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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 23, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am. the government launches its vision for the future of british industry — its designed to boost the economy after brexit. in the resistor says she wants people in all corners of the country to feel the benefits of economic growth, but what does it mean in practice and what can it mean for oui’ practice and what can it mean for ourjobs and practice and what can it mean for our jobs and businesses? practice and what can it mean for ourjobs and businesses? i'm in warrington this morning to find out. an independent report into the death of a mentally ill man who electrocuted himself in prison finds staff failed to protect him, despite the risk he would kill himself. theresa may faces growing pressure to reveal what she knew about how the test firing of a trident missile went wrong. labour and the snp demand a full explanation. it is president trump's first full
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working day in office. he said today will see the start of great deals for america. also, how dangerous is burnt toast? a warning from the food standards agency that overcooked foods could increase the risk of cancer. and milton keynes, one of the best—known 20th century new towns, built to ease housing swap shortages in london is celebrating its 50th birthday. —— housing shortages. good morning. it's the 23rd of january. welcome to bbc newsroom live. ministers are at a cabinet meeting, which is being held in the north west of england for the first time, to unveil a new vision for british industry. it's designed to give the economy a boost as the country prepares to leave the european union.
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theresa may says the government will take a "new, active role" focusing on science, technology and infrastructure, but labour is describing the plans as "too little, too late." our political correspondent, eleanor garnier is covering the cabinet meeting in daresbury in cheshire. what is this new industrial strategy they are outlining? of course the thing that is dominating theresa may's time in office is brexit, and this is all about getting the country ready for it. in proving productivity, boosting skills, and notjust in london that the south—eastward across the country. that is why we are here, it is a science and tech campus where lots of different industries can work together and collaborate. the cabinet meeting is going to start in the next few
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minutes. we expect it to start at about 1115. the whole idea of this new industrial strategy is to boost productivity but to do it in the region. where countries —— companies and groups can get together and say we need investment here, theresa may is saying we will do that for you. it is also about cutting red tape and about improving those skills, which means potentially new technical colleges focusing on those stem subjects, science, technology, engineering, maths. there has been a warm welcome from, for example, the cbi, but also pressure that that shouldn't be a one—off cash injection, the country needs long—term investment. the emphasis being on the importance of developing those skills and of course the fact that they will take time to grow, it won't be an immediate thing. with that worry from business that the potential
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that it might be harder to recruit people from across the european union, those important skills for certain sectors once we leave the eu, there is that emphasis being put on developing those skills as soon as the. labour are saying this is too little too late and that the money simply isn't enough to equip the country for the 21st—century. thank you. ben is in warrington. we are here in warrington, just four miles north of where the prime ministers expected to speak little later. the crucial thing is what all of this means in practice, what will it mean for business in my day—to—day basis? as you heard, she is expected to lay out a huge planned for giving the economy a boost as we approach brexit negotiations. but it breaks
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down into two key elements. hard infrastructure, roads, railways, that sort of thing, including broadband internet connections. but also a focus on soft infrastructure, skills, training, etc. does the uk have the rights people for the right jobs and if not how can that be addressed? it jobs and if not how can that be addressed ? it is jobs and if not how can that be addressed? it is a huge challenge but one that the prime minister says is the only way to make sure people in all corners of the country are able to benefit from economic growth. it is a huge task as my colleague has been hiding out. how can the government in short the economy is fit for the future? for the business secretary places like this are part of the answer. it is a new automotive innovation centre in warwick, backed by government and industry money and designed to keep our car makers firing on all seven does. the industrial strategy will be committed to driving very hard,
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to spread the opportunities right across the country and to drive, notjustjobs but really good, well paying jobs in all parts of the country. it will be a big part of our strategy. today, the strategy will be outlined in a new green paper, aimed at kick—starting a wide—ranging consultation on the government's new vision. that will include plans for sector deals where businesses and stakeholders in specific sectors can make the case for government support. that is just one of ten so—called strategic pillars which are all designed to increase productivity and drive growth. in the past, governments used industrial strategies as an excuse to back key firms or industries. it didn't always work. as we prepare for the challenge of leaving the eu, the big test of this plan will be that it doesn't just deliver for successful firms like this but that it reaches out to a part of the uk to deliver the government's aim of an economy that works for everybody.
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so that's the theory but how will it work in practice? there is already criticism that it should not be westminster or whitehall that is deciding whether priorities for business should be in places like this, in the north—west of england. act and actually more power should be devolved from london to regional authorities who can decide where that money should be spent and where it could be put to best use. earlier i was chatting to the ippr in the north and this is what they told me about the priorities of westminster when it comes to spending money in some regions of the uk. we know the north of england has some fantastic capabilities around health innovation, digital, around energy as well. but those decisions are best made by people who are experts in those local regions, and so we need to see them with the
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powers to decide how those industries flourish. so what difference could it mean day—to—day for businesses like those hearing warrington? this place mixes this, the raw oil that comes in from places in europe and ends up somewhere like this. they blended into all the engine oil that you would find at your local petrol station. that illustrates the story we will hear a lot about from theresa may later on. they have to get all this stuff around. they have to use the physical infrastructure, the roads, the roadways, to shift this around the country and into the country. but this is the crucial thing, their brand—new £3 million headquarters. at the top you get all the offices you would expect the business but down below on the ground floor is where they are going to have all the research and development that is so needed to make sure that business can operate well, if efficiently, and come up
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with more highly skilled jobs. the bosses with me this morning. you wouldn't traditionally expect a manufacturing plant like this to have a big research and element facility, but it's really important for you. it is the cornerstone of our business will stop we have to have quality behind the product or we can't compete. when we are exporting across the globe having that quality basis allows us to compete with cheaper products that are easier to find locally. the resurgent element facility we have allows us to temporary test out temperature ranges and is absolutely paramount what we do. we've heard a lot about how uk manufacturing can't compete on costs. but i'm looking around here and a lot of the barrels of the finished project —— product have made in england on them. is just we it better here. on the trip.
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on the trips we go round in asia and the like the question we are again is, is it still made in the uk? brand gb is something to be proud of andi brand gb is something to be proud of and i would argue that it is least respected in britain but the rest of the world looks at the british brand and wants to have a piece of it. the quality that that stands for is something to be very proud of. what is the one thing you would want to hear from the premise 20 speaks later? that she is going to give me a skilled workforce for the future. so that when people come in here they will have skills i can put to use from day one, not from six or nine months down the line. thank you for that. and that will be the challenge of course. a lot of announcements we will hear of cross the morning from the prime minister and cabinet. the big question we have been talking about this morning is when will they be implemented? what will it mean day—to—day? how
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long will it take for the money to filter through to the businesses that can use it? those are the big questions. we might get some more detail on that later on. from warrington, back to you. an independent report into the death of a mentally ill man who electrocuted himself in chelmsford prison has found staff failed to protect him, despite the risk he would take his own life. the report was published by the prisons and probation ombudsman for england and wales. it follows an inquest on friday into the death of dean saunders when a jury found neglect was a contributing cause of his death. dean saunders was sent to hmp chelmsford when he stabbed his father who'd intervened to stop him injuring himself. michael buchanan has more details. this is a tragic case. the report today finds that there was a catalogue of failures across the prison and health care staff in chelmsford. essentially what it
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finds is they fail to pay due attention to the self harming that dean saunders was doing to himself in the prison. they found they had failed to properly assess the risks of him killing himself. they had just looked at how he was presenting and because he was presenting as fine and answering their questions they ignored all the other evidence, they ignored all the other evidence, they say there was little critical input into a meeting that led to dean saunders's observations being moved to every half hour. sadly the chronicle does justice did too little to protect this very vulnerable man. dean saunders have no hit previous history of mental illness but in 2015 he suddenly became paranoid and delusional, convinced he had to kill himself. his family were plunged
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into despair. within hours he attacked his brother and father with attacked his brother and father with a knife. already injured, mark could only stand and watch as his son took a kitchen knife to his own throat. he brought the knife down and it did not cut. and that's when we both realised that in his haste to pick the knife up it was the back of the blaze that had gone to his throat, and that was my opportunity. i was back on him and this time i kind of got him in a bear hug again, but the hand with the knife was free, and this time he came down to actually put it in his heart, in his chest. and just at the last moment i thought, all i could do was move my arm in the way so that one went in my arm... as dean tried to kill
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himself mark was stabbed in his stomach but held the knife in place to save his son's life. at that time i thought i cannot let him have the knife. and i put my hand over the top of his so he could not pull it out. he tried to pull it out, i held it in, i could not let him have it. dean saunders was charged with attempted murder and sell sent to chelmsford prison, at initially on co nsta nt chelmsford prison, at initially on constant observation. but then comes a meeting took place. three staff, none of whom were medically trained or had read his notes, reduced his observations to every half hour. the report heard this may have influenced the decision but the manager denied the allegations. he said i'm phoning to tell you they think 30 minutes is sufficient. i
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said i'm telling you now, if you don't put my son back on constant watch them he will kill himself. you won't be able to say you weren't aware, because won't be able to say you weren't aware , because you won't be able to say you weren't aware, because you know. if he kills himself it will be your fault. effo rts himself it will be your fault. efforts were made to move dean to a secure hospital that a shortage of beds and delays over christmas and new year meant it never happened. on january the 11th of last year, dean saunders killed himself. his partner now has two raise their son without his father. we openly talk about dean to teddy. we say daddy this, daddy that. there will never be a day that will pass that teddy won't know how much you love him. dean was so know how much you love him. dean was so looking forward to the point where teddy would be walking around and running and kicking a football with him. two days after dean went,
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teddy started walking. he missed it by two days. the inquest was told repeatedly that dean saunders should have been in hospital not present but basic failure contributed to this loving family being ripped apart. michael is still with me in a studio. that is a really distressing case. very powerful testimony from the father. what other broader implications? it is a tragic tale but unfortunately it is becoming too common and never going to be new figures released this week, official statistics, likely to show the number of people who killed themselves in prisons in 2016 are at record levels. the increase has nearly doubled over the last five yea rs. if nearly doubled over the last five years. if you listen to campaigners and charities they say there is effectively a toxic mix in prisons. budget and staff cuts over recent yea rs
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budget and staff cuts over recent years at the same time as a rising rise in population. they save prisons are becoming far less safe. a p pa re ntly prisons are becoming far less safe. apparently there is £40 million being invested to increase staffing levels # £14 million. thank you. our latest headlines. the government is launching its vision for the future of british industry, designed to boost the economy after brexit. as we have just heard an independent report here is that staff failed to protect a mentally ill man who electrocuted him self in prison despite knowing he might take his only life. theresa may is facing pressure to reveal what she knew about a trident missile gone wrong.
