Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 22, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

8:00 am
hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and rogerjohnson. theresa may will be the first world leader to meet president trump. hello, this is breakfast, with rachel burden and rogerjohnson. theresa may will be the first world leader to meet president trump. his spokesman confirms they'll meet on friday. a trade deal and brexit are expected to be on the agenda. as hundreds of thousands take to the streets in protest against the new president — the white house goes to war over reports of the numbers who attended friday's inauguration. after reports that a trident missile test went wrong — the ministry of defence says it has absolute confidence in its nuclear defence system. a cancer charity calls for more to be done to encourage women to have smear tests. also is this the first public statue of jane austen? we report on why it proved to be such a challenge for the artist. in sport, britain's andy murray has lost his match against germany's mischa zverev by three sets to one in the last 16 of the australian open. and nick has the weather. cold a frosty start. all the details coming up later. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will become the first foreign leader to meet the new us president in washington.
8:01 am
they're due to have talks on friday. the announcement was made during donald trump's first day in office, which also saw a series of protests against his administration; and an onslaught against the media for inaccurate reporting. our us correspondent david willis has more. crowd: hey, hey! ho, ho! donald trump has got to go! in the nation's capital, they have rarely seen a rally quite like this. not since the vietnam war have so many people come together, in defence of women's rights and minority rights, liberties these people believe could be imperilled by the presidency of donald trump. the man himself was visiting the headquarters of the cia whilst that rally was underway, less concerned about secrets, it appeared, than crowd sizes, in particular reports of the attendance at his inauguration the previous day. i made a speech. i looked out, the field was... it looked like a million, 1.5 million people. they showed a field where there were practically nobody standing there. that theme was echoed in an unscheduled news conference
8:02 am
a short while later. before confirming that britain's theresa may would be the first foreign leader to visit president trump, the new white house press spokesman railed against reports that mr trump had failed to attract as large a crowd to his inauguration as barack obama. this was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period. these attempts to lessen the enthusiasm of the inauguration are shameful and wrong. official estimates of crowd sizes are not released, but aerial photographs appear to contradict the trump administration's assessment. nonetheless, mr spicer, in his first briefing at the white house, went on to issue a thinly veiled threat to reporters covering the trump presidency. we're going to hold the press accountable, as well. he will take his message directly to the american people, where his focus will always be. size clearly matters greatly to donald trump, and regardless of the inauguration
8:03 am
crowds, the crowd at yesterday's protest was so large that a march on the white house proved impossible, because there were so many people present. it is a question of which will ultimately prove the most unpalatable to the new administration, the messenger or the message. we will talk about the planned meeting between donald trump and theresa may. the ministry of defence has insisted it has full confidence in the trident nuclear defence system, despite reports that a rare test—firing went wrong last year. the sunday times says a missile fired from a submarine in the atlantic ocean veered off course and in the direction of the united states. the rocket was not armed. andy moore reports. this is what the launch of a trident missile looks like.
8:04 am
it is an expensive business. even an unarmed missile costs around £70 million, so it doesn't happen very often. no video has been released of last year's launch, because, says the sunday times, it went badly wrong. according to the paper, hms vengeance was stationed about 200 miles off the coast of florida. it was due to fire the missile 5,600 miles, to a location off the west coast of africa. instead the rocket veered off—target, heading towards the us. all this was just a few weeks before a crucial vote in parliament to spend £40 billion on building a new generation of trident submarines. one labour former defence minister is now calling for an inquiry. the government hasn't denied that the missile from hms vengeance may have veered off—course, but it said the capability and effectiveness of the trident missile was unquestionable. in a statement, a spokesman added... the government and the prime
8:05 am
minister are now expect to face further questions about what exactly did happen with the trident launch last year. long delays in assessing the needs of patients are fuelling a bed—blocking crisis in hospitals, according to the watchdog, healthwatch england. research seen by the bbc‘s 5 live investigates programme suggests many social care assessments are failing to happen in the recommend time of six weeks. the department of health has said it's investing £900 million of additionalfunding into the system over two years. we have an ageing population and
8:06 am
more older people are needing care for longer and they often have more than one long—term condition. it is easy to find somebody to blame but the whole system is grossly underfunded both in hospital and the timidity. the former president of the gambia, yahya jammeh, has flown into exile — 22 years after taking control of the west african state in a coup. he sparked a political crisis when he refused to accept the outcome of the country's election. but finally agreed to hand over power to the winner, adama barrow, after the leaders of neighbouring countries threatened military action. french voters will begin the process of choosing a presidential candidate for the ruling socialist party today. the current president, francois hollande, announced last month that he won't be standing for re—election. our correspondent hugh schofield is in paris — how does this fit into the way the french presidential election is shaping up? it means that in this primary the
