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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 21, 2017 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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-- olly mann. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the first full day in office for the new president of the united sates, as donald trump pledges to fulfill his campaign promises he's already signed his first orders as president, including changes to barack obama's healthcare act, which mr trump said he will repeal. we want to make america great again, and we will. inauguration day ended with a series of balls, before the president and first lady returned to the white house to spend the first night in their new home. good morning. it's saturday the 21st of january. we'll look back on president trump's inauguration,
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and what's in store for his first few days in power. also ahead: four more survivors have been pulled out of the debris of an italian hotel, almost 72 hours after it was swamped by an avalanche. leaders of europe's right wing parties gather in germany to discuss their opposition to the european union. thousands of protestors are expected to demonstrate. in sport, a woman on a roll, and johanna konta is aiming to keep her winning run going by knocking out a former world johanna konta breezes into the fourth round of the australian open by knocking out a former world number one in straight sets. and in from the cold: i've been training with the british long—track speed skating team, whose sport has been revived in the netherlands. and nick has the weather. the weekend is getting off to a frosty start. patchy fog around too. most places will see the sunshine
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today, with a dry day ahead. all your weather in half an hour. good morning. first, our main story: president donald trump, has wasted no time in getting to work. shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge signed an executive order to begin dismantling ba rack obama's affordable care act, known as obamaca re. in his first speech as leader, mr trump promised to take power from the establishment in washington and give it back to the people. last night the president and first lady attended a number of traditional balls held to thank his supporters. our washington reporter, laura bicker, has more. and now, the president and first lady of the united states will take their first dance. # an now the end is near...#
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and never has a song been more appropriate for a president. donald trump got here by doing things very differently, a trait he shows no sign of losing as commander—in—chief. # i did it my way... #. should i keep the twitter going or not? keep it going? i think so. he beamed as he arrived at galas across washington, clasping the hand of his wife and first lady. inaugural balls are part of the choreography of this historic day. and mrtrump and mr trump invited supporters from across the country. well, we did it. we began this journey, and they said we, we, and me, we didn't have a chance, but we knew we were going to win. and we won. as he shuffled around the floor, word spread that he had already made his first executive move, an action that will help repeal obamacare, his
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predecessor's signature health care law. across the country, gatherings of a more hostile nature sprung up from coast—to—coast. in washington, more than 200 protesters were arrested after a small handful of anti—trump rallies turned violent. in chicago, hundreds peacefully voiced their concerns at donald trump's agenda, and in seattle, they marched through the streets. further demonstrations are planned over the weekend. but the new president will shrug off this criticism, just as he did during the campaign. surrounded by family and friends, he is taking a moment to enjoy this particular piece of pageantry before the real work begins. laura bicker, bbc news. reacting to president trump's inaugural speech
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to put america ‘first‘, the foreign secretary borisjohnson told the bbc he remains positive about the prospect of a new trade deal with the us. the new president has made it very clear that he wants to put britain obviously, that's extremely exciting and important. and he is very keen to get it done as fast as possible, and optimistic that it can be done soon. he said within a short period after the exit from the eu, and that's great, but it's got to work in the uk as well. every reason to be positive and optimistic. protest marches to demand women's rights will take place in more than 30 countries to mark donald trump's first day in office. this one in sydney, australia, is already underway and hundreds more are due to take place around the world, including in many uk cities. around 200,000 people are also expected to attend a march in the american capital.
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italian firefighters say four more survivors have been pulled out of the debris of the hotel swamped by an avalanche on wednesday. four children were among those pulled from the remains yesterday. attempts are continuing to rescue more sui’vivoi’s, but it's thought at least 15 people remain unaccounted for. andy moore reports. as darkness fell on the third night since the avalanche, a six—year—old girl was pulled from the rubble, cold but apparently well. soon after came another child, a boy, one of four children who have so far been rescued from the rubble of the hotel. they are said to have survived in a kitchen, protected by concrete walls that also silenced their cries for help. after these images were filmed, another four adults — two women and two men — were also rescued. the survivors found yesterday were flown to hospital in pescara.