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and in sport adams looks set to turn professional. the double olympic gold medallist was the first woman to become olympic boxing champion at london 2012. johanna konta says she is relishing the 12 of facing serena williams in the quarterfinals of the australian open. and ryan mason is said to be in a stable condition after undergoing surgery for a skull fracture. he clashed heads with gary hack k hill in the 2—0 loss to the blues. i'll be backjust after half past. mps are calling on the prime minister to explain what she knew about a trident missile veering off course last year. parliament was not
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told about the incident. during a bbc interview theresa may fails to a nswer bbc interview theresa may fails to answer questions about it. let's go to our assistant political editor. so what did she know and when did you know it? i wish i knew. ministers are refusing to give any information about when mrs may was alerted to the failure and wide parliament on the cusp of that crucial vote revolving around £40 billion of taxpayer money for upgrading trident, why parliament wasn't informed. today we have no new information. whether that will stick is cracks chewable because the expectation is that the defence secretary will either volunteer to make a statement or will be forced to give a statement. he is always had, so far the business secretary offering this is exploration that it
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would be damaging to national security of this sort of information was put in the public domain. have a listen. if you have a policy you have it for a good reason. if you have tests all the time. obviously that is sensitive information to enemies, to the very people that we have this protection against. so i think you have to abide by that policy, that you don't, every time there is a test, make a commentary on it. if you do that and think you have stick by that. so what are we to make of all this? iam by that. so what are we to make of all this? i am joined by that. so what are we to make of all this? iamjoined by by that. so what are we to make of all this? i am joined by the former labour defence minister. is it credible that mrs may did not know? no. in my experience with the minister ministry of defence. the prime minister is always informed. so the argument that she knew the reason she did not say anything was because she did not want to compromise national security.“
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ecuador? no, because if you look at protests that took place, the mod usually press release them. there is a full description of these test in a full description of these test in a book. they are not secret. the idea that ministers are trying to hide behind secrecy for this, someone took a really a decision not to publicise this. we need to know why. in terms of the debate over trident, how do you think this risks damaging support for the nuclear deterrent? i don't think it would change the outcome of the debate but certainly for someone like myself, a strong advocate for it, it doesn't help if you have a ham—fisted approach trying to cover up this type of information. doesn't it suggest perhaps that our nuclear deterrent is now ageing and maybe is no longerfit for deterrent is now ageing and maybe is no longer fit for purpose? no, because it is not a regular test as mrs may said yesterday. that is a
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sickness —— factual inaccuracy. it is on every four years. it is currently undergoing renewal. the test was to test the actual rockets and their capabilities. so no, it is not. what they have done in obscuring this news does not help that case, though. how seriously do you take the call from some that parliament should have the debate again because all the debate was not put in the public domain and mps we re put in the public domain and mps were possibly misled about the reliability of trident? nonsense. we had a vote in the last labour government, the defence select committee did a thorough investigation. all the facts are out there. all this has done is muddy there. all this has done is muddy the waters. the summaries and someone took the decision not put this information out. and that is reg retta ble. this information out. and that is regrettable. thank you for your time. we may find out in the next hour whether michael fallon is going to have to come before the house. i
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imagine that is the expectation of most mps will stop one other side barfrom this, the most mps will stop one other side bar from this, the chairman of the conservative defence, julian lewis, is actually blaming david cameron for withholding the information. he is suggesting mr cameron's media tea m is suggesting mr cameron's media team advised him not to reveal details about this, it is something they have denied this morning. thank you, norman. us president donald trump told fox news last week that monday would be the day that he and his administration start signing and working and making "great deals" for the country. let's take a look at mr trump's first full business day: the us is five hours
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behind british time. despite his plans a busy agenda, it isa despite his plans a busy agenda, it is a rout over many people did or did not attend his inauguration on friday that has dominated media coverage over the last 48 hours. the way his team have dealt with the press has also been coming under scrutiny. this was the largest audience to ever witness and inauguration, period. both in person and around the globe. even the new york times printed a photograph showing a misrepresentation of the crowd in the original tweet in their paper, which showed the full extent of the crowd which existed. these attempts
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to lessen the enthusiasm of the inauguration are shameful and wrong. don't be so overly dramatic about it. you're saying it's a false ode and sean spicer gave alternative facts to that. alternative facts? four of the five facts he uttered we re four of the five facts he uttered were not true! alternative facts are not facts, they are false roads. to think it is a fact or not that millions of people have lost their doctors and health care under obama? he was here for eight years, trump has been here for eight hours. there is an accession by the media to delegitimise this. we're not going to sit around and let it happen. we will fight back to that and nail every day and twice on sundays. it's a shame the cia did not have a cia
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director to be with him today when he visited. democrats are stalling the nomination and playing politics with national security. that is what you guys should be writing and covering, instead of sowing division about tweets and false narratives. the president is committed to unifying our country and this is the focus of his inaugural address. this in the media is making this more difficult. there's been a lot of talk about holding him accountable. i'm here to tell you it goes both ways. we will hold a press accountable as well. the american people deserve better and as long as he serves as the messenger for this incredible movement he will take his message directly to the american people where his focus will always be. that was the new white house press secretary. just a flavour of
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the row about inauguration day. tonight on bbc news we have a new programme covering donald trump's first acts as president, brexit and more. that is at seven o'clock this evening. scientists are warning that overcooked foods including potatoes, toast, crisps and waffles could increase the risk of developing cancer. the food standards agency's "go for gold" campaign says over—browning food for more flavour and crunch produces a potentially harmful compound called acrylamide. our health correspondent robert pigott reports. the warning includes some of the most popular foods in the british diet, such as crisps, chips, cakes and biscuits. the longer they're cooked above 120 celsius, the more acrylamide they contain. those foods go through a browning process, which many of us like in terms of flavour and taste, but it also produces this acrylamide.