8:07 am
continuity candidate is not the president which should normally be that he is so unpopular he has decided not to run again. it is the man who used to be the prime minister who stood down a few years a few weeks ago who represents a right wing of the socialist party broadly, up against a couple of key characters who represent much more the left of the party. there are other candidates as well but what will happen with end of today is probably that one of the left—wing characters will go through along with manuel valls. in reality the polls show that whoever winds this
8:08 am
socialist party primary is in a terrible position. fifth place currently amongst all the candidates in the presidential race behind not just the national front and the mainstream right but against two other candidates from the ce ntre—left other candidates from the centre—left in the far left who are out pulling the socialist bloc will now have been the main left—wing party and that speaks volumes about the appalling state of the ruling socialists right now. a charity says many local authorities and clinical commissioning groups in england are doing too little to encourage women to have smear tests. jo's cervical cancer trust found embarrassment and worries about pain were putting many people off. our health reporter, smitha mundasad has the details. a smear of lipstick to encourage women not to ignore their smear tests. they are offered to women aged 25 to 64, to help prevent cervical cancer. last yea r‘s campaign drew celebrity support,
8:09 am
from the model cara delevingne to reality star lauren pope, a smear of lipstick to encourage women not and the charity behind it says this year their message has never been more important. at the moment, in england, for example, the number of women who attend cervical screening is at a 19—year low. that is hugely concerning, because if it carries on, we are going to see more women diagnosed, we are sadly going to see more women passing away, and we just don't want that to happen. the charity's latest survey suggests half of women aged 25 to 29 have put off getting a smear test. the reasons — more than a quarter said they were too embarrassed, a similar numbersaid they were worried about pain, and almost one in ten said they had never had the test at all. nhs england says it is particularly worried about the fall in young women getting smears in the last few years, because that has been linked to a rise in women under 35 getting cervical cancer. it says it is working on projects to encourage more young women to take up the tests.
8:10 am
the time new cars are allowed on britain's roads before they need an mot could go up from three to four years, under government proposals. the department for transport said safer technology and improved manufacturing means new vehicles stay roadworthy for longer. the change, which could come in from 2018, would bring britain in line with northern ireland and many other european countries. it sounds like the plot to a classic american road—trip movie... five young adventurers make a perilous coast—to—coastjourney to build a new life in the west. well, now it's happened in real life — to a group of baby raccoons. they were born in a truck in florida, which was driven to california. the driver only discovered his stowaways four days later.
8:11 am
the racoons are now being cared for at a local zoo until a new, more permanent home is found. how special will the so—called special relationship be under the new us president? number 10 will be pleased with the initial signs, after confirmation the prime minister will become the first foreign leader to meet donald trump when she flies to washington later this week. nadhim zahawi mp is a member of the foreign affairs committee and joins us from central london now. how much do you think it can be achieved at this first meeting?” think it is quite important meeting. donald trump 's interview in the times last week spoke about the importance of bilateral trade agreement with the uk and the with
8:12 am
their ties that. during the campaign he spoke about wanting better trade agreements, especially country to country agreements. he did not like the big global agreements. country agreements. he did not like the big globalagreements. i country agreements. he did not like the big global agreements. i think pa rt of the big global agreements. i think part of that special relationship, i think theresa may will be pushing very hard. as soon as we are out of eu, to have the united states uk trading agreement in place before anything else. that would take many yea rs anything else. that would take many years till we have out of the eu and we do not know what the terms of brexit will be although we know what she wants now. that is not a lot concrete they can agree on at this stage, is there? we will trigger article 50 by the end of march and then negotiations proper will begin which could take up to two years. there is a lot of preparatory work which can be done. i am on the foreign affairs committee as you know and i have come back from a
8:13 am
trip to turkey. the president they are talks about the trade agreement with the uk as soon as he can make it happen. other countries such as india and china and new zealand and australia, many countries are looking to the uk. depending on how you count it we are the fourth or fifth largest economy in the world and the united states of america and presence of trump wants to see america do well and he sees that strong trading agreement with the uk asa strong trading agreement with the uk as a priority. seeing america do well is key here. i know as a supporter of brexit you were very keen to leave the eu but the message from donald trump is it is america first and you get the impression whatever deals he signs will be in america's interests. and upper minister says that everything she does before anything else on the first day that she took office, both leaders will take a robust position
8:14 am
