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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  January 23, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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today at five, theresa may declares her ‘absolute faith' in the trident nuclear deterrent, despite reports of a test that went wrong. the test happened lastjune, before mrs may became prime minister, and she's refusing to confirm or deny reports that an unarmed missile veered off course. i'm regularly briefed on national security issues. i was briefed on the successful certification of hms vengance and her crew. we don't comment on the operational details for national security reasons. in the commons, the defence secretary refuses to share any operation details of the weapons test, as opposition mps demand more transparency. the british public is the facts on the matter as important as britain's nuclear deterrent. and they deserve a fax from the prime minister, not sprawled across the sunday papers.
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this is a deliberate withholding of information from this house. we will speak to a former labour defence minister. at the start of his first full week in power, donald trump focuses on jobs, and threatens big border taxes on goods entering the country. the series of failures that led to a prisoner's suicide, dean saunders' mother says she'd warned prison authorities. i'm telling you know, if you do not put my son back on constant watch he will kill himself, you won't be able to say you didn't know. a focus on science and technology, as the prime minister unveils her new industrial strategy for britain after brexit. and, the actor gorden kaye, best known for his part in the bbc sitcom ‘allo ‘allo!, has died at the age of 75. it's five o'clock.
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our main story is the government's admission that theresa may was told about a test of the trident nuclear deterrent, which took place last june. she was informed when she became prime minister a month later, but ministers won't confirm if she'd been made aware of a possible malfunction, when, it's claimed, an unarmed missile veered off course. the defence secretary sir michael fallon, told mps that a test did take place off the coast of florida last summer, but he insisted it was a success, and refused to comment on the operational details. the prime minister said today she had ‘absolute faith‘ in trident. our correspondent andy moore has the latest. initiate, fire one. back in 2012, there was a successful trident
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missile launch, which the government is more than happy to talk about and released footage. the government has been much more reticent of discussing last year's lodge. the sunday times says the american built trident missile went off—course. some security sources in the us are confirming reports. same the missile was deliberately blown up because it malfunctioned. this afternoon, the prime minister confirmed she was told about the test, but refused once again to give any details about what she was told. i am regularly briefed on national security issues, i was briefed on the successful certification of hms vengeance and her group. we don't comment on operational details for national security reasons. why weren't you just admit if you knew were not?” have just admit if you knew were not?|j have said i was briefed on the certification of hms vengeance. we don't speak about operational details for national security
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reasons. in the house of commons the defence secretary stuck doggedly to the government line that the testing of the government submarine was successful. contrary to reports in the weekend press, hms vengeance and her crew were successfully tested and certified as ready tojoin her crew were successfully tested and certified as ready to join the operational cycle. we do not comment on the details of submarine operations. that answer was not good enough for the opposition. mr speaker, at the heart of the issue isa speaker, at the heart of the issue is a worrying lack of transparency. a prime minister who has chosen to cover up a serious a prime minister who has chosen to cover up a serious incident, rather than coming clean with the british public. this house, and more importantly the british public, deserve better. michael fallon has 110w deserve better. michael fallon has now been invited to discuss the matter further at the defence committee tomorrow, in closed session if need be. let's talk to
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the former shadow defence minister, kevinjames. the former shadow defence minister, kevin james. what do the former shadow defence minister, kevinjames. what do you think the minister should be doing today, that he was not doing? he explained what he was not doing? he explained what he could not go further, you wanted to go further, why was that? in 2012 the mod gave a press release out, they gave footage. peter hennessy in his book gave a full description of the missile launch, cleared by the ministry of defence, michael fallon‘s home department. to date michael fallon said we could not talk about anything to do with the tests. i'm there is a complete disjunction between 2012, and what was spoken about by a conservative defence secretary and the ministry of defence, and what is now convenient that they don't have the public. what do you think happened, given the sources we have reported today. and there have been more than
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one. what happened? the remarkable thing, as the parliamentary session was happening, a report came from the united states that us defence officials were openly talking about a failed test. if it is good enough for the american public and congress to know about what happened on this test, to have a secretary of state and also a prime minister refusing to even talk about what happened, and how it came to be, it is not acceptable. interesting line in those reports, the unnamed us official was reported to have said that the altered trajectory, the missile veering off course, part of an automatic self—destruct sequence, triggered when missile electronics detect an anomaly. what do you make of that? i am a supporter of the uk's nicola deterrent. i don't think the way the government is handling this is doing anything to bolster the case, making an argument for the
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reason why we need a nuclear deterrent. they are tested rigorously, and quite rightly they should be. when things go wrong, if they hide it, the way this government is doing, all it does is lead to suspicion and fear that there is something more sinister to hide. clearly there might be. is it afair bet hide. clearly there might be. is it a fair bet that if you were at the dispatch box, you may if not sharing information? the last government adults more than any other government included. the number of warheads, targeting lists. we had an open policy. there is a strict need for security, but there are certain areas already in the public domain. in peter hennessy‘s that, the side of geek, already authorised by the ministry of defence. —— silent deep.