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the sugars in starchy foods such as your breakfast toast combine with the molecules that make up protein to produce acrylamide that can damage the dna in cells. we know that in animal studies it can create cancer and so we are concerned if there is the same mechanism in people that high exposure could increase people's risk. the fsa says people should go for gold, aiming for gold and yellow in baking, roasting, frying or toasting rather than something darker. it says eating a balanced diet rich in vegetables will guard against cancer. cancer research uk says acrylamide might be harmful to people but insists there are other far bigger proven dangers — being obese, drinking too much and especially smoking. let's see what the weather is doing. well you'll need plenty of hot
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buttered toast before stepping out this morning. it was freezing and foggy and some of the fog is lingering. expecting some of it to stay across the south east south east and east today. that will affect the temperatures elsewhere. there will be sunshine coming through elsewhere, a bit more of a breeze to the west. slightly milder, eight or 9 degrees. but mostly four or five eight or 9 degrees. but mostly four orfive and eight or 9 degrees. but mostly four or five and if the fog lingers struggling to climb above freezing. the fog will build overnight but further west wayne will rain will come in. that where the front pushes into the north—west. by then just band of drizzle. it stays mild to the west, colder to the east, but hopefully the fog will lift away as the breeze starts to pick up. but there is the potential first thing tomorrow morning for widespread and
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dense freezing fog. tune into your bbc local radio stations for updates. the supreme court is about to rule on whether the government needs parliament's on whether the government needs pa rliament‘s approval to on whether the government needs parliament's approval to trigger article 50. it is the biggest decision the court has ever made and it will affect the most important issue now facing britain. join us for the ruling. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: the prime minister, theresa may, is set to unveil a new industrial strategy aimed at boosting the post—brexit economy — and seeing the government stepping up to "a new, active role". an independent report
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into the death of dean saunders — a mentally—ill man, who took his own life in chelmsford prison last year, has found staff failed to do enough to protect him, despite the risk that he might kill himself. theresa may is under pressure from labour and the snp, who are urging the government to give a full explanation to mps on how a test firing of a trident missile went wrong back injune. scientists from the food standards agency warn that overcooking foods like bread, chips and potatoes could increase the risk of cancer because they increase the amount of the chemical acrylamide. us president donald trump begins his first full business day in office by announcing the start of ‘great deals' for america. could double olympic gold medallist, nicola adams,
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be about to turn professional? adams won the first gold medal available to women boxers at the london olympics, a feat she repeated four years later in rio. ryan mason is said to be in a stable condition, after undergoing surgery on a fractured skull. the hull city midfielder clashed heads with chelsea's gary cahill in their 2—0 loss to the blues yesterday. our sports news reporter richard conway is outside st mary's hospital where mason is being treated. any news on his condition this morning, richard? hull city put out a statement saying ryan mason had undergone surgery following that clash with gary cahill. there has been no further
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information but we expect a statement later. we expect an update on how he's getting on following the operation. a brain injury charity, headway, has congratulated staff for exemplary reaction to the incident, there was quick medical attention to both ryan mason and gary cahill following an incident in the first half of the game, which was stopped for around nine minutes, before ryan mason was stretchered off and brought to st mary ‘s hospital in paddington. we await further information about his condition. thank you. the football association are waiting for refereejon moss' report before deciding what action to take against arsenal manager arsene wenger. wenger was sent off in injury—time during arsenal's 2—1win over burnley on sunday after protesting at moss awarding the visitors a penalty. he then pushed fourth official anthony taylor. wenger served touchline bans in 2009
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and 2010 after incidents against manchester united and tottenham respectively. i should have kept my control and apologise for that. they should have shut up. i was frustrated, that is for sure. is that the message from officials at the time? yep, of course. britain'sjohanna konta has continued her dominant form in the australian open, reaching the quarterfinals. the world number nine beat russia's ekaterina makarova 6—1, 6—4, and hasn't dropped a set in entire tournament. konta is the last remaining briton in the singles draw, and says she's relishing the challenge of playing 22—time grand slam champion serena williams next. it will be the first time on court
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against and it will be the first time on court againstandi it will be the first time on court against and i am looking forward to competing against her, she is one of the, if not the best player, so i think to play against someone like that who you also grew up watching, it is another great opportunity for me to take a really great load of experience from. one of britain's longest serving swimmers and olympic silver medallist keri—anne payne has called time on her illustrious career. payne — seen here in the red cap — finished eighth in the 10k swimming marathon at rio 2016. that's all sport for now. thank you. fresh peace talks aimed at bringing to an end the conflict in syria have begun in the kazakhstan capital,
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asta na. for the first time, the negotiations are being brokered by russia, turkey, and iran. also, for the first time, representatives of syria's main armed rebel groups are leading the opposition delegation. the talks are expected to last for two—days, although organisers are playing down expectations of a breakthrough to end the conflict, which has already claimed more than 300,000 lives. we must admit that the bloodshed that has continued in syria for approximately six years has brought nothing but misery and hardship to the whole region, regarded as an intersection of different of nations and cultures. kazakhstan is a peace—loving state and a nonpermanent member of the united nations security council and is interested in strengthening and promoting security and stability in the middle east. today's meeting is
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a clear manifestation of the international community's efforts directed towards peaceful settlement of the situation in syria. a police officer in belfast is in a sta ble a police officer in belfast is in a stable condition after being shot twice in the arm on the crumlin road in the north of the city. the northern ireland secretary has called the attack sickening. this incident underlines the risks that they take. and equally the nature of some of the challenges we continue to see northern ireland, where people will use violence to achieve their twisted or seek to achieve or advanced some ends. that has no place in northern ireland at all. it is political engagement in the peace process that we stand absolutely behind. powerful storms ripped through the south—eastern united states. the hardest hit was georgia,
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where 40 people died. the tornado also swept through southern mississippi, killing four people and injuring 20. more fierce storms are being forecast for southern georgia, as well as part of florida and alabama. an actor has died in australia after being shot during the filming of a music video. police said the man, who has not been named, was on a set at a bar in brisbane, when the incident happened. they say the film crew tried to resuscitate the actor, who died at the scene. it is not yet known if the gun was loaded with live ammunition. a police crackdown on motorists to use mobile phones illegally while driving has resulted in nearly a thousand drivers being caught in the space of seven days. 36 forces took part in the operation in november. the national police chief counsel has released the figures and a new clamp—down gets under way today. a special adviser
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to the gambia's new president says that more than $11 million are thought to be missing from the state coffers after the departure of the long—time ruler, yahya jammeh. the president remains in senegal and it is unclear when he will return to the gambia to retake office. yahya jammeh was thrown out of the country after pressure from regional leaders have threatened to use force to remove him. our africa correspondent reports from the capital, banjul. it was the first chance gambians had to celebrate the country's only ever peaceful change of president in half a century. the dates of state is where they gathered, knowing a new ca rd where they gathered, knowing a new card is on its way into power. the crowd welcomed foreign troops, a regionalforce crowd welcomed foreign troops, a regional force led by the senegalese. the threat of military action helped remove the president who refused to accept election defeat. now, there are extra
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security will help smooth the transition. 24 hours earlier, former president yahya jammeh had come to the airport, finally persuaded by regional heads of state that it was time to leave the gambia. this is what democracy in africa can look like. a dictatorial leader of 22 yea rs, like. a dictatorial leader of 22 years, peacefully leaving the country. it has taken the persuasion of presidents of neighbouring countries and the threat of force but he is going. with an eccentric flourish, he boarded the plane ultimately taking him on to a new home in equatorial guinea. but there is concern over how much state money he took with him. it was an emotional moment for those waiting. ya hya emotional moment for those waiting. yahya jammeh still has many supporters here, just not enough to win an election. what he did as the best thing for the country. we saying, thank you, president yahya
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jammeh, for leaving the gambia. without bloodshed, going out without bloodshed. we say thank you for that. with their old president gone, the streets are getting busier again. after days of desertion amid the fighting. there is one must have item in the market, they could have been jailed item in the market, they could have beenjailed for item in the market, they could have been jailed for selling these one week ago. this musician also had to avoid authorities as he and his crew spray—painted the city. avoid authorities as he and his crew spray-painted the city. it was really unsafe and then, if i was going to be one of those people tortured or killed or missing, but me and my team did not care about that. we just wanted to free our people. the president is still in senegal. he says he will be back when it is safe. others who fled
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across the border are already heading home, to a new country led bya heading home, to a new country led by a new democratically elected leader. a cluster of rural villages in the mid—sixties, milton keynes was conceived 50 years ago as a brand new town to ease the housing shortages in london. in the decades that followed it became the uk's fastest growing economy, and while some people associate it with endless roads and roundabouts, those who live there have a very different view. graham satchell has been to find out how the town is evolving. # milton keynes, this is our home... # milton keynes, a place of our own.# a love song to milton keynes. lizzie bancroft moved here in 1968. # milton keynes, takes life in its stride.# i don't think i have spoken to somebody who lives here who has said they don't like living here or they regretted moving here. they get it and they realise what a fantastic place it is to be. a beautiful name for a lovely village...
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milton keynes was the last of the post—war new towns, a collection of villages half—way between london and birmingham. it would become home to 250,000 people. the big inspiration behind milton keynes is an american urban designer called melvin webber who wanted to create community without propinquity which basically means loads of people together, but not all densely packed in. from the air you can see it, a grid, each square a community with no real centre. an american—style town built for the car. in the master plan were principles. one of them was freedom of choice. if you think about the grid, it always gives you the option to go another way. ken baker was part of the original design team 50 years ago. milton keynes has the freedom of choice and the grid offers it that. the grid gives freedom? yes. maybe, but on the ground, milton keynes can feel uninspiring.
