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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 24, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. judgement day as the supreme court decides who has the power to officially begin brexit. downing street says the government should be allowed to start the process without a vote. but campaigners who've brought the case say parliament must have a say. i will be live at the supreme court where the levy and seniorjudges are prepared to pass theirjudgement and examines in —— examining the process of taking britain out of the european union. good morning, it's tuesday 24th january. tougher penalties are on their way for drivers caught well above the speed limit. in sport it's bye bye bernie. liberty media complete their £61;
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billion take over of formula one and remove bernie ecclestone as chief executive, ending his a0 year reign in charge of the sport. a surge in cyber crime pushed the cost of fraud above £1 billion last year. and it's getting worse despite attempts to tackle it. i'm looking at why and what more needs to be done. and we're going to be talking about the happiest children in the world. studies suggest they live in the netherlands. but what makes them so happy? we'll meet two mums now living there who've been trying to find out. carol is always happy and she has got the weather. good morning. across england and wales, dense, patchy fog. some spots of reasoning. scotla nd patchy fog. some spots of reasoning. scotland and northern ireland, much more mild. patches of rain but later, some sunshine. good morning. first, our main story. the supreme court will rule today on whether it's up to parliament or government to start the process for exiting the european union.
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the government argues that ministers have the power to trigger the eu's article 50 exit clause. but opponents say they need pa rliament‘s approval to start negotiations. the judgement is significant, as it goes to the heart of where power lies in the uk and could disrupt the prime minister's brexit timetable as our political correspondent, chris mason reports. the european union ignites strong passions. almost seven weeks ago, protesters gathered outside the supreme court as the ii protesters gathered outside the supreme court as the 11 most senior judges in the land gathered inside. power after power of dense legal argument followed on the biggest question in politics. where does power light? is it behind the door here in downing street? or inside here in downing street? or inside here in downing street? or inside here in parliament? the prime
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minister says she can start the uk's divorce from the eu herself but campaigners, led by the businesswoman jean miller, campaigners, led by the businesswomanjean miller, says mps and peers have to have a say first. this morning, we will find out who has won. if the government loses, they will also lose complete control of the timetable for starting the process of leaving the european union. it will have to rush its planned through parliament in the next few weeks. today is not about whether brexit should or will happen but who gets to press go. that is why it matters and that is why there was a lot of interest here in what thejudges had to was a lot of interest here in what the judges had to say. was a lot of interest here in what thejudges had to say. chris was a lot of interest here in what the judges had to say. chris mason, bbc news, westminster. we will be focusing on that through the day. let's speak to our political correspondent, carole walker who is outside the supreme court this morning. is there any indication yet about what the judges are expected to decide? the expectation widely as the
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judgement will go against the government, that theresa may will be told she must seek the approval of parliament before she can trigger article 50 which will begin the formal process of those negotiations to ta ke formal process of those negotiations to take britain out of the european union. nobody expects mps or peers to try to block that process but they will try to amend any legislation that she tries to get through parliament, to try to affect her whole approach to those negotiations. that could delay the process. as you mentioned, theresa may wants to trigger article 50 by the end of march. if there are a series of different boats which go against her, that could delay the whole proceeding. it will throw an extra light as well onto the labour party amid some confusion as to exactly what their position is on this whole process. another important issue which the judges will be deciding today is whether
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the government has to take account of the devolved administration of scotla nd of the devolved administration of scotland and northern ireland and wales. scotland is demanding to have position to stay —— permission to stay in the single market but pending elections in northern ireland so it is not clear who she will have to consult, an important judgement today which could have a big effect on that whole process of britain's departure from the eu. later on this morning, we will be talking to the former deputy prime minister nick clegg to get his thoughts on the supreme court. it will dominate things this morning. drivers caught driving well above the speed limit will face bigger fines after a review of the sentencing guidelines for courts in england and wales. the changes will allow magistrates to impose much tougher penalties on drivers and are intended to make sure the punishment for speeding is a lot higher for the worst offenders. sian grzeszczyk has more. president trump has announced that america will formally withdraw from the trans—pacific partnership, one of the major pledges he made during the election campaign. the trade deal involving a dozen countries was agreed by barack
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obama. president trump has also cut funding for international groups that provide abortions, and has frozen the hiring of some federal workers. flood management in england and wales is still fragmented, inefficient and ineffective according to a group of mps. members of the commons environment committee have accused the government of failing to take simple steps to protect homes after they recommended an overhaul of the system. the government has rejected the criticism, saying that many suggestions have been accepted. fiona lamdin reports. sadly not such a rare sight, waging war against the water as roads are transformed into rivers. in recent years there's been severe flooding in cumbria, yorkshire, scotland and somerset. two months ago the nvironmental food and rural affairs committee defra called for a radical overhaul to what it called the government's disjointed flood management.