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they were said to be cold and dehydrated, but otherwise in remarkably good condition. for some relatives who had endured a long wait for news, there was huge relief. translation: can't you see it from my face? doesn't my face show how happy i am? it's great, i can't describe it in words. i'd like to see him. for now, the boy is safe, and i hope his parents have managed to survive as well. but for other relatives, the anxious wait goes on. four bodies have been recovered so far. at least 15 people are missing. the italian rescue services say they will work night and day until everyone is accounted for. andy moore, bbc news. a hungarian coach has crashed in northern italy killing at least 16 people. the coach was on its way back from a mountain resort in france when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city of verona and caught fire. according to reports, the coach was carrying a large number of schoolchildren. the leaders of some of europe's
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right—wing populist parties will gather in the german city of koblenz today to discuss their shared opposition to the european union. the leader of the french national front, marine le pen, will be one those attending. 0ur berlin correspondentjenny hill is in koblenz for us this morning. this is certainly a controversial meeting, thousands of people protesting potentially outside of this. what are they trying to achieve inside the meeting? in essence, we are expecting the leaders to arrive any minute, but what they want to achieve is a public display of unity at the beginning of what is for some of them is an important electing the year. —— election year. marine le pen is making her bed to be france's
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next president. geert wilders is leading the polls in the netherlands. they will be joined by germany's right—wing anti—islam party, which is also polling well and is expected to take seats for the first time in the national parliament here in germany's general election in the autumn. it is controversial, as you say. some of these leaders have already threatened to pull their countries out of the eu should they succeed, and many of them share the same anti—islam fears and anti—immigrant rhetoric. there are expected to be large demonstrations here today, also because of the fact that the german mainstream press has been excluded from this meeting, lots of newspapers and television stations are ignoring this meeting, which is alarming notjust are ignoring this meeting, which is alarming not just the are ignoring this meeting, which is alarming notjust the establishment but much of the german public. the mexican drug lord
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joaquin guzman, also known as el chapo, appeared in a us court after a surprise extradition from mexico. guzman pleaded not guilty to charges that he headed the world's largest drug—trafficking organisation, the sinaloa cartel, in a criminal life spanning decades. he's accused of drug trafficking, kidnapping, murder and conspiracy. the brazilian football club chapter quincey bookplates first match tonight after its players were killed in an air crash. they will play against the current champions and the match will raise money for the victims‘ families. all the sport and weather coming up for you shortly. donald trump‘s furst ‘s speech
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included an important message to the world. let‘s listen. included an important message to the world. let's listen. we are issuing a new decree to be heard in every city, every foreign capital, and in every hole of power. from this day forward , every hole of power. from this day forward, a new version will govern oui’ forward, a new version will govern ourland. forward, a new version will govern our land. from this day forward, it is going to be only america first. america first. let's get the view of the former uk ambassador to the us, sir christopher maher. thank you for joining us. give us your thoughts on that theme, the america first theme. 0ne that theme, the america first theme. one thing that theme, the america first theme. 0ne thingi that theme, the america first theme. one thing i would say is, when has american foreign policy in the world not been about america first? what we really need to find out, and we won‘t know until trump‘s administration need bolts, is what he really means by that. i would suggest that on his paper of ——
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piece of paper, there are only two other markings — china and mexico. he thinks china have been cheating in world trade, and mexico because jobs have gone to mexico by virtue of the north american free trade agreement. what it will mean for other countries, for the united kingdom, all of this at the moment is unclear. looking at a couple of the other themes — on islamic terror, he said, i will eradicate com pletely terror, he said, i will eradicate completely islamic terrorism from the face of the earth. what do you make of those comments? that is a massively ambitious statement of intent which i would be happy to bet he will not achieve. personally, i would have preferred him to have talked about terrorism, notjust
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islamic terrorism, but that is the ambition he has set himself. i bet you, for years from now, he will not have achieved it. —— four years from now. he said he had to make simple rules: by american and higher american. —— by american products and higher american people. american. —— by american products and higheramerican people. —— purchase american products and employee american people. purchase american products and employee american peoplem purchase american products and employee american people. it is above all a reference to the departure ofjobs from the united states to mexico, because of the north american free trade agreement. as far as north american free trade agreement. as farasa north american free trade agreement. as far as a trade agreement with the writer king is concerned, we can