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big roads and roundabouts means you can drive through it and not really see it or notice it. critics of milton keynes have been brutal. francis tybalt, the great urban designer, called it "bland, rigid, sterile and totally boring". and while some do hate it, milton keynes is surprising. it has 180 miles of footpaths and cycle tracks, the fastest growing economy in the uk. 22 million trees and shrubs. gill prince has taken a series of photographs called unexpected milton keynes. it's a fantastic place to live. it has 40% green space. the parks and gardens are lovely. it's an absolutely brilliant place to build a business, grow a family, anything you want to do. it's fabulous. the government has announced 14
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new garden towns and villages, so can they learn lessons from milton keynes? well, this isn't part of the original master plan of milton keynes. it's incredibly narrow. there's nowhere to park. milton keynes itself is expanding rapidly. but campaigners say new developments here are too densely populated and the original principles of the town have been lost. myopic people with the wrong agenda who don't realise the greatness of what they've got. that's being copied all over the world, but here they're busy destroying it. love it or hate it, nothing with the open spaces, the high—minded design principles has been tried since and 50 years on, nothing like it is planned today. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour. first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the government launches its vision
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for the future of british industry, designed to boost the economy after brexiter. an independent report finds that stuff fails to protect a mentally ill man who electrocuted himself in prison, despite knowing there was a risk he would take his own life. theresa may is facing growing pressure to reveal what she knew about hameed test—firing of a trident missile went wrong. —— eight test missile. in the business news: as you've been hearing the prime minister will set out her vision for britain's industrial future today. theresa may's plans will set out how the government can help businesses through trade deals, extra skills, regulatory change, and fresh funding. we'll have more on this shortly. britain is set for slow growth over the next three years, according to an influential forecast. the ey item club, a respected forecasting group, says we are in for a "hard rebalancing" over the next few years as the weak pound means consumer
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spending will fall — but they expect exports to rise. samsung has released its response to the mobile phones which caught on fire, they said there were problems with the manufacturing of the batteries, not the actual phone. go figure. the prime minister is launching her industrial strategy for the post—brexit economy today — in a style that marks a more interventionist approach than previous conservative administrations. theresa may will set out her ideas on boosting support for industry — saying the government is "notjust stepping back, but stepping up to a new, active role". the business secretary, greg clark, says the proposals aim to help economic growth.
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one of the big themes of our industrial strategy is to build on our great successes. but also to help make sure we drive growth in all parts of the country. here is a very good example of this, we are in a catapult centre, which takes government research money to combine with industry and universities to help small businesses prosper in the future. the industrial strategy will be committed to driving very hard to spread the opportunities right across the country and to drive, notjustjobs, but really good, well—paying jobs in all parts of the country. it's going to be a big part of our strategy. investors have retreated to safe
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havens after the election of donald trump. although, he had the biggest market rally out of any president in us history, even bigger thanjfk, after the election victory. markets are waiting for more meat on the bone. more details on his economic policy. i will see you soon. beautifully presented. he doesn't hang around. he's gone! when it comes to finding a new relationship we know millions of people in the uk now turn to the internet. but can you always be certain the person you're speaking to is real? figures seen exclusively by the victoria derbyshire show that in the last year a record number of people — almost 4,000 — have become victims of online dating scams.
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so what makes someone send vast sums of money to a person they've never met? nicola rees has been to meet the women who've lost hundreds of thousands of pounds. judith is a university professor from winchester. in 2015, she decided to try online dating. john porter from decided to try online dating. john porterfrom london was her strongest match. like judas, porterfrom london was her strongest match. likejudas, he was a christian, who emphasised honesty and trust. he sounded wonderful on the phone. so, we started getting
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quite friendly quite quickly, really. john claimed to be working abroad. after weeks of daily m essa g es abroad. after weeks of daily messages and phone calls, the conversation turned to money. when he went to south africa, he said, i've got to have a bond of good faith against me not delivering the goods. well, i have known people who have been in business and they have to put up a bond of good faith, so i didn't think it was strange. he lost his passport, this was the story. the e—mail started getting a bit frantic. and i immediately, because i was so believing in him, i immediately said, don't worry, john, ican loan immediately said, don't worry, john, i can loan you some money. why might you are a respected academic, you're clearly intelligent, successful, articulate. judith, why was your judgment so poor it here? because i believed injohn. judgment so poor it here? because i believed in john. i judgment so poor it here? because i believed injohn. i believed i was helping him and was completely
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bowled over by him. with as many as one in three relationships in the uk now starting online, the internet is becoming an increasingly lucrative place for cyber criminals. we have discovered that last year alone, almost 4000 people were compared by online dating stammers, with losses amounting to a record £39 million. they are in foreign jurisdictions, they are in west africa, eastern europe, places like that. and it's very difficult for british law enforcement to take action against them in those jurisdictions.“ enforcement to take action against them in those jurisdictions. it was five months beforejudith realised she had been scammed. john porter did not exist. the photo was probably stolen. judas had sent £140,000 to an organised criminal gangs. i won't get any of the money back. i have to tell myself that it was complete fraud, so feeling sorry
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for myself is just not an issue. you're dealing with the best salesman in the world. they don't have a product, theyjust want to ta ke have a product, theyjust want to take your money and they will run you over time and i can totally see why you fall for that. that was nicola rees reporting. it was the film that defined the cool britannia era, and made household names of its cast. more than twenty years later, the sequel to trainspotting has finally arrived. "t2 trainspotting" had its world premiere in edinburgh last night. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson was there. after more than 20 years, the trainspotting gang back together, on the orange carpet of the long—awaited sequel. hello, mark. so what have you been up to for the last 20 years? we had a real duty not to disappoint people because the film has affection in people's hearts, so you don't want to ruin it and tarnish that image, so i hope we haven't done that. aside from all the fun stuff in the first movie, i think people found it relatable. even though it was maybe about subjects they weren't involved in, it was still relatable
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in some way. it's carrying such a cultural weight associated with it that it feels like no event that i've been to before. choose life, choose a job, choose a career... trainspotting was the defining film of mid—‘90s cool britannia. the movie poster was on students' walls, the soundtrack in their cd players. it dealt with addiction, hedonism and friendship. for the sequel, ewan mcgregor‘s famous choose life speech has had an update. ‘choose life, choose facebook, twitter, instagram, and hope that someone, somewhere, cares'. there's something very deep and moving about finding out where they all are now, and i don't know of any movie that i've done, and there aren't very many that we've seen, where the characters become almost like people we know. it's fair to say the four
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guys have lived a bit. how do you think they've aged? there was always a moment in every shooting day where there was that 20 years later moment, where you felt 20 years had gone by since you were last playing this guy. need to detox the system. what does that even mean? it doesn't mean anything. it isn't getting it out of your body that's the problem, it's getting out of your mind. you're an addict. you think i haven't heard that 100,000 times? so be addicted. but be addicted to something else. after trainspotting came out, we were like the oasis of the movie industry in britain. we represented britpop movies. so there was a part of me that yearns for that again, i suppose. and he might not be finished with the role. the cast are already talking about trainspotting 3,
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using irvine welsh‘s latest novel as the starting point. i think the chances are good. i mean...i think irvine's just arrived now. i'm up for it, he's up for it, so i don't think you've seen the last of begbie just yet. we leave you with a look at the weather. here's louise lear. a quiet weather story can bring problems. it was a cold and frosty start across much of the country, debated by this picture. more significant was the problem of fog this morning. some of it dense and freezing in places. it will be slow to clear in places. if you're out and about orare to clear in places. if you're out and about or are heading towards airport stations, tune into your
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local bbc radio station for further traffic and travel updates. fog may be slow to clear in the south—east of england and also in parts of north—east england. elsewhere, the fog will lift to some sunshine. more ofa fog will lift to some sunshine. more of a breeze towards the west. more cloud here. temperatures will struggle to climb above freezing. but if the fog lifts and breaks up with some sunshine, it still will not be very warm. 5 degrees at the best. in the west, more sunshine across cornwall in parts of wales, 8 degrees, quite possible here. more breeze and cloud in northern ireland. and western scotland. into eastern scotland, a cold afternoon. at least there will be some sunshine. or decrease for aberdeen. this evening and overnight, winds will continue to strengthen. that will continue to strengthen. that will dry more cloud in and rain off the atlantic, across northern ireland into western scotland and eventually into north—west england.
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i had eventually into north—west england. ihada eventually into north—west england. i had a fat, a cold and frosty and foggy night for many. fog could be dense and slow to clear. tuesday, a contrast morning, fog for much of central and eastern england. for the north and west, the cloud and rain pushing into england and wales and by now a band of cloud and light drizzle. it will be milder in the west. double figures here. a cool day with 4 degrees at best. high pressure still in the driving seat. it looks as though it will stay increasingly windy. that will help lift the fog through the middle of the week. but it will turn my colour for the weekend. —— milder. and a
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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday. the government launches its vision for the future of british industry — it's designed to boost the economy after brexit. the prime minister says she wants people in all corners of the country to feel the benefits of economic growth. but what does it mean for business and for our jobs? growth. but what does it mean for business and for ourjobs? i'm here in warrington to find out. an independent report finds that staff failed to protect a mentally ill man who electrocuted himself in prison, despite knowing there was a risk he would take his own life. theresa may faces growing pressure to reveal what she knew about how the test firing of a trident missile went wrong. labour and the snp demand a full explanation. it's president trump's first full
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working day in office — he's said today will see the start of "great deals" for america. also, how dangerous is burnt toast? a warning from the food standards agency that overcooked foods could increase the risk of cancer. and milton keynes — one of the best known 20th century "new towns" built to ease housing shortages in london — celebrates its 50th birthday. good afternoon. it's monday the 23rd of january. welcome to bbc newsroom live. ministers are at a cabinet meeting — which is being held in the north west of england for the first time — to unveil a new vision for british industry.
