Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 21, 2017 7:00am-8:01am GMT

7:00 am
hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the first full day in office for the new president of the united sates. donald trump, pledges to fulfill his campaign promises. he's already signed his first orders as president, including changes to barack obama's healthcare act, which mr trump said he will repeal. we want to make america great again, and we will. inauguration day ended with a series of balls, before the president and first lady returned to the white house to spend the first night in their new home. good morning, it's saturday the 21st of january. we'll look back on president trump's inauguration, and what's in store for his first few days in power. also ahead: three more survivors have been pulled out of the debris
7:01 am
of an italian hotel, almost 72 hours after it was swamped by an avalanche. leaders of europe's right wing parties gather in germany to discuss their opposition to the european union, thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate. in sport, yohanna konta is aiming to keep her winning run going, by knocking out a former world number one out of the australian open. and in from the cold: i've been training with the british long speed skating team, who's sport has been revived in the netherlands. and nick has the weather. the weekend is getting off to a frosty start. a hard frost in some parts. patchy fog around as well. most places will see the sun shine, with a dry day ahead. more in the next half an hour.
7:02 am
first, our main story. president donald trump has wasted no time in getting to work. shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge signed an executive order to begin dismantling barack obama's affordable care act, known as obamaca re. in his first speech as president, mr trump promised to take power from the establishment in washington and give it back to the people. last night the president and first lady attended a number of traditional balls held to thank his supporters. here's our washington reporter, laura bicker. and now, the president and first lady of the united states will take their first dance. # now the end is near... never has a song been more appropriate for a president. # the final curtain... donald trump got here by doing things very differently, a trait he shows no sign of losing as commander in chief. should i keep the twitter going or not?
7:03 am
keep it going? i think so. ithink so! he beamed at people across washington, clasping the hand of his wife and first lady. inaugural balls are part of the political choreography of this day, and he invited supporters from across the country. well, we did it. cheering we did it. we began this journey, and they said we, we and me, we didn't have a chance, but we knew we were going to win. and we won. as he shuffled around the floor, word spread that he had already made his first executive move, an action that will help repeal obamacare, his predecessor's signature healthca re law. across the country, gatherings of a more hostile nature spread out
7:04 am
from coast to coast. over 200 people were arrested in washington after a handful of small anti—trump rallies turned violent. in chicago, hundreds peacefully voiced their concerns at donald trump's agenda. and in seattle, they marched through the streets, further demonstrations are planned over the weekend. but the new president will shrug off this criticism, just as he did during the campaign. surrounded by family and friends, he is taking time to enjoy this pageantry before the real work begins. laura bicker is in washington for us this morning. he got there by doing things
7:05 am
differently, but now donald trump has got down to —— has to get down to work and start fulfilling the promises he gave in his speech yesterday. yes, he is pressing the white house reset button and he's doing it very, very quickly. not only has the white house changed its entire website, he started signing executive orders. that campaign pledge that he made, there was a cry throughout the campaign from him and republicans to repeal and replace obamacare, republicans to repeal and replace obamaca re, that was republicans to repeal and replace obamacare, that was not the biggest shifts in healthcare since the 19605, that shifts in healthcare since the 1960s, that president obama introduced. it means 20 million more people have health insurance, but it also means that for many, insurance premiums have gone up. it has proved controversial. donald trump said he would find a replacement and repeal it quickly and that's exactly what he will do. doesn't mean it will be repealed by him and now, but it does
7:06 am
set in the motion. he also has his two cabinet picks in place, or a start, there are still more challenges ahead. you have seen some of the protests that have sprung up. he will no doubt shrug it off and carry on regardless. thank you. the foreign secretary borisjohnson has told the bbc he remains positive about the prospect of a new trade deal with the us. the new president has made it very clear that he wants to put britain at the front of the line for a new trade deal and obviously that's extremely exciting and important, and he is very keen to get it done as fast as possible, very optimistic that it can be done soon. i think he said within a short period, after the exit from the eu and that's great. but it has got to have a —— got to work for the uk as
7:07 am
well, but there is every reason to be optimistic. protest marches to demand women's rights will take place in more than 30 countries to mark donald trump's first day in office. this one in sydney, australia, is already underway and hundreds more are due to take place around the world, including in many uk cities. around 200,000 people are also expected to attend a march in the american capital. italian firefighters say four more survivors have been pulled out of the debris of the hotel swamped by an avalanche on wednesday. four children were among those pulled from the remains yesterday. attempts are continuing to rescue two more known survivors, but at least 15 people remain unaccounted for. andy moore reports. as darkness fell on the third night since the avalanche, a six—year—old girl was pulled from the rubble, cold but apparently well. soon after came another child, a boy. one of four children who have so far been rescued from the rubble of the hotel. they're saiad to have
7:08 am
survived in the kitchen, protected by concrete walls that also silenced their cries for help. after these images were filmed, another three adults , two women and a man were also rescued. all survivors were flown to hospital. they are said to be cold and dehydrated, but otherwise in remarkably good condition. for some relatives who have endured a long wait for news, there was huge relief. translation: can't you see it from my face? doesn't it show how happy i am? it's great, i can't describe it. i'd like to see him. for now the boy is safe, and i hope his parents have managed to survive. but, for other relatives, the anxious wait goes on. the rescuers say they believe there are at least two more people alive and trapped under the snow. they haven't managed to get to them yet. some bodies have been recovered, at least 15 people are unaccounted for.