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a lwa ys writer king is concerned, we can always expect the americans to be very, very, very, and i emphasise this, tough negotiators. they will drive a hard bargain. but donald trump is the man of the deal. he advertises himself as a man who can make deals. it will be possible for the uk, for theresa may and donald trump to reach a good, mutually advantageous trade agreement, but i don‘t think it happen any time. there has been a suggestion that theresa may might go to america as early next week to meet donald trump, but certainly she hopes the goal there soon — what do you think her message to donald trump will be, and what will be the tone of that first meeting, do you think? the tone will be friendly, and it will be pretty frank as well, because we need to forget for a moment all this gaffe and wispy stuff about the
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special relationship. —— all this nonsense and wispy stuff. there are important things at stake in the uk -us important things at stake in the uk — us relationship, and the advantage in theresa may getting over to the us early is to put the british fix in on us early is to put the british fix inona us early is to put the british fix in on a whole series of issues that have come up in the presidential campaign — the future of nato, the future of relations with vladimir putin, the future of the nuclear agreement with iran, the supply of the advanced multirole fighter, the f 35, which donald trump has criticised, which is destined for the two new big aircraft carriers we will be putting into service soon. there is a whole range of staff, nuclear nonproliferation, global trade, on which theresa may will have very firm views and she will wa nt to have very firm views and she will want to register them with trump and
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his closest advisers. it is an important visit, but people should stop wittering on about the special relationship. this is about hard british interests being negotiated with the us. without wishing you to wear toronto much more, the special relationship —— without wishing you to twitter on after george w bush‘s inauguration in 2001 when the uk was the first european country whose prime minister met the new president, so there is a bit of a
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race on. there is an importance, a real national importance, for our prime minister to make her views very clearly known to the president before opinions inside the new us administration start to coagulate anyway, so she needs to get her fix in. i have no doubt that this relationship will work pretty well, because i think it is fair to say that trump is well disposed towards the united kingdom, rather likes brexit, doesn‘t like the eu, and he‘s upset lots of our european friends and partners by saying other people are going to follow the uk out of the eu. there is quite good, fertile ground on which theresa may will be able to conduct our talks with president trump. thank you very much for your time this morning. good to speak to you. some wise words. it is 18 minutes
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past nine. let‘s find out what is happening with the weather. thank you very much for this gorgeous view. some are as our waking up to sunshine and a hard frost. there will be a fair amount of sunshine on offer today, any fog gradually clearing. this area of cloud is expanding across parts of wales and the midlands. it is also cloudy in cornwall and devon, and that will feed along the south coast through the afternoon. some decent sunshine in between the two areas of cloud. northern ireland and scotland, much more sunshine then in recent days. some cloud into parts
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of eastern scotland. maybe a few lingering fog patches, even into the early pa rt lingering fog patches, even into the early part of the afternoon. their ebay a bit apache rain or drizzle developing across parts of northern england. it feeds towards north—east wales and into the midlands as well. it will be a cold start of the weekend. —— there may be a bit of patchy rain. wales in south—west england may see some showers. some patchy rain and drizzle in northern england and scotland. there may be some sleet and snow on the hills out of this weather. it is very light.
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12—mac showers here and there tomorrow. —— one or two. i pressure is in control next week. that‘s how it looks. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. professor cary cooper from the university of manchester is here to tell us what‘s caught his eye. you have had a look through some of the inside pages harass. the first thing ifound the inside pages harass. the first thing i found was the inside pages harass. the first thing ifound was in the daily mail.
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look at the 0bama inauguration event in 2009, and then look at the trump and how many people came in comparison. that is about the divisiveness and the nature of what has gone on, who trump has alienate it- has gone on, who trump has alienate it — the west coast, east coast, the a leaked and all that. —— the elite. could you just argue that those who are most vociferous in their support for donald trump just don‘t travel that much? yes, it's more what the americans call blue—collar workers. they wouldn‘t travel if they came from montana, nebraska, iowa, whatever. it says that even though he has got the grassroots going, they didn‘t actually turn up in big numbers. there is a change in media,