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just one of the many criticisms levied at defra, it hasn't created a national floods commissioner for england. flooding is a much more regular occurrence affecting many more people than it ever has done. so the citizens of this country want to see the government protect them against flooding. we've asked some questions and made some recommendations, it's the government's responsibility to protect its citizens. defra say it's already implementing many of the report suggestions, such as managing water courses across entire catchment areas. but say there is no need for structural changes. over the next five years the government is investing £2.5 billion on building flood defence schemes across the country, protecting an additional 300,000 homes. but with climate change we're being told to expect more heavy rain, increasing the flood risk. and so for this select committee it's unlikely the government's current interventions
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will be enough. fiona lamdin, bbc news. two men two men have been arrested after an explosion at a block of flats in east london yesterday. —— two men. four people were taken to hospital and 25 people had to be rescued from the pa rtially—colla psed building in hornchurch. transport for london said debris had been scattered across nearby roads. the cause of the explosion is not yet known. the nominations for this year's academy awards will be announced later today. critics have tipped modern musical romance, la la land as a frontrunner. it's expected to face stiff competition from brooding domestic drama manchester by the sea starring casey affleck and also from moonlight, a coming of age drama set in drug—torn miami. bat news. zookeepers at san diego safari park are caring for a miracle baby a bat delivered by caesarean section.
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the 12—day—old rodrigues fruit bat, also known as the flying fox, is being hand—reared following surgery. staff say he's a fiesty creature, who's quick to let them know what he wants. i want to know so much more about that. what can you tell me? i have already done some research. one of the most endangered species. they grow a bit of golden hair so they are known as a golden backed. more fa cts are known as a golden backed. more facts view later. i will also miss —— tell you about when i was set upon by bat at chester zoo. it wasn't a nice moment for me my family, iam wasn't a nice moment for me my family, i am scarred by it. a big change in formula i? family, i am scarred by it. a big change in formula 1? it couldn't get much bigger. imagine held in a position a particular organisation for 40 years. after 110 years in charge of formula one, bernie ecclestone has been replaced as the sport's chief executive by new owners liberty media.
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this is a quote from them overnight. i have been dismissed, this is official, i know longer run the company, my position has been taken. the us giant completed its £6.11bn takeover of f1 last night. chairman chase carey takes on ecclestone's role and former mercedes team boss ross brawn is the sport's new managing director. 86—year—old ecclestone has been given the title of chairman emeritus and will act as an adviser to the board. good morning, then. did hejust walked in front of... that was then. he is so small, he can sneak in anywhere. good morning. i am sorry it. he is like a little fruit bats. there's anybody know what chairman emeritus means? apparently bernie ecclestone does not. they say he
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does not understand the title. it means honorary chairman. after making history at the rio olympics, double olympic gold—medallist boxer nicola adams has turned professional. she's signed with boxing promoter frank warren. hull city midfielder ryan mason remains in hospital, but is conscious and able to talk, following surgery for a fractured skull. mason was injured in a clash of heads with chelsea's gary cahill on sunday. rory mcilroy has pulled out of the dubai desert classic as he recovers from a rib injury. the world number two missed last week's event in abu dhabi. still not quite fit enough. in a considerable amount of pain. still not quite fit enough. in a considerable amount of painlj still not quite fit enough. in a considerable amount of pain. i am very sorry. it is always good to start the day that way. it's only 11 minutes past six. he has got a new haircut. that is have a look at the
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front pages of the papers. very organised today. here is the times. the main story is, us urged britain to keep trident blunder secret. that is on to keep trident blunder secret. that isona to keep trident blunder secret. that is on a few front pages. free little puppies who have been rescued from that italian hotel that was hit by the avalanche. the telegraph. donald trump vowing to make the special relationship between the uk and the us even closer. theresa may is due to meet him on friday. us even closer. theresa may is due to meet him on fridaylj us even closer. theresa may is due to meet him on friday. i have got the mirror and the sun to you. the front page of the mirra says, she did know. she was briefed on the trident missile failure before the vote. and the sun has got the story, two bafta vote. and the sun has got the story, two ba fta have vote. and the sun has got the story, two bafta have kate? —— do we bafta
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have kate? apparently they do not wa nt ca kes to have kate? apparently they do not want cakes to come. prince william has been. but she is going to upstage the likes of emily blunt and naomie harris. the front page of the guardian. one of the world's most recognised images. and michael fallon accused last night of keeping parliament in the dark about the trident weapons test failure. loads of pictures of gordon kay on front pages, the front page of the daily mail. i got a great story. how much time do you spend on your phones? eddie jones, the english rugby team boss, has brought in this woman, a former south african hockey player and she says your eye muscles are like any muscle in the body. you need to exercise them and get off
