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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 21, 2017 8:00pm-8:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm martine croxhall. the headlines at 8.00pm: organisers in washington say half a million people havejoined a protest led by women against the new trump administration. similar marches are taking place in the uk and across the world. the new us president is expected to meet theresa may in washington next week. ukip‘s candidate for the upcoming by—election in stoke—on—trent central will be the party's leader, paul nuttall. nine people have now been rescued from the italian hotel which was buried by an avalanche three days ago — 23 people are still missing. also in the next hour: wayne rooney overtakes sir bobby charlton. the striker becomes the all—time leading goal—scorer for manchester united, with his 250th goal for the team. and in half an hour here on bbc news, talking business examines the economic consequences
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of the trump presidency. good evening and welcome to bbc news. hundreds of thousands of people havejoined protest marches around the world, on this the first full day of donald trump's presidency. the demonstrations are to highlight women's and minority rights, which protesters say are under threat from the new administration. tens of thousands of people joined the rally in london and other cities across the uk, but the biggest event was in washington. from there, james cook reports. washington has a long history of public protest, but even judged by those standards, this march is massive. hundreds of thousands of women and many men as well poured into the capital to make their voices heard. i came from hawaii to be here today, and i'm here to represent all the people that cannot be here.
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i'm glad there is a lot of people who are willing to come and stand up for these things. i feel like it's important. it's not that we hate trump, but we hate what he stands for. bigotry and racism, we will not stand for that. it gives me hope for our future. it was a really dark day when the election results came in and seeing this gives me hope that we will move forward for the better. it is clear from the scale of this march that president trump faces an enormous and perhaps impossible challenge, convincing these women and many more like them around the country that he governs for all america. he will need more than a prayer to unite the nation. mr trump and vice president mike pence started their first full day in office at church with theirfamilies. # and more, much more than this...# but the new president shows no sign of compromising with his opponents as his choice of music at this inaugural ball hinted.
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# ..myway #. even as they danced, plans to repeal president obama's health—care plan were already underway. we want to see great things happen for our country. we want to make america a great again and we will. politicians around the world are now adjusting to the new era, britain's foreign secretary give his reaction in myanmar. the new president has made it very clear that he wants to put britain at the front of line for a new trade deal and that is extremely exciting and important. but germany's leader had what sounded like a coded warning for president trump. translation: i believe it is best if we work together based on rule of common values and joint actions on international trade and military alliances. there was less subtlety on the streets, these were the scenes in london at an anti—trump demonstration. they were reflected here in the kenyan capital, nairobi, in the australian city of sydney, and in many other places. the elevation of a controversial populist to the most powerful office
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in the west has shaken the entire world. one of the speakers at the march was the hollywood actress scarlettjohansson, who expressed her fears over the future of health care and women's services and clinics. i feel that in the face of this current political climate it is vital that we all make it our mission to get really really personal. so, yes, at 15 i had been to a gynaecologist. i was living in new york city and had visited a planned parenthood there. for the more than 2.5 million patients a year that rely
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on planned parenthood services for cancer and std screenings, birth control, safe abortion and pregnancy planning, these are uncertain and anxious times. lawmakers in 2a states have tried to block patients from receiving care at planned parenthood. congress has voted to limit access to reproductive services nine times. boo, yes — boo! there are very real and devastating consequences to limiting access to what should be considered basic health care. back to london now, and our correspondent sian greschick has been speaking to some of the marchers in trafalgar square in london. thousands of people marched from the us embassy in grosvenor square here to trafalgar square for a rally with a number of speakers from amnesty international to politicians to union members. many people in the crowd telling me how frustrated
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they are at the election of donald trump and their concern moving forward on the protection of women's rights. they wanted to urge the white house and the new administration there to protect women's rights. notjust that, lots of people in the crowd as well have come out to talk about women's rights in general, things like pay and gender equality. this is one of more than 60 marches going on across the world. sian in trafalgar square. actually 600 marches are taking place across the world. let's speak to one of the organisers of today's march, kimberly espinel. shejoins me on webcam from her home in south east london. thank you very much forjoining us this evening. what did you make of the turnout in london? we were overwhelmed, we started this as nine