of negotiation and we will negotiate from a strong position because were not a small economy. america already has bilateral trading agreements with other countries around the world and it can make this happen. mrtrump has world and it can make this happen. mr trump has promised that he was this to happen so i think let's not begin the process by being negative of america, let's be positive and protagonists look forward. one of the paper reports this morning that theresa may will bring up the subject of his derogatory comments about women in the past when she meets. do you expect that to happen and if so what will she say to him? our ambassador, a fantastic ambassador with long experience and also in eu negotiations, he will be able to talk to the trump administration about how we are going to come out of the eu and how we will negotiate. theresa may will tackle the difficult questions but as candidate trump said at the time
8:15 am
the staff is media tittle tattle. he is actually won an election and we have to respect the democracy of the united states of america as they respect their own democracy with the brexit board. yes you have tough conversations but at the same time you try to get off with a strong start and the special relationship. a p pa re ntly start and the special relationship. apparently he reversed her as his maggie. do you think that is how theresa may sees herself? —— he refers to her. she is old woman as you have seen a steely determination to make sure she gets the best deal for the eu watches bombarded by your collea g u es for the eu watches bombarded by your colleagues in the media about wanting to reveal her hand and she is stuck to her position saying she will not reveal her negotiation position and i think it is beginning to pay dividends. many people i know in the business committee have come
8:16 am
round to that position. the brexit prime minister will be bombarded with questions. she will be a guest on the andrew marr show on bbc i at 9 this morning. here's nick with a look at this morning's weather. i frost in ifrost in derbyshire. it is not i frost in derbyshire. it is not as cold as it is in south east england. it is -8 cold as it is in south east england. it is —8 in fessenden in kent. —— frittenden. you can expect cloud in scotla nd frittenden. you can expect cloud in scotland and ireland and where you have that also north—west england
8:17 am
you have patchy and light rain and perhaps a few wintry flies out they are causing things to be a little bit i see on any untreated surfaces. that hard frost in east anglia and south—east england may well stay in the shade today but there is plenty of sparkling sunshine on the way in the xavier ‘s. elsewhere sunshine will be limited. i think will be some in northern ireland and initially the fire after scotland will get off to a frosty start. much of scotla nd will get off to a frosty start. much of scotland rather cloudy and part of scotland rather cloudy and part of north england and wales some sunshine. a chance of some photos of rain in scotland. another cold night to come tonight with a frost developing again and maybe just the odd lecture initially but that will clear. then we are watching this. this is for developing and parts of england and wales. this is where the greatest risk is overnight and some of it could be dense freezing fog. not for everybody but it is worth checking the situation near you
8:18 am
before heading out in the morning because it could cause a few problems. it is notjust monday morning, it is tuesday morning with that potential as well. some of that will be very slow to clear. monday morning there will be a few places that hold onto that even into the afternoon and where that is the case no better than freezing. elsewhere available cloud and some sunny spells. and they stay to come for monday with dentures and three degrees to 6 degrees temperatures just getting little higher than that. chilly spells in england and wales later this week and eventually scotla nd wales later this week and eventually scotland and northern ireland will turn more unsettled that it will ta ke turn more unsettled that it will take some time. plenty of scraping jane austen is one of britain's favourite authors, but there's lots of debate about what she actually looked
8:19 am
like — only one portrait was taken of her when she was alive, a sketch made by her sister. that was one of the challenges facing the artist who's been tasked with creating what's thought to be the first public statue of the writer to mark 200 years since her death. ben moore went to have a look. piano music. "how quick come the reasons for approving what we like." jane austen in her novel, persuasion. it is hoped the town of basingstoke will echo that sentiment over a bronze statue of the author. it is like she is walking down the stairs and someone says "good morning" and she says "good morning" back. she was a real person, a headstrong woman of her time, living in her time. she is relevant for us today walking past her as her work is still here. the statue has taken shape from adam's early sketches, but finding a real likeness of jane austen has historically been a problem, as only two portraits were ever done. i have to go back and study from life. i have to read between the lines of what was written about her and i have to pull
8:20 am
together a real face. she was born just a few miles outside of basingstoke in steventon. and basingstoke is staking its claim. jane austen knew basingstoke well. she even attended social gatherings at the assembly hall here in market square, where her statue will go. it was alljust such a great influence on her that here she wrote the first draft of pride and prejudice. many places have been better to try to claim jane austen. on the 200th anniversary of her death, we want a prominent memorial to the fact she is our most
8:21 am
famous of residents. it has taken two years and almost £100,000 to bring this forward. everyone we have discussed this with has come on board. really, the association with basingstoke is not as well—known as it should be. that is what we want to celebrate, that jane austen spent time here and lived and shopped and danced in basingstoke. the final and rather delicate work has now been done and it will be cast in april, leaving this town with a sense of pride, not prejudice. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's 8.22. time now for a look at the newspapers. politics lecturer victoria honeyman is here to tell us what's caught their eye. we'll speak to her in a minute. the sunday telegraph. donald trump is on the front pages of most of the papers today, you will not be surprised to learn. the new america