7:09 am
a hungarian coach has crashed in northern italy, killing at least 16 people. the coach was on its way back from a mountain resort in france when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city of verona and caught fire. according to reports, the coach was carrying a large number of schoolchildren. the leaders of some of europe's right—wing populist parties will gather in the german city of koblenz today to discuss their shared opposition to the european union. the leader of the french national front, marine le pen, and the dutch politician geert wilders are among those planning to attend. thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate outside the event. the brazilian football club chapecoense will play its first match tonight after nearly all of its players were killed in a plane crash in columbia. the club made 20 new signings following the disaster, which left 71 people dead. 0ur reporterjulia carneiro has more. these pictures travelled the world.
7:10 am
sheerjoy as the chapacoense football tea m sheerjoy as the chapacoense football team qualified for the final of the cup last year. the dressing room now stands silent. their finest dressing room now stands silent. theirfinest moment sent dressing room now stands silent. their finest moment sent them to play in colombia on the doomed flight play in colombia on the doomed flight that killed 19 players, as well as directors and members of the coaching staff. the flight crashed ona coaching staff. the flight crashed on a mountainous area close to the area where it was headed. a preliminary report by colombian authorities said the plane had insufficient fuel and human error was to blame. 0nly insufficient fuel and human error was to blame. only six people survived the crash. this defender only managed to walk again last week. translation: they told me three days before i came back. it was the saddest day of my life. i ask about my teammates and the
7:11 am
doctors said they won't here any more. the seats have been empty for almost two months now. but today the fa ns almost two months now. but today the fans will return to the arena to cheer on a new chapecoense, with new players and new hopes for a successful future a re players and new hopes for a successful future are striving to live up to the past. we will have all of the weather and sport coming up later. anyone who predicted trump the world leader would differ in rhetoric from trump the candidate would have been proven wrong by his first speech as president. in his inaugural address, he vowed to end what he called the "carnage" of modern america and reiterated his promise to "make america great again". let's discuss this with republican commentator and former speech—writer for george w bush, anneke green. she joins us now from washington. thank you very much for staying up late for us. after what has been a
7:12 am
momentous i2 late for us. after what has been a momentous 12 hours or so. can you just briefly give us your thoughts with the white house immediately behind you, a new resident in place? like you said, it is momentous. it has been quite a long day for those of us in washington, dc covering the inauguration and watching to see how the crowds respond to the speech, what's in the speech itself. it was a short speech, i thought it was a good speech, although it had some very colourful language at times. but that certainly made it memorable. i was at one of the inaugural balls today. there are still people out returning from these parties and i saw them even coming into the studio tonight. we will talk about the language you mentioned a moment ago. let's have a clip from one of the passages in the inaugural speech. mothers and children trapped in poverty in our inner cities. rusted out factories
7:13 am
scattered like tombstones across the landscape of our nation. an education system flushed with cash, but which leaves our young and beautiful students deprived of all knowledge. let's pick up on some of that language. a lot of people say there is quite a lot of bleak language, rusted factories, american carnage, the word decay cropped up. what did you make of the language?” the word decay cropped up. what did you make of the language? i actually thought the line rusted out factories dotting the landscape like to m bsto nes factories dotting the landscape like tombstones was one of the most beautiful lines in the speech, but it is bleak, it isn't hopeful. his speech was set up so that in the beginning he said, today, how is being transferred from washington to you, the people, but before this moment what you've been experiencing is... and then we heard the language you played. it delivered the audience to a place and then he
7:14 am
said, no more. now you can have hope again, you can dream again, you will not be forgotten. so get into that place of saying where things are now, he did describe things very blea kly and that now, he did describe things very bleakly and that was in keeping with the speech we heard at the republican national convention, where he spoke about death and destruction. he was keen to place himself as the anti— establishment president if there can be such a thing. the establishment protected itself but not the citizens of our country. their victories have not been your victories, their triumphs have not been your triumphs, and while they celebrated in our nation's capital, there was little to celebrate for struggling families all across our land. many people wondered whether
7:15 am
in his speeches, in the weeks and months to come, he would be true to what he said during the campaign trail. yes, and he was making clear in his address as president that he is not going to be like the politicians that have jaded many members of the american public who make campaign promises, who sound one way when it is a primary and then when they are running in a more general election they start to moderate, and when they get to washington, dc, the perceptions of many voters, they don't get to come through on these promises and the way we saw the cycle coming out with 18 candidates for republican nomination and then donald trump, the one person who was not a politician, he was a businessman, making it to the top, becoming president, is a reflection of people being set up. you mentioned being at one of the events, one of the balls that followed, i was mindful watching a clip of president trump as he is now speaking at one of the
7:16 am