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iama ministry of defence. —— silent deep. i am a strong supporter of the nuclear deterrent, the majority of british people. the conference will be undermined by these type of actions taken by the government. thank you very much. former shadow defence minister, kevin james. thank you very much. former shadow defence minister, kevinjames. let's go back to westminster, and vicky. the prime minster has made have you known, not addressing the central point, what might and might not have gone wrong. what do you make of the exchange? the government, the ministers and the prime minister have ended looking evasive. yesterday theresa may was asked four times what she knew, when she knew it, not totally answering the question. similarly today briefings from downing street tojournalists, saying she had been briefed about the test. not telling us what she had been told, if she was told there was a problem. michael fallon in the house of commons taking questions
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for 45 minutes, and our, not telling us for 45 minutes, and our, not telling us anything. that moment when he's not giving us any details, a labour mp reading on twitter that cnn have sources on what may or may not have happened. they have got themselves into a tangle. michael fallon said they believe everything you read in they believe everything you read in the newspapers. absolutely adamant they have confidence in the system. the political side of this, this all happened just before there was a vote in the house of commons about the renewal of trident. they say thatis the renewal of trident. they say that is why the prime minister should have been more open about this. michael fallon has turned down an offer to go to this defence committee tomorrow, in secret if he needs to. he says you have to trust us, there is nothing wrong with the system. effectively it work as it needed to do. until they tell us more details, incredibly difficult for mps or asked to judge that. micky young, with the latest on the
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row over trident. president trump has signed a number of executive orders. the transpacific partnership. promising advantages for companies making products in the us. but reiterated his pledge to impose a substantial border tax on foreign goods entering the country. he's been meeting corporate and union leaders at the white house, with the focus on manufacturing jobs. after a weekend settling in, this was his first day at the office. he assembled a number of industrial heads. taxes will be down, you will
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have incentives to build. then came the stick. a company that wants to fire all its people in the united states, and build some factories elsewhere, thinking that product will just flow across the border into the united states, that is not going to happen. there will be aboard attacks, substantial tax. what else is on the long to—do list written in the campaign? near the top is repealing 0bama care. the president's health—care reforms. which president trump began doing so on friday. he said he would withdraw from the transpacific partnership with asian rim countries. he began that from day. he said he would end gun free zones in places like schools. although that would take legislation. 0n schools. although that would take legislation. on his position on the mexican wall, he changes policy,
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saying it will not be built along the whole border, and that mexico will not pay for all of it. he also moved the us embassy from tel aviv tojerusalem. moscow moved the us embassy from tel aviv to jerusalem. moscow said moved the us embassy from tel aviv tojerusalem. moscow said it expects tojerusalem. moscow said it expects to receive a first phone call between president trump and president putin soon. translation: we see quite a few things i to eye on foreign policy. some things president trump has said overlap of president trump has said overlap of president putin's foreign policy goals. theresa may has a ready bag for the first meeting with president trump bya for the first meeting with president trump by a foreign meter. but that is at the end of the week. for now, his focus is on jobs, manufacturing and national security. the issues on those who voted for him willjudge ‘s presidency on. —— judge ‘s presidency. president trump's first weekend
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in charge was overshadowed by a row with the media, over coverage of the inauguration. his press secretary sean spicer warned that the administration would "hold the press accountable". let's talk to erik wemple, who's a media columnist with the washington post. thank you forjoining us. what is the atmosphere at the moment, in terms of the way you want looking ahead to the next four years? well, the media is stunned, about what happened on saturday. although they really should not have been. these tactics have been in circulation with the trump people for 18—19 months, they have been savaging the media in twitter, interviews, for a long time. the level of surprise and shockis long time. the level of surprise and shock is that this has migrated so
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strongly to the white house itself. there may have been a sense that they would leave these tactics aside, as they took power. it got them the power, helped get them to power. some surprise and shock. i am not so sure that people should be shot. how credible is it that a new administration can get its message out there effectively, if it does not have an efficient relationship with the press within the white house? that traditional white house context. it is increasingly more and more credible. donald trump has millions of followers on twitter. there are so many ways of getting at the public. president 0bama did that himself. there were some grousing amongst the press, that they were being circumvented by president 0bama. these sort of tactics go back a long way with presidents. they have not waited to get to the
