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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 22, 2017 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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theresa may will be the first world leader to meet president trump. his spokesman confirms they will meet on friday. a trade deal and brexit are expected to be on the agenda. as hundreds of thousands take to the streets in protest against the new president, the white house goes to war over reports of the numbers who attended friday's inauguration. we had a massive field of people. you saw them, packed. i get up this morning, i turn on one of the networks, and they show an empty field. good morning, it is sunday 22 january. also ahead: after reports that a trident missile test went wrong, the ministry of defence says it has absolute confidence in its nuclear defence system. a cancer charity calls for more to be done to encourage women to have smear tests. in sport: britain's andy murray is being made to fight hard in the last 16 of the australian open. the world number one lost the first set to germany's mischa zverev.
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also, is this the first public statue of jane austen? we report on why it proved to be such a challenge for the artist. and nick has the weather. good morning. it is another cold, frosty start. i see in a few spots as well because there are some showers around. that means those of us showers around. that means those of us today it will be cloudier than yesterday. for others, though, still some sparkling sunshine on offer. all the details coming up in the next half an hour. good morning. first, our main story: theresa may will become the first foreign leader to meet the new us president in washington. they are due to have talks on friday. the announcement was made during donald trump's first day in office, which also saw a series of protests against his administration and an onslaught against the media for "inaccurate" reporting. our us correspondent david willis has more. donald trump has got to go! in the
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nation's capital, they have rarely seen a rally quite like this. not since the vietnam war have so many people come together in defence of women's rights and minority rights, liberties these people believe could be imperilled by the presidency of donald trump. the man himself was visiting the headquarters of the cia, while that rally was under way. less concerned about secrets, it appeared, then crowd sizes, in particular reports of the attendants at his inauguration the previous day. i made a speech. i looked out, the field was... it looked like a million, a million people. they showed a field where there was practically nobody standing there. that theme was echoed in an unscheduled news conference a short while later, before confirming that
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britain's theresa may would be the first foreign leader to visit resident trump, the new white house press works in railed against reports that mr trump had failed to attract as large crowd to his inauguration as barack obama. this was the largest audience to ever witnessed an inauguration, period. these attempts to lessen the inauguration doormat enthusiasm of the inauguration are shameful and wrong. official estimates of crowd sizes are not released, but aerial photographs appear to contradict the trump administration's assessment. nonetheless, mr spicer, in his first reading at the white house, went on theissue reading at the white house, went on the issue a thinly veiled threat to reporters covering the trump presidency. were going to hold the press accou nta ble presidency. were going to hold the press accountable as well. he will ta ke press accountable as well. he will take his message directly to the american people, where his focus will always be. size clearly matters greatly to donald trump, and regardless of the inauguration crowds, the crowd at yesterday's protest was so large that a march on
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the white house proved impossible because there were so many people present. it is a question which will ultimately prove the most unpalatable to the new administration, the messenger or the message. our political correspondent susana mendonca is in our central london newsroom for us. susana, what more do we know about the prime minister's visit? quite a coup for downing street. we understand that they are going to be focusing on trade and the eu. a whole brexit issue. in terms of trade, they wouldn't be in a position to do a trade deal at this stage, because britain is to leave the european union before it can actually do trade deals, but for theresa may this is an opportunity to put out that message, really, at the eu, ahead of those eu negotiations, that she has a close relationship, that special relationship, that special relationship, with the united states. of course, if you look back at the previous president, barack obama, he said that britain would be at the back of the queue in any
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trade deals with the us. so certainly this is a coup for theresa may, the fact that she has managed to, it seems, will be one of the first leaders to meet with the new president, donald trump, after his inauguration. of course, it was embarrassing for her back in november when we saw nigel farage, the former ukip leader, being the first politician, the first british politician, to meet donald trump. so this certainly has turned that around for her and her administration here will certainly be very happy that they are getting this opportunity to meet donald trump. in around half an hour's time, we will speak to protestors who attended one of yesterday's anti—trump demonstrations. the ministry of defence has insisted it has full confidence in the trident nuclear defence system, despite reports that a rare test—firing went wrong last year. the sunday times says a missile fired from a submarine in the atlantic ocean veered off course and in the direction of the united states. the rocket was not armed. andy moore reports. this is what the launch of a trident
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missile looks like. it is an expensive business. even an unarmed missile costs around £70 million, so it doesn't happen very often. no video has been released of last yea r‘s video has been released of last year's launch, video has been released of last yea r‘s launch, because, video has been released of last year's launch, because, says the sunday times, it went badly wrong. according to the paper, the ship was stationed about 200 miles off the coast of florida. it was due to fire the missile 5600 miles to a location off the west coast of africa. instead the rocket veered off target, heading towards the us. all this was just a few weeks before a crucial vote in parliament to spend £40 billion on building a new generation of trident submarines. 0ne labour former defence minister is now calling for an enquiry. the government hasn't denied that the missile from hms vengeance may have
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veered off course, but it said the capability and effectiveness of the trident missile was unquestionable. in thea trident missile was unquestionable. in the a statement, the spokesman added... the government and the prime minister are now expect to face further questions about what exactly did happen with the trident launch last year. long delays in assessing the needs of patients are fuelling a bed—blocking crisis in hospitals, according to the watchdog healthwatch england. research seen by the bbc‘s 5 live investigates programme suggests many social care assessments are failing to happen in the recommend time of six weeks. the department of health has said it is investing £900 million of additionalfunding into the system over two years. the former president of the gambia, yahya jammeh, has flown into exile, 22 years after taking control of the west african state in a coup.