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women with no political affiliation, no political experience. we are a grassroots movement and never expected this turnout. why did you wa nt to expected this turnout. why did you want to organise a march like this in london, thousands of miles away from the country where donald trump would be president? because it was not just about donald would be president? because it was notjust about donald trump. his election perhaps was the straw that broke the camel's back. 2016 was a very difficult year. we had brexit, jo cox's stabbing, so many difficult global occurrences, that we felt we wa nted global occurrences, that we felt we wanted to come together in solidarity and move forward in a positive way. so what is the message, then, over all that you we re message, then, over all that you were trying to send? obviously lots of different groups of people chose to turn up for their own reasons? very much so. i think we wanted to get people interested again in politics, involved in politics, from the grassroots, who wanted to send out the message that you can make a difference, get involved. but we
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also wanted to stand in solidarity together for across—the—board, religious groups coming together, different... just different cause is coming together to fight for unity, human rights, dignity and also safety. what difference will it make, though? he hasjust begun his presidency, he has at least four matters. what difference do you hope to make with one marked on one day? this is just the to make with one marked on one day? this isjust the beginning. we hope people will get active in their communities, take heart, that they will speak to their mps, and influence the way laws are set and the way that, you know, they are made. but what would you say, though, to people who voted for donald trump, and separately voted for brexit? the two particular issues you have highlighted, they are saying, look, we have registered oui’ are saying, look, we have registered our boat at the ballot box, we have exercised our democratic right, why
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should it be overturned just because you don't like it? no, not overturn it. we just want to run an open dialogue. we cannot function in a society where there is not quality, where we are voting out of fear. if there is fear and pain, let's come together and talk about it and move forward together in a positive way. what is it, though, that donald trump stands for that you feel is unacceptable in 2017 in the united states ? unacceptable in 2017 in the united states? because clearly for a lot of people, millions and millions of people, millions and millions of people, he spoke to them. he promised a change, he was in part, is in part, of the political establishment. well, he is part of the establishment. his politics serve himself and nobody else. he is not making politics for the people, so not making politics for the people, soi not making politics for the people, so i think we need to be very careful in terms of his rhetoric, because it is quite misleading. what we we re because it is quite misleading. what we were concerned about is the
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nominal hydration —— normalisation of very derogative comments about women, immigrants, because that is unacceptable and is not positive. kimberly espinel, one of the organisers of the march in london, thank you very much for speaking to us. the bbc understands that the prime minister theresa may is to fly to washington next week to meet the new us president. our political correspondent ian watson explains how officials have been working hard behind the scenes to make their first meeting happen. certainly there is going to be an early meeting soon after his inauguration. herjoint chiefs of staff are over there talking to his officials and senior people in his administration, his inner circle, to try to get a date sorted out. various dates have been discussed privately during the week. certainly the assumption was it was going to be this week or next week. there have been some reports from the white house on american television it was likely to be this week. it has certainly not been officially confirmed by downing street, but our understanding is it probably will be in the next week, so she would therefore become one of the first leaders
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since he was inaugurated to meet the president, which from her point of view would be obviously quite a coup politically, because she wants, as she was doing her speech last week, to present britain as a global nation as it leaves the eu, and before she triggers article 50 to leave the eu she would be there, face—to—face, trying to sort out a new type of relationship with the most powerful politician in the world. borisjohnson‘s been talking about the importance of trade deal for britain with the united states, but we are hearing somewhat isolationist nationalist talk from donald trump, so how easy will a trade deal with britain be? i think it won't necessarily be that difficult, but the question is would it be that beneficial? i think theresa may really has quite a difficult task. some people are suggesting in fact, and this even came up in the phone conversation she had with donald trump after he was elected, and perhaps they could forge a relationship like margaret thatcher and ronald reagan, but i think hearing his inauguration speech, i think he is a different type of republican politician from ronald reagan. as you were saying, some isolationist rhetoric. nevertheless we have also had other things very positive toward britain. in an interview with one of our own mps, michael gove, who interviewed him on behalf of the times, he suggested there could be an early trade deal with britain.
