to anything. —— mild air and some rain. this dominant area of high pressure has been with us all this week but this clears out. that cold air has established itself and we've got to really work to move that high pressure out of the way. you can see what an area it covers. but as we go through the early part of the week we will find these low pressures are starting to push in, their momentum starting to push in, their momentum starting to push in, their momentum starting to move the rain and stronger wind into the north—west of the uk, so we still have the high pressure with us and the cold continental feel, but pressure with us and the cold continentalfeel, but gradually pressure with us and the cold continental feel, but gradually we get the milder atlantic winds at least into the north and west, and it isa
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least into the north and west, and it is a matter of how quickly those that start to a road that area of high pressure that will determine how quickly we start to see our weather change from this cold, crisp, sunny weather to the rainy wet weather in the west, because it will take quite a significant area to move it out of the way, and we could have some gales or severe gales moving in later next week. but for the meantime, fog becoming a more proper —— a big problem. tonight at ten — on the eve of his inauguration, donald trump promises immediate action to start fulfilling his campaign pledges. he flew into the nation's capital less than 211 hours before being sworn in as 45th president of the united states. one of his first official duties — to remember america's fallen, as his deputy promised early action on promises made. we've focused at the president—elect‘s direction on a day one, a day 100,
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and a day 200 action plan, for keeping our word to the american people and putting the president—elect‘s promises into practice. we'll be looking ahead to tomorrow's events in washington dc, and we'll be asking some trump voters for their expectations for the next four years. also tonight. at the world economic forum in switzerland, theresa may tells business leaders that britain wants to forge a new role in the world after brexit.
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