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he sparked a political crisis when he refused to accept the outcome of the country's election, but finally agreed to hand over power to the winner, adama barrow, after the leaders of neighbouring countries threatened military action. french voters will begin the process of choosing a presidential candidate for the ruling socialist party today. the current president, francois hollande, announced last month that he won't be standing for re—election. 0ur correspondent hugh schofield is in paris. how does this fit into the way the french presidential election is shaping up? well, it means that in this socialist party primary, that the sort of government candidate, if you like, the person who is going to be defending the record of the last few yea rs, defending the record of the last few years, is not going to be the president but is going to be the prime minister, or the former prime
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minister, who stood down in order to do this, a few weeks ago. so we have him representing the kind of continuity, and broadly the right wing of the socialist party, up against other characters. people much more aligned with the left wing of the socialist party, and in this first round what we should see is a right—winger, probably manuel valls, and a left—winger emerging and there will probably be a run—off between those two in a week's time. one has to say that the whole of the socialist party primary, which would normally be an extremely important event because it might well designate the left—wing contender in the presidential election, a good, 50- 50 the presidential election, a good, 50— 50 chance of winning, it has been thrown into total disarray by the unpopularity of the socialist party, and the other figures on the left, including the whiz kid of the government, the liberal, these are characters who have a greater chance of representing the left in the
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upcoming election. it will be interesting to watch. thank you very much indeed. the number of women being tested for cervical cancer is at a nine—year low, as women delay or avoid check—ups, according to one charity. jo's cervical cancer trust found embarrassment and worries about pain were putting many people off. 0ur health reporter smitha mundasad has more details. a smear of lipstick to encourage women not to ignore their smear test. they are offered to women aged 25 to 64, to help prevent cervical cancer. last year's campaign drew celebrity support. from the model car at the levine to reality star lauren pope. and the charity behind it says this year their message has never been more important. at the moment, in england, for example, the number of women who attend cervical screening is at a 19 year low. that is hugely concerning because if it carries on we is hugely concerning because if it carries on we are is hugely concerning because if it carries on we are going to see more women diagnosed, we are sadly going
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to see more women passing away, and we just to see more women passing away, and wejust don't to see more women passing away, and we just don't want that to happen. the charity's latest survey suggests half of women aged 25 to 29 have put off getting a smear test. the reasons, more than a quarter said they were too embarrassed. a similar number said they were worried about pain. and almost one in ten said they had never had the test at all. nhs england says it is particular worried about the fall in young women getting smears in the last few yea rs, women getting smears in the last few years, because that has been linked toa years, because that has been linked to a rise in women under 35 getting cervical cancer. it says it is working on projects to encourage more young women to take up the tests. the time new cars are allowed on britain's roads before requiring an mot could rise from three to four years, under government proposals. the period before the annual safety check is needed could change in 2018, after a public consultation. the department for transport said safer technology and improved manufacturing means new vehicles stay roadworthy for longer. the move would bring britain into line with northern ireland and many other european countries.
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it sounds like the plot to a classic american road—trip movie. five young adventurers make a perilous coast—to—coastjourney, to build a new life in the west. well, now it has happened in real life, to a group of baby raccoons. they were born in a truck in florida, which was driven to california. the driver only discovered his stowaways four days later. you will be pleased to know the creatures are now being cared for at a local zoo, until a new, more permanent home is found. they are unbelievably sweet creatures, really friendly as well. let's have a quick runs through some of the front pages of the sunday newspapers. we will start with the sunday times, unsurprisingly donald trump is on the front page of most of the papers today. the rallies here, the demonstrations, a picture of resident trump and his wife at the top and the story about the
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trident missile misfire, which is there on the front page of the sunday times. the british prime minister, theresa may, likely to go and meet donald trump next week on friday. the sunday telegraph is talking about a new deal full britain which will be top of the agenda. the possibility post brexit forming a trade association with the united states. the stories regarding the new american president, both the protests a nd the new american president, both the protests and the —— theresa may's visit. cut out your sexist insults, mr president. curious to know how this will work. theresa may is a p pa re ntly this will work. theresa may is apparently going to challenge or somehow raise president putin's attitude to women and comments he has raised previously when she met him. i wonder how all in what context him. i wonder how all in what co ntext s he him. i wonder how all in what context she will do that. yes, president trump. his comments have
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made headlines. he now currently calls theresa may my maggie, harking back of course the ronald reagan, anotherformer back of course the ronald reagan, another former republican president, and his relationship with margaret thatcher all those years ago. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: theresa may will be the first foreign leader to meet donald trump since he was sworn in as us president. meanwhile, mr trump has accused the media of lying about the size of the crowds at his inauguration, as more than a million peoplejoined protests against the new president in cities around the world. also coming up in the programme: with pride, and some prejudice, many towns and cities have tried to claim jane austen as their own. but, as plans for the first statue of the author are revealed, we will find out why basingstoke appears to have the ultimate powers of persuasion. a pretty cold start in many places this morning. scraping the highs off
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the windscreen. your picture confirms the point. —— ice. the windscreen. your picture confirms the point. -- ice. good morning. if you wanted to know how cold air is outside, especially if you are still stuck under the blanket, the lowest temperatures in rural south—east england and east anglia at the moment. well below freezing. some places in highland scotla nd freezing. some places in highland scotland below freezing. belfast, edinburgh, as well. a bit more cloud around for some of us compared with yesterday morning. even some precipitation. i say that because it is in the form of rain, sleet, and even snow. brush and northern ireland to begin the day. it is clipping the west midlands as well. not amounting to much. it could turn things icy in a few spots. not too many fog patches around. where we