8:22 am
president and his new deal for britain. that is what the sunday telegraph is talking about. theresa may is my maggie, the front page of the sunday express. we asked our interviewee how theresa may would ta ke interviewee how theresa may would take that and he said she was very much alone woman but that echo of ronald reagan swisher with margaret thatcher is maybe what donald trump is after. the front page of the observer talks about another element of the holder donald trump inauguration think and that is the protests which we saw yesterday, his first full day in office. mainly motivated and inspired by those comments he made about women during the election campaign and prior to that. and the front page of the mail on sunday suggests that theresa may world directly challenged donald trump and those comments about women when she meets them but were not
8:23 am
exactly sure. theresa may is over on bbc one on the andrew marr programme after nine o'clock. the front page of the sunday times has an exclusive, apparently a missile fired from carrying nuclear submarine ——, nico summoning carrying, trident was fired. —— nuclear submarine carrying trident. is it a coup for britain that theresa may will be the first foreign leader to meet donald trump? it is the first european leader
8:24 am
indeed global leader. i believe that tony blair did it with bush and branded with obama and no theresa may has managed to get trump and she's going to washington. there's a lot of talk in the papers that trump will come to britain and try to outdo it out, and that is discussion about will he go to the churchill war room and will he play golf with the queen? perhaps he will go to someone the queen? perhaps he will go to someone golf course. this is interesting in the political sense, not just interesting in the political sense, notjust in the sense of political niceties. here we have an individual who appears to be quite an anglophile and says he likes britain and has the golf course in scotland. that is honestly a very important element to this because with brexit a lot of attention is being paid to the us and uk special relationship because looks like it could be the alternative to europe and an important bilateral trade could stuck. whether that will happen we
8:25 am
will have to wait and see. trump talks of putting america first. it would be a bilateral trade agreement between two nations that are substantially different in terms of size and financial and economic output so it will be interesting to see if positive feelings towards the uk generally play out into political benefit for the uk. that is what theresa may is after. although one would imagine america cannot become entirely isolationist it is interesting that the world order of the last 50 years is something that the last 50 years is something that the americans of lead and been very much in the forefront. it could be very destabilising if the retreat too much. it could be if we take america first further than we have only seen it being demonstrated. it could lead to isolationism. we know the donald trump is not the manner suggested he is not a big fan of natal and will put more pressure on france and germany to up their natal financial investment. —— nato. it is
8:26 am
one thing being on the campaign trail at getting into the system of government is slightly more constraining and it will be interesting to see how the system responds to him and how he responds to the system. these pictures were all over social media yesterday and make the papers today, the women's marches not just in make the papers today, the women's marches notjust in the united states but right across the world. there was one in london and in leeds and manchester and lancaster and bristol got this article which was in the sunday times. the main aim of this seems to have been twofold. the first is to remind the world and donald trump specifically that women are there and that they count and do not forget that equality which is important. it is not a battle that has been one yet across the world. when you look at donald trump ‘s
8:27 am
tea m when you look at donald trump ‘s team and entourage is the woman who ever accompany him to all of this and are very visible as part of two yea rs and are very visible as part of two years and the image she sells. the overall strong woman, particularly on the part of his daughter, having an active part in this business affairs. his daughter and his daughters—in—law who have politically involved in some way. i think it is quite a nuanced element of feminism about how he feels about women and we don't have a lot of time to discuss it but i think that is one thing liking women and respecting women, that is not for these women are talking about. what they are saying is that you cannot simply say let those women but don't really care about those women over there. it is specifically related to there. it is specifically related to the locker room banter that went on i was broadcast during the election campaign which was incredibly disrespectful and had no place in any presidential race let alone being america. and also reproductive
8:28 am
rights in america. the issue of abortion is not going to go away. this notice about women, it is about offering people a peaceful way of expressing their upset. we were at the scene sums by unseen special body was to see and is never a good response to things. this is more peaceful. this would be very interesting. liver cell ed balls going on strictly? he says the deal should. here suggesting the david cameron travel blog. i don't personally see it but you never can say, can you? —— that david cameron should have a goal. —— go. say, can you? —— that david cameron should have a goal. -- go. he may yet end up living somewhere on downing street one day. who knows?
8:29 am
thank you very much. my pleasure. coming up to the next half—hour, we'll meet the record breaking rally driver who's in a race against time to raise enough money to compete. stay with us. headlines coming—up. hello, this is breakfast with rachel burden and rogerjohnson. coming up, nick will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the prime minster is due to become the first foreign leader to hold talks with the new us president.