balls in which the quote was, his words, they said we and me couldn't do itand words, they said we and me couldn't do it and we won. to my mind, that sounds like the man on election night, it sounds like the man who is still crowing on about beating the opposition when a lot of people were hoping at this point in time for a unifying message. why hasn't he changed that mantra ? unifying message. why hasn't he changed that mantra? he is speaking to his supporters. people who attend these balls gave money. even though one of the distinctive is was he had many small donors, it was an historic number supporting him, he was not the deep pocketed candidate, soi was not the deep pocketed candidate, so i don't think it is unusual to see a president at this point at these balls thanking his supporters and saying, we have accomplished something, we are in office and looking forward, we will be working. it is important to know audience, thatis it is important to know audience, that is not a comment that is nation
7:17 am
facing. you will be familiar with cloud boards people have put up together, which crops up often in the speech. i think we can see the cloud boards. you can see and america, one of the things from looking outside the usa, politicians drawing attention to it, is how american it was, the simple rules, purchase american, higher american, is ita purchase american, higher american, is it a hostile message to the rest of the world and preaching to those in the us, but necessarily something thatis in the us, but necessarily something that is alarming to the rest of the world ? that is alarming to the rest of the world? i don't think i that is alarming to the rest of the world? i don't thinki appreciate how much this would sound reminiscent to the rest of the world of some of the things that predated world war two, for example, appeasement language, that kind of thing, until tonight, talking with people who are european, and hearing
7:18 am
the message, i don't think president trump is thinking about it that way, andi trump is thinking about it that way, and i would say most americans hearing that would think, well, it makes sense to focus on what is good for the nation and then the rest of the world instead of being focused on the rest of the world first, which was one of the accusations that president obama faced. thank you for speaking to us and for staying up so late in washington this evening. thank you. let's find out what is happening with the weather. what a beautiful picture. there will be sunrisers is across parts of england, we expect sunshine but it is foggy and frosty to start. the hardest has been in rural southern england, —7 in hampshire. you can see a hard frost in parts of wales, northern ireland, into scotland, especially in the east. more widespread frost to start the day. it is called to come, with
7:19 am
settled weather. there is some fault in eastern scotland, northern ireland, yorkshire, lincolnshire, into east wales, fog patches possible just about anywhere. it may bea possible just about anywhere. it may be a problem for the next couple of hours. south—west england has more clout around. cornwall and devon. we have cloud coming from the north sea across eastern england, running eventually into the midlands. you can see the extent of the frost and the clear whether to begin the day. that is the case into northern ireland and scotland. more of us will get to see the sunshine can head to recent days. on through the day, it the emphasis is dry and sunny weather to start the weekend. more cloud pushing into south—west england, eventually into northern ireland, but this is the significant area of cloud, that will be into norfolk and the midlands, eventually north—west england. it might be drizzly to the north
7:20 am
north—west england. it might be drizzly to the north sea north—west england. it might be drizzly to the north sea coast north—west england. it might be drizzly to the north sea coast as well. temperatures mostly 3— six degrees. so a definite chill after a frosty start. not so frosty tonight. it will come and go as cloud moves around. it is more patchy. still some fog patches. damp weather, northern england, southern scotland, showers for south—west england and wales. and all it means is not as much sunshine around. some showers, wintry on the hills, patchy rain and drizzle into scotland, flurries on the high ground, none of that wet weather amounts to much and you can see where the best weather will be for the midlands, east anglia and south—east england and single figure temperatures, it doesn't get warmer going into next week and we are worried about the extent of fog on monday and tuesday, which could cause some problems, so we will keep an eye on that and we will update you as we get closer to monday and
7:21 am
tuesday. thank you very much. the time is 7:20am. there have been more dramatic scenes in italy as firefighters there confirmed three more people have been pulled from the debris of a hotel, buried by an avalanche on wednesday. rescue workers in the abruzzo region managed to pull six people from the wreckage yesterday and crews are continuing to work to reach at least two other survivors. let's speak to alistair read from mountain rescue england and wales. good morning. iam good morning. i am sure that like eve ryo ne good morning. i am sure that like everyone else, with your expert knowledge, you have been looking at the images coming out of italy and this rescue operation is under way as we speak but they have been pulling people out of that avalanche, and this is 70 hours after the event. i think that is exceptional. with a pure avalanche you would expect poor survival times but with this case, with a building,
7:22 am
there is more chance of survival. it is an extra of disaster that we seek with the earthquakes and avalanches. we are looking at some of the imagery here and there were a number of children brought out from the situation. what are you seeing in terms of the rescue operation itself? quite a range of people working. you have got rescue workers who are able to work inside the building, surrounding them are the people who help to get there and also to transport the survivors of way, so it is quite an operation. what are the stages of the rescue? initially, the response to getting there on wednesday evening, i think that was quite challenging, with the snow, not able to fly helicopters with the application, and then the first stage of trying to work out where people were in the building, how to gain access to it, and at the same time they were bringing more
7:23 am
people so that when they start digging, if they meet the structures, they can penetrate through. it looks fascinating, how they have built tunnels in the snow, because there must be danger in getting it right, so how do they know? you do the best you can. snow itself doesn't hold much weight but the avalanche snow sets hard once it has moved, so then you have to dig through the building, which can be quite difficult work, and they will be guided by the best routes given what you know about the building, but they will be searching for people, trying to listen for them, using dogs to see if they can detect them through smell, and hopefully they will get cameras in to put in to see if anyone is surviving. reports we are getting from some who have been brought out suggest they took refuge between a collapsed part of the building, a pocket where they are not affected at trapped within, but they say they possibly lit a