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the hard facts are there can be no to deal with britain until we have actually left the eu. those are the rules, but people are asking if they can scope out a deal. certainly american negotiators are very much up american negotiators are very much up to speed because they have been involved of course and trying to sort out a trade deal, u nsuccessfully, sort out a trade deal, unsuccessfully, with the european union. the question is whether a quick deal would be in britain's interests. but politically the mere fa ct we interests. but politically the mere fact we could be speaking about a trade deal with the world's biggest economy before we leave the eu would bolster theresa may's position, without a doubt, even if that deal cannot be signed until a couple of yea rs cannot be signed until a couple of years down the line. it was only a few days ago donald trump said brexit would be a great thing for
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the uk. yes, and there are a range of things from theresa may's point of things from theresa may's point of view she will also want to raise that he has said. as well as saying brexit will be good for the uk, he was also relatively neutral in that interview about the future of the eu itself, didn't seem too bothered if itself, didn't seem too bothered if it were to break up or if other countries were to leave. theresa may has been clear she wants good relations with the eu, what's the eu to be successful even though britain is leaving it, so she will be speaking to him about that, and she will also be speaking to him about natal. he has praised britain in recent days for our contribution to the alliance, but i think on the perceived threat from russia and also more generally, notjust about the british trigger, but she will be speaking about trade bolster —— she will also be speaking to him about nato. the singer madonna was also among the women taking part in the demonstration in washington against donald trump, and she said she was still struggling to believe that he
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the election. yes, i am angry. yes, lam the election. yes, i am angry. yes, i am outraged. yes, i the election. yes, i am angry. yes, lam outraged. yes, i have the election. yes, i am angry. yes, i am outraged. yes, i have thought an awful lot about blowing up the white house. but i know that this will not change anything. we cannot fall into despair. as the poet w h auden once wrote on the eve of world war ii, we must love one another or die. i choose love. argue me? say this with me —— are you with me? we choose love! choose love! we choose love!
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that was the singer madonna in washington. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30pm this evening in the papers. our guests joining me tonight are tony evans, sport columnist at the london evening standard, and anne ashworth, assistant editor at the times. it is quarter past eight. the headlines on bbc news: a day of protests is being held across america and around the world, against president trump's new administration. theresa may is expected to fly to washington next week to meet the new us president. ukip's leader, paul nuttall, will contest next month's by—election in stoke—on—trent central. the seat has been held by labour since its creation in 1950. sport now, and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's james. good evening. it wasn't necessarily the result
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that tottenham wanted as they try to close the gap on chelsea at the top of the premier league table, but they will consider the 2—2 draw at manchester city a point gained after they came back from two goals down. city had dominated the first hour of the match, but couldn't hold on for what would have been an important morale boosting victory. ben croucher reports. he is one of the best managers in the world but is pep guardiola good enough for manchester city? he has questioned that himself this week. after four defeats in the last eight league games, inform tottenham, stressful for the manager before kick—off. but city peppered the spurs goal with 11 first—half shots. despite the dominance, it did not change pep guardiola's mode. but this long ball for hugo lloris had it covered? this long ball for hugo lloris had it covered ? sane this long ball for hugo lloris had it covered? sane on hand to change the entire mood at the end had. another long ball, another error, another goal, kevin de bruyne this time. as soon as city had stopped
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celebrating dele alli had pushed totte n ha m celebrating dele alli had pushed tottenham back into the game, but as walker was pushing raheem sterling. penalty? pep guardiola seemed to think so but the referee did not, which made this all the more annoying. sung—joon men with his second shot on target, and second goal! then he thought he had won it with his second shot in a city shirt. just the one problem... two agonising seconds in the career of a football manager. city were good, but not good enough. we gave few chances, conceded few, but were not able to win the right positions at the right moment. always this again. you have to score goals. we created so you have to score goals. we created so many chances to score goals but we we re so many chances to score goals but we were not able. with the top teams like tottenham, so again... they should four times at everton, two times, to goal —— two goals. should four times at everton, two times, to goal -- two goals. that is