8:30 am
theresa may will meet donald trump in washington on friday. trade, security and the future of the european union are all expected to be high on the agenda. within the last half hour, the pro—brexit, conservative mp nadhim zahawi told this programme both leaders will take robust positions in the talks. other countries, india, china, new zealand, australia, many countries are looking to the uk. remember, we the fifth largest economy in the world and the united states of and president trump wants to see america too well and he sees that strong trading agreement with the uk as a priority. i think we should hold on to his word and make that happen. our political correspondent susana mendonca is in our central london newsroom for us. is in the sense that downing street
8:31 am
have had to play catch up to get this meeting? i think so. nigel farage was the first uk politician to have a meeting with donald trump and downing street were pretty irritated by that. they have been working hard behind—the—scenes to secure this first meeting with the new president after his inauguration. it sends out after his inauguration. it sends out a message that theresa may has that closeness, will have that closeness to the united states ahead of the eu negotiations over britain's exit of the european union and that will no doubt strengthen her hand. it's something downing street will be positive about. they will be talking about trade, although they can't do about trade, although they can't do a deal yet. they'll talk about the
8:32 am
eu. the key question is whether she would challenge him over his attitude towards women. certainly this is a positive for theresa may and we will be herring from her on the andrew marr show in about half an hour. thank you. the ministry of defence has insisted it has full confidence in the trident nuclear defence system, despite reports that a rare test—firing went wrong last year. the sunday times says a missile fired from a submarine in the atlantic ocean veered off course and in the direction of the united states. the rocket was not armed. long delays in assessing the needs of patients are fuelling a bed—blocking crisis in hospitals, according to the watchdog, healthwatch england.research seen by the bbc‘s 5 live investigates healthwatch england. research seen by the bbc‘s 5 live investigates programme suggests many social care assessments are failing to happen in the recommend time of six weeks. the department of health has said it's investing £900 million of additionalfunding into the system over two years. we have an ageing population, people
8:33 am
are living longer, so older people need care and care for longer. it is made more difficult because they often have one or more long—term condition to manage. the whole system is grossly underfunded, both in the hospital and in the community. the government responded by saying it has invested over £900 million over the next two years. the former president of the gambia, yahya jammeh, has flown into exile, 22 years after taking control of the west african state in a coup. he sparked a political crisis when he refused to accept the outcome of the country's election. but finally agreed to hand over power to the winner, adama barrow, after the leaders of neighbouring countries threatened military action. the time new cars are allowed on britain's roads before they need an mot could go up from three to four years, under government proposals. the department for transport said safer technology and improved manufacturing means new vehicles stay roadworthy for longer. the change, which could come in from 2018, would bring britain in line with northern ireland
8:34 am
and many other european countries. micah will always need an mot. it's considerably older than four years. disappointment for tennis fans. andy murray is out. there he is. you can see the frustration. i'm sure he will be scratching his head. he faced the player who is ranked 50th in the world. the tournament opened up in the world. the tournament opened upfor him in the world. the tournament opened up for him with novak djokovic out. he made the tournament five times, but he is out. so andy murray out of the australian open. he lost the opening set, took the second but zverev refused to buckle and won the third and fourth to clinch the match 7—5, 5-7 , 6-2 , 6-4. the world number one couldn't handle
8:35 am
zverev‘s serve and volley tactics. he tried everything to show he is the world's best , he is the world's best, but the world number 50 was just too good on the day. and andy murray will have to wait until next year for another crack at that elusive australian open title. obviously a tough match, it was a long one. hot conditions, it was hot out there. he played extremely well, especially the end of the match. he came up with some great stuff, really good volleys and pick—ups, reflexes, you know, he was really good. he deserved to win. a tough one to lose. gracious words from andy murray. britain's dan evans is also in action in melbourne. it's the first time he's made it to the fourth round of a grand slam. he's facing the 12th seed jo wilfiried tsonga. evans took the first set on a tie break but was unable to keep up that intensity as the frenchman
8:36 am
controlled the second, winning it 6—2 to level the match, one set all. tsonga also a break up in the third. england's cricketers have already lost the one day series against india so there's little more than pride to play in the final match in kolkata. after being put into bat, england have made a positive start on a tricky pitch. sam billings is opening the batting in place of the injured alex hales — whilstjoe root sits out as well. a short time ago, england were 27—0. wayne rooney has become manchester united's all—time leading goal scorer. he hit his 250th goal for the club and he'll not have scored too many better with a stunning 94th minute free kick earning united a 1—1 draw at stoke. sir bobby charlton, who now sits second on united's all—time list said he was disappointed to lose the record but added he was honestly delighted for rooney. yes, a great honour, so i can really
8:37 am
proud. it is difficult at the minute to be over pleased because of the result. two points dropped, but in the grand scheme of things, is a huge honourfor me and the grand scheme of things, is a huge honour for me and something the grand scheme of things, is a huge honourfor me and something i did not expect when ijoined the club, but i am delighted and really proud. premier league leaders chelsea with be happy with the results in the premier league yesterday — the teams chasing them gained little ground. liverpool suffered a shock defeat to swansea city and manchester city and tottenham hotspur drew. ben croucher wraps up the day's action. saturday wasn't a good day to manage a top—six side. if you played, that is. along with manchester united, the other three in action couldn't muster a win between them. liverpool are yet to win in the league in 2017. struggling swansea had never won in the league at anfield, but llorente put them ahead. liverpool couldn't hang on. it is going to come to sigurdsson.