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have the clearest skies in south—east england and east anglia todayis south—east england and east anglia today is where we will see sparkling sunshine. absolutely gorgeous in the afternoon. some brighter breaks. some sunshine into northern ireland. the northern part of south—west england, wales, northern england, and especially scotland, cloudy at times. the potential for and especially scotland, cloudy at times. the potentialfor some light showers. a few flurries in scotland. a call today but not as cold as in wales and south—west england. the frost co m es wales and south—west england. the frost comes back. one or two showers. some fog patches developing. we are concerned about the extent and density of the fog in england and wales. by no means will eve ryo ne england and wales. by no means will everyone get that. there will be dense and freezing fog patches to start the day tomorrow in parts of england and wales. and potentially on tuesday morning as well. there is a risk of some disruption from that. please check things before heading out in the morning. those areas
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tomorrow in england and wales start with some of the biggest fog and may see it linger even into the afternoon. that will make things very cold. variable cloud and sunny spells elsewhere. mainly dry, though. single figures. the emphasis is on cold weather as the week begin. england and wales, and for scotla nd begin. england and wales, and for scotland and northern ireland, the breeze will pick up. 0utbreaks scotland and northern ireland, the breeze will pick up. outbreaks of rain later in the week as things start to change and we lose high—pressure and low pressure begins to come in. that is how it is looking at the moment. very atmospheric. thank you very much indeed. we will be back with a summary of the news at half past six. now it is time for the film review. hello, and welcome to
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the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases, as ever, mark kermode is with me, and what will you be telling us about this week, mark? very interesting week. we have jackie, in which natalie portman plays the first lady. we have split, a psychological thrillerfrom m night shyamalan. and lion, the true story of a little boy lost. well, jackie, how timely? yes, extraordinary, isn't it. so this is directed by chilean film—maker pablo larrain, and it's the story of the assassination and aftermath ofjohn f kennedy, as seen through the eyes of jackie kennedy, played, as everyone will know, by natalie portman. there's been an awful lot of interest in her performance, lots and lots of nominations, and the film plays out like a kaleidoscope. it's essentiallyjuggling a series of different time frames that are all meant to be representing her fragmented state of mind,
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so we have the motorcade in dallas, the aftermath in washington, we have the funeral, the huge sort of funeral arrangements, and we also have a wrap round which is jackie kennedy being interviewed by a journalist who, in the film is unnamed, but it's obviously inspired by the life magazine interview. at the very beginning of the interview she says to him, "just remember i'm editing this conversation." and he says, "ok, it's going to be your version of events." here's a clip. you'll have to share something personal eventually. people won't stop asking until you do. and if i don't, they'll interpret my silence however they want? "her brow furrows, her lips are drawn. she holds back her tears but she can't hide her anger." most writers want to be famous. you want to be famous? no, i'm fine as i am, thank you. you should prepare yourself. this article will bring you a great deal of attention. in that case, any advice for me? yes. don't marry the president. are you afraid i'm about to cry again? no, i'd say you're more likely to scream?
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scream what? "my husband was a great man." and interesting, because people might think we know everything there is to know about that story, is there anything new in this, does it resonate? what it does is, it attempts to portray her, firstly as somebody going through an horrendous personal crisis, and we do have the assassination, and it is shocking, as it should be. but also somebody who, in the period immediately afterwards, is constructing the legacy, is basically building the camelot story, which then became the story everybody told aboutjfk. jackie is portrayed very much as first lady of the televisual age, somebody who is a master of the printed word and also the moving image. some of the things — you may have noticed from that clip her performance is very arch, very stagey, very mannered, and when i first saw the film i actually found that alienating. it was only later on, and i have seen it twice now, i realised what it is alienated. she is alienated
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from her surroundings. because the film has this kaleidescopic and necessarily fragmentary structure, it is possible that it may not gel, that it may not engage you emotionally. the key to it doing the emotional engagement is mica levi's score, which is absolutely brilliant, and it's one of those films in which the music is the thing that pulls it all together. pulls all these different fragments, shards, elements together, and involves you in the story emotionally. i think natalie portman's performance is very peculiar, very strange, but it's because she is performing a performance. she is playing somebody on a stage, also somebody in the eye of a storm. the music for me is what made it, you know, cohere, what made it gel, what made it into something other than just a kind of arch and slightly abstract exercise in revisiting history. well, we will find out next week whether she has been nominated for an oscar, of course. let's talk about split. james mcavoy, great british actor back on the screen. yes, so this is a new film
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from m night shyamalan, who i think is still best known for the sixth sense, and had a run of critically acclaimed films and then made some real stinkers, and kind of came back recently with a sort of stripped down found footage movie. this is, i think it's an interesting story. james mcavoy plays somebody who has 23 separate personalities. at the beginning of film we see him kidnapping some young women, one of them is played by anya taylor—joy, who was so brilliant in the witch, who realises pretty early on the key to her survival is going to be negotiating with different personalities that seem to be existing within this one warring character. now, mcavoy has real fun with the role. he really enjoys it. 0n the one hand, he is playing someone who is a fashion designer, another is a young child with a lisp, and there's a veyr prim, proper woman called patricia, and all these controlling elements, and they keep talking about the beast, the beast, this thing called the beast, which may or may not surface. shyamalan, i think, is not the —
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is not quite the master of the genre that he once looked like being. sometimes the screenplay is very clunky, some of the direction is a little bit creaky and the story is preposterous, but in a way which is — but if you saw it as like an old fashioned b—movie, when you kind of think, ok, it's one of those films, it kind of functions 0k, but it is held shoulder high by mcavoy‘s performance, and also by the fact that if you accept that the set up is fairly preposterous, and what you're going to get shouldn't be taken too seriously, there are certain joys about it. it is much better than the films he was making a few years ago, when he really did seem to be somebody, who, having started with, you know, brilliant work like sixth sense, had then just gone completely out of control, and was making nonsensical science fiction movies. and described as horrorfilm when i've read about it. is that accurate? it's a psychological thriller with some horror elements, yes. that's probably the best way...