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your phone. she is encouraging all the players... which one is she? that is. she is encouraging all the players to get off their phones and what she has set up for the england players is something called an eye gym. you exercise all the muscles in your eyes to improve your spatial awareness. she says that instinctive knowledge of what might be just out of your vision is going because of how much we are using phones. she is hugely effective. affected in rugby union, cricket, football, all over the world. i can see why in rugby. she is working with the backs at the moment. do you ever have the problem when you're shirt comes on top?! little bit. in the side area. i have the answer. he ago. excuse the picture. suspender — like devices
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which keep shouts tucked in and you are supposed to wear these, 28 quid, you wear them around your thighs and it keeps your shirt tucked in. it looks like the most painful thing in the world. or you could just type it in. but it never stays. apparently, the outline of the show —— shelves. lawyers and managers and chief executives. there you go. we are missing out. thank you for that. are you happy? i would say when i was 27... i would say when i was 27. .. it is actually a date. alternatively, 1977. that was one of the happiest yea rs. 1977. that was one of the happiest years. but it was really sunny and warm. to be fair you are not born, either of you, 1957. none of us were born, which is amazing. it was the happiest year, few men lived beyond
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the age of 70, most people had an outside loo but it was the happiest yearin outside loo but it was the happiest year in recent rikishi street, looking at 230 different years —— british history. southend have sacked their groundsmen because there pitch was frozen, so the game was called off. a statement from the clu b was called off. a statement from the club said people generally lose their position as a result of not doing theirjob. that is like sacking carol because its nose. doing theirjob. that is like sacking carol because its nosem isa sacking carol because its nosem is a bit like that, it is not his fault it is so cold. he did his best. controversial! see you both later, thank you. cyclists who choose the right on the pavement instead of the road often face angry stares, not to mention falling foul ofa stares, not to mention falling foul of a fine. but some police have opted not to challenge every cyclist, instead asking them what
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prompted them to leave the road in the first place. after 8am we will speak to the police officer who came up speak to the police officer who came up with the idea. is it ever ok to cycle on the footpath? we have been finding out. i choose to cycle on the pavement, i don't agree with people who do cycle of paper, but maybe there should be more facility for people to park in cycle lanes, and stuff like that. i ama cycle lanes, and stuff like that. i am a cyclist myself, so probably i have been known to, you know, be a bit naughty like that at times.|j tend tojust bit naughty like that at times.|j tend to just come bit naughty like that at times.|j tend tojust come home, i have occasionally been stopped by a policeman. i feel much safer on a bike than in a car, as far as police are concerned. i don't think cyclist should be on the pavement, especially when they have made the cycle lanes and everything. it is more difficult when you are in places where there are no cycle lanes and if they feel trapped by the traffic, then they might but it is difficult for pedestrians.” the traffic, then they might but it is difficult for pedestrians. i was always told to get off my bike when
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i was cycling on the pavement. i can actually remember going down there and turning a corner, down the street, a policeman, and i was about 14, and he said get off your bike. what do you think about that?” what do you think about that? i do not cycle on the pavements, but i think if you have got children, for example, should they be allowed on the pavement? i think possibly they should. i feel the pavement? i think possibly they should. ifeel a the pavement? i think possibly they should. i feel a lot the pavement? i think possibly they should. ifeel a lot of the pavement? i think possibly they should. i feel a lot of people getting incensed already. you can feel the audience getting incensed. as per usual, you can share your thoughts via e—mail, facebook and twitter as well. and the policeman is going to stop them and ask them why they are on the pavement to try and change things. he is also a keen cyclist himself. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the supreme court is preparing to announce its landmark brexit
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ruling this morning. the government will learn if it has to give mps a vote. drivers in england and wales caught going well above the speed limit are to face bigger fines, 1.5 times their weekly income. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. a lot to talk about, the fog and the ice yesterday. good morning. for some of us it is faulty again. there isa some of us it is faulty again. there is a real temperature difference. if we ta ke is a real temperature difference. if we take kates bridge in northern ireland, yesterday morning it was -7.1 ireland, yesterday morning it was —7.1 celsius, making it the coldest night this winter in northern ireland. this morning at the same time it is eight .3, said that as a 15.4 degrees increase in temperature. it is not like that everywhere. it is still cold across england and wales. we still have some freezing fog which could well lead to some travel disruption once again. and you can find out what is happening where you are on your bbc local radio station. so patchy fog,
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but dance patchy fog. not all of us are seeing it, it is not a complete and get, it is patchy but it is freezing. i have hammered at home quite a lot now. as we push into the south—west we are looking at misty conditions but a cold start. a cold start away from the west coast of wales, patchy bits and pieces of fog. a brighter start across parts of north—west england but the weather front not too far away and for northern ireland, again, much milder than it was this time yesterday, and fairly cloudy. there isa yesterday, and fairly cloudy. there is a weather front across scotland, producing rain, a weak weather fronts are not particularly heavy rain we are looking at and ahead of it across northern england we are back into some fog, especially across the vale of york. rather like yesterday, what is going to happen with that fog is some of it will lift, some of it will be slow to clear and lift into low cloud and some that will hang around for much of the day. where that happens it will hold temperatures back but across a lot of england we are looking at sunny and bright spells.