8:38 am
swansea back in front! and holding on for a 3—2 win, paul clements's first as swansea manager. the liverpool slip—up presented manchester city, at tottenham, the chance to move clear of them. city looked on—course, when two mistakes allowed them to go two goals up, only for spurs to then score with their only two shots on target. gabrieljesus thwarted one with his first shot in a city shirt. one slight problem. it is not easy being a football manager, is it? look at the agony. if it is tough near the top, try being at the bottom. that is where david moyes's sunderland find themselves, after losing 2—0 at west brom. chris brunt scored the pick of the goals. if the moyes magic hasn't rubbed off on sunderland, sam's sorcery is lacking at little palace as well. allardyce is still without a premier league win sam's sorcery is lacking at little palace as well. allardyce is still without a premier league win at his new club.
8:39 am
seamus coleman's late strikes for everton relegate palace into the bottom three. one man on the upper right now is andy carroll. he followed up his wonder goal last weekend with two more in west ham's 3—1victory at middlesbrough. elsewhere bournemouth came from behind twice to salvage a draw against watford. and you can see there confirmation of that draw between stoke city and manchester united. league leaders chelsea play hull city later in one of three games. rangers came from behind to beat motherwell 2—1 and reach the fifth round of the scottish cup. rangers left it late but kenny miller scored twice at ibrox to ensure last season's beaten finalists are in the next round. there was no fairytale for the minnows — bonnyrigg rose were thrashed by cup holders hibs — 8—1 it finished. highland league side fomartine united lost four nil at partick thistle. the upset of the day was at dundee, who were beaten at home by championship strugglers st mirren 2—0. a full rundown of results can be found on the bbc sport website. european champions cup holders
8:40 am
saracens narrowly beat toulon 10—3 to top their pool and secure themselves a home quarter final. in a low scoring contest, chris ashton, who isjoining toulon at the end of the season, scored the game's only try at allianz park. the result of the day though came at welford road, where glasgow hammered leicester 43 —0 to reach the quarter finals for the first time in the club's history. elsewhere exeter are out, after a heavy defeat at clermont auvergne. ronnie o'sullivan will face joe perry in the final of snooker‘s masters at alexandra palace in north london this evening. o'sullivan had to recover from 4—3 in his semi—final with marco fu — and having to replace the tip of his cue. he won three frames in a row to seal a 6—4 win. ijust felt, like, all the way through that match i felt, i can win thism but i have to play well, and i can't make many mistakes. and the little shot was missable. i thought it is a tap against me, but i can do this.
8:41 am
when i did it i was so relieved, because now i have another day to get used to the tip. joe perry trailed barry hawkins 5—2 in their semi final before an astonishing come back — the game hinged on this snooker in the eight frame. he then went on to win fourframes in a row. and will now try to stop o'sullivan winning a 7th masters title. in golf, england's tyrell hatton takes a one—shot lead into today's final round at the abu dhabi championship. he's 13 under par after a round of four—under—par 68 yesterday, but he's faced with an intimidating chasing pack including us open champion dustinjohnson and martin kaymer. england's tommy fleetwood's also in that group 12 under. english pair ross fisher and lee westwood are two shots further back. till houghton in great shape.