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i think he would like to describe it as a mystery. i would describe it as a clunky b—movie, raised shoulder high by the central performance, which of course is several central performances in one. lion, based on a true story. an extraordinary true story. this whole thing about truth is stranger than fiction. the story of a young boy in the mid 80s, from kandahar, who got onto a train on which he was trapped, which then travelled 1600 kilometres, and by the time he got off it he was away from home, couldn't speak the language, didn't know how to describe how to get himself back home, and ended up in the hands of the authorities and ended up being adopted by a couple in tasmania. decades later, the taste of an indian sweet food suddenly sends him into a reverie, which takes him back to his childhood and he suddenly becomes obsessed with trying to find the life that he lost, and had almost forgotten about. here's a clip.
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saroo! you need to face reality. what do you mean, reality? do you have any idea what it's like knowing my real brother and mother spend every day of their lives looking for me? how every day my real brother screams my name? can you imagine the pain they must be in, not knowing where i am? 25 years, luce. 25! why didn't you tell me that was happening for you? we swan about in our privileged lives. it makes me sick. i have to find home. they need to know i'm 0k. i mean, he's a hugely likeable actor, dev patel. he is absolutely brilliant in this, and also the film itself does a very good job of not becoming what you think it might be, which is the film in which somebody looks something up on google earth. it's a film which has real emotional resonance. the opening scenes with the young boy, the five—year—old boy getting
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lost in the train station has a spielbergy element to it. the young kid with the enormous machinery of these train stations. it's heartbreaking stuff. it doesn't descend into melodrama. nicole kidman as saroo's his adoptive mother does a very, very good job of an understated performance, which manages to show two things. firstly anguish, but she also manages to demonstrate love, which is a really hard thing to act on screen, and i think she does it brilliantly. i have seen this twice now, both times i confess i have been reduced to floods of tears by it. i think you would have to be pretty hard hearted not to. it is a really, really moving story, and it is told in a way which is populist and accessible, but also, i think, profoundly touching, and even second time around, even when i knew, because the first time round i didn't know anything about the story, i saw it completely cold. even second time round when i did, i found it a very overwhelming experience.
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definitely one to see then. best out — i have a feeling i know what you might pick? it's la la land. the biggest problem la la land has is, everyone says la la land is brilliant, so now there is almost a backlash, people saying "0h, surely it can't be as good as that." it is, i'm sorry, it is. it's a modern musical that owes a debt to the umbrellas of cherbourg and singin' in the rain, but also to casablanca and new york, new york. and the big crowd scenes, the big numbers are quite something. and i've heard some people say "oh, there's not a memorable tune in it." there's lots! of course there are. i could be singing that soundtrack endlessly since seeing the film. i thought it was really charming. i thnk damien chazelle has done an absolutely brilliant job. i would recommend anybody saw it. it's bitter—sweet. it does have a strong poignant thread of sadness, which is what makes the joyful element morejoyful. i loved it. i absolutely loved it. your thoughts about dvd. i don't know this one, i confess. so kubo and the two strings is an animated film, stop motion animation film, and, i mean, i'm a huge animation fan,
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not least because it's such a diverse genre. what i loved about this is the animation itself is breathtaking, you canjust watch it over and over again, which is why it's lovely to have it for home viewing. it's a lovely complicated multi—layered story, which is told through words, actions, but also through music, and it's one of those films i think genuinely audiences of all ages can watch, and a film which treats its audience with respect. it imagines that its audience is smart enough to keep up with the story, is emotionally engaged enough to understand the deeper themes of the story, and are also willing for the story to play out in its own time. i thought it was dazzling. i thought it was wonderful, and several nominations. i think it's a film which really deserves repeat viewing. i can imagine, i have the blu—ray of this, i can imagine going back to it time and time again, and every time you see it seeing something you missed the first time. well, that is a recommendation. mark, great to see you, as ever, thank you very much. just a reminder, you can find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online, including you can see
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all these previous shows. that's at bbc.co.uk/markkermode. also, of course, it is award season. we were talking about natalie portman, find out who has been nominated for the oscars on our special programme coming on tuesday, 1:15pm lunchtime, on the bbc news channel. join me and the film critic jason solomons for all of that. that's the oscar nominations 2017. that's it for this week, though, thanks for watching. bye. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and roger johnson. coming up before 7:00am, nick will have the weather. but first, at 6:30am, a summary of this morning's main news. the prime minster is due to become the first foreign leader to hold talks with the new us president. theresa may will meet donald trump in washington on friday. trade, security and the future of the european union are all expected to be high on the agenda. millions of people around the world
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have taken part in protests against president trump's new administration. the demonstrations during his first full day in office had originally been planned to highlight women's rights. the crowd at the washington event surpassed the numbers who turned out to watch friday's inauguration. the ministry of defence has insisted it has full confidence in the trident nuclear defence system, despite reports that a rare test—firing went wrong last year. the sunday times says a missile fired from a submarine in the atlantic ocean veered off—course, and in the direction of the united states. the rocket was not armed. long delays in assessing the needs of patients are fuelling a bed—blocking crisis in hospitals, according to the watchdog healthwatch england. research seen by the bbc‘s 5 live investigates programme suggests many social care assessments are failing to happen in the recommended time of six weeks. 0ur reporter emma forde has more.