7:24 am
fire to keep warm. if you are in that situation, horrendous situation, you are trapped, presumably they have access to things and getting cold is possibly the most dangerous thing at that point? if there is a lot of snow, then hypothermia is a great risk, he would be surrounded by cold snow and cool off quickly, so you want to keep warm, and so it you have access to materials to generate heat, you have a better chance of survival. 0ne have a better chance of survival. one of the challenges is if you are ina one of the challenges is if you are in a pocket which is cut off from free—flowing air, you could asphyxiate yourself and cause more problems. you have been involved in avalanche rescues in north wales. what is it like to be on one of those teams. it is quite a challenge. we get short notice, we try to get people into look for the victims of the avalanche. we have ha rd victims of the avalanche. we have hard work to get a lot of people in
7:25 am
and we generally do the best we can to find the person, but it is for our that they tend not to be that successful. we have seen pictures of you in croatia at which is where you have been out helping and training as well, haven't you? yes, i have been out a number of times to help the croatian mountain rescue, we we re the croatian mountain rescue, we were involved in some of the biggest rescue incidents about 10 years ago. it is ongoing and even after this length of time there is still hope that people will be a live. they will hold out hope, the hotel structure will give voyage when people can survive. i think temperatures, the snow is like an igloo, it won't protect you from the extreme cold outside, but people will be cold and i think they will also get weak as they get dehydrated and get more and more hungry if they are surviving. thank you very much. we will see you later on in the morning. now, we are going to talk about a
7:26 am
coin hall. it was an obsession that lasted 30 yea rs for two metal detector enthusiasts, but eventually their search paid off when they discovered one of the largest hoards of celtic treasure in the world. the last of nearly 70,000 coins, worth millions of pounds, have now been removed from the site injersey, as robert hall has been finding out. a good story needs the right ingredients. this one has a legend of buried treasure and two lifelong friends who never gave up the search. i can still remember the first time we went to the fields and i was probably early 20s, i suppose, late teens, early 20s at the time, and we arrived at the field expecting to find the coins insta ntly. expecting to find the coins instantly. but of course it didn't happen like that. it is a strange feeling because there was something that drew us to it. every time we drove by on a sunday to go out to a
7:27 am
field we would stop and say, the field we would stop and say, the field is empty, and we would go and give it another try. the treasure they were searching for had come to jersey with kilted tribesman well over 2000 years ago. their coins kept turning up, convincing reg meade and richard miles there wasn't even a larger hall to be found here. in 2012, somebody was at the top of the field and they shouted, got one, or words to that effect, and that is when the story took off. reg got down with the shovel and just scooped out some more earth. 0n the end of it was five points. so i shouted out, reg, haul. reg, richard ata shouted out, reg, haul. reg, richard at a team of excited archaeologists had no idea what the 30 year surge had no idea what the 30 year surge had actually uncovered. everybody thought it was going to be a pot of coins, so we had some bandage to put around it and we thought we would be out at the end of the first day, and
7:28 am
thenit out at the end of the first day, and then it became incredibly exciting because we knew how big it was, but it also became a worry because no one had actually got something like this out of the ground safely in one piece before. in this story there we re piece before. in this story there were secrets within secrets. the 70,000 coins in folded even more precious treasures. what we have even more of these gold neck talks which would have been warned by a very important people in these celtic tribes, thin sheet gold over an iron core and then probably would around that, and they made it into halves so they would originally sort of click apart and go back together. week after week, month after month, more treasures have emerged. after three years' work, the final coin has now been removed. dismantling the port has left many mysteries unsolved. how did it come to be here? was it buried as a tribute to the gods or hidden enemies? and does
7:29 am
a large number of objects indicate a hidden presents? there is so much study to do with the horde itself and what we can learn about events and what we can learn about events and times 2000 years ago, but in a much broader context, what else is beneath the ground ? much broader context, what else is beneath the ground? it is as if the horde found us, we didn't find the horde. maybe there is a reason for it in the future. robert hall, bbc news, jersey. 30 years! and they think that it found them, rather than them finding the horde. it is the kind of thing that makes people go out today with their metal detector, thinking, this will be the big one. let's hope so, yeah. headlines coming up injust will be the big one. let's hope so, yeah. headlines coming up in just a moment. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. coming up before 8am, nick will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. president donald trump has wasted no time in getting to work. shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge signed an executive order
7:30 am
to begin dismantling barack 0bama's affordable care act, known as 0bamaca re. and now the president and first lady of the united states will take their first dance. the president and first lady also attended a number of traditional balls held to celebrate the inauguration. they danced to ‘my way‘ just hours after thousands gathered to see him take the oath of office and hear his inaugural address. people that weren't so nice to me were saying that we did a really good job today. they hated to do it, but they did it. and i respect that. you're going to see things happening over the next few weeks. oh, you're going to be so happy. you're going to be...