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american public themselves. with the rise of technology and the web, it is easier and easier. at some point the media has a pretty big role. they are able to trust questions out there, do a lot of accountability. when they do accountability they get a lot of eyeballs. i don't think the trump administration will be wholly successful on this front. we have seen a successful on this front. we have seena campaign successful on this front. we have seen a campaign marked by, on both sides, and a lot of scepticism and cynicism. now we have the weekend, and the press secretary's own performance, presenting what were called alternative facts, by a colleague of his. to what extent is it possible for the traditional media, the mainstream media to reset the rules, in terms of its own credibility and integrity? is that damage really very significant? credibility and integrity? is that damage really very significant7m you look at the polls and the
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studies that have been done. the media credibility is well down in the cellar. the us media is one of the cellar. the us media is one of the most discredited institutions around. that is a huge problem for us. something that has been abetted by donald trump's serial denunciations of the media this at the same time, that is a very broad and amorphous conception in the american public. when the us media bring stories to bear, specific stories, people read them, and people still do believe them. the blocking and tackling ofjournalism, basically reporting a story, nailing it down, getting it right, it is a formula that is classic and releva nt, formula that is classic and relevant, as relevant as it was decades ago. as you speak, we are looking at images from the oval 0ffice today, president trump signing executive order after executive order. some of those
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significant, on the trade deal, the major trade deal he has pulled out. your sense of how the american media is keeping up with what is a pretty formidable news machine. this man is generating headlines by the hour. what is your sense of the way the american media is handling that christmas the american media has grown. our media organisations, basically despatching record numbers of teams to cover the white house and the federal government. increasingly there is a great deal of investment in american media outlets and this stuff. we can keep up outlets and this stuff. we can keep up with that. there is more money, more eyeballs, more clicks on government politics. 0ne place where the american media can make a go of things. we are keeping up with these things. we are keeping up with these things. it is a fast and furious cycle. especially with trump's
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nominees on capitol hill, trying to get them approved by the senate. for these executive orders and initiatives in the first 100 days, coming atan initiatives in the first 100 days, coming at an insane pace. it does test us. we will talk in the weeks ahead, i hope. thank you forjoining us. and from tonight on the bbc news channel we have a new programme covering the start of donald trump's presidency and the impact it could have on brexit. that's100 days with katty kay in washington and christian fraser in london at 7pm. the prime minister has refused to give more detail on the reported misfiring of a trident missile
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during a test. as we have seen president trump has signed an executive order to formally withdraw the us from the transpacific partnership, including a dozen countries. an independent report into the death of dean saunders, a mentally ill man, who took his own life in chelmsford prison last year has found the staff failed to do enough to protect him. in sport, nicola adams will make her professional boxing debut in april. the double 0lympic professional boxing debut in april. the double olympic champion says she wa nts to the double olympic champion says she wants to become world champion the professional ranks. hull city's ryan mason is said to be conscious and able to talk after undergoing surgery on a fractured skull. he clashed heads with chelsea's gary cahill in the 2—0 defeat yesterday. johanna konta will face serena williams in the quarterfinals of the australian open. an investigation into the death of a prisoner has found a catalogue
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of failures contributed to his suicide and he should have been in hospital not prison. 25 year old dean saunders electrocuted himself at chelmsford prison in essex in january last year. the prison 0mbudsman said that staff ignored significant risk factors when they cut back observation of him injail. it comes as figures due out later this week are expected to show the number of suicides in prisons in england and wales last year was at record levels. here's our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan. dean saunders had no previous history of mental illness but in december 2015 the young dad suddenly became paranoid and delusional, convinced he had to kill himself. i think i'm still, on a day—to—day basis, trying to understand that he was ill in the first place. his family were plunged into despair. within hours he attacked his brother and father with a knife. already injured, mark could only stand and watch as his son took a kitchen knife to his own throat. this
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he brought the knife down and it didn't cut. and that's when we both realised that in his haste to pick the knife up, it was the back of the blade that had gone to his throat. as dean tried to kill himself, mark was stabbed in his stomach, but held the knife in place to save his son's life. at that time i thought i can't let him have the knife. and i put my hand over the top of his so he could not pull it out. as he pulled it out, i held it in, i could not let him have that knife. dean saunders was charged with attempted murder and sent to chelmsford prison. though initially on constant watch, three staff, none of whom were medically trained or had read his notes, reduced his observations to every half hour. his family pleaded with officials not to do it, but were turned down in a phone call.
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i said, "i'm telling you now, if you don't put my son back on constant watch then he will kill himself. you won't be able to say you weren't aware, because you know. if he kills himself it will be your fault." efforts were made to move dean to a secure hospital, but a shortage of beds and delays over christmas and new year meant it never happened. on january 11th last year, dean saunders killed himself. his partner now has to raise their son without his father. we openly talk about dean to teddy. we say "daddy this, daddy that". i suppose i kind of promised dean, there will never be a day that will pass that teddy won't know how much you love him.