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nhs england says at the end of november last year nearly 7000 hospital beds were occupied by patients who should have been discharged. it says one in three remained in hospital because of delays in assessment and care package is not being in place. healthwatch england has investigated how widespread delays in social care assessments are, both in the community and in hospitals. the longest reported delay in the community was nearly two years. it said that data from local authorities on waiting times for assessments was incredibly patchy. not only that, it also found assessment reviews which according to the care act should be done every 12 months to assess changing needs simply aren't being done. the department of health said it was investing £900 million of additional funding into adult social care over the next two years, and will continued to challenge local authorities that fail to carry out
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timely assessments. the former president of the gambia, yahya jammeh, has flown into exile, 22 years after taking control of the west african state in a coup. he sparked a political crisis when he refused to accept the outcome of the country's election, but finally agreed to hand over power to the winner, adama barrow, after the leaders of neighbouring countries threatened military action. a charity says many local authorities and clinical commissioning groups in england are doing too little to encourage women to have smear tests. jo's cervical cancer trust says that, over the past five years, there has been a 3% drop in the number of women having the checks. the time new cars are allowed on britain's roads before they need an mot could go up from three to four years, under government proposals. the department for transport said safer technology and improved manufacturing means new vehicles stay roadworthy for longer. the change, which could come in from 2018, would bring britain in line with northern ireland and many other european countries. and richard is here with the sport.
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lots of live sport to keep an eye on as well, the tennis this morning. yes, a great chance for andy murray to win his first australian open, novak djokovic is out. but it is not going his way at the moment, he is losing 2—1 against the german zverev who is ranked world number 50. so andy murray certainly hasn't had it all his own way at the australian 0pen. he was in a good position in that opening set, but ended up losing it 7—5. the world number one bounced back in the second. it was another battle, though. he eventually won it 7—5. zverev has just taken the third set 6-2 zverev has just taken the third set 6—2 as well. it is a fascinating contest, with murray really being challenged by zverev‘s serve—and—volley tactics. britain's dan evans is also in action in melbourne. it is the first time he has made it
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to the fourth round of a grand slam. he is facing the 12th seed, jo—wilfried tsonga, and in the opening set it is going with serve. 5-5. 5—5. good luck to dan. wayne rooney has become manchester united's all—time leading goal—scorer. yesterday he hit his 250th goal for the club, an equaliser against stoke city, to surpass sir bobby charlton's record. patrick gearey has been looking back at his manchester united career. wayne rooney, with the ball at his feet. it is a sensational goal! wayne rooney, recordbreaker. that is number 250. wayne rooney, master of timing, master of placement. the goal was a point and yet were far more than that. in the grand scheme of things it is a huge honourfor me, and something i never expected when ijoined the club. i'm delighted, and really proud. rooney arrived at old trafford in 2004. £27
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million worth of teenage potential. he paid the first instalment rack with a hat—trick on his debut and was united's top scorer in his first season. the passion that fuelled rooney sometimes ignited in those early years but he became united's effervescent centre. that is absolutely fantastic! capable of turning any game upside down. he was pa rt turning any game upside down. he was part of a side which won five premier league, a champions league, and the fa cup, and yet twice he wa nted and the fa cup, and yet twice he wanted to leave. some questioned whether he really led red. he has followed in past united royalty. sir bobby charlton admitted today he was disappointed to lose his record but was delighted for the man he has handed it on to. comparison between the man is tricky. sir bobby charlton's goals came at a slower rate at a longer period of time, but he was a midfielder, really is a forward. charlton's goals a recent in the imagination. he survived the munich air crash and led the club's
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recovery. rooney may never received such rocksolid legendary status, but in terms of facts, in terms of goals, no one at manchester united is above wayne rooney. premier league leaders chelsea will be happy with the results in the premier league yesterday. the teams chasing them gained little ground. liverpool suffered a shock defeat to swansea city, and manchester city and tottenham hotspur drew. ben croucher wraps up the day's action. saturday wasn't a good day to manage a top six side, if you played, that is. along with manchester united, the other three in action couldn't muster a win between them. liverpool are yet to win in the league in 2017, struggling swansea had never won in the league at anfield, but llore nte won in the league at anfield, but llorente put them ahead. liverpool couldn't hang on. it is going to come to sigurdsson, swansea back in front! and holding on for a 3-2 win, clements' first as swansea manager.