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in how people watch this. a lot of people might not have gone but would be watching it. the next one is... we have talked before about the political and policy things, but how can someone political and policy things, but how can someone like hillary clinton turn up and feel what she felt. she certainly demonstrated her disenchantment, her kind of attitude, visually. you can see the nonverbals of her and bill, and a bit from michelle 0bama as well. this picture, i think it epitomises it, to some extent. everybody was looking, won‘t they? the other one was the bit about melania. the minute i saw her dressed in that outfit, i remembered jackie kennedy wearing that thing. is it pastel
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blue? yes, it is slightly different fashion for the times, but it made me wonder about what kind of first lady she will be. jackie kennedy was not active. john kennedy was active, she was not at all until he died, then she became more active, strangely enough. so what is our role? she is not even moving into the white house. you picked this up from the times. i like this. this is a great guy — kissinger. henry kissinger said, and he was the secretary of state under nixon, i never really liked nixon. he told colleagues, he won‘t be around in a month. he got that wrong. i like that he then said, nixon was a very conceptual thinker and a student of world politics. trump is much more
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instinctual, and he beat 16 professional politicians to the nomination and pursued a strategy universally decried as hopeless, and he prevailed. a person who can do thatis he prevailed. a person who can do that is a leader of some significance. so don't dismissing? yes. then he goes on to say, him ally in himself with russia might be ally in himself with russia might be a good thing. —— aligning himself with russia. he is probably doing the right thing. we need to get close with russia, not in terms of election manipulation or anything, but politically, we need to get closer. he also is talking about what he is going to do in the first few days. he is an action man, isn't he? he has got executive orders when he? he has got executive orders when he doesn‘t have to go to congress,
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and he has already issued them. parts of the 0bamacare bill, things on climate change, where he is going retrograde. he is pulling money out so retrograde. he is pulling money out so that they can do roads, bridges, rail. that is what he is going to do, and he will getjobs for the rust belt by doing all of that. in a way, the us needs to do that. surely the processes that if you are a trump support around you want change, fantastic, he can do things from day one. if you‘re one of those who are worried, the thought of him being able to do things fast, and with the backing of the congress and senate, that will worry you. yellow that he will get lots of these domestic economic things through, for sure. when it comes to international things, even his own party will stop him in congress. ——
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he will get lots of these domestic economic things through. what would you doing yesterday? drinking a cup of tea ? you doing yesterday? drinking a cup of tea? i was observing. i am a psychologist. come on, charlie! i had a cup of tea, i am sitting there thinking, i wonder how clinton is going to react when he comes up and kisses her on the cheek? everyone is looking at everyone. everyone is doing the same. nice to see you. it is 26 minutes past nine. we are on bbc one until ten o‘clock this morning. when matt tebbutt takes over in the saturday kitchen. matt, what‘s on the menu for us? we have liz carr, from silent
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witness. let‘s talk about your idea of food heaven? crab claws. food hell? keen wire or anything healthy. fernando makes a welcome return. lots to look forward to. we will see you at ten. all this makes me hungry watching that. still to come: from david bowie
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to eltonjohn, he‘s recorded with many of the musical greats and is soon to be inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame. rick wakeman‘s here to tell us more about it before nine. stay with us. headlines coming up. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. now a summary stayt and steph mcgovern. now a summary of this morning‘s menus. —— main news. president donald trump has wasted no time in getting to work. shortly after his inauguration parade ended, the new man in charge signed an executive order to begin dismantling ba rack 0bama‘s affordable care act, known as 0bamaca re. and now the president and first lady of the united states will take their first dance. # and now the end is near... the president and first lady also attended a number of traditional balls held to celebrate the inauguration. they danced to my wayjust hours after thousands gathered to see him take the oath of office and hear his inaugural address. people that weren't so nice to me were saying that we did
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a really good job today. they hated to do it, but they did it, and i respect that. you're going to see things happen over the next few weeks — oh, you're going to be so happy. because there are very elegant people tonight, but there are also very political people, right? we want to see great things happen for our country. we want to make america great again, and we will. and we will. reacting to president trump‘s inaugural speech to put america "first", the foreign secretary borisjohnson told the bbc he remains positive about the prospect of a new trade deal with the us. the new president has made it clear that he wants to put britain at the front of the line for a new trade deal.