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dean was so looking forward to the point where teddy would be walking around and running and kicking a football with him. two days after dean went, teddy started walking. he missed that by two days. today's report says dean saunders should have been in hospital, not in prison, but basic failure contributed to this loving family being ripped apart. negotiations to try to end the conflict in syria have got under way in kazakhstan. it's the first time talks have been convened by russia, turkey and iran, rather than the united nations. it's also the first time representatives of syria's armed rebel groups have led the opposition side at the negotiating table. sinn fein has named its health minister, michelle 0'neill as the party's new leader in northern ireland. she will take over from martin mcguinness who is standing down because of ill health. she said she was following in the
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footsteps of a political giant. the political parties in northern ireland are preparing for an election in early march. sinn fein are describing this is generational change. she replaces martin mcguinness, he has been a figurehead, representing sinn fein for a matter of decades. michelle o'neill is an experienced politician, health and agriculture minister. she takes over that most senior position in northern ireland. although she is from a staunchly republican family, she does not have the personal ira past that martin mcguinness had. he will be a difficult man to replace, important in bridging the gap between unionists and republicans that led to power sharing. that has collapsed, that will be a challenge to michelle 0'neill. she did pay tribute to him as she was confirmed. for me to be selected as leader of the party
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in the north the truly the biggest honour of my life. ifeel a huge responsibility on my shoulders and while i don't underestimate my task given the change in the political world locally nationally and internationally, i will not let you down. i won't let you down because i've learnt from the best. my late father former sinn fein councillor brendan doris, our mp, francine molloy and of course martin mcguinness. i've worked with martin throughout all of my adult life as an activist, councillor, mla and minister. i have no doubt that i am following in the foot steps of a political giant. the warm response for those words about martin mcguinness. the difficulty and the challenge for michelle 0'neill begin immediately
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because of the collapse of the power—sharing executive. the election campaign has already begun. campaign posters going up. it has all the makings of a pretty bitter election. this was the immediate response online, saying new deputy, same problem. shaving her in the pocket of gerry adams, the all ireland president of sinn fein. it gives you an idea how far apart the parties. how bitter this election can be. the difficulties of getting power—sharing up and running again. the difficulties they have over brexit, education, finances, and issues like the irish language and even same—sex marriage. a big gulf to be filled. this could be a very difficult election for both michelle o'neill and arlene foster, the two women who will lead the main two political parties here in northern
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ireland. the inquest into the deaths of 30 british people — murdered by an islamist gunman in tunisia two years ago — has begun hearing evidence from survivors of the attack. one british tourist described how he saw seifeddine rezgui shoot one of his victims with a single shot "like an execution" as his victim lay on a sun lounger. richard galpin has been at the inquest today at royal courts ofjustice in central london. the inquest has reached a critical and sensitive stage. questions into how each of the 30 british holiday—makers were killed in the attack in tunisia in 2015. the first person was trudyjones, her death was being looked at. there was a portrait of her life from the family, heartfelt portraits. devastating for them, describing her as someone who put the happiness
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everybody else about her own. someone who had a massive impact to people's lives. a care worker, 51 yea rs old people's lives. a care worker, 51 years old when killed. the other crucial evidence has come from another british holiday—maker, former member of the military he said that when they booked a holiday with thompson travel agent, he said they did not give them any warning about the terrorist risk at that time in tunisia. which is obviously very crucial. he also said they were not aware of the travel advice being put up by the foreign office on its website. he went on to say there was absolutely no security at the front of the hotel, and very poor security in the immediate surrounding areas. that is also very important. that
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was richard galpin, our correspondent at the courts of justice. just about 5:30 p.m., we will have a headlines in a moment. talking more about theresa may's technology and industry policy announced today. all of that coming up, in the meantime, john with the weather. huge variety today, cloudy and sunny with showers. some of us have been faulty. freezing fog tonight. travel disruption, check out your local bbc radio station. fog patches across eastern patches, an area of cloud phrasing a class —— floating across the western counties. much milder in scotland, patchy outbreaks of rain. frost and mixed in with the fault. temperatures are getting very low, minus six degrees, a hard frost.