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all for now. back to you for some yea rs. all for now. back to you for some years. thank you very much. we are going straight back over to washington. well, virginia, the home of the cia headquarters, to be precise. donald trump is making a visit there, but first we will hear from the vice president, mike pence. let's listen in... i have gotten to know our new president. we have travelled a lot together. when the cameras are off and the lights are on, i will tell you two things. firstly, i have never met anyone more dedicated to the safety and security of the people of united states of america, or anyone who is a greater strategic thinker about how we accomplish that for this nation. in fact, to understand the life of our new
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president, his whole life was strategy. he built an extraordinary success in the private sector and i know he is going to make america safe again. applause lastly, and lastly, i can honestly tell you for all my years serving in the congress, as governor of my home state, travelling across the country and seeing the connection he has made, the men and women who serve and protect in every capacity in this country, i have never met anyone with a greater heart for those who every day in diverse ways protect the people of this nation through their character and our service and their sacrifice. so let me say, it is my high honour and distinct privilege to introduce to all view the president of the states. applause —— to all of you. thank you.
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well, i want to thank everybody. there are special people, and it is true, this is my first stop officially. we are not speaking about the balls or even the speeches, although they did treat me nicely on that speech yesterday. i always call them the dishonest media, but they treated me nicely. but i want to say that there is nobody that feels stronger about the intelligence community and the cia and donald trump. there is nobody. applause —— van donald trump. applause —— than donald trump.
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the wall behind me is very special. we've been touring for quite a while, and i will tell you... 29? i can't believe it. 28. we have to reduce it. we really appreciate what you have done in terms of showing us something very special, and your whole group, these are really special amazing people. very very few people could do the job you people do, and ijust want to let you know i am so behind you and i know maybe sometimes you have not got the backing you have wanted, and you are going to get so much backing. maybe you are going to say, please don't give us so much backing, mr president. please, we don't need that much backing. but you're going to have that. and i think everybody in this room knows it. you know, the military and the
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law enforcement generally speaking, but all of it, but the military gave us but all of it, but the military gave us tremendous percentages... we were unbelievably successful in the election with getting the vote of the military, and probably almost everybody in this room voted for me, but i will not ask you to raise your hands, but i would guarantee a big portion, because we are all in the same wavelength, folks, all on the same wavelength, folks, all on the same wavelength. he knows. it took ryan about 30 seconds to figure that one out, right? because we are on the same wavelength. we are going to do great things. we are going to do great things. we have been fighting these wars for longer than any wars we have ever fought. we have not used the real abilities that we
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have. we have been restrained. we have. we have been restrained. we have to get rid of isis, we have to get rid of isis. we have no choice. applause radical islamic terrorism, and i said yesterday. it has to be eradicated. just off the face of the earth. this is evil. this is evil. and you know i can understand the other side. we can all understand the other side. there can be wars between countries, there can be wars, you can understand what happened. this is something nobody can even understand. this is a level of evil we have not seen. and you're going to go to it and you are going to do going to go to it and you are going todoa going to go to it and you are going to do a phenomenaljob. but we are going to end it. it is time, it is time right now to end it. you have somebody coming on who is extraordinary. you know, for the different positions of secretary of
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this and that and all of these great possessions, five, six, seven, eight people, and we had a great transition. we had an amazing team of tale nt transition. we had an amazing team of talent and, by the way, general flynn is right over a year. put up your hand. what a good guy. applause and they don't care about ryan... this political guy who turned out to bea this political guy who turned out to be a superstar. we don't have to talk about him. but we did, we had such a tremendous success. so when i am interviewing all of these candidates, that his grip and all those are putting in front, it went very quickly, and in this case so quickly because i would see six