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afterwards the west there is more cloud and the weather front sinks into northern england and north—west wales will produce some patchy rain and drizzle. as we head on through the evening and overnight you can see the wind strengthening our towards the west. still bits and pieces of drizzle from our decaying weather front and if you take a line from the wash down towards dorset and point south—east, this is where we are prone once again to some dents and patchy fog, and it will be freezing fog with temperatures close to freezing. no such issues further north, a healthy seven or eight. still windy out towards the west, a fair bit of cloud, weather front not too far away. we are starting to pull in more of a breeze from the continent across the southern areas so there will be a bit more cloud but in between we have a drier and sunnier slice. still mild out towards the west. then as we move from wednesday into thursday, watch how the wind veers. it is pushing to more of a south—easterly. normally that would be quite a mild direction for us, coming from the near
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continent but it has been so cold across other parts of europe that you can see that cold filtering across the uk. on thursday we are looking at a windy day for some, a breezy day for others, it will be sunny, but don't forget it will be cold if you are exposed to that wind. temperature—wise what we are looking at is this kind of range, between one and seven celsius. when you add on the wind, this is how it will actually feel against your skin, more like —2 or minus five. we have another weather front waiting to come in our direction. this will bea to come in our direction. this will be a fairly weak affair as it pushes them from the west towards the east and on friday there will be quite a bit of cloud around as well, still cold if you are exposed to that wind. but out towards the west, something brighterfor a wind. but out towards the west, something brighter for a time, wind. but out towards the west, something brighterfor a time, and you can see what is waiting in the winds on friday. thank you very much indeed. we will see you in half an hour. i like how cal's dresses perfectly matching the blue of the
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rain. trying to hide it! -- carol's. some of the happiest children in the world are being raised in the netherlands, according to a unicef study. so what is the secret of the dutch success story? two mothers who now live there have written a book to find out. our correspondent anna holligan has been to meet them, and to see what happens when you place children at the centre of society. this doesn't take much, according to the dutch. they have got the most contented babies, the happiest kids and, as adults, the best work—life balance. the lessons start with breakfast. they place a high value on family life, and on communication between the members of the family. and so part of eating together is about talking together. and the dutch scored the highest on children who ate breakfast before they went to school, and that sets them up for the day. so at the end of the day it doesn't matter if it's chocolate. chocolate sprinkles clearly contradict the healthy eating advice
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and yet dutch kids have some of the lowest obesity rates, which may be linked to the fact that so many cycle to school. but, as you can see, bikes and cars have separate lanes, so parents don't have the same worries about sending kids out on two wheels. and, when they get to school, dutch pupils don't face academic pressure, things like tests and homework, until much later. when there's not so much pressure, children start school by a positive way, by enjoying it, by feeling this is something nice to do, and i think that lasts your whole life. and that is backed up by the unicef statistics, which suggests these children are more likely to go on to further education than their british counterparts. you will see lots of fathers at the school gates. the dutch government legislates for unpaid "daddy days," which encourage families to share the childcare. and then there is the freedom. it's actually wonderful. and plus, we always read in all of these books, right, that they should play outside. so i'm happy that it's
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part of our culture, that they're expected to be out and playing. is it because, in the netherlands, it is safer? we can't send kids out to parks in london or the heart of birmingham, can we? i think so, actually. in a sense, you have to trust your own society, right? back to basics parenting is what it's all about. you don't have to try so hard. and the byproduct of giving kids greater independence — more time for yourself. at least, when they're a little older. head due west from here, and you'll reach essex. the uk may be geographically close, but there are of course fundamental differences between our societies, and not all of the lessons from here can simply be exported over there. but they mayjust inspire you. that was anna holligan, reporting with the help of her six—month—old baby zena.
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i think they are onto something with those chocolate sprinkles. it is like we have chocolate spread, but they have these hard chocolate sprinkles and they pour them on hot toast and they melt, and they are magical. a little bit of what you fancy. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: the not—so—beautiful game. an amateur football referee tells us why he is calling on his colleagues from grassroots football to strike over abuse and assault on match days. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we are off for some chocolate sprinkles. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza armah.
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two men have been arrested on suspicion of arson after an explosion at a block of flats in hornchurch, in east london, yesterday evening. firefighters rescued 25 people, while several were taken to hospital. the building partially collapsed, forcing homes to be evacuated, with many residents having to spend the night with family and friends. one of the mayor's major schemes to reduce pollution in the capital has been criticised by his opponents as too expensive and ineffective. the ultra low emission zone, which comes into force in 2019, is due to establish a charge on the oldest, dirtiest vehicles entering central london, but sadiq khan plans to extended the zone to the north and south circulars. however, the conservatives claim the £800 million cost could be better spent, and will only improve air quality by 10%. the mayor said the zone will make a huge difference to air quality. a murder investigation has been launched after a 15—year—old boy was stabbed to death in north—west london yesterday. police were called to doyle gardens, in willesden, brent, just before 3:30pm in the afternoon. the boy was taken to hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. officers are appealing
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for witnesses. let's have a look at the travel situation now. first up on the tube, so far there is a good service this morning. and on the railways, southern is running a full timetable for first time in six months, so a good service there. on the roads, the a127 remains closed between the m25junction 29 and gallows corner, following last night's explosion in hornchurch. there is still some local access. while at poplar, one lane closed on the a12 southbound, just before the blackwall tunnel, because of a burst watermain. at london bridge, tooley street is closed eastbound for long—term works. and another foggy start this morning. that may cause disruption to some flights, especially at heathrow. do check before you travel. let's have a check on the weather now. good morning. it is another cold start to the day. temperatures down
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at zero and below. saw widespread frost, and also quite a lot of fog around again. now, the met office hasissued around again. now, the met office has issued a yellow weather warnings for the dense fog for this morning, and the potential for that to freeze. it is fairly likely, as the temperatures is, as i mentioned, down at zero and below. out towards the east there is a bit more cloud so perhaps not quite as much fog but elsewhere the fog fairly stubborn. it may persist a little longer today but if it does lift we should see a bit of sunshine in the afternoon. the temperature still feeling cold, regardless, we are looking at a maximum of three to five celsius. overnight tonight it is a repeat performance. the mist and fog will reform, but amateur will fall. performance. the mist and fog will reform, butamateurwill fall. so another cold night, towns and cities hovering just above zero but outwards the countryside zero and below. so a bit of frost tomorrow morning and some dents hatches. it should lift a little quicker, with some dry air is moving in from the south but it looks like a predominantly cloudy day. another cold night wednesday into thursday,
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are widespread, hard frost thursday morning, but we should at least see a bit more sunshine. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it's on tuesday the 24th of january. we'll have the latest news and sport injust a moment and coming up on breakfast today, a new chapter for motor sport. following the £6 billion pound takeover of f1, we'll look back at the 40 year reign of its former chief, bernie ecclestone. also this morning, the police officer who won't punish some cyclists who ride on the pavement. instead he's investigating why they do. safety campaigners hail the move but is it a free pass for those on two wheels? and after nine, will the musical la la land continue its unstoppable quickstep towards glory at next month's oscars?