7:31 am
because, you know, they're very elegant people tonight, but they're also very political people, right? we want to see great things happen for our country. we want to make america great again, and we will. and we will. reacting to president trump's inaugural speech to put america first, the foreign secretary boris johnson told the bbc he remains positive about the prospect of a new trade deal with the us. the new president has made it very clear that he wants to put britain at the front of the line for a new trade deal and obviously that's extremely exciting and important, and he is very keen to get it done as fast as possible, very optimistic that it can be done soon. i think he said within a short period after the exit from the eu, and that's great.
7:32 am
but it has got to work for the uk as well, but there is every reason to be optimistic. in other news, italian firefighters say four more survivors have been pulled out of the debris of the hotel swamped by an avalanche on wednesday. four children were among those pulled from the remains yesterday. attempts are continuing to rescue two more known survivors, but at least 15 people remain unaccounted for. a hungarian coach has crashed in northern italy killing at least 16 people. the coach was on its way back from a mountain resort in france when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city of verona and caught fire. according to reports, the coach was carrying a large number of schoolchildren. the former president of the gambia has finally agreed to step down and leave the country. yayya jammeh had been clinging on to power despite losing last month's election. troops from several west african countries had threatened to depose him by force if necessary. the leaders of some of europe's right—wing populist parties will gather in the german city of koblenz today
7:33 am
to discuss their shared opposition to the european union. the leader of the french national front, marine le pen, and the dutch politician geert wilders are among those planning to attend. thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate outside the event. the brazilian football club chapecoense will play its first match tonight, after nearly all of its players were killed in a plane crash in columbia. the club has made 20 new signings since the disaster, which left 71 people dead. the friendly against current champions palmeiras will raise money for the victims‘ families. that is going to be a very emotional moment. absolutely. 22 new players and three survivors watching on from that tragedy, which has changed the club forever. if all that happens they we re forever. if all that happens they were relatively unknown outside of the country. they shot to fame, the
7:34 am
underdogs, and now they are known all over the world. so a very different time for them. there have to play at some point, but it will never be easy to play football again. take us through the sports news. well, johanna konta, dan evans, and johanna konta is obliterating the former world number one! that picture tells the story. how far that picture tells the story. howfarcan that picture tells the story. how far can she go? catchy do better than last year, which got to the semifinals? —— can she do. she just beaten former world number one caroline wozniacki in straight sets in an hour and 15 minutes. konta's been in fantastic form this year, winning a title in sydney in the build up to the big grand slam in melbourne, and wozniacki simply had no answer to britain's number one. wozniacki, who's now seeded 17, only managed to win four games, as konta cruised to an eighth win in a row. she'll now play ekaterina makarova, in the fourth round. liverpool and tottenham will be looking to narrow the gap on top of the table chelsea
7:35 am
in the premier league today. chelsea are seven points ahead at the moment. and there are seven matches today, with the leaders amongst those playing tomorrow. spurs are involved in the late kick off. they are away at manchester city, who you might remember got hammered 4—0 at everton last weekend. liverpool are involved in the early kick off at home to swansea city, who were also beaten 4—0 last weekend. they lost to arsenal. but the liverpool manager jurgen klopp says results aren't everything. interesting thing in the premier li, i don't know when it started, but only finals. 0nly finals since i don't know where. swansea have been playing in the league. we play for whatever, but each game, especially in the european, it decides the whole season. that's really intense. we are whole season. that's really intense. we a re really whole season. that's really intense. we are really looking forward to the opportunity. they are good side and we are going to have to defend well, not dissimilar to what we did
7:36 am
in the first 30 minutes against arsenal. we had our chances against arsenal. if we get those against liverpool, we need to take them. and we need to be more consistent. we're into the business end of the january transfer window, and in the last 12 hours a couple more premier league players have agreed moves. west ham united have signed the southampton defenderjose font for a fee of around £8 million, and saido berahino is to move from west bromwich albion to stoke city for £12 million. the striker is 23 and played for england at under 21 level, but he hasn't played for west brom since the 10th september. he's had a strained relationship with the club since a bid from spurs was turned down in the summer of 2015, and he responded with angry words on social media. in the fourth round of the scottish cup, what a day for bonnyrigg rose athletic, who will be trying to take down last year's winners hibs.
7:37 am
and if you are wondering who they are, they are based just south of edinburgh, and they're the current champions of the east region super league. that's one of the 3pm kick—offs today. before that, last year's beaten finalist rangers take on motherwell. elsewhere, formartine united, from the highland football league, have a trip to top flight partick thistle. that'll be tough, but a great day out. brighton have gone two points clear at the top of the championship after a 2—1win over sheffield wednesday. but it was a bad—tempered game. two goals from anthony knockaert, including the winner five minutes from time, was enough for chris hughton's side. there were though three red cards in the match and wednesday missed a penalty. in rugby union, northampton suffered a fourth european champions cup defeat of the campaign, as they were beaten 26—17 at montpellier. saints already knew they couldn't progress, but the french side can go through still in a best runner—up spot if other results go their way this weekend. leinster boosted their chances
7:38 am
of securing a home quarter—final, with a thrilling 24—24 draw at castres. leinster came back from seven points down at half—time to earn two points. only a massive win for connacht away to toulouse tomorrow could deprive them of home advantage in the last eight. jonny bairstow will replace alex hales in england's twenty20 squad to face india. hales will miss the remainder of the tour, after suffering a fractured hand. the opener damaged it during the second one—day international defeat on thursday. he will fly home today. england play the final game of their three—match one series tomorrow, before the twenty20 series starts on thursday. barry hawkins has denied world number one mark selby the chance to hold the world, uk and masters snookers crowns at the same time, after beating him 6—3 in their masters semi final. neither player was at his best in a nervy match at alexandra palace.