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the liverpool slipup presented manchester city and told them the chance to move clear of them. city looked on course when two mistakes allowed them to go two dolls up, only for spurs to then score with their only two shots on target. gabrielle's thwarted one with his first shot in a city shirt. 0ne slight problem. it is not easy being a football manager, is it? look at the agony. if it is tough near the top, try being at the bottom. that is where moyes's sunderland find themselves after losing 2—0 at west brom. chris brunt scored the pick of the goals. if the moyes magic hasn't rubbed off on sunderland, sam's sorcery is lacking at little palace as well. a la dice is still without as well. a la dice is still without a premier league win at his new club. seamus coleman's led strikes or everton relegate palace into the bottom three. 0ne or everton relegate palace into the bottom three. one man on the upper right now is andy carroll. he followed up his wonder goal last
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weekend with two more in west ham's 3-1 weekend with two more in west ham's 3—1 victory weekend with two more in west ham's 3—1victory at middlesbrough. elsewhere, bournemouth came from behind twice to salvage a draw against watford, and you can see there confirmation of that draw between stoke city and manchester united. league leaders chelsea play hull city later, in one of three games. rangers came from behind to beat motherwell 2—1 and reach the fifth round of the scottish cup. rangers left it late, but kenny miller scored twice at ibrox, to ensure last season's beaten finalists are in the next round. there was no fairytale for the minnows. bonnyrigg rose were thrashed by cup holders hibs. 8—1 it finished. highland league side formartine united lost 4—0 at partick thistle. the upset of the day was at dundee, who were beaten at home by championship strugglers st mirren, 2—0. a full rundown of results can be found on the bbc sport website. european champions cup holders saracens narrowly beat toulon 10—3, to top their pool and secure themselves a home quarter—final. in a low—scoring contest, chris ashton, who isjoining toulon at the end of the season,
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scored the game's only try at allianz park. the result of the day, though, came at welford road, where glasgow hammered leicester 43—0, to reach the quarter—finals for the first time in the club's history. elsewhere, exeter are out, after a heavy defeat at clermont auvergne. ronnie 0'sullivan will face joe perry in the final of snooker‘s masters, at alexandra palace in north london this evening. 0'sullivan had to recover from 4—3 in his semi—final with marco fu. and having to replace the tip of his cue. he won three frames in a row to seal a 6—4 win. ijust i just felt, ijust felt, like, i just felt, like, all the ijust felt, like, all the way through that match i felt i can win this but i have to play well, and i can't make many mistakes, and a little shop was missable. i thought it isa little shop was missable. i thought it is a tap against me, but i can do
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this. when i did it i was so relieved, because now i have another day to get used to the tip. joe perry trailed barry hawkins 5—2 in their semi—final before an astonishing comeback. the game hinged on this snooker in the eighth frame. he then went on to win fourframes in a row. and will now try to stop 0'sullivan winning a seventh masters title. in golf, england's tyrell hatton takes a one—shot lead into today's final round at the abu dhabi championship. he is 13—under—par, after a round of four—under—par 68 yesterday. but he is faced with an intimidating chasing pack, including us 0pen champion dustin johnson and martin kaymer. england's tommy fleetwood's also in that group at 12—under. english pair ross fisher and lee westwood are two shots further back.
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and the third one dayer between england and india gets under way at 8:00am. that is in kolkata. england have already lost the three—match series, having lost the first two. and andy murray has gone a breakdown. keeping an eye on dan evans as well. he has knocked out cilic, tomic, the home favourite. he isa cilic, tomic, the home favourite. he is a great shot today. this is when you realise you are getting old, when you can't read the score! he has definitely been broken, first game in the fourth set. the brazilian football club, chapecoense have played their first
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match since after nearly all of its players were killed in a plane crash. in an emotional return to the field, the side, mostly made of of players on—loan from other clubs, met the country's current champions for a friendly. 0ur reporterjulia carniero was there. it is kick—off time for the new chapecoense. the fans have crowded the conda arena to watch their comeback. with fresh new signings, the team is taking a big step back into the game. the flight carrying the chapecoense squad crashed in the mountains, close to the city of medellin, in november. investigators in colombia found it had run out of fuel. defender neto was the last person to be pulled from the wreckage. last week, he managed to walk again. translation: they told me the truth three days before i came back to chapeco. it was the saddest day of my life. i asked about my team—mates, and the doctors said they weren't here anymore. ijust couldn't believe it. ahead of today's match,
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the families of the crash victims were given medals in the players' honour. the survivors received the copa sudamericana trophy, a tribute to the final they didn't get to play. it was an emotional moment for everyone. i feel very great because, i guess, this is the dream of my father, my father's dream, and i think we need to keep coming here and being... i don't know what to say, i'm very emotional right now. it is 71 minutes into the game, and the match has stopped to remember the 71 victims of the crash. instead of a minute of silence, a moment of sheer energy. the match is a draw, but the chapecoense scored twice, filling fans with hope, as the new team strives for a successful future. julia carniero, bbc news, chapeco, brazil. an emotional return to the pitch today.