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we'll make our predictions ahead of today's nominations. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. loads of your comments coming in on the cycling story. it first. —— but first. the supreme court will rule today on whether it's up to parliament or the government to start the process for exiting the european union. the government argues that ministers have the power to trigger the eu's article 50 exit clause. but opponents say they need pa rliament‘s approval to start negotiations. thejudgement is significant, as it goes to the heart of where power lies in the uk and could disrupt the prime minister's brexit timetable as our political correspondent, chris mason reports. au revoir! the european union ignites strong passions. almost seven weeks ago, protesters gathered outside the supreme court as the 11 most senior judges in the land gathered inside.
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hour after hour of dense legal argument followed on the biggest question in politics. where does power lie? is it behind the door here in downing street? or inside here in parliament? the prime minister says she can start the uk's divorce from the eu herself but campaigners, led by the businesswoman gina miller, says mps and peers have to have a say first. this morning, we will find out who has won. if the government loses, they will also lose complete control of the timetable for starting the process of leaving the european union. it will have to rush its plan through parliament in the next few weeks. today is not about whether brexit should or will happen but who gets to press go. that is why it matters and that is why there was a lot of interest
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here in what the judges had to say. chris mason, bbc news, westminster. later this morning we'll be speaking to the former deputy prime minister nick clegg to get his thoughts on the supreme court ruling. that's at 7:10. president trump has announced that america will formally withdraw from the trans—pacific partnership, one of the major pledges he made during the election campaign. the trade deal involving a dozen countries was agreed by barack obama. president trump has also cut funding for international groups that provide abortions, and has frozen the hiring of some federal workers. drivers caught driving well above the speed limit will face bigger fines after a review of the sentencing guidelines for courts in england and wales. the changes will allow magistrates to impose much tougher penalties on drivers and are intended to make sure the punishment for speeding is a lot higher for the worst offenders. flooding has caused billions
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of pounds of damage and ruined flood management in england and wales is still fragmented, inefficient and ineffective according to a group of mps. members of the commons environment committee have accused the government of failing to take simple steps to protect homes after they recommended an overhaul of the system. the government has rejected the criticism, saying that many suggestions have been accepted. fiona lamdin reports. sadly not such a rare sight, waging war against the water as roads are transformed into rivers. in recent years there's been severe flooding in cumbria, yorkshire, scotland and somerset. two months ago the nvironmental food and rural affairs committee efra called for a radical overhaul to what it called the government's disjointed flood management. just one of the many criticisms levied at defra, it hasn't created a national floods commissioner for england. flooding is a much more regular
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occurrence affecting many more people than it ever has done. so the citizens of this country want to see the government protect them against flooding. we've asked some questions and made some recommendations, it's the government's responsibility to protect its citizens. defra say it's already implementing many of the report suggestions, such as managing water courses across entire catchment areas. but say there is no need for structural changes. over the next five years the government is investing £2.5 billion on building flood defence schemes across the country, protecting an additional 300,000 homes. but with climate change we're being told to expect more heavy rain, increasing the flood risk. and so for this select committee it's unlikely the government's current interventions will be enough. fiona lamdin, bbc news. two men have been arrested
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after an explosion at a block of flats in east london monday. four people were taken to hospital and 25 people had to be rescued from the partially collapsed building in hornchurch. transport for london said debris had been scattered across nearby roads. the cause of the explosion is not yet known. the nominations for this year's academy awards will be announced later today. critics have tipped modern musical romance, la la land as a frontrunner. it's expected to face stiff competition from brooding domestic drama manchester by the sea starring casey affleck and also from moonlight, a coming of age drama set in drug—torn miami. we will be talking —— talking about them a bit later. and we are hearing at 100 flights have been cancelled at 100 flights have been cancelled at heathrow, due to fog. ds -- the airport says there is reduced visibility and passengers should check flight status before setting off so check on your phone or your
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la ptop off so check on your phone or your la pto p to off so check on your phone or your laptop to make sure your flight is going. carol will talk laptop to make sure your flight is going. carolwill talk us laptop to make sure your flight is going. carol will talk us through all the weather. wherever you are. mostly in the uk. good morning, sally. you are in charge of sport. iam i am steering sport. bernie ecclestone has gone and he is not very happy about it. he says the —— that he has basically lost his job. he is in his 805. he is obviously going to find it difficult to move away from formula 1. the us giant liberty media completed its £6.4bn takeover of f1 last night. chairman chase carey takes on ecclestone's role and former mercedes team boss ross brawn is the sport's new managing director. double olympic gold—medallist boxer