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0bviously, that is extremely exciting and important. and he‘s keen to get it done as fast as possible and is optimistic that it can be done soon, he‘s said within a short period after the exit from the eu, and that is great. it‘s got to work for the uk as well, but there is every reason to be positive. italian firefighters say four more survivors have been pulled out of the debris of the hotel swamped by an avalanche on wednesday. attempts are continuing to rescue one more known survivor, but at least 15 people remain unaccounted for. iamjoined by i am joined by a witness thereby. can you bring us up—to—date on how many have been rescued so far?|j
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can you bring us up—to—date on how many have been rescued so far? i am talking to you from an operation centre. the rescues are in progress at the hotel. the resort collapsed under the avalanche, as you reported. nine persons have been rescued alive in total. and there are four children. in addition, we can confirm that there are five persons alive — sorry. after more than 48 hours since the tragedy, we know that there are at least 135 responders who are working with specialist tools. they will carry on all day. it is impossible to know
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how many are inside the rubble. do not forget that the ruins of the hotel are covered by the snow and the temperature is very low. in the night, it is —16 degrees. since wednesday, the italian emergency teams have confirmed the number of dead. now the snow remains the real enemy, especially in the small villages. thank you for your time. that was alessandro marchetti, talking about the avalanche which happened at a hotel in italy, where nine people have been pulled out alive. at least one survivor is
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still in the rubble and four bodies have been found as well. that rescue operation is continuing. a hungarian coach has crashed in northern italy, killing at least 16 people. the coach was on its way back from a mountain resort in france when it hit a pylon at a motorway exit near the city of verona and caught fire. according to reports, the coach was carrying a large number of schoolchildren. the brazilian football club, chapecoense, will play its first match tonight after nearly all of its players were killed in a plane crash in columbia. the club has made 20 new signings since the disaster, which left 71 people dead. the friendly against current champions palmeiras will raise money for the victims‘ families. mike is here with the sport. it is going to be such a tough game for them. dan was talking about it as
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well and they will talk about it in football focus. the eyes of the world a re football focus. the eyes of the world are on them and the arms of the world are around them. unprecedented territory. they were a little—known club, an underdog. but they rose through the ranks and then this terrible tragedy happened. they have recruited 22 new players. three of the survivors will be there as well, watching. just the strangest and most emotional night ahead. the football doesn‘t really matter. i suppose they had to get back to it at some point. for the sake of everybody. let's talk about sport more generally. we have a picture behind us that is telling a great success story. johanna konta, britain‘s number one, made the semifinals last year. the way she‘s going, there is belief that she could go further this time. it will interesting if she gets through her next match. then it would be serena williams potentially in the quarterfinals. she has won eight matches in a row and 16 sets in a
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row, which is a real sign of someone‘s form. her latest match took herjust one hour and 15 minutes to sweep the high —— sweep aside a former world number one and reach the fourth round of the australian open. she‘s just beaten former world number one caroline wozniacki in straight sets in an hour and fifteen minutes. konta‘s been in fantastic form this year, winning a title in sydney in the build up to the big grand slam in melbourne, and wozniacki simply had no answer to britain‘s number one. wozniacki, who‘s seeded 17, only managed to win four games, as konta cruised to an eighth straight victory. she‘ll now play ekaterina makarova, in the fourth round. i‘m very happy with the level i was able to maintain throughout that much. from the get—go, i knew that she was not going to give it to me. caroline is the kind of player that will make her opponents really earn any point they win against her. i knew that, and ifelt i committed to the way i wanted to play sometimes going to work
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it was going to bring the opportunities. and i am happy that it did that today. liverpool and tottenham, will be looking to narrow the gap on top of the table chelsea, in the premier league today. they are seven points ahead at the moment. and there are seven matches today, with the leaders amongst those playing tomorrow. spurs are involved in the late kick off, they are away at manchester city — who you might remember got hammered 4 —0 at everton last weekend. liverpool are the early kick off at home to swansea city — who were also beaten 4—0 last weekend. they lost to arsenal, but the liverpool manager jurgen klopp says it‘ll still be tough. the interesting thing in the premier league, i don‘t know when it started, but only finals, since i don‘t know when, swansea are playing to stay in the league, we play for whatever. but each game, obviously, it is really intense. but we are
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really looking forward to this opportunity. in the fourth round of the scottish cup, what a day for bonnyrigg rose athletic, who will be trying to take down last year‘s winners hibs. and if you are wondering who they are, they are based just south of edinburgh, and they‘re the current champions of the east region super league! sean connery played for them in the 50s. we still don‘t know what position he played. possibly number sheven. that‘s one of the three o‘clock kick—offs. before that, last year‘s beaten finalist rangers take on motherwell. elsewhere, formartine united from the highland football league have a trip to top flight partick thistle. in rugby union, northampton suffered a fourth european champions cup defeat of the campaign, as they were beaten 26—17 at montpellier. saints already knew they couldn‘t progress, but the french side can go through in a best runner—up spot if other results go their way this weekend.