7:39 am
but at 4 frames to 3, hawkins won two in a row, to book his place in the last four. he'll will play joe perry, who eased past ding jun hui by six frames to one. that match is later today. the other semi final is between ronnie 0'sullivan and marco fu. just a word that, —— the tennis. there was a word between dan evans and he spotted his favourite cricketer and asked if he could have a selfie. he got the palm away. so, dan a selfie. he got the palm away. so, da n eva ns a selfie. he got the palm away. so, dan evans tweeted peterson and said, you denied me a picture! kevin pietersen has apologised. he said he couldn't even remember his own name at the time! he has apologised and of course they will now arrange a photo. yes, it never good to do a drunken picture. let's tease this up. can we see
7:40 am
these pictures? you have been iceskating? yes, these pictures? you have been iceskating ? yes, the these pictures? you have been iceskating? yes, the british iceskating? yes, the british iceskating team are now based in the netherlands because they dominate the sport. this was a day of international competition and there i was. i took on one of the best young brits in front of that crowd, who were rather we will do it. they we re who were rather we will do it. they were watching these top racers and suddenly this buffoon comes on. we will find out more about that later, at about 8:30am and 9:30am. you a lwa ys at about 8:30am and 9:30am. you always do everything in style! thanks very much. back to our top story. millions of people around the world watched donald trump being sworn is as president. breakfast‘s john maguire joined one group of american students here in the uk for an inauguration party to see what they thought of the occasion. every four years we gather on these steps... right across the united
7:41 am
states and around the world, americans gathered to witness an event that so many had predicted couldn't and wouldn't happen. aya, donald john trump, do solemnly swear. . . donald john trump, do solemnly swear... that i will faithfully execute... that i will faithfully execute... that i will faithfully execute. . . the execute... that i will faithfully execute... the office of president of the united states. the office of president of the united states. these students, studying in london, are thousands of miles from home, yet witnessed every second of donald trump's inauguration, as if they have a front row seat on capitol hill. in washington, the atmosphere was serious, momentous, even, so in london we decided to lighten the mood. folks, we are going to play trump dingo, top trumps, whatever you want to call it. we are going to give you this valuable and rare abc brea kfast give you this valuable and rare abc breakfast queue cards. i want you to each choose for words, phrases and mannerisms. —— bbc. as the president
7:42 am
makes his speech you have to mark each time it comes along and whoever gets the most at the end will win a prize. 0r gets the most at the end will win a prize. or at least will win, gets the most at the end will win a prize. 0rat least will win, how does that sound ? prize. 0rat least will win, how does that sound? me, along with the global audience, hung on every word and luckily every hand gesture. we are transferring power from washington, dc and giving it back to you. i did terribly. washington, dc and giving it back to you. idid terribly. ionly washington, dc and giving it back to you. i did terribly. i only got three. three mentions of the words strong? 0k. three. three mentions of the words strong? ok. i got dirty, 29 ok gestures and one beautiful. —— 30. we will make america safe again and, yes, together with will make america great again. an inaugural speech should differfrom great again. an inaugural speech should differ from campaign great again. an inaugural speech should differfrom campaign rhetoric and lacks the policy details of the state of the union address. so how did president trump said? based on his crowd i think it is something
7:43 am
they would have liked, but for an inaugural address i don't think it's a good job. it seems like he was still in campaign mode, talking about the issues and why he is the one to fix them, but it seemed like he sold himself to the people and he won the election, now he should talk more about healing and more ambiguous overall themes about going forward. we are going to make america great again. he only said it once, but at the same time he spoke about healing the country, making compromises, notjust about healing the country, making compromises, not just the about healing the country, making compromises, notjust the country but the whole world, and i thought that was paradoxical. so far the man who has just become the 45th resident has confounded history, politics, convention and, if he governs in the same vein, then as the 40th president used to declare, you ain't seen nothing yet. clearly not the most important of issues, but that body land which is fascinating, analysing the hand
7:44 am
gestures. —— wadi language. here's nick with a look at this morning's weather. where are you? another fabulous picture. good morning. lots of hand gestures. i am exhausting the back catalogue of photos until the weather watchers pictures coming. it isa weather watchers pictures coming. it is a cold start but there is plenty of sunshine around. the hardest frost has been in rural southern england, but we found —5 in scotland, wales, northern ireland. more widespread frost and fog around. it is showing up here. eastern scotland, northern ireland, yorkshire, lincolnshire, and patches elsewhere. so, bear that yorkshire, lincolnshire, and patches elsewhere. so, bearthat in yorkshire, lincolnshire, and patches elsewhere. so, bear that in mind if you are planning an earlyjourney. let's have a look at 9am this morning. it isn't cold in cornwall with the cloud around. it is the same for the north yorkshire coast, six degrees at the moment. not
7:45 am
everybody has a frost. more sunshine for northern ireland and scotland is the flipside to the cold night, with clear whether an sunshine to begin. frost in the northern and western isles with six or seven degrees to start. 0n through the day, plenty of sunshine, cloud increasing across south—west england, for example, into northern ireland, and this north sea coast cloud will push further west, so some in north—west england will cloud over after a sunny start, and parts of the midlands. temperatures on the cold side after the cold start to the day, but at least we get some time to compensate. from the cloud in northern england, into southern scotland, patchy light rain or drizzle, flurries of snow over the high ground, and showers into south—west england and wales. in wales, wintry on the hills. it isn't amounting too much. even where the
7:46 am