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you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: theresa may will be the first foreign leader to meet donald trump since he was sworn in as us president. meanwhile, mr trump has accused the media of lying about the size of the crowds at his inauguration, as more than a million peoplejoined protests against the new president in cities around the world. and now for a look at this morning's weather. much cold out there today. a frost for many of us this morning. not everyone. it is eight degrees in cornwall. —8 in rural hampshire. just above freezing in cardiff, belfast, and edinburgh. some area of rain and some sleet and snow as well for some people. very light in nature. parts of scotland has thick cloud and the far east of northern
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ireland, but especially wet weather in parts of wales, clipping the west midlands, and for some in west england. a lot of this is patchy and light rain. some sleet and snow as well. turning things quite icy out there this morning. and we have a ha rd there this morning. and we have a hard frost in parts of east anglia and south—east england. this is where we have the clearest skies. mist the in some spots. this is where we will see the best of the sunshine. some sunny spells in northern ireland as well. some brighter breaks elsewhere. thicker cloud for parts of south—west england, wales, northern england, and especially into scotland. potential for light showers, especially in scotland. flurries in places. not quite as cold in wales and south—west england as it has been. through tonight, frost developing for many of us. the odd light show it initially. particularly in parts of england and wales, dense and even freezing fog patches around. by no means for
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everyone, as monday begins. but the risk is highest in england and wales. for some people, that could be causing disruption to tomorrow morning and tuesday as well. it is worth checking before heading out in the morning. dense and freezing fog could linger even into the afternoon. that could hold temperatures down where that holds on. elsewhere, variable cloud, sunny spells, yes, a chilly feel to things, but not as cold as were that fog lingered. 5— seven degrees in the most hard. some of that will hang around into england and wales. the week ahead, england hangs on to be settled and cold weather but scotla nd be settled and cold weather but scotland and northern ireland will notice the change. wind will pick up, temperatures will pick up. eventually we will see outbreaks of rain. the atlantic weather system is coming our way. that is the change in the week ahead initially across northern part of the uk where it
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will turn more unsettled by the end of the week. that should go elsewhere by this time next week to be that is how your sunday weather is shaping up. a gloomy outlook but we will forgive you. thank you very much. delivered with a smile, though. from los angeles to chicago, in the us and in cities across the world, millions of anti—donald trump protesters have taken to the streets. more than 500,000 people turned out in washington, a larger crowd than that which attended the new president's inauguration. we'll be talking about the marches in a moment, but first, this is what some of the famous faces at the protests had to say. good did not win this election. but good will win in the end. donald trump takes power! b00|ng. i don't think so! here is the power. here is
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the majority of american right here! we are the majority! this is the upside of the downside. this is an outpouring of energy and tree democracy like i have never seen in my very long life. —— true. democracy like i have never seen in my very long life. -- true. feet on the ground. not backing down! music picks up. this girl is on fire! charlotte ward is a briton living in chicago who attended the anti—trump protest there yesterday. she joins us from the city now. good morning. thank you very much for staying up late for us. this is very much a time for the anti—trump
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protesters to be out. is this not disrespectful to the democratic process ? disrespectful to the democratic process? to turn out like this just after the election? you say anti—trump protest, but for me, it was a woman's march. 0bviously anti—trump protest, but for me, it was a woman's march. obviously it is off the back of the election. my personal motivation was that i have watched this whole election process, andi watched this whole election process, and i was very upset, and, umm, just some of the things that donald trump said to women during the election process , said to women during the election process, some of the things that came out, i just process, some of the things that came out, ijust could not believe it. it offended me greatly. and then to have him still go on to be president wasjust to have him still go on to be president was just extremely shocking. and i think for me and for lots of women, we just feel a bit dismayed. and i... ithink this whole woman's march, we were all feeling like there wasn't much we
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could do. there was not really a way. everyone has a rant on social media but it does not really achieve anything. and arguing on social media with people is never going to do anything. so i think it really kind of spark a thought for some women when this happened because there was an opportunity to get out there was an opportunity to get out there and make your voice heard to be so, for me, i was not trying to be so, for me, i was not trying to be disrespectful. there are just issues that i do not feel are very high on his administration agenda. and i also... i am high on his administration agenda. and i also... iam a high on his administration agenda. and i also... i am a mother. high on his administration agenda. and i also... iam a mother. i have a son who is 18 months old. this is going to be his president in america. i really want him to have a role model. i want to stand up and say... you have children, but some people would say you are a brit in america and have no right to take pa rt america and have no right to take part in this. but also, many are saying they do not want to be lectured to by the likes of madonna.
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there is a disconnect between a good proportion of the voters and the world of celebrity they feel does not represent them. i really do not feel that... i feel i am getting involved in a movement that will unite people. today i was listening to the speeches and it was all about basically is similar to what 0bama said in his farewell address. he was saying, you know, do not argue with people, do not be rude about people, get out there, meet those people, and listen to them. so, a lot of those messages today were very positive saying, you know, do not argue with people on social media, just get out there and go and find somebody who disagrees with you and talk to them. thank you very much for your time. joining us from chicago today. let's now speak to leslie vinjamuri who's a us foreign policy analyst at chatham house. shejoins us from our central london newsroom. good morning to you. thank you for
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coming injoining us this morning. you were in a protest that took place in london yesterday. i will ask for your professional foreign policy analysis in a minute. but to speak up on the tenor of what she was speaking about, donald trump, you know, he is the right leg, freely elected president of the united states. should we leave what happened in the past behind and judge him on what happened in office? protesting is legitimate. lots of what's donald trump has done has been incredibly contentious. i was in london where there were estimated between 80000 and 100,000 people marching across many different groups. it was by no means solely women. there were handicapped people representing their rights.