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it's designed to give the economy a boost as the country prepares to leave the european union. theresa may says the government will take a "new, active role" — focusing on science, technology and infrastructure — but labour is describing the plans as "too little, too late." for more on this, our business presenter, ben thompson is in warrington for us now. you're quite near to the meeting is happening. that's right. we are in warrington, just four miles down the road from where mrs may will make the announcement. like many businesses in this part of the world this place wants to know what it will mean for them. it refines and mixes oil to make some of the lubricants we use in things like ca rs lubricants we use in things like cars and machinery. they are a perfect example of the sort of
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businesses theresa may worlds talk about later. on one hand they are a manufacturing success story, they sell up and down the country but also exports to places like asia. the made in england brand they can put in the barrels they sell is a real selling point for them around the world. but at the same time, like many other manufacturing businesses in this country, they know they cannot compete on cost alone. other countries around the world a re alone. other countries around the world are able to keep their costs down and can undercut them. so what they need to do is come up with smarter, better, more efficient ways of making the products they do. so here they are investing £3 million ina new here they are investing £3 million in a new research and development facility. it is on this site and will let them do all of that. one of the key things they want to hear from the promised today is about the so—called soft infrastructure, not just about building roads and ra i lwa ys just about building roads and railways and internet connections, but also making sure staff have the
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right skills and training for the jobs that are available. that will bea jobs that are available. that will be a big issue, it is something they wa nt to be a big issue, it is something they want to hear from the be a big issue, it is something they want to hearfrom the prime minister and, crucially, they want the timing. how long will it take until the people with those skills are available to start work and how quickly will they see the investment thatis quickly will they see the investment that is promised filter through to the real economy? let's get more reaction to that. for more reaction on this, let's talk to luke wraikes — he's a senior researcher at the think tank ippr north, and joins us live from salford. what are your thoughts on this new industrial strategy? we strongly welcome it. it's about time we had an industrial strategy to compete with places like france, germany, the united states. we strongly welcome in particular the regional element of this, that hopefully the powers will go down to local and regional government in order to make sure it benefits from the assets across the country not just
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sure it benefits from the assets across the country notjust london in particular. how important is all of this with brexit in mind? it's absolutely essential. it would be good regardless of the situation. we are pleased always need to be competing, we have been behind other countries for a while. but it is more important than ever with brexit. benefits from the northern assets in particular that are very strong in this country but have not been invested in for a long time. we're seeing pictures just coming in off cabinet meeting in cheshire. all pa rt off cabinet meeting in cheshire. all part of the government's attempt to show that cabinet meetings don't just happen in downing street, they wa nt to just happen in downing street, they want to get around the country. this is as the government launch this new industrial strategy that we are talking about. do you think there needs to be a rebalancing of british industry, that this country has some
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would say become overreliant on the services industry? we think it's become overreliant on industry and on london, because that is the only place that has seen investment. if we we re place that has seen investment. if we were to invest in the north then the country would be able to punch its own weight in the world and in the context of brexit that is even more important. is the government and doing enough to have a coordinated strategy would you say? it's obviously difficult because traditionally some conservative governments have tried to let industry go its own way and do its own saying, not wanting to be too interventionist. there has been quite a dogmatic approach ofjust not intervening, and that has left us behind many of our competitor countries. from what we can see, this new strategy does look interventionist and that is what is needed. thank you very much. our political correspondent, eleanor garnier is covering the cabinet meeting
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at daresbury in cheshire. we would just seeing pictures of it. how important do you think this is to the government and to the prime minister, this relaunch if you like, of british industrial strategy? it's very important. and it's part of theresa may's plan to prepare the country for brexit. to improve productivity, boost skills where business is concerned. there is a huge crisis. that is why they have come to this campus, a science and innovation campus, here in cheshire. the cabinet meeting started about 15 minutes ago and lasts for about an hour. theresa may has come here to launch this industrial strategy because she wants to invest in areas around the country, notjust london and the south—east, and she wants to make that message loud and clear, if you like, to ensure that the
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investment the government puts around the country helps countries that are notjust around the country helps countries that are not just already doing around the country helps countries that are notjust already doing well but those countries —— companies that are struggling. the different areas this is designed to help, they areas this is designed to help, they are designed to get rid of red tape and bureaucracy, there will be an investment plan, investing region by region and project by project, recognising that while something manchester needs and wants will be the same as what cornwall meets and wa nts. the same as what cornwall meets and wants. and thirdly investing in skills because that is what business is concerned about. there will be new institutes of technology with £170 million of investment to help with that. that will focus on stemmed stub jets like science, technology, engineering and maths. this is with the idea that will happen at will help to grow skills
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in those particular areas. the concern is that once we leave the eu this might be harderfor businesses to employ people from across the world, but more particularly the eu, that have the skills that are so crucial for businesses up and down the country. one interesting thing about this about this new industrial strategy from the prime minister, it is far more active, far more interventionist than strategies we are seeing from governments before. i think that shows theresa may thinks that for the success of business to spread around the country and reach everybody needs a bit of help from government, a bit ofa bit of help from government, a bit of a shove, if you like, to make sure the benefits are shared. thank you. we arejust we are just hearing this morning that theresa may according to downing street was told about last yea r‘s test of that downing street was told about last year's test of that trident missile that misfired. there was a lot of
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criticism of the prime minister after the andrew marr interview yesterday when she was asked four times whether she knew about it and did not give a clear answer. letters get the latest now from norman smith. see if you can shed some light on this for us. what are downing street saying now?|j light on this for us. what are downing street saying now? i would like to say things are clear but honestly they aren't. what downing street is saying is that the prime minister was briefed on nuclear issues and this was part of the nuclear brief and she was given. routinely she would be told when these tests were carried out, bart, and it's a big but, they are not saying there is any misfiring of the missile and they are not saying mrs may was told about a potential misfiring. so all they are saying is that mrs may was told about nuclear issues, this was a nuclear issue, she would have been test the ten ——
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told the test was carried out but not necessarily that the test went wrong. having spoken to defence ministers, they say it is simply not credible to suggest mrs may would not have been told if a nuclear missile had misfired and inevitably, iimagine, missile had misfired and inevitably, i imagine, there are going to be renewed calls for clarity about if there was a misfiring why on earth parliament was not told. at the moment i understand that the defence secretary will not be making a statement of his own volition, he has not volunteered to come to the house of commons and make a statement, but we may find out in the next ten minutes or so, whether he likes it or not he may have to come to the commons if the speaker decides to grant one of the several urgent questions which have been put down, demanding he is asked. in brief, we are not massively further forward. we do not know what mrs may
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actually knew that we do not know whether there was a misfiring of the trident missile. obviously, it has not been categorically denied, there has not been footage of the test launch which we would usually get. the working assumption is that yes, the missile went a wall and may have even been heading to america. downing street are not confirming that and are indeed stressing mrs may's conviction that the reliability and capability of our trident missiles. thank you. an investigation into the death of a
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prisoner has found a catalogue of errors. dean saunders was seriously mentally ill, found the report, and needed hospital treatment. it is concluded the hospital system did too little to help this vulnerable man. dean saunders had no history of previous mental illness but in 2015 he suddenly became paranoid and delusional, convinced he had to kill himself. he brought the knife down and it
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didn't cut, and that's where we both realised in his haste it was the back of the blade that had gone to his throat. that was my opportunity. i was back on him and this time i got him in a bear hug again but the hand with a knife was free and this time he came down to put it in his heart, in his chest. and just at the last moment i thought, all i can do...i last moment i thought, all i can do... i moved my arm in the way so that one went in my arm. as dean tried to kill himself mark was stabbed in his stomach, but held the knife in place to save his son's life. at that time i thought i can't let in have this knife. i put my hand over the top of his so he could not pull it out. he tried, as he tried to pull it out, i held it in,
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i could not let him have the knife. dean saunders was charged with attempted murder and sent to chelmsford prison, initially on co nsta nt chelmsford prison, initially on constant observation. but then three staff, none of whom were medically trained or had read his notes, reduced his observations to every half—hour. the inquest heard the cost of keeping constant watch may have been a consideration. the manager who led the meeting to need denied these considerations will stop they said they're phoning to tell you that they decided 30 minutes is sufficient. and i said i'm telling you now if you don't put my son back on constant watch he will kill himself. you won't be able say you didn't know, you hadn't been told you we ren't say you didn't know, you hadn't been told you weren't aware, because you know. and if he kills himself it will be your fault. efforts were made to move dean to a secure hospital but a shortage of beds and delays over christmas and new year meant it never happened. onjanuary