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leinster boosted their chances of securing a home quarter—final, with a thrilling 24—24 draw at castres. leinster came back from seven points down at half—time to earn two points. only a massive win for connacht away to toulouse tomorrow would deprive them of home advantage in the last eight. barry hawkins has denied world number one mark selby the chance to hold the world, uk and masters crowns at the same time — after beating him 6—3 in their masters semi—final. neither player was at his best in a nervy match at alexandra palace. but at 4—3, hawkins won two in a row, to book his place in the last four. he‘ll play joe perry, who eased past ding junhui by six frames to one. that match is later today. the other semi—final is between ronnie 0‘sullivan and marco fu. great britain started it in the 1870s and for decades, dominated the world of longtrack speed skating — outside on the frozen fens. but as the climate changed,
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the sport almost died out... until now. the frozen fens in eastern england, where once the world‘s top speed skaters would draw huge crowds. come on, eliza! but in the second half of the 20th century, scenes like this and indeed the ice itself were thin on the ground due to climate change, and by the ‘90s, british long track speed skating had all but gone. but three years ago, the british long track programme was reborn. here in the netherlands, the country that now dominates this sport. looking more like a stadium than an ice rink, the netherlands responded to the warmer winters by building 17 of these arenas with their 400—metre tracks. and for the brits who now come here, it‘s home from home. on a rink as big as this, there‘s enough space for the team
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to build their stamina and speed alongside the hundreds of leisure skaters who use this every day. it‘s been reborn in the netherlands mainly because we don‘t have a facility like this in the uk. it‘s an absolute tragedy to think where we were in the beginning of the development in the fens. we only have short track figure skating rinks, which are a maximum of 60 metres long in the uk. so you quickly run out of space. so, first steps with the british team. these are a bit more difficult than the skates you go on every christmas once a yearjust for leisure, because they are just 1.2 millimetres thick. that‘s all that‘s resting on the ice. that is why i look like bambi. get nice and low.
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i obviously needed a body suit, and to learn the moves, the british team practise at home when they can‘t get out here. there are all sorts of things you can practise. so you do this in the garage? at least a long track is a time trial, supposedly about pure speed rather than a race with the risk of others taking you down. and to help you on your way, the special boots are hinged to give you extra leverage. i feel like i‘m part of the wind. the first couple of steps, you need to be explosive and get that speed up. then you can accelerate and finish your stride. as ellia was keen to prove to me, out of the blocks, in my debut time trial against her. races can be 5,000, even 10,000 metres. but for me, 100 metres was like a marathon. and while ellia finished in 12 seconds, she had time to put the tea on before i came in at 46.76, albeit a personal best. the less said about my performance,
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the better. but the british have done well in short track speed skating. that is a race against others. you can have crashes and people can take you down. we are trying to recapture glory in the long track, which has a much bigger track and it is a time trial against the clock. it is the fastest time that wins. it is a long time since great britain had any representation in the olympics in that spot, but thanks to the netherlands, by 2022, watch this space. there have been more dramatic scenes in italy as firefighters have confirmed that four more people have been pulled alive from the debris of a hotel buried by an avalanche on wednesday. rescue workers managed to rescue nine people from the wreckage yesterday and crews are continuing to try and reach other known survivors. here to tell us how these rescue operations work is alistair read from mountain rescue england and wales. we were just speaking to a correspondent in italy a moment ago, establishing that as we speak, there is one person they know to be
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trapped. presumably, they have communicated, but they can‘t yet reach? i imagine they will be listening to whichever noises... hopefully, they will have established voice communication. it will be a challenge to make their way through the remains of the building, especially if there is a lot of snow inside the structure. so slow and steady work, but hopefully they have communication with that person. we have seen pictures of some of the children who were pulled out alive from what is left of the hotel. we heard a bit about the conditions, the wind and snow. what will they be doing to get them out? the first part would be to get as many people safe as they can. but to work in these conditions, you would need a range of different agencies to respond. there is mountain rescue, fire service, the police and ambulance. they are all working together to get people into that
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location, and work their way through the building to try and find voids, listen for other noises. they probably have search dogs as well in case they can pick up sent from people who are trapped. then there are people with tools for people to dig and break through any concrete structures or walls they may find as pa rt structures or walls they may find as part of the evacuation process. the shots from the air give you a sense of the quantity of snow lying on the hotel itself. we saw a moment ago that tunnel that is dropping down almost vertically down. how would they know where to put that tunnel in? normally, they will see if there is an easy in? normally, they will see if there is an easy access in? normally, they will see if there is an easy access point and try and dig snow at a location where they can go into the building. there were also put sensors out in the snow and listen for any noise. they will have white periods, so all the rescuers. work and listen. but every now and again, they will bigger and if they
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find a location where they can make an entry into the remains of the building, they will. and it is still an ongoing operation and has been for nearly 70 hours, so they will be tired. yeah, and we have seen already in the photographs in the aerial shots, there are 100 rescuers currently involved. it is going to be 2a hour working, so they will be rotating through people being flown in and flown out, people driving up with vehicles to take heavy equipment in. it is a major operation. thank you for coming in from mountain rescue england and wales. here‘s nick with a look at this morning‘s weather. it isa it is a sunny one. the cold in continental europe has been spreading across the uk to give a ha rd spreading across the uk to give a hard frost for many of us to start the day, but there has been a good deal of sunshine. there is cloud through north—east england which will push further towards the