8:42 am
we talked about football, of course one team that benefits from what happened at the top of the english premier league is chelsea. i think the odds have been cut again. yes. they take on hull again today. struggling at the wrong end of the table. results wend their way, but it was a bad result for liverpool. and an absolute belter from rooney to break the record. fantastic. at the end of the game, a nice touch. sir bobby charlton p°pped nice touch. sir bobby charlton popped into the dressing room to give his congratulations in person to wayne rooney. that is two of his records that wayne rooney has taken. yes, but a nice touch. and jo—wilfried tsonga is serving. we'll keep an eye on that. thank you
8:43 am
very much. rescuers in italy have been working day and night in the hope of finding more people trapped in a hotel by an avalanche on wednesday. so far, nine survivors have been pulled out alive, but more than 20 remain unaccounted for. tommaso della longa is from the italian red cross, which has been helping with the rescue operation. hejoins us live he joins us live now from hejoins us live now from rome. thank you for your time this morning. can you bring us up to date with what you understand is the latest situation with the rescue at the hotel? yes, good morning. actually the latest news is that the search and rescue operation is still going on and they still hope to find someone going on and they still hope to find someone alive. at this stage, there have been nine survivors and let's save 23 are missing. and from your experience, the authorities in italy said they will not give up until everybody is accounted for. how
8:44 am
likely is it now that people might still be found alive? first of all, hope is still there until the last moment and as has happened in other situations like this one, the search and rescue teams will continue the work until they have found everyone. speaking with the survivors, they said that some of them were alive because they were using snow to drink water. this is important in this situation. on the other side there were people inside the hotel, inside the rooms, so obviously it is cold, but not so cold that they could dine, so we still have these people are alive. there is always hope. i understand some of the equipment that the rescue teams have, they can listen in under the snow through the rubble and there is
8:45 am
hope there may have heard some sounds? yes, exactly. one of the instruments that the guys from a special organisation working in an avalanche scenario are using. the work is continuing around the clock, even during the night with a lot of people working at the scene. obviously it is very cold, but what are the conditions like for the rescuers? safety of the rescuers is a priority, as usual. this is why, for instance, the red cross with other organisations are supporting the rescuers. it is a difficult scenario and it can be dangerous because of the snow. this is why there are specialised search and rescue teams working there. italy has had bad fortune with earthquakes recently. how concerned are people
8:46 am
in the wider area that these events are becoming more regular now? very worrying for people who live in certain parts of the country. yes, exactly. it is one of the biggest concerns and the first earthquake in this area arrived at the end of august 20 16. then there were another two in october and now a snowstorm that is one of the worst in the last 40 years. people are obviously concerned. there is a lot of panic every time. when people return to normal life, there is another after—shock. there are organisations working on psychological support with the families because panic is one of the worst enemies for them. we are grateful to you for taking the time to bring us up to date on the rescue
8:47 am
operation. and to update you on the australian open, dan evans is sadly out. he lost to jo—wilfried australian open, dan evans is sadly out. he lost tojo—wilfried tsonga. that's after andy murray also crashed out after losing to zverev. it has not been a good morning for the tennis. it has been rather grim all the way. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: theresa may will be the first foreign leader to meet donald trump since he was sworn in as us president. meanwhile, mr trump has accused the media of lying about the size of the crowds at his inauguration, as more than a million peoplejoined protests against the new president in cities around the world. time to say goodbye to roger now. i'm off to read the news on the andrew marr show. hgppy
8:48 am
happy birthday to you. working on your birthday, that really is above and beyond. i love it. the sticker look at the weather. —— let us have a look at the weather. many places are hovering close to freezing. parts of the uk have a lot of cloud, and that's the case in scotland. we will see wintry flurries in scotland today, not amounting to very much. some light
8:49 am
rain, sleet and snow. thicker cloud across the north as well. where the ground is frozen, do watch out. untreated services could be icy. elsewhere, northern ireland will do quite well for sunshine. brighter brea ks quite well for sunshine. brighter breaks in wells and the south as well. frost will come back and there could be the odd light shower. for patches as well. not too expensive, but tomorrow morning it could be dense. freezing fog patches as well. not everyone will have it, but it
8:50 am
will cause problems for those who do. this is how monday is shaping up. do. this is how monday is shaping 9 do. this is how monday is shaping up. fog for parts of england and wales. for patches over scotland and northern ireland will clear. in england and wales the fog could linger into the afternoon. any temperature will be in single figures. close to low pressure in scotla nd figures. close to low pressure in scotland and northern ireland and things will turn windier. that is still some time away though. that is the forecast. when it comes to rally driving, the general aim is to get around
8:51 am
the course as quickly as possible. but for one world record holderfrom britain, simply getting to the start line could be challenge enough. frankie mccamley has been to find out more. louise has been competing professionally in rally driving for seven years. in 2012 she became a world record—holder in the sport. when i first set foot in a rally car, obviously i found it amazing to just be controlling the car, and instantly hooked, really. such an amazing feeling. but now she may be forced to drop out of her latest competition, after her main sponsors delayed their plans. instead, she is trying to raise the money herself, by putting her winning trophy up for sale. when i first listed it on ebay, to be honest, all that day i felt sick. itjust didn't feel right. but after a couple of days, i kind of get used to the idea, and ijust thought, well, i would rather that the trophy goes than the whole season go. a funding group set up by supporters have raised enough to halt the auction for now. but, with nearly £20,000 left to find, the 29—year—old may still be forced to sell. women face greater challenges
8:52 am
finding sponsorship in their sports than men. partly because of the perception of the sport, that sometimes it is perceived that women's sport is less technical, less good, less valued than men's sport, partly because of the lack of coverage for it. despite this, louise says she is not giving up. to her, crossing the finish line is her only option. if you knew a simple test could help save your life, you'd think most of us would take it. but when it comes to cervical cancer screening, it seems many women are delaying or missing checkups altogether. joining me to discuss this is tina holland — who was diagnosed with the early stages of the disease.