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four last year, dean saunders killed himself. his partner now has two raise their son without his father. we openly talk about dean. we say daddy this, daddy that. i suppose i kind of promise to dean there will never be a day that will pass that teddy won't know how much you love him. dean was so looking forward to the point where teddy would be walking and running and kicking a foot ball walking and running and kicking a football with him. two days after dean went, teddy started walking. he missed it by two days. the inquest was told repeatedly that dean saunders should have been in hospital not present. but basic failure contributed to this loving family being ripped apart. the government launches its vision for the future of british industry —
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its designed to boost the economy after brexit. an independent report finds that staff failed to protect a mentally ill man who electrocuted himself in prison, despite knowing there was a risk he would take his own life. theresa may faces growing pressure to reveal what she knew about how the test firing of a trident missile went wrong. nicola adams looks set to turn bore professional after leaving gb boxing's world class performance programme to pursue other career opportunities. there has been much speculation about her future after she defended her title last summer. the double olympic gold medallist was the first woman to ever become an olympic boxing champion, at london 2012. she now looks set to turn professional at the age of 34. and ryan mason is said to be in a stable condition
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after undergoing surgery for a skull fracture. the hull city midfielder clashed heads with chelsea's gary cahill, in their 2—0 loss to the blues. despite winning the final one—day international match against india, india's dashed —— england's coach said this... the bowling was probably a little disappointing, we seemed bowl well in the past. there's reason they can't do it again going forward. it's just one of those things, every now and then, you go through a period. i don't think we bowled quite enough balls in the right area in this series. johanna konta has continued her dominant form in the australian open. she won 6—1, 6—4, and hasn't
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dropped a set all tournament. she's the last reigning britain in the singles draw and is ravishing challenge of playing 22—time champion serena williams next. kerri anne payne has called time on her illustrious career. you can see her in the red cap. she finished eighth in the red cap. she finished eighth in the marathon at rio 2016. in a 13 year international career she finished second at the beijing olympics in 2008 and one world marathon titles in 2011 and 2013. that's all for now. we'll bring you the latest on the reports about the misfiring of the trident missile and whether or not
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the prime minister knew about it before a debate on renewing trident. we are now hearing there is to be an urgent question on trident from labour's former defence minister kevan jones and labour's former defence minister kevanjones and that means a defence minister from kevanjones and that means a defence ministerfrom the kevanjones and that means a defence minister from the government would force to come to the house of commons. we can see now pictures of the cabinet on the road with the prime minister in cheshire, where they are launching a new industrial strategy for britain. this is very much the political question of the day, what the promised to knew about the alleged misfiring of the trident missile last summer. we are hearing the speaker of the commons has granted an urgent question on trident from labour's former defence minister, so we will get a response from the government to that and perhaps a little more information. us president donald trump said last week that monday would be the day that he and his administration start signing and working and making
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"great deals" for the country. let's take a look at what his first full business day looks like: with the us five hours behind british time... despite his plans and busy agenda, it is a row over how many people did — or didn't — attend his inauguration on friday that's dominated media coverage over the past 48 hours. the way mr trump's team have dealt with the press has also come under scrutiny. this was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period. both in person and around the globe.
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even the new york times printed a photograph showing a misrepresentation of the crowd in the original tweet, in their paper, which showed the full extent of the support, depth and crowd which existed. these attempts to lessen the enthusiasm of the inauguration are shameful and wrong. don't be so overly dramatic about it. you're saying it's a falsehood and sean spicer gave alternative facts to that. alternative facts? four of the five facts he uttered were not true! alternative facts are not facts, they are false roads. —— falsehoods. -- falsehoods. you think it is a fa ct -- falsehoods. you think it is a fact or not that millions of people have lost their plans and health insurance and doctors under obama? choosing it is a fact that everything heard by these women yesterday heard on the watch of oh bomber? there is an assertion by the
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media to delegitimise the president. we're not going to sit around and let it happen. we will fight back and nail every day and twice on sunday. it is a shame the cia did not have a cia director to be with him today when he visited because the democrats have chosen to stall the democrats have chosen to stall the nomination and are playing politics with national security. that is what you guys should be writing and covering. instead of sowing division about tweets and false narratives. the president is committed to unifying our country and that was the focus of his inaugural address. this kind of dishonesty in the media is making it more difficult to bring our nation together. there has been talk about holding donald trump accountable. it goes both ways. we will hold the press accountable as well. the american people deserve better and as long as he serves as the
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messenger for this global movement he will take his message directly to the american people where his focus will always be. more. that was sean spicer on the current row. we've just heard that trump is tweeting again. he said busy week planned with focus on jobs and national security. executives coming in to talk manufacturing in america. that is his latest tweet. and from tonight on the bbc news channel we have a new programme covering donald trump's first acts as president, the brexit effect and much more. that's 100 days, with katty kay in washington and christian fraser in london, at 7pm. the mother of a writer who was found dead in a septic tank at her home
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in hertfordshire has told a court that her daughter had complained of feeling tired and forgetful in the weeks before her disappearance. helen bailey's partner ian stewart is accused of her murder. our correspondent ben ando has been following the case at st albans crown court. what is the latest that the court has heard? the lady is 88 years old now and has given evidence via video link from her home. she told the jury that she and her daughter spoke often on the phone and in the weeks before she disappeared in april last year helen bailey had said to her mother that she was worried about her state of mind. she said she felt spaced out and had suffered from memory lapses. she described to in particular, one where she went to the supermarket and found after she left that she was still holding the scanner she
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had used to check prices, and another where she went for the four award on the beach with her dog and got home to find she had left him out there. her partner went out to retrieve him. mrs bailey said her daughter was traumatised by this. she said she kept repeating, you know, ma'am, iwould never do this. she was devoted to the dog. she described another time when her daughter said she had slept for five hours in the morning after a full nights sleep. completely out of character. mrs bailey said she was uneasy about her daughter's relationship with mr stewart. it is the prosecution's case that he was giving her sleeping drugs that were prescribed to him and then killed her and put her in body in the septic tank outside the home they shared. he denies this.
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scientists are warning that overcooked foods including potatoes, toast, crisps and waffles could increase the risk of developing cancer. the food standards agency's "go for gold" campaign says over—browning food for more flavour and crunch produces a potentially harmful compound called acrylamide. our health correspondent robert pigott reports. the warning includes some of the most popular foods in the british diet, such as crisps, chips, cakes and biscuits. the longer they're cooked above 120 celsius, the more acrylamide they contain. those foods go through a browning process, which many of us like in terms of flavour and taste, but it also produces this acrylamide. the sugars in starchy foods such as your breakfast toast combine with the molecules that make up protein to produce acrylamide that can damage the dna in cells. we know that in animal studies it can create cancer and so we are concerned if there is the same mechanism in people that high exposure could increase people's risk. the fsa says people should go
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for gold, aiming for gold and yellow in baking, roasting, frying or toasting rather than something darker. it says eating a balanced diet rich in vegetables will guard against cancer. cancer research uk says acrylamide might be harmful to people but insists there are other far bigger proven dangers — being obese, drinking too much and especially smoking. a look at the weather now. fogg has been causing a few problems this morning. it is still still pretty market would serve coast but things should improve as cloud works its way south. there will be showers coming into the northwest of england and wales. north—west of scotland has a bit of cloud. most of us have clear scummy skies. —— sunny skies.
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temperatures between seven and 9 degrees, quite mild. the england and wales it is different. the frost will be back. temperatures as low as -6 will be back. temperatures as low as —6 in the countryside. notjust frosty but with fog again. probably the worst of it will be across the midlands and central southern england as we go through the day. some of it will linger through the afternoon. outside of that, there will be sunshine but it will stay cold. northern ireland and scotland will be quite cloudy. temperatures up will be quite cloudy. temperatures up to 10 degrees in belfast. the supreme court is about to rule on whether the government needs parliament's on whether the government needs pa rliament‘s approval to on whether the government needs parliament's approval to trigger article 50. it is the biggest decision to court has ever made. it
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will affect the most important issue now facing britain. join us for the ruling and all the reaction. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: the prime minister, theresa may, is set to unveil a new industrial strategy aimed at boosting the post—brexit economy — and seeing the government stepping up to "a new, active role". prime minister theresa may was informed about a recent test of the trident nuclear deterrent when she came into office last year, downing street says, but a spokesperson refused to confirm or deny reports that a missile malfunctioned during the test. an independent report into the death of dean saunders — a mentally—ill man — who took his own life in chelmsford prison last year — has found staff failed to do enough to protect him, despite the risk that he might kill himself.