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midlands into north—east wales. clad towards the south—west of england as well. that will bounce more along the south coast. you can see decent sunshine between these two cloud areas. you may see a few light showers and patchy rain or drizzle around the thicker cloud moving into yorkshire. more sunshine for northern ireland and scotland compared with recent days. but in the clear areas, there are still fog patches and they will take longer to clear. a dry weather through the day and sunny weather, but cloud will increase in two parts of northern ireland. more across the far south of england. this cloudy zone will eventually cover more of the midlands and northern england to produce light showers. it is cold enough to turn wintry over the tops of the pennines. into scotland overnight, as it starts to push its way further north, it is very light. a few showers are heading into
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south—west england and wales. with more cloud around tonight and the cloud tending to come and go, the frost will be more patchy compared with this morning. tomorrow morning, it will be a cold start with patchy frost and fog. but we will also keep an eye on this cloud, producing a few light showers. looks like the best of the sunshine will be across the midlands, the east anglia and south—east england. sunshine or cloud, it is not going to feel any warmer, mind you. it is a chilly weekend and it will be into the start of next week. millions of people around the world watched donald trump being sworn in as president. breakfast‘s john maguire joined one group of american students here in the uk for an inauguration party — to see what they thought of the occasion. every four years we gather on these steps... right across the united states and around the world, americans gathered to witness
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an event that so many had predicted couldn‘t and wouldn‘t happen. i, donald john trump, do solemnly swear... that i will faithfully execute... the office of president of the united states. these students, studying in london, are thousands of miles from home, yet witnessed every second of donald trump‘s inauguration as if they had a front row seat on capitol hill. in washington, the atmosphere was serious, momentous, even. so in london, we decided to lighten the mood. folks, we‘re going to play trump bingo, top trumps, whatever you want to call it. we‘re going to give you each one of these valuable and rare bbc breakfast cue cards.
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i want you to each choose four words, phrases and mannerisms. as the new president makes his speech, you have to mark each time it comes along, and whoever gets the most at the end will win a prize. or at least will win, how does that sound? we, along with the global audience, hung on every word and, luckily for one person, every hand gesture. we are transferring powerfrom washington, dc and giving it back to you. i did terribly. i only got three. three mentions of the word "strong"? 0k. igot 30. 29 ok gestures and one "beautiful". we will make america safe again and, yes, together we will make america great again. an inaugural speech should differ from campaign rhetoric and lacks the policy details of the state of the union address. so how did president trump fare? based on his crowd, i think it‘s something they would have liked, but for an inaugural address,
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i don‘t think he did a good job. it seemed like he was still in campaign mode, talking about the issues and why he is the one to fix them, but it seems like he already sold himself to the people and he won the election, now he should talk more about healing and more ambiguous overall themes about going forward. "we are going to make america great again" — he only said it once, but at the same time he spoke about healing the country, making compromises, that he will bring notjust the country, but the whole world together, and i thought that was paradoxical. so far, the man who hasjust become the 45th president has confounded history, politics, convention and, if he governs in the same vein, then, as the 40th president used to declare, you ain‘t seen nothing yet. there are so much analysis after a
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big event like that, looking at how people react and the words they use. let‘s have a look at this word cloud, because it gives us an indication of what the key themes we re indication of what the key themes were in president trump‘s speech. you could see that the word america was very you could see that the word america was very dominant. his big message was very dominant. his big message was about putting america first, giving it back to the forgotten people. the themes become very clear when you see them like that. the word world was only mentioned five times, but america or american were the main themes. that is just a snapshot of some of the language used as part of the trump inauguration speech. he‘s recorded with everyone from david bowie to black sabbath and elton john. but now keyboardist rick wakeman is to be inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame himself. and hejoins us now. you are
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and he joins us now. you are without your keyboard at the moment. but there is a story attached to this particular album which you are bringing out. it is linked to david bowie‘s death and a moment in time when you went to radio 2 to pay tribute. that is correct. david died almost a year to the day a couple of weeks ago. and because i did a lot of work with him in the 70s, like space 0ddity and other things, we we re space 0ddity and other things, we were really good friends. we were neighbours for a few years. and i was asked to do various press and things to talk about david, which wasn‘t difficult because it is a lwa ys wasn‘t difficult because it is always nice to talk about somebody who has passed away when you really admire them and they were such a great and clever person. simon mayo, who does the radio 2 drivetime show, i was down in london and he called me up and said, will you, on the programme about david? i said ok, so i went on the show and they had people calling in. it was very nicely done. it came to 6.50, and i
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said, i have got an idea. nicely done. it came to 6.50, and i said, i have gotan idea. in the studio next door was eltonjohn‘s piano, because he took it there yea rs piano, because he took it there years ago and somebody would take it back because it was too big. he said, when you play life on mars? i said, when you play life on mars? i said ok. so i am walking out of the door and he said, said ok. so i am walking out of the doorand he said, make said ok. so i am walking out of the door and he said, make sure you finish when the pips start, because then we get cut off. i said, how will i know when that is? he said, i will i know when that is? he said, i will hold a clock up for you. so there was a girl at the end of the piano holding the clock up. luckily, it wasn‘t difficult because i know how long it is. and it was a couple of days later when simon called me and said, there have been millions of hits on this. you should record it. so we recorded it for macmillan care. we can see a bit of that recording now. music: life on mars by david bowie.