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nicola adams has turned professional. at last year's rio games she became the first british boxer to successfully defend an olympic title in nearly 100 years. i feel like i have ifeel like i have achieved everything i wanted to achieve in the amateur ranks. commonwealth games champion, double olympic champion, number one, it's the best way to leave the sport. there are of goals —— goals in the professional ra nks goals —— goals in the professional ranks to achieve. becoming a world champion and european champion. so many goals to achieve in the professional ranks. england's women take on sweden in a friendly. it's all part of the preparations that this year ‘s european championships. we want to bea european championships. we want to be a major part of it. when we come
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up be a major part of it. when we come up againstany be a major part of it. when we come up against any team, we will be as possible —— as ready as possible. but we had to take those that doorsteps. rory mcilroy has pulled out of the dubai desert classic as he recovers from a rib injury. the world number two missed last week's event in abu dhabi. the wales back row sam warburton says not being captain of the national side will help make him a hungrier player. warburton led wales for nearly six years but has handed the armband over to alun wynjones. the cardiff blues player's in the squad for wales' opening game against italy but knows he's got competition for his place in the side. that is what drives me every day, when you are training and at home, you have that goal of wanting to play for wales. it will make me more hungry, not to have the captaincy. ryan mason's family have
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thanked well—wishers to their support upto what they described as a traumatic 24 hours. the hull city midfielder underwent surgery, after sustaining a fractured skull at sta mford sustaining a fractured skull at stamford bridge on sunday. mason was injured ina stamford bridge on sunday. mason was injured in a clash of heads with chelsea defender gary cahill. he's conscious and talking. from that moment until being in surgery was less tha n moment until being in surgery was less than one hour. he was hugely helped by being on a huge ground near a fantastic hospital. one hour later, he was in surgery to relieve pressure on his brain. how incredible the first aid is. taken seriously quickly. a massive difference, not only did the relate asa difference, not only did the relate as a football grounds of sporting stadiums but the speed at which they are able to manoeuvre. ryan mason's
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recovery is testament to that. all the best to him. bernie ecclestone was key to turning formula 1 into what of the biggest sports in the world. baht for the first time in 40 yea rs, world. baht for the first time in 40 years, he will no longer be involved in the day—to—day running of formula 1. markjenkins ‘s professional business strategy at cranfield university. 40 years in charge. quite a legacy. what is most significant? i think he created a business where no business existed, which was the whole formula 1 model. he created a series of races which we re he created a series of races which were delivered year—on—year where before then it was all and hoc so he created an entirely new racing product. many people became very rich on the back of his work. are you surprised at the speed with which he seems to be exiting? on one level, yes. they said it would be
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involved but three years. clearly, they have put a new company in place. that is a good time to make the kind of changes they feel they need to make. he is going to be a huge figure. he is going to be missed in the sport. they are replacing him with two jobs missed in the sport. they are replacing him with twojobs but it's likely there will more roles needed to really provide the kind of attention to detail and build the relationships that he had at his fingertips. that is interesting. so much of it is about relationships. teams and circuits and all the rest of it. he has built all those relationships. he is at every race. he understands all the little things that need to be oiled and all the issues that need to be resolved. i do not think anyone has that detailed understanding of the whole process. tell us, what does it mean for fans of the sport? i think in the short run, there is not going to
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be much change but in the longer run, we are going to see far more engagement with social media, the tv pack moorman —— platform is fragmenting, people are watching on their mobiles and the way in which their mobiles and the way in which the sport is delivered to fans will change. does that mean fans will get up change. does that mean fans will get up close and personal with the drivers more? in las vegas earlier this year, there was a virtual race where people where people were at their consoles racing each other and you can see the distinction between the real world and the virtual world is going to become more blurred. absolutely, those scenarios are very possible. we know ticket prices can be expensive. i noticed bernie ecclestone made the comment that he would be able to afford to go to a formula 1 race and you could argue he is probably one of the few people who can. prices are very expensive but what we are going to seek is the way the sport is delivered, the way
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you engage with it will be less physical, but with more virtual technologies. 40 years and that job. will he find it difficult to let go? certainly. that has been his life. that is as well. i am sure he well. what now happens, quite a few out of work team principals, like ron dennis. quite a few retired drivers. we could see another series. what an interesting point to end on. an interesting point to end on. an interesting future, isn't it? thank you to being with us. let us remind you to being with us. let us remind you of the main stories. the supreme court is preparing to announce its landmark brexit ruling and the government will learn if it has to give mps the vote. drivers caught going well above the speed limits are to face bigger fines, 1.5 times their weekly income.