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scientists from the food standards agency warn that overcooking foods like bread, chips and potatoes could be a ‘potential cancer risk‘ because they increase the amount of the chemical acrylamide. anticipating president donald trump's first full day in office— george stephanopoulos and cecilia vega from abc's good morning america, took a look back over controversial events over the weekend and looked forward to what we can expect at today's press briefing. no surprise, the president has taken to twitter this morning. why not start the week on twitter? and that is what donald trump did. a busy week planned with a focus on jobs and national security. if he makes good on his campaign promises, he will sign executive orders to
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rollback policies of president barack obama on everything from trade to immigration. this morning, president trump potentially headed for a new legal battle, a liberal watchdog group alleging the president is violating the constitution and they are suing him. the presidents were in his senior staff from... the first order of business for the new administration, a fight over facts. no questions allowed during the press secretary first white house briefing, instead he ripped into supporters for the cove rage of he ripped into supporters for the coverage of the inauguration crowd size. this was the largest audience to ever win size. this was the largest audience to everwin as size. this was the largest audience to ever win as an inauguration period. both in person and around the globe. the problem is, that's not true. there was no official crowd count but there are photos. on
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the left, obama's thousand nine inauguration, on the right, president trump's. the images taken at the exact same location two minutes apart. spicer also claimed there were more dc metro riders per president trump's inauguration of president trump's inauguration of president obama's. a transit officials say they were actually more than 200,000 fewer writers friday than the 2013 swearing in. when pressed, counsellor to the president, kellyanne conway, said spicer offered "alternative facts". he had hundreds of thousands of people here. there's no question. i was only president's platform. you could see people as is the eye could see. they told the new york times may have been as many as three times more people at the women's march in washington on a tram's inauguration. it was that speech by the president himself at the cia net launch the debate. bill murray when all the way back to the washington monument. i think they will be a big price. seam—mac if you're going to live,
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don't make it so obvious. not that you are lebron james. don't make it so obvious. not that you are lebronjames. now that dissident to the memorial wall to falle n dissident to the memorial wall to fallen heroes. and the president spent much time bashing the media and rehashing his election win. i did not sit well with the former cia director, who said it was a despicable display of self aggrandising. kellyanne conway told me yesterday... you're going to see a real confrontational atmosphere in the briefing room today. that is the way that good morning america on abc news television in america is viewing the first full day in office of donald trump in the white house. the first full working day in the white house and we will bring you more on that later. an update on that urgent question on the question
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about the trident missile and whether it misfired or not last year. there will be an urgent question in the commons at which the government will put out the defence secretary, sir michael fallon, he will be answering questions from the former labour defence minister, kevinjones, on whether or not that trident missile did misfired and whether the prime minister, theresa may, did know about it before the debate on trend in the commons. what she knew and when she knew it. all of that this afternoon, we think it about 3:30pm. the defence secretary will answer that question and we will answer that question and we will bring you full coverage of that here on the bbc news channel. as we've been hearing, theresa may is to unveil a new, more interventionist, industrial strategy on monday, designed to boost the post—brexit uk economy. theresa may said the government will ta ke theresa may said the government will take what she called a new active role, focusing on science, technology and infrastructure.
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that's talked to the chief economist at the manufacturers association, the eef. thank you forjoining us. how important is this government industrial strategy?” how important is this government industrial strategy? i think it's really positive that an industrial strategy is back on the government's agenda and that it is the prime minister making the announcement about the consultation today. i think industry, particularly in the context of potential uncertainty through the brexit negotiations, to come over the next couple of years, looking for real clarity about the management of the uk economy. it is important to note this is the start ofa important to note this is the start of a process, rather than an event, so making a judgment on whether or not this is enough is going to be difficult. it is enough, in the sense that it is the start of a conversation and engagement with industry about future policy of the government. and what do you think that industrial strategy should be? i think, from what we have seen so
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far, it is focusing on some of the right areas, in terms of the horizontal or crosscutting policies, important to sustain bruce croft businesses —— to sustain growth across businesses. reducing cost, thatis across businesses. reducing cost, that is critical. some interesting ideas and sector deals, how we can build on previous successes of the automotive council, the aerospace growth partnership, to make sure the uk's growth partnership, to make sure the uk's leading in the development of new technologies and new capabilities that will be really important for future investment in the country. and all of this more important than ever in the wake of the brexit vote? it is important in the brexit vote? it is important in the context of brexit but i think you could argue that this is something we have really needed to nail down since the financial crisis. the uk has been overly dependent on household spending as a means to drive growth, we have a problem of productivity, we don't innovate enough, so, it has kind of crystallised it, with the vote to
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leave the european union but i think the time was right to really with this agenda forward, right across government. i think that's most important. thank you. fresh peace talks aimed at bringing to an end the conflict in syria have begun in the kazakhstan capital, asta na. for the first time, the negotiations are being brokered by russia, turkey, and iran. also, for the first time, representatives of syria's main armed rebel groups are leading the opposition delegation. the talks are expected to last for two—days, although organisers are playing down expectations of a breakthrough to end the conflict, which has already claimed more than 300,000 lives. we must admit that the bloodshed that has continued in syria for approximately six years has brought nothing but misery and hardship to the whole region, regarded as an intersection of different nations and cultures.
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kazakhstan, as a peace—loving state and a nonpermanent member of the united nations security council is interested in strengthening and promoting security and stability in the middle east. today's meeting is a clear manifestation of the international community's efforts directed towards peaceful settlement of the situation in syria. police say one man has been arrested after an officer was shot in belfast last night. the officer is in a stable condition after being hit twice in the arm when a number of shots were fired from a car on the crumlin road in the north of the city. the northern ireland secretaryjames brokenshire has called the attack sickening. this incident underlines the risks that they take. and equally the nature of some of the challenges we continue to see in northern ireland, where people will use violence to achieve their twisted — or seek to achieve or advance some ends.
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that has no place in northern ireland at all. it is political engagement in the peace process that we stand absolutely behind. at least 18 people have been killed after powerful storms ripped through the south eastern united states. authorities say hardest hit was georgia, where 14 people died. a tornado also swept through southern mississippi, killing four and injuring 20 people. more fierce storms — including tornadoes — are being forecast for southern georgia, as well as parts of florida and alabama. a police crackdown on motorists who use mobile phones illegally while driving has resulted in nearly 8,000 drivers being caught in the space of seven days. 36 forces took part in the operation in november. the national police chiefs' council has released the figures as a new clamp—down gets under way today. the world's biggest smartphone maker, samsung, has blamed faulty
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batteries for the fires that led to the recall of its flagship galaxy note 7. the company was forced to discontinue the device after a chaotic recall that saw replacement phones also catching fire. the korean electronics giant said it apologised for the defect, and had learned lessons from what happened. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website where you'll be able to get more details on all those stories. when it comes to finding a new relationship we know millions of people in the uk now turn to the internet. but can you always be certain the person you're speaking to is real? figures seen exclusively by the victoria derbyshire show that in the last year a record number of people — almost 4,000 — have become victims of online dating scams. between them they were conned out of 39—million—pounds.
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according to the national fraud intelligence bureau that's the highest total ever recorded. so what makes someone send vast sums of money to a person they've never met? nicola rees has been to meet the women who've lost hundreds of thousands of pounds. millions of us use dating websites but not everyone online is looking for love. every yea r, but not everyone online is looking for love. every year, millions are conned by criminals using fake profiles. i woke up in the middle of the night and suddenly realised, not only positives camp at this so called john was part of his gang. ! judith is a university professor from winchester. in 2015, she decided to try online dating. john porter from decided to try online dating. john porterfrom london was decided to try online dating. john porter from london was strongest match. byjudith, he was a christian, who emphasised honesty and trust. he sounded wonderful on
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the phone. so, we started getting quite friendly quite quickly, really. john claimed to be working abroad. after weeks of messages and phone calls, the conversation turned to money. when he went to south africa, he said, i've got to have a bond of good faith against me, not delivering the goods. well, i have known people in business and they have to put up a bond of good faith, so, again, i didn't think it was strange. he lost his passport, this was the story, the e—mail started getting a bit frantic and i immediately, because i was so believing in him, i immediately said, don't worry, john, i can lend you some money. you're a respected academic, you're clearly intelligent, successful, articulate. judith, why was yourjudgment is so poor here? because i believed in john. i believe i was helping him.