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there were lgbt people. all sorts of different groups. it was quiet here in london, but committed. so, it wasn't american. there were plenty of americans, though. it was a very international audience. of americans, though. it was a very internationalaudience. certain rights and freedoms need to be respected during the course of this presidency. that is now what we can consider if you don't mind. already he has started to make changes. 0bamacare is he has started to make changes. 0bamaca re is the he has started to make changes. 0bamacare is the first thing he has started to address. what are we expecting for him may be over the next first 100 days that people are looking out over this key period of analysis. it is a key period. going back to fdr. that is from when we started looking at the first 100 days, the honeymoon period, where he can, he orshe, days, the honeymoon period, where he can, he or she, he so far, days, the honeymoon period, where he can, he orshe, he so far, can days, the honeymoon period, where he can, he or she, he so far, can get
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more legislation through congress and tend to pass a number of executive orders. it is real as opposed to symbolic, though there is some symbolism. the symbolism of what happens in the first 100 days is extremely symbolic. the first thing president trump did was to make it possible for he is defence secretary to take up that offers by signing a waiver that he had to be out of uniform for seven years, which has been the norm. and james mattis has not been. that was the first thing. 0bamacare has been something that republicans broadly, but also donald trump, have wanted to repeal and replaced. there was an executive order that he signed immediately saying there will not be any further implementation of 0bamacare if it entails fiscal spending. so there is no plan in place right now for replacing 0bamacare, but we will probably see a repeal of that copy it is going to be very politically difficult, even if there is support in congress, to
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get this through. there are 20 million americans benefiting from 0bama's healthca re at million americans benefiting from 0bama's healthcare at the moment. million americans benefiting from obama's healthcare at the moment. on a wider scale, obviously, obama's healthcare at the moment. on a widerscale, obviously, his inaugural address, he talked a lot about the domestic agenda and putting america first. 0ver about the domestic agenda and putting america first. over the yea rs, putting america first. over the years, since the second world war, america has become the pre—eminent force in the world. there has been a world order which america has constructive. is he going to start dismantling that by turning away from ed? yeah. i feelthis is the big fear. it was reflected in his speech. that is why so many people across the world were protesting and marching yesterday. in donald trump's speech and policy, we are seeing the biggest walk back from liberal internationalism that america has made over the decades. the rhetoric of america first was very strong. the foreign policy agenda, the number one item on the
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foreign policy agenda, is now countering islamic terrorism, not counter—terrorism, but islamic terrorism, has been named. moving away from america's support for multi lateral trade deals to negotiating bilateral trade deals. a very ha rd negotiating bilateral trade deals. a very hard line of american interests and jobs and buying american first. this is of tremendous interest to america's allies. just a few days ago, donald trump said that nato was obsolete. the commitment he will have to alliances is very much at sta ke. have to alliances is very much at stake. now, theresa may will be meeting with donald trump in just a few days, on friday. and i think the agenda will be to try to secure first a trade deal, to begin a negotiation on a us— uk trade deal. but also to highlight that nato is important for european security and
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america needs to remain committed. for your time this morning. a fellow on the us programme. just after eight o'clock we will talk to the conservative mp about the planned meeting of theresa may with donald trump which our guest was just referring to at the end of a week. word on the tennis. andy murray has won his first game against jo—wilfried tsonga. great news. jane austen is one of britain's favourite authors, but there's lots of debate about what she actually looked like. only one portrait was taken of her when she was a alive, a sketch made by her sister. that was one of the challenges facing the artist who's been tasked with creating what's thought to be the first public statue of the writer to mark 200 years since her death. ben moore went to have a look. piano music. how quick come the
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reasons for approving what we like. jane austen in her novel, persuasion. it is hoped the town of basingstoke will echo that sentiment over a bronze statue of the author. it is like she is walking down the stairs and someone says good morning and she says good morning back. she was a real person, a headstrong woman of her time, living in her time. she is relevant for us today walking past her. the statue has taken shape from adam's early sketches, but finding a real likeness of jane austen has historically been a problem as only two portraits were ever done. historically been a problem as only two portraits were ever donelj historically been a problem as only two portraits were ever done. i have to go back and study from life. i have to read between the lines of what was written about her and i have to put together a real face. she was born just a few miles outside of basingstoke in stevenson. and basingstoke is staking its
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claim.jane and basingstoke is staking its claim. jane austen new basingstoke well. she even attended social gatherings at the assembly hall here in market square where it hurts that you will go. it was alljust such a great influence on her that he/she wrote the first draft to ride prejudice. many have tried to claim jane austen. on the 200th anniversary of her death we want a prominent memorial to the fact she is our most famous of resident naman tha. it has taken two years and almost £100,000 to bring this forward. everyone we have discussed this with has come on board. really, the association with basingstoke is not as well—known as it should be. that is what we want to celebrate, that jane austen spent time here and lived and shopped and danced in
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raising six. the final and rather delicate work has now been done and it will be cast in april, leaving this town with a sense of pride, not prejudice. the people there will be delighted. stay with us, the headlines are coming up next. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and roger johnson.

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