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telling you this morning about some flights being held up at heathrow, about 100 flights. fog out there in places. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. you could be forgiven for saying monday, because the weather for many of us is like it was on monday. it is tuesday and there is fog around, it is dense and patchy in places. it is also freezing fog and it has already caused a little bit of travel disruption and may well cause some more. you can find out what is happening where you are on your bbc local radio station. it is patchy fog so you may have it where you are, travel down the road and there will be nothing and then you will land back in it again a bit further on. for the south—west it is misty rather than faulty. a cold start with widespread frost and away from the west coast of wales it is a cold start with some patchy fog. a
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brighter start across parts of north—west england although there is rain notfar north—west england although there is rain not far away and a much milder start to the morning across northern ireland. in kate ‘s bridge is 15 degrees warmer than it was this time yesterday. we have a weak weather front across scotland, producing some light rain and drizzle, and we have some more fog as we move across the pennines and into the vale of york. like yesterday, what will happen with that fog is some will clear altogether, some will be very slow to clear and lifting the low cloud, and some will hang around all day. if you are in an area where it sticks in the butcher will struggle to break freezing sticks in the butcher will struggle to breakfreezing but sticks in the butcher will struggle to break freezing but if you are in an area where it clears the temperatures will rise. you could see six or seven in some brightness and sunny spells but the highest temperatures will be out towards the west and through the day our weather front moving across scotland will get into northern england and north—west wales but by then it will be very weak and producing patchy, light rain and drizzle. through the evening and overnight the wind picks up evening and overnight the wind picks up towards the west. there will be a
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fair bit of cloud and again some patchy, light rain and drizzle. no problems with frost here but take a line from the wash down towards dorset and point south—east and once again we are looking at some pockets of dance, freezing fog —— points south—east. —— dance, freezing fog. this could be slow to lift in some places but move away from the fog areas, and you will have some sunshine coming through and weather front starting to show its hand across the north—west of scotland. breezy conditions here, but very mild. ten or11. breezy conditions here, but very mild. ten or 11. as we move from wednesday into thursday, our weather front weakened as it approaches us. look how the wind veers to more of a south—easterly. the impact that will haveis south—easterly. the impact that will have is dragging this cold, continental air onto our shores. it is going to feel pretty chilly if you are exposed to that through the course of thursday but there will be a lot of dry weather around on
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thursday. there will be a fair bit of sunshine as well. out towards the west, the wind particularly strong. but to show you the temperature values, this is what you will see in your thermometer. between one and seven, but this is how it will feel against your skin with the wind chill. as low as —5 in some areas, so you should wrap up warmly. here is our weak weather front moving from the west was the east. quite a bit of cloud around and if you are exposed to that trees it will feel on the nippy side. thank you very much for that. we will send you outside ina bauer‘s time. are you prepared for some live fog news, later? thank you very much for that. it is not too foggy at the moment, but that could change. fraud cost the uk more than £1 billion last year, blamed on a massive rise in cyber crime. ben has been taking a look at why. are sadly familiar tale, i am
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afraid. the figures are from the accountancy firm kpmg. they have looked at fraud cases, and that boom in online and so—called cyber crime. it cost britain £1 billion last year. that is more than double the previous year. but why, when there have been so many attempts to tackle it? well, the number of cases has actual fallen by a third, it is just that the cost of each case has risen sharply. and that is largely due to cyberfraud. it has risen by more than 1,000%, at a cost of £120 million. david clarke is director of the fraud advisory panel, and a former head of the city of london police fraud squad. very good morning to you. good morning. as i said in the introduction, sadly not surprising that cyber crime is on the rise, despite all of the attempts to
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tackle it. are you surprised by what these figures show?” tackle it. are you surprised by what these figures show? i am not surprised, in fact i am pleased to be seeing reports of the nature and extent of the problem being much clearer now. the chief inspector of co nsta bula ry clearer now. the chief inspector of constabulary reported last week, he said fraud in the uk is epidemic. the fraud advisory panel, we would agree with that. i would say it goes further. fraud is a global pandemic that we need to address. we have seen that we need to address. we have seen it coming. the cyberfigures, yes, they are worrying, but a lot of these are using cyber, the criminals have used tools now that a newly available. they have found other ways to con people, but this is a global pandemic. it is an illness we need to treat urgently. so if they are using new tools, how do we stay one step ahead? it strikes me every time we deal with one element, be
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they phishing or anything like that, they phishing or anything like that, they come up with a new thing. that is the art of the clever fraudster. the police will always be some way behind. it links in with what we have said at the fraud advisory panel charity, and it is about the moral compass here. what you will see in those figures which is worrying for me is not the number of cases. we will see larger numbers going to court, and the police and law enforcement will prioritise the serious cases. what is interesting with this is that we are seeing senior management involved. this is worrying. senior managers trying to maintain lifestyles. we're also seeing some of the poorer people trying to engage in fraud. we know these criminal offences. a story about people buying teeth whitening scams and subscriptions to satellite tv, it is the moral compass. and globally, not just tv, it is the moral compass. and globally, notjust in the uk, we record fraud very well here but it isa record fraud very well here but it is a problem we need to address through education as well. and that