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difficulty on the roads. getting the detail right not easy. most of the file should lift, some will not, especially cold. elsewhere, england and wales, fine weather, scotland will be mild. despite sunshine for the east, it is chilly, barely getting above freezing. back in half an hour. this is bbc news at five — the headlines. theresa may declares her ‘absolute faith‘ in the trident deterrent and refuses to confirm or deny reports that an unarmed missile veered off course. i‘m regularly briefed on national security issues. i was briefed on the successful certification of hms vengance and her crew. we don‘t comment on the operational details for national security reasons. president trump has signed an executive order to formally withdraw the united states from the trans—pacific partnership which includes a dozen countries. an independent report
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into the death of dean saunders — a mentally—ill man who took his own life in chelmsford prison last year — has found staff failed to do enough to protect him. the prime minister unveils her new industrial strategy for britain after brexit, focusing on science and technology. sport now, here‘s reshmin. nicola adams has announced her decision to turn professional. the double 0lympic decision to turn professional. the double olympic gold medallist will make her pro debut in april. adams, who successfully defended her flyweig ht title who successfully defended her flyweight title in rio last summer, now has her sights set on becoming a world champion. katie gornall reports. nicola adams, the first woman to win
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two olympic titles in the boxing ring. as britain's most successful and recognisable boxer, she is used to breaking new ground, now the double olympian is seeking a fresh challenge. after winning the gold in 2012, i decided i wanted to stay amateur and continue my career as an amateur and continue my career as an amateur just because i amateur and continue my career as an amateurjust because i wanted to leave the amateur game world champion as well as a double olympic champion, i decided to stay to fulfil my goals, i wanted to be a double olympic champion, world champion and leave ranked number one as well. as an amateur she had nothing left to prove, last year in rio she became the first british boxer to successfully defend an olympic title in nearly 100 years. an incredibly tight gold—medal bout. she‘s also the reigning commonwealth champion and european champion. the clare nce champion and european champion. the clarence has secured commonwealth gold here. every major fight ending
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with the famous smile. today gb boxing released a statement praising her huge contribution to the olympic programme and the sport of boxing. adams follows another high—profile olympic champion, katie taylor into the professional game. the irish fighter recently featured on the undercard of anthony fighter recently featured on the underca rd of anthony joshua‘s fighter recently featured on the undercard of anthonyjoshua‘s title fight. their biggest challenge could be finding suitable plans to fight next. arsene wenger has been charged by the fa with misconduct. it follows a n by the fa with misconduct. it follows an incident during arsenal‘s. win over burnley yesterday when wenger pushed fourth official anthony taylor after being sent off. the arsenal manager had reacted angrily when burnley were given a penalty in added time. wenger apologised after the game and said he ‘regretted everything‘. hull city midfielder ryan mason is conscious and able to talk, following surgery for a fractured skull. mason was injured in a clash of heads with chelsea defender gary cahill, during yesterday‘s fixture between the sides. hull said in a
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clu b between the sides. hull said in a club statement mason would continue to be monitored in hospital "over the coming days". liverpool have confirmed lazar markovic has joined hull on a season long loan. the forward — who signed from benfica forward — who signed from benfica for £20m three years ago — has been on loan at sporting lisbon.// meanwhilejurgen on loan at sporting lisbon.// meanwhile jurgen klopp says on loan at sporting lisbon.// meanwhilejurgen klopp says steven gerrard will get every support from him in his ambition to become a manager. gerrard will re—join the clu b manager. gerrard will re—join the club as academy coach next month. being a manager is a job you have to learn. and when a person like steven gerrard and a player of the player he was, more the person he is, is ready to make the steps, that is wonderful news for football because combining the player experience with all the things you learn from now on, that‘s a bright future. britain‘sjohanna
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on, that‘s a bright future. britain‘s johanna konta on, that‘s a bright future. britain‘sjohanna konta has continued her dominant form in the australian open, reaching the quarterfinals. the world number nine beat russia‘s ekaterina makarova 6-1, 6-4, beat russia‘s ekaterina makarova 6—1, 6—4, and hasn‘t dropped a set in entire tournament. konta is the last remaining briton in the singles draw, and says she‘s relishing the challenge of playing 22—time grand slam champion serena williams next. it‘ll be the first time i‘m playing against and it‘ll be the first time i‘m playing againstand i‘m it‘ll be the first time i‘m playing against and i‘m looking forward to competing against, she is one of, if not the best player for us to ever have in the game so i think to play against someone like that to you also grew up watching, i think it is another great opportunity for me to ta ke another great opportunity for me to take a really great load of experience from. that is all the spot for now, you can keep up—to—date with all other stories on the sport website. the prime minister has launched the government‘s new industrial strategy, for britain after brexit, during her first cabinet meeting