cloud is thick enough. patchy frost, not as widespread, still some fog patches, not as much sunshine. it is in the midlands, east anglia and the south—east, some showers, south—west england and wales, patchy rain for northern england and southern scotland, wintry on the hills with flurries in northern scotland as well, and cold again tomorrow. you are right about the hand gestures, i counted nine. they were all very well delivered, though, which is the main thing. we'll be back with the headlines at 8am. now it's time for newswatch with samira ahmed. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. coming up on this programme. the prime minister reveals more of the government's plans for leaving the european union. but is the bbc obsessed with the potential downsides of brexit? and the bbc trust says a report
7:47 am
about jeremy corbyn's policies on shoot to kill was inaccurate, but the corporation's director of news, rejects the finding. what's going on? first, in the build up to donald trump's inauguration on friday, the bbc broadcast a number of programmes and reports about the 45th president of the united states. monday's panorama, for example, asked whether he was the kremlin's candidate for the job? the reporter, john sweeney, has a habit of "testy" on—air encounters as demonstrated in this programme with an acolyte of president putin's and in a clip from a 2013 interview with donald trump. maybe you're thick, but when you have a signed contract you can't, in this country, just break it. and by the way, john, i hate to do this but i do have that big group of people waiting so i have to leave. 0k. one last question, please, sir. i have to leave, thank you. one more second, please, tell me about boris nemtsov. he was murdered 100 yards from...
7:48 am
by putin. you think he was murdered by putin? 0k. he was critical of putin. can you tell me, can you list the number of american journalists who have died under 0bama. you can't, can you. this is a completely stupid kind of conversation. please, i'm very nice to meet you but i don't like to continue. ian shaw was watching that and thought: john sweeney does an excellentjob of irritating people and does very little reporting whatsoever, on monday this was the third headline on bbc‘s news at six. also on tonight's programme: crisis in stormont. today sinn fein will not re—nominate for the position of deputy first
7:49 am
minister. new elections in northern ireland as power—sharing collapses. some viewers felt that such dramatic and significant political news from northern ireland merited more attention from the bbc, which didn't lead with that story on any of its main bulletins, as kevin marr put it on twitter: both sky and bbc news ten 0'clock news programmes have collapse of northern ireland power—sharing in third spot, that's how much we're bothered. and johanna paulson pointed out: hey, isn't there something going on in northern ireland? now since lastjune's very close and hotly debated referendum, the arguments about how britain will leave the european union have raged on. this week gave us some clarity on the issue with the prime minister's speech on tuesday but it certainly didn't mark an end to the arguments about how easy or successful the process might prove to be. parliament will have a vote on the final deal but already the criticism has started.
7:50 am
if all her optimism of a deal with the european union didn't work, we would move into a low tax corporate taxation, bargain basement economy. i'm not prepared for scotland to be taken down a path that i firmly believe is going to be damaging. now businesses are very worried that getting that deal in principle within two years is pretty unrealistic and that what we might do then is fall off a cliff of regulatory and trade no man's land and people have warned that would be very damaging. this is one day, 24 hours, in what is going to be a long, complicated, fraught and difficult process. and there are people, here in westminster still, and more importantly, perhaps, on the other side of the negotiating table, those 27 countries, who believe what she's asking for is a delusion. several viewers got in touch with us to complain of what they saw as a lack of balance in the coverage. elizabeth miller asked: does
7:51 am
the bbc never get tired of being so negative about brexit. who was the first person to be inviewed at the end of the speech? tim farron. he is in total denial about the decision to leave the eu and there is no way he is ever likely to be objective about the issue. the trend has continued with all sorts of experts being wheeled out to say a disaster is about to happen and reports asking loaded questions. give negotiations a chance and provide even handed coverage, please. and other viewers echoed that such as arthur smith who e—mailed: 0nce again the pro—eu bbc managed to put its end is nigh spin on the speech! you would have thought that armegeddon was upon us. we had analysis from various reporters all stressing what they regard as the negatives of leaving the eu as if we are on the road to certain ruin. as always, very little mention of the positives which lie ahead for us. well let's talk about this to katie serle who, is our editor of bbc political news and she joins
7:52 am
from us our westminster studio. katie, let's start with the complaints as to who is getting air time. many viewers as you heard there saying, too many voices giving initial reaction to may's speech, are hostile to brexit, and the bbc is rehashing the whole debate that we had in the referendum? i think the job aa journalists, and it is true across other media or indeed the newspapers, is to question and ask for answers that we don't have and we, the country voted for brexit, but it's really left many, many questions unanswered. actually, on tuesday, when the prime minister gave her speech, we gave a great deal of coverage to the speech itself, which set out the arguments and the plans for brexit from the government but it did leave many, many questions unanswered and you heard there from jeremy corbyn and nicola sturgeon, with their own questions, so we're notjust asking the questions, just from the bbc‘s point of view, although we would do that as journalists, we are putting the concerns of the other main politicians in this country, to try to get some answers and the answers that we don't have. part of that concern, though,
7:53 am
is about the language used by reporters. a lot of people are very concerned. is there too much hypothetical worry, rather than straight reporting of what the prime minister said? we did a piece that granted about 5.5 minutes for the main six and ten 0'clock news for the main programmes, and actually that's a very long piece for news at that point. we did that specifically because we wanted to give the people, the audience, the chance to hear the prime minister's case on what was a defining speech from the government. so i think we did give air time to that. but as i say, there is then the opportunity to say, well hang on a minute, we're trying to do the job for the audience, which is to raise questions they may have in their mind and answer questions that they may think — well, she didn't really explain that — and what does that mean, and why would we do that?