8:53 am
we're also joined by robert music from jo's cervical cancer trust and dr aisha awan. thank you very much to all of you for coming in. tina, let us go to you first. you got the letter at 25, which all women do, to say you were due for one of these tests. you put it to the bottom of the pile. why was that? it was just, it to the bottom of the pile. why was that? it wasjust, i it to the bottom of the pile. why was that? it was just, i will get round to it. i had no symptoms, i wasn't in any pain, so i thought i would get round to it. was it about time, embarrassment, how the procedure would go? more time than anything. if your arm procedure would go? more time than anything. if yourarm hurts, procedure would go? more time than anything. if your arm hurts, you go to the doctor. i have no symptoms, no pain, so it was pushed out of my mind. what change your mind? a friend of mine put on social media
8:54 am
that she had been given the all clear. she urged everyone to get the smear test done. i got mine don't think it will be fine, but that is when i was diagnosed with the early stages. very scary moment for you. what happened next? i discussed my options with my consultant. it was either a hysterectomy or another procedure. having children, having any more children, after the various tests, i was two millimetres shorts and would've had have had a hysterectomy. you have discovered allsorts of reasons why women are not having the smear tests. what kind of things? they are many and
8:55 am
varied, particularly amongst different age groups and community backgrounds. with younger women, it is embarrassment, worried about it being painful. interestingly, not really knowing what the test is for. some think it is a test to find cancer rather than prevent it. that has to be turned around. 70% of the women aged 25—29 did not link is a vital smear test as a healthy test. if they don't get it, they don't go. it's imperative to run campaigns to encourage them to attend.” it's imperative to run campaigns to encourage them to attend. i did not realise that incidents of cervical cancer is highest in that age range. it's not like breast cancer, where people think it affects older women. absolutely right. it's a myth we have to break down. in terms of that age group, it is most common in women under the age of 35. how do
8:56 am
you reassure people if they are worried and concerned? for some women, physiologically, we are different and it can be uncomfortable. it can be uncomfortable. it can be uncomfortable as the vast majority of women it will be something they will not feel, but it can be uncomfortable for women. i was say what a patient said to me. she had been putting it off for six months and when she finally had it done, she had an appointment with me, i asked her how it went and she said it was better than having a leg wax. that puts it into perspective. it is 45 seconds of your life every three years. it does not need to take that much time over the vast majority of women it will be painless, just a little uncomfortable. and if you are worried in particular that it's not going to be as easy for you as it is the other women, what can you do? there is. the nurse will guide you
8:57 am
through. doing breathing exercises will help. if you are over the age of 25 and the age of 49, there is one “— of 25 and the age of 49, there is one —— this is one test every three years. there has been a debate as to whether the test should be more frequent. what the experts say is that screening under 25 could do more harm than good. sabbatical cancer is caught from a virus that is more prevalent in younger women. there is a risk that they could be overtreated and damage the cervix. evenif overtreated and damage the cervix. even if you have had the vaccine against hpv, you still need to have the test. final thoughts? against hpv, you still need to have the test. finalthoughts? don't put it off. it saved my life. thank you
8:58 am
for coming in. that's it from breakfast this morning. dan and louise are back tomorrow from 6am. they will be speaking to michael portillo. thanks for watching. bye— bye. this is bbc news. i'm gavin esler. the headlines at nine. theresa may will be the first world leader to meet president trump when she travels to washington on friday — trade, nato and brexit are on the agenda. after hundreds of thousands took to the streets in protest against the new president — the white house accuses the media of dishonestly reporting the size of the crowd at his inauguration. we have a massive field of people.”
8:59 am
get up this morning and this show an empty field. —— on the show. —— they show. the ministry of defence says it has absolute confidence in the uk's nuclear defence system after reports that a trident missile test went wrong. also in the next hour — calls for more to be done
9:00 am

29 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on