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seven, secretaries of agriculture —— reince and his team. but i met mike pompeo and that was the only guy i met. i didn't want to meet anybody else. i said cancel everybody else. he was approved, essentially, but they are doing little political games with me. he was one of the three. last night, as you know, general mattis and general kelly got approved. mike pompeo was supposed to be in that group. it was going to be the three of them. can you imagine those guys? people respect that military sense. all my political people, they are not doing so political people, they are not doing so well. the political people are not doing so well but you... we will get them all through, but some will
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ta ke get them all through, but some will take longer than others. but mike, i had literally... we had a group of nine different people. i must say i didn't mind cancelling eight appointments, not the worst thing in the world. but i met him and i said, he is so good. number one in his class at west point. i know a lot about west point. i am a person that very strongly believes in academics. every time i see i had an uncle who was a great professor at mit for 30 years who did a fantasticjob in so many different ways academically, he was an academic genius, they say, is donald trump and intellectual? trust me,| donald trump and intellectual? trust me, i might... a smart person. and i recognised immediately. he was numberone in recognised immediately. he was number one in westpoint, and he was also essentially number one at harvard law school, then he decided to go into the military and ryan for
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congress and everything he has done has been a home run. people like him, but more importantly to me everybody respects him. and when i told point rally —— paul ryan i wanted to do this, and i may say he may be the only person not totally thrilled, right, mike? because he said, i don't want to lose this guy, but you will be getting a total staff. you will be getting a total gem. this is a gem. applause and ijust... applause you will see. and many of you know him anyway. and you're going to see. and again we have some great people. but this one is something that is going to be very special. because this is one... if i had to name the most important, this would certainly be perhaps, you know, in certain ways you could see my most
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important. you do the job like everybody in this room is capable of doing. and the generals are working —— wonderful, and the fighting is wonderful, but if you give them the right direction the fighting becomes easier and, boy, do right direction the fighting becomes easierand, boy, do we right direction the fighting becomes easier and, boy, do we lose sulphuric lives and wind so quickly —— do we lose so fewer lives. i feel young. like i am 30,35, —— do we lose so fewer lives. i feel young. like i am 30, 35, 39. someone askedif young. like i am 30, 35, 39. someone asked if i was young and i said, i think i am young. laughter in the final month of that campaign, four stops, five stops, seven stops. speeches in front of 25,000, or 30,000 people. 19,000 people, stop to stop. i feel young. and 30,000 people. 19,000 people, stop to stop. ifeel young. and i 30,000 people. 19,000 people, stop to stop. i feel young. and i think we are all young. when i was young we are all young. when i was young we we re always we are all young. when i was young we were always winning things. in this country. we would win with
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trade, we would win with wars. at a certain age! trade, we would win with wars. at a certain age i remember hearing from one of my instructors, the united states has never lost a war. then after that it is like... we haven't won anything. we don't win any more. the old expression, to the victor belong the spoils. they always used to say, keep the oil. i was not a fan of iraq, did not want to go into iraq. but, itell you, when we fan of iraq, did not want to go into iraq. but, i tell you, when we were in we got out wrong. and i always said in addition to that... and i said in addition to that... and i said it for economic reasons but if you think about it, mike, if we had ke pt you think about it, mike, if we had kept the oil we probably would not have i says, because that is where they made their money in the first place, but, 0k, they made their money in the first place, but, ok, maybe you will have another chance. but the fact is we should have kept the oil. i believe this group is going to be one of the most important groups in this
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country towards making us safe, towards making us winners again, towards making us winners again, towards ending all of the problems. we have so many problems that are interrelated that we don't even think of, but interrelated, to the kind of havoc and fear that this sick group of people have caused. i can only say i am with you 1000%, and the reason you are my first up is that you know i have a running water with the media. they are among the most dishonest human beings on earth. applause they are. says sort of made it sound like i had a feud with the intelligence community. i want to let you

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