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in the north—west of england. theresa may said the government would take a ‘new, active role‘ focusing on science, technology and infrastructure. our industry correspondent john moylan has the story. how can the government drive the economy forward? for the business secretary, places like this are part of the answer. it‘s a new automotive innovation centre in warwick, designed to get the sector firing on all cylinders. one of the big themes of our industrial strategy is to build on our great successes, but also to make sure we drive growth in all parts of the country. the industrial strategy will be committed to driving very hard to spread the opportunities right across the country and to drive not justjobs, but really good, well paying jobs, in all parts of the country. the strategy was unveiled
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by the prime minister at a regional cabinet meeting this morning in daresbury in cheshire. a green paper sets out key areas, from research and development to skills and infrastructure, to boost productivity. but will it help all regions of the uk? we need an industrial strategy that combines hard and soft infrastructure. we desperately need the transport spending the government has talked about and is yet to deliver. but we also need to is his skills strategy, we need to see education right back to early years if we are going to make sure the northern economy can flourish. the strategy will play to our strengths, backing areas like battery technology and life sciences. other sectors will also be able to strike deals for government support. over the years governments of all shades have blown hot and cold over whether we need an industrial strategy or not. the big test of this plan is whether it can get the economy firing on all cylinders as we prepare to leave the eu. this high—tech auto
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firm in berkshire makes gearboxes for racing cars. its boss wants any strategy to deliver certainty for the long—term. we invest millions of pounds a year into people, into training, into the expertise we need into technology, into machinery. we are looking for some degree of certainty that the environment we operate in, is going to be some stability for it right through, so we know if we make the investment we kow we can get a return because things are not going to change around it. £4] billion of funding announced last autumn will back the plan, and there is new money to boost skills in science, technology and maths education. today, labour called it too little, too late, and the lib dems said any strategy while leaving the eu single market is laughable. john moylan, bbc news. sir keith burnett is vice chancellor of sheffield university and is president of the uk
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science council. let‘s pick up with several themes. thank you for coming in. what is for you the main advantage of what of what she has put together? you the main advantage of what of what she has put together7m you the main advantage of what of what she has put together? it is important there is an industrial strategy which starts with innovation for universities and other companies. within that, what is new, what‘s the g as today find innovative about that? there are a lot of initiatives but one i would point to is the uk catapult systems. they are a place where companies can try out new ideas from productivity, we have one in sheffield and aerospace and in the midlands and down in bristol and other places in strathclyde. these are key because they are the places where the innovation will get into new products and the government has been
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putting effort into getting a context for that. they‘ll be innovation and places which would translate into new products. at what point do we see results? jobs and orders. if you look at the way in which the aerospace centre put money into those, generating newjobs in places like sunderland, newjobs and companies. what you need to add to that, you need the innovation, you need these centres and you also need orders in larger products. whether defence infrastructure so companies can see the possibilities of orders going through being a key part. it won‘t work without that. orders from outside here is great, often it has to start with investment in the country so if we look at it with nuclear for example, we are thinking if we will build you play power plants, if you can do that build a
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prototype and then flopping around the world. that is where real industrial strategy is. its funds local people to get going and do something fancy. that‘s what needs to happen. you're very clear about you know why was asking about the global footprint, this you know why was asking about the globalfootprint, this is all being presented in a post—brexit context. what are the challenges thrown up by all the uncertainty and where we might be in four orfive all the uncertainty and where we might be in four or five years‘ time with our relationship with the rest of the world, surely that could impact quite significantly? and the biggest problem we would have is common to commerce industries, its people. i welcome it when boris says we must be to bring talent in from abroad. without that, that would be very ha rd to abroad. without that, that would be very hard to drive for innovation.
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what other talks with government so far about how hopeful you should be? it is very hard for them because they interpret brexit as being essentially anti—immigrants. when we speak to our constituents it is not that, clever scientists and clever engineers, people don‘t think that, it has to get a point of view we are bringing students, we were talking about it, maybe a clever feature stephen hawking c comes to study at cardiff. that has to keep going. as we infirst... cardiff. that has to keep going. as we in first... very good to talk to. if you regularly roast, fry or grill potatoes and bread at high temperatures for a long time, it could increase the risk of cancer, according to government scientists. the food standards agency says a potentially harmful compound, called acryl—amide, is produced.