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and i was completely bowled over by him. with as many as one in three relationships in the uk now starting online, the internet is becoming an increasingly lucrative place for cyber criminals. we have discovered that last year alone, almost 4000 people were compared by online dating scammers, with losses amounting to a record £39 million. they are in foreign jurisdictions, we st they are in foreign jurisdictions, west africa, eastern europe, places like that. and it's very difficult for british law enforcement to take action against them. it was five months before judith action against them. it was five months beforejudith realised she had been scammed. john porter didn't exist. the photo was probably stolen. judith had sent £140,000 to an organised criminal gangs.|j stolen. judith had sent £140,000 to an organised criminal gangs. i would get any of the money back. i'll have to tell myself that it was a
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com plete to tell myself that it was a complete fraud, so feeling sorry for myself is just not an issue. complete fraud, so feeling sorry for myself isjust not an issue. you're dealing with the best sales men in the world. they don't have a problem, theyjust will the world. they don't have a problem, they just will take the world. they don't have a problem, theyjust will take your money and groom your time and yes, i totally ca n money and groom your time and yes, i totally can see why you would fall for that. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: there will be an urgent question on the trident nuclear deterrent. an independent report finds staff failed to protect a man who took his own life in prison, despite him being seriously mentally ill and knowing there was a risk he would kill himself. the government is launching its vision for the future of british industry, designed to boost the economy after brexit. a special adviser to the gambia's
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new president, adama barrow, says more than $11 million are thought to be missing from state coffers following the departure of long—time ruler, yahya jammeh. president barrow remains in senegal, and it is unclear when he'll return to the gambia to take office. yahya jammeh was flown out of the country after pressure from regional leaders, who'd threatened to use force to remove him. our africa correspondent alastair leithead reports from the capital banjul. it was the first chance gambians had to celebrate the country's only ever peaceful change of president in half a century. the gates of state house is where they gathered, knowing a new guard is on its way into power. the crowd welcomed foreign troops, a regionalforce led by the senegalese. the threat of military action helped remove the president who refused to accept election defeat. now, their extra security will help smooth the transition. 24 hours earlier, former
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president yahya jammeh had come to the airport, finally persuaded by regional heads of state that it was time to leave the gambia. this is what democracy in africa can look like. a dictatorial leader of 22 years, peacefully leaving the country. it has taken the persuasion of presidents of neighbouring countries and the threat of force but he is going. with an eccentric flourish, he boarded the plane ultimately taking him on to a new home in equatorial guinea. but there is concern over how much state money he took with him. it was an emotional moment for those waiting. yahya jammeh still has many supporters here, just not enough to win an election. what he did is the best thing for the country. we're saying, thank you, president jammeh, for leaving the gambia. without bloodshed, going out without bloodshed. we say thank you for that.
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with their old president gone, the streets are getting busier again. after days of desertion amid the fighting. there is one must—have item in the market, they could have been jailed for selling these one week ago. this musician also had to avoid authorities as he and his crew spray—painted the city. it was really unsafe then, if i was going to be one of those people tortured or killed or missing, but me and my team did not care about that. we just wanted to free our people. the new president, adama barrow, is still in senegal. he says he will be back when it is safe. others who fled across the border are already heading home, to a new country led
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by a new democratically elected leader. a cluster of rural villages in the mid—sixties, milton keynes was conceived 50 years ago as a brand new town to ease the housing shortages in london. in the decades that followed it became the uk's fastest growing economy, and while some people associate it with endless roads and roundabouts, those who live there have a very different view. graham satchell has been to find out how the town is evolving. # milton keynes, this is our home... # milton keynes, a place of our own.# a love song to milton keynes. lizzie bancroft moved here in 1968. # milton keynes, takes life in its stride.# i don't think i have spoken to somebody who lives here who has said they don't like living here or they regretted moving here.
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they get it and they realise what a fantastic place it is to be. a beautiful name for a lovely village... milton keynes was the last of the post—war new towns, a collection of villages half—way between london and birmingham. it would become home to 250,000 people. the big inspiration behind milton keynes is an american urban designer called melvin webber who wanted to create community without propinquity which basically means loads of people together, but not all densely packed in. from the air you can see it, a grid, each square a community with no real centre. an american—style town built for the car. in the master plan were principles. one of them was freedom of choice. if you think about the grid, it always gives you the option to go another way. ken baker was part of the original design team 50 years ago. milton keynes has the freedom of choice and the grid offers it that. the grid gives freedom? yes. maybe, but on the ground,
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milton keynes can feel uninspiring. big roads and roundabouts means you can drive through it and not really see it or notice it. critics of milton keynes have been brutal. francis tybalt, the great urban designer, called it "bland, rigid, sterile and totally boring". and while some do hate it, milton keynes is surprising. it has 180 miles of footpaths and cycle tracks, the fastest growing economy in the uk. 22 million trees and shrubs. gill prince has taken a series of photographs called unexpected milton keynes. it's a fantastic place to live. it has 40% green space. the parks and gardens are lovely. it's an absolutely brilliant place to build a business, grow a family, anything you want to do.
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it's fabulous. the government has announced 14 new garden towns and villages, so can they learn lessons from milton keynes? well, this isn't part of the original master plan of milton keynes. it's incredibly narrow. there's nowhere to park. milton keynes itself is expanding rapidly. but campaigners say new developments here are too densely populated and the original principles of the town have been lost. myopic people with the wrong agenda who don't realise the greatness of what they've got. that's being copied all over the world, but here they're busy destroying it. love it or hate it, nothing with the open spaces, the high—minded design principles has been tried since and 50 years on, nothing like it is planned today. it was the film that defined the cool britannia era,
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and made household names of its cast. more than twenty years later, the sequel to trainspotting has finally arrived. "t2 trainspotting" had its world premiere in edinburgh last night. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson was there. after more than 20 years, the trainspotting gang back together, on the orange carpet of the long—awaited sequel. hello, mark. so what have you been up to for the last 20 years? we had a real duty not to disappoint people because the film has affection in people's hearts, so you don't want to ruin it and tarnish that image, so i hope we haven't done that. aside from all the fun stuff in the first movie, i think people found it relatable. even though it was maybe about subjects they weren't involved in, it was still relatable in some way. it's carrying such a cultural weight associated with it that it feels like no event that i've been to before. choose life, choose a job,
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choose a career... trainspotting was the defining film of mid—‘90s cool britannia. the movie poster was on students' walls, the soundtrack in their cd players. it dealt with addiction, hedonism and friendship. for the sequel, ewan mcgregor‘s famous choose life speech has had an update. ‘choose life, choose facebook, twitter, instagram, and hope that someone, somewhere, cares‘. there‘s something very deep and moving about finding out where they all are now, and i don‘t know of any movie that i‘ve done, and there aren‘t very many that we‘ve seen, where the characters become almost like people we know. it‘s fair to say the four guys have lived a bit. how do you think they‘ve aged? there was always a moment in every shooting day where there was that 20 years later moment,
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where you felt 20 years had gone by since you were last playing this guy. need to detox the system. what does that even mean? it doesn‘t mean anything. it isn‘t getting it out of your body that‘s the problem, it‘s getting out of your mind. you‘re an addict. you think i haven't heard that 100,000 times? so be addicted. but be addicted to something else. after trainspotting came out, we were like the oasis of the movie industry in britain. we represented britpop movies. so there was a part of me that yearns for that again, i suppose. and he might not be finished with the role. the cast are already talking about trainspotting 3, using irvine welsh‘s latest novel as the starting point. i think the chances are good. i mean...i think irvine‘s just arrived now. i‘m up for it, he‘s up for it, so i don‘t think you‘ve seen the last of begbie just yet.
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ina in a moment, the news at one with so few wringer. first, the weather. the weather is going to vary significantly. south—east england, foggy. significantly. south—east england, foggy, some of that around east dean has been captured here, an area of cloud is working southwards to help improve visibility. not foggy and grey everywhere. sunshine in midlothian and a glorious picture showing some high cirrus across the sky. for patches are loitering but those will lift. it will stay quite
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misty, mind you. visibility will prove that it might improve a bit. north west england and wales, a few showers coming in from the irish sea. northern ireland, quite cloudy, staying on the cool side. scotland, cloudy across western areas and sunshine in central and eastern parts. overnight, worth mentioning that defra have high pollution levels at the moment across northern ireland, eastern and south—eastern england. things will probably improve in northern ireland overnight with stronger winds blowing in milder conditions. patchy rain here and west scotland. england and wales? another called make the countryside. temperatures getting down to minus six celsius. and fog is likely to reform and become dense. the worst of it towards the somerset levels, perhaps the south midlands, and the vale of york. you
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should allow extra time for your early morning commute. but there will be some bright weather, with sunshine across england and wales. for northern ireland and scotland, still a fair bit of cloud. winds coming in off the atlantic bring in milder air, so temperatures into double figures for belfast and for stornoway, still quite cold. the isobars tend to crunch together in the middle part of the week. the wins will be coming up from the south and boosting temperatures. stronger winds will clear the fog. try from many and turning milder. temperatures into double figures later this week. an investigation uncovers a catalogue of failures that contributed to the death of a man who should have been in hospital not prison. 25—year—old dean saunders electrocuted himself in jail a year ago, despite repeated warnings from his family that he was a suicide risk.
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i‘m telling you know, if you do not put my son back on constant watch he will kill himself, you won‘t be able to say you didn‘t know. his death comes as new figures are expected to show record levels of suicides in prison last year. also this lunchtime: theresa may was informed of a trident test carried out when she became prime minister — but downing street won‘t comment on reports it malfunctioned. a boost for business — the government says it will focus on science, technology and infrastructure in a post—brexit economy. overcooked toast, potatoes and crisps — government scientists warn they could increase the risk
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