7:54 am
so it's very much ourjob as journalists to try to do that for the audience. it's part of what we're for. to try and get to the answers and try and give some clarity, where there is perhaps an uncoming from the government. it sounds from some of the viewers' complaints we are getting there, the bbc might say, look, we're dealing with where there are concerns, questions, in a sense you are looking for the drama but perhaps, the bbc news should slightly rethink the tone in which it covers these things and the assumptions made? certainly, i would agree that tone is absolutely vital and that's true of any story that we cover. and you know, we think carefully about this. i think we look at our scripts over again. we think about the words that we use. i'd be very careful if we were adopting a tone that was reflected one side or the other. i think, you know, the bbc continues to be committed to impartiality and that's true of the brexit debate as it is on any other subject.
7:55 am
is it as simple as the bbc more often leaving to caveat, more that we just don't know what a lot of this is going to mean? i think that's absolutely true and we do that. one of the things we've set up in the last couple of years is the bbc‘s reality check. which is there to try and get to the bottom of those unanswered questions and to try to provide the audience with some clarity and some facts and figures. actually, very often, the answer will come, well, there is this evidence and that evidence but in truth, we don't really know the outcome. do you think there might actually be more good news about brexit out there that could be reported? i think we should absolutely do that. we will try and make every effort as the negotiations go on to ask the question, is that a good thing, is that a bad thing. again, it's part of ourjob to present every side of that. i would agree that we will be
7:56 am
looking for that opportunity as much as highlighting any concerns or problems with it. katie serle, thank you very much. finally, newswatch is only one vehicle that audiences use to voice their objections, and occasionally compliments about bbc output. complaints can go through a more formal procedure, ending up with a finding by the bbc trust, that's what happened after this was broadcast in november 2015, following the terror attacks in paris. earlier today, i asked the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, if he were the resident here at number ten, whether or not he would be happy for british officers to pull the trigger in the event of a paris style attack. i'm not happy with a shoot to kill policy in general. i think that is quite dangerous and i think it can often be counterproductive. i think you have to have security
7:57 am
that prevents people firing off weapons where you can. there are various degrees of doing things, as we know. but the idea you end up with a war on the streets is not a good thing. butjeremy corbyn had in fact been responding there to a question from laura kuenssberg about whether he would be happy to order police or military to shoot to kill on britain's streets, and not specifically regarding a paris style attack in the uk. the bbc trust this week found that the report inaccurately represented the labour leader's views, breaching the bbc‘s impartiality and accuracy guidelines. but bbc news rejected that, saying: mr corbyn's remarks were not taken out of context, that he fully understood the nature of the questions asked, and were reported accurately and impartially. john blairfrom st andrew's objected to what he saw as insufficient coverage of the finding on the bbc itself, writing: incidents of this nature cause irreparable harm to the trust we public place in the professed impartiality of the bbc and attempted to cover up
7:58 am
in transgressions, makes for even greater distrust. and hugh moony had this response: it seems that the bbc is only worried about fake news it does not agree with. your own staff managed to keep theirjobs, even when they are caught lying to the nation. thank you for all your comments this week. you too can share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs tv and online, or even appear on the programme. please call us on: 0370 010 6676 or email: newswatch@bbc.co.uk and you can find us on twitter at @newswatchbbc, and do have a look at previous discussions on our website, bbc.co.uk/newswatch. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the first full day in office for the new president of the united sates, as donald trump pledges to fulfill his campaign promises he's already signed his first orders as president, including changes to barack 0bama's healthcare act,
7:59 am
which mr trump said he will repeal. we wa nt we want to make america great again, and we will. inauguration day ended with a series of balls, before the president and first lady returned to the white house to spend the first night in their new home. good morning. it's saturday the 21st of january. we'll look back on president trump's inauguration, and what's in store for his first few days in power. also ahead:
8:00 am

59 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on