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but other experts say the focus should be on far more well established foods and habits with links to cancer, like smoking and drinking. our health correspondent robert pigott reports. a new warning about food, and one that strikes at the heart of the nation‘s diet. food scientists say best selling products such as crisps, chips, cakes and biscuits contain a molecule called acrylamide that can damage the dna in cells. it‘s created when the sugars in these starchy foods react with the molecules that make up protein at temperatures above 120 degrees celsius. starchy foods, when you cook them at high temperatures, toast, roast, fry, they can create acrylamide. the longer and the hotter, the more acrylamide there will be. we know in animal studies it can create cancer. so we are concerned if there is the same mechanism in people, the official advice is to bake, fry and grill food to a lighter colour, follow instruction on packaging carefully, avoid storing potatoes
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in the fridge, where the cold produces more sugar, and eat a balanced diet to minimise the risk of cancer. even our daily toast is under scrutiny. the food standards agency says we should go for gold, rather than brown, or still less black. with toast on the menu at this glasgow cafe, the advice got a mixed reception. i would think twice, yes. think twice about it. because i eat quite a lot of burnt toast. i burn it even blacker and eat it. doesn't matter what your eating, there's always something to say, they say something will kill you. the food standards agency says although manufacturers have significantly reduced the acrylamide content of processed food, over a lifetime we are eating too much. an expert on risk is sceptical. i think it‘s overprecautionary. acrylamide has been around since someone stuck a piece of bread in front of the fire and toasted it. there is no strong evidence that it
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causes cancer in humans. if you give massive doses to mice they have an increased risk in tumours, but the amount people consume is 100 times less than that. cancer research uk says acrylamide may pose a risk to people, but there are bigger proven dangers such as being obese, drinking too much and especially smoking. robert piggott, bbc news. the time is 546. a quick update on the headlines. the prime minister has refused to give any detail on the misfiring of the trident missile. president trumper signed an executive order to formally withdraw the us from the transpacific partnership which includes trade with a dozen countries. an independent report into the death of dean saunders — a mentally—ill man who took his own life in chelmsford prison last year — has found staff failed to do enough to protect him. tomorrow the 11 justices
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of the supreme court will decide if ministers alone can trigger article 50 of the lisbon treaty, the mechanism by which the uk leaves the eu, or whether they need the authority of an act of parliament. our legal affairs correspondent clive coleman reports on what is being seen as a momentous case, that will dictate the manner and could affect the timing of the uk‘s departure from the eu. who has the legal power to switch on the process by which the uk leaves the eu? is it the government alone, or does it need an act of parliament? tomorrow, the 11 justices of the supreme court will give their ruling. the government was appealing a case brought by businesswoman gina miller. the result today is about all of us. she had won a judgment at the high court stoppbing ministers bypassing parliament and triggering article 50
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using what are known as prerogative powers. they are derived from times when all—powerful kings and queens could do pretty much what they wanted. it‘s accepted that they can legitimately use the prerogative to enter into and leave international treaties, like the one that took the uk into what is now the eu. but that treaty led to an act of parliament, which brought rights into our domestic law, and it‘s the removal of those rights that lies at the heart of the case. the government argue that we are dealing with an international treaty that our government has signed with the other eu governments, so even though the eu treaty gives rights to british citizens, it is ultimately up to the government to decide whether it wants to pull britain out, and not up to parliament. and in court, the attorney general argued that if parliament had wanted to limit ministers‘ powers, it could have done so. when it comes to leaving the european union, parliament has
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had full capacity and multiple opportunities to restrict the executive‘s ordinary ability to begin the article 50 process, and it has not chosen to do so. but gina miller‘s barrister dismissed that out of hand. it is inherently unlikely in that context that parliament, when it enacted the 1972 act, can possibly have intended that something so fundamental could be set aside by a minister. if the government wins, its problems disappear and ministers can trigger article 50. but what are the consequences if the judges across the square here rule against it, and a bill has to be put through parliament? the consequences are that the government will start to lose control. it has to go to parliament and ask parliament to empower it to act. that means mps can put conditions on the government‘s power. so they might want to propose
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amendments to the government‘s bill. they might want to have future debates. they might put conditions on future discussions or more detail, and that starts to wrest control away from government towards parliament. be you ever so mighty, the law is above you. so said the latejudge lord denning. this case is about where power lies in the constitution as between ministers and parliament, but it also shows the power ofjudges in applying a fundamental constitutional principle that no one, including the government, is above the law. the first minister of wales has called for britain to retain u nfettered called for britain to retain unfettered access to the pin single market. his welsh labour party has joined forces with plaid cymru and the welsh liberal democrats to publish proposals to restrict
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freedom of movement to those eu migrants who already have a job offer in the uk. theresa may has already said that britain will leave the single market. the actor gorden kaye — best known for starring in the 19805 sitcom ‘allo allo‘ — has died at the age of 75. he appeared in all 82 episodes of the show — playing a cafe owner called renee in nazi—occupied france. would you believe it‘s possible that the plot has now thickened? they think the general and the kernel are planning to blow up hitler. he can do nothing about this because he has been imprisoned in the dungeon of the chateaux surprised as a woman. if my hands are shaking it is because a plan in the resistance placed a bomb in the wheelchair of my wife‘s mother. fortunately the attem pts my wife‘s mother. fortunately the attempts misfired. and my wife‘s