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so you mentioned a moment ago, you we re so you mentioned a moment ago, you were originally working with david bowie in the early stages when he was devising those songs. he was great. he was very generous as well. he invited me to his house in the 19705 he invited me to his house in the 1970s and said, i want to play you some songs. he had this battered 12 string guitar and he played me the songs and life on mars came up and he said, think of this as a piano piece. he said, play it as a piano piece. he said, play it as a piano piece and we will work around you. and that is exactly what we did. he was very generous as a
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and that is exactly what we did. he was very generous as a musician. but when you have got such a great song of that, it is not difficult. sometimes when you were doing sessions for someone back them and the song was rubbish, you have to make something of it. but when you have great songs to work with, it‘s fantastic. coming back to the radio 2 show with simon mayo, is that what prompted the album? yeah. i got calls from various record companies and universal, who i deal with a lot. they have, you need to do a piano album. there are some on the other things you played on in the 70s —— so many other things. they said, it is time you put all of these onto an album. why have you never done it? said, no one has ever asked me. they said, well, we are asking you. so i went into a favourite studio near where i live, which has some beautiful concert grand pianos, and we spent five weeks in there doing these pieces. it wasn‘t a case of going in and
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editing bits together. i wanted every piece to be a performance. sometimes, we only got one a day. that is dedication. let‘s listen to space 0ddity. music: space 0ddity by david bowie. it is really interesting listening to that. it works so well done as a piano piece. one i was at the royal college, i had a wonderful orchestration professor who used to give me exercises of taking the music from one composer and doing it
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in the stars of others and doing variations. that is nothing new, composers have been doing it for yea rs. composers have been doing it for years. but the secret is to have a good melody. so i picked some classical pieces as well as modern pieces, the object being that hopefully, if somebody didn‘t know any of them, they hopefully wouldn‘t know if the tune was five years or 500 yea rs know if the tune was five years or 500 years old. you have had such a brilliant, long career. meaning i am old! in the nicest possible way! how much have you seen music change in that time? it is completely different. i was talking to people last night about it, and it has changed a lot. some things are for the better. in general, there are more opportunities for young musicians. instruments have become cheaper. it is much more accessible in many ways. the things we have lost a wonderful record shops and places to go, which were communal places to go, which were communal places where people talked about music. i would like to see those
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comeback. and i think they will, because vinyl is now outselling cds and downloads. i can see the shops coming back. iwould and downloads. i can see the shops coming back. i would love to see record shops selling vinyl, cds, doing downloads, so there is a place to get all your music. that would be great for young bands. it has been lovely seeing you. rick wakeman‘s new solo piano album piano portraits is out now. that‘s all from breakfast this morning. have a lovely weekend. this is bbc news. i‘m gavin esler. the headlines at ten: the first full day in office begins for the new president of the united sates, as donald trump signs orders to start dismantling the legacy of his predecessor. inauguration day ended with a series of balls, with the president pledging to fulfil his campaign promises. we want to make america great again, and we will. meanwhile protests are taking place around the world
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against his presidency in support of women‘s rights. four more survivors are pulled out of the ruins of an italian hotel, almost 72 hours after it was swamped by an avalanche. british tennis number one, johanna konta, storms into the last 16 of the australian open. and coming up in half an hour, jon kay speaks to people along america‘s route 45 about their hopes, fears and expectations for president trump.
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