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mother survived. she was last seen disappearing at very high speed with a cloud of smoke coming from the back. the wheelchair. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba is here. lots of tributes today because he really was the one most associated with the series. absolutely he was the centre of the series as, the harassed cafe owner trying to get to the end of the war without interruptions so he could have affairs with his staff and avoid his wife‘s dreadful singing. it is important to remember he did so many other roles as well. he made his debut broadcasting a radio play by siralan debut broadcasting a radio play by sir alan ayckbourn who suggested he should go into acting full—time. he ended up in coronation street. he played a number of episodes in 1969 and 1970 and then there was the
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association with david croft who cast him in small roles. and then of course when allo allo came around, it was famous for the one—liners. officer crabtree saying things like good moaning. his wife‘s terrible singing. his ridiculous excuses. although he didn‘t have all the best lines, he was at the centre of this programme. he was the actual centre of gravity that everything rotated and let‘s not forget his charity work. he was elected king rat, the granddaughter of water rats. he will be remembered by so many people for that kind of work and for being the main character in one of the most beloved sitcoms we have had on the bbc. thank you. some thoughts on gorden kaye who has died at the age of 75. let‘s get more on the start
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of president trump‘s first full week in office. the next few months are likely to define the coming years —— on both sides of the atlantic. to mark this the bbc news channel has a new programme called 100 days —— starting tonight —— covering the start of donald trump‘s presidency, the uk‘s move towards brexit and much more. it will be presented by katty kay from washington —— and christian fraser here in london. i‘m joined now by katty. i‘m just wondering there are so many important themes here, how are you going to be tackling them and trying to make sense of them? what to want to make sense of them? what to want to do is take this extraordinary moment in politics on both sides of the atlantic and connect the dots. there are themes that are the same in both places. this is really the beginning of the test of the populist movement, his first 100 daysin populist movement, his first 100 days in office, does it work, he benefits, who loses, are his ambitions realistic and what impact will everything that is being done
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here have of course on the brexit negotiations, we know that theresa may will be here on friday, what impact will it have on the dutch elections on the campaign coming up in france? we will try to make those connections and look at the how and why of this amazing moment on both sides of the atlantic. and i'm sure viewers will already be trying to make sense of what has happened in the last few days including it seems a bit of declaration of war by the white house press department on the press and media, what do you make of that? we have sean spicer who came out again on saturday to talk about the size of the crowds at the inauguration. he didn‘t really hold a press conference, he ranted, he will come out in an hour‘s time and we will see if that relationship will be any more cordial. there‘s a lot of discussion in the american media about how to cover donald trump‘s presidency and how to cover
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the administration who does seem to mass sarge the figures and facts and a challenge. thank you very much. just a quick reminder she will be back at 7pm alongside christian fraser for back at 7pm alongside christian fraserfor100 days. back at 7pm alongside christian fraser for 100 days. they back at 7pm alongside christian fraserfor100 days. they will back at 7pm alongside christian fraser for 100 days. they will be measuring the impact of the trump presidency as it progresses over the coming weeks. a quick reminder that bbc news at six is here with george inafew bbc news at six is here with george in a few moments, i will see you again at ten. nothing to wet windy, and frog filly —— for rust that said many of us have enjoyed a lot of sunshine, for others though the gloom has lingered across
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southern counties and temperature is having kept well done close to freezing. that frog close to freezing. that frog close to freezing now. it will cause travel disruptions, difficult to pinpoint detail but check the local radio stations for updates. some early frog three fog across eastern counties which will clear up but more falque will form. it could be quite nasty here by tomorrow morning. again we could see some interruptions and alesi flights. —— fog. temperatures well below freezing, it won‘t be foggy everywhere, some places will wake up to dry and bright conditions. across northern england it went to be as extensive but there will be patches. a completely different story for northern ireland and scotland. there will be patchy rain around, it won‘t amount to much and will fade away with time, but here it would be a
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lot milder where ironically lucy the best of the sunshine. in some places the fog will not lift and it will stay cold. typically out west, not far off double figures. further eased 5—6 and a lot lower than that where it stays boggy. not so much fog on wednesday. the breeze will be picking up clearing the fog. they further to the cloud for northern ireland and scotland but still drive down here. further south and east hopefully some sunshine, another chilly day across england and wales compare to scotland and northern ireland. that is a sign of things to come because as we go towards thursday it will get colder as ritual in some chilly air off the neocons and twitches freezing at the moment. thursday will be a particularly raw day, despite a lot
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of sunshine, nearly all of us will be dried with broken cloud and sunshine but look at the temperatures, barely above freezing on the eastern part and on the wind and it will feel quite better. for the latest including updates on weather warnings can be found on the website.
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