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such an important area, that education. it gives us the sense that big business is reluctant to admit it sometimes. they don't want to put their hand up and say we have been a victim and we need to deal with it. it is about coming clean, because until people come clean, we have trouble dealing with it. we have trouble dealing with it. we have to encourage reporting. people saying the police will not do anything, but it is not about doing something, it is about knowing it. when you have a serious illness, you go to the doctor. when you have a serious crime, you report it. what is reassuring as people are coming forward. our message is disclose, report. we have seen the awful situation with brands like rolls—royce embroiled in an awful situation. many companies are trying to do their best in business. they become targets of fraud. they can go to the police or authorities and they can disclose. when they have
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information about people and it is insiders, properly two thirds of the time, research shows, insiders are collusive and involved in this. the business very often is the. so i find it very reassuring that companies are coming forward, and they are disclosing this, because then we can start to understand it and act on it, and get these people before the courts in these kinds of cases. it is good to talk to you, thank you for your insight. thank you. after 7am, we talk about your favourite subject, the cost of coffee. the cost could be going up and there could be less available. so the price of my coffee is going to go up?! yes, to be blunt. i will tell you how you might be able to avoid it. why have you put her in a bad mood? hejust doesn't
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avoid it. why have you put her in a bad mood? he just doesn't drink it. it is going to take years, but one day we will convert you.” it is going to take years, but one day we will convert you. i have never drank coffee, don't like the smell. he has coffee beams, everybody. —— coffee beans. punched, head—butted and spat at, just three examples of abuse an amateur football referee has had to deal with on the pitch. ryan hampson says the bad treatment he and his fellow match officials sometimes receive has led him to calling a strike of grassroots referees. brea kfast‘s tim muffett met him on the sidelines. another football match, refereed anotherfootball match, refereed by ryan hampson. this one is played in good spirits. his decisions are respect that. it is your first one. that is not always the case.” respect that. it is your first one. that is not always the case. i have had experiences such as being headbutted by a player, i have been spat at and i have been punched on numerous occasions. it got to the point where i had to stop refereeing
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for about four or five weeks. if you we re for about four or five weeks. if you were on the streets, and you were assaulted, you would be arrested. on the pitch it is different. it is not, it is completely the same. ryan says amateur referees are not getting enough support. he has called for a national strike on the first week of march. he says 400 referees have been in touch, backing up referees have been in touch, backing up his ideas. when you have been speaking to so many government bodies and asking them for help, asking them to for support, and you get the door slammed in your face on several occasions, what else can you do? jo fleming refereed for years, and our organisers for officials in manchester. there has always been abused was referees, but it has got worse. why do you think it has gone worse? it has become a blame culture. before you think about yourself, it should never go as far as the abuse and the physical
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intimidation. a group referees are saying they want to make a stand, thanl saying they want to make a stand, than i would say make sure that you are heard. manchester fa, which oversees this league, has just announced it will give referees more support, visiting them within 24 hours of any incident and ensuring any assaults are reported to police. but after much deliberation, ryan still wa nts but after much deliberation, ryan still wants referees to boycott matches. if referees‘ strike does go ahead, nationally, hundreds of face cancellation. a timely wake—up call, orjust a huge own goal?” cancellation. a timely wake—up call, orjust a huge own goal? i don't advocate a strike, i think that‘s going too far. he doesn't want them to go on strike. he the zero tolerance approach adopted by his clu b tolerance approach adopted by his club is more effective. we fully support the referees, and if a player is abusing referees on a
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regular basis, we get rid of them. most of these problems are caused by a minority of people, and it is the same people. and i‘m sure given another couple of years we. this. for ryan hampson, though, a referees because strike is the only way to tackle this problem effectively. let us know if you have thoughts on that. we will be speaking to ryan later. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m claudia—liza armah. two men have been arrested on suspicion of arson, after an explosion at a block of flats in hornchurch, in east london, yesterday evening. firefighters rescued 25 people, while several were taken to hospital. the building partially collapsed, forcing homes to be evacuated, with many residents having to spend the night with family and friends. one of the mayor‘s major schemes to reduce pollution in the capital
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has been criticised as too expensive and ineffective. the ultra low emission zone, which comes into force is 2019, will charge the oldest, dirtiest vehicles entering central london, but sadiq khan plans to extend the zone to the north and south circulars. however, the conservatives claim the £800 million cost could be better spent, and will only improve air quality by 10%. the mayor said the zone will make a huge difference to air quality. a murder investigation has been launched after a 15—year—old boy was stabbed to death in north—west london yesterday. police were called to doyle gardens, in kensal green, just before 3:30pm in the afternoon. the boy was taken to hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. officers are appealing for witnesses. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. first up, on the tube, so far there is a good service this morning.
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on the trains, a freight train has derailed near lewisham leaving south—eastern trains delayed. no trains can run from orpington to charing cross or cannon street. on the roads, the a127 remains closed between the m25junction 29 and gallows corner, following last night‘s explosion in hornchurch. there is still some local access. while at poplar, one lane closed on the a12 southbound just before the blackwall tunnel, because of a burst watermain. and another foggy start this morning, that is causing disruption to some flights. 100 have already been cancelled at heathrow. do check before you travel. let‘s have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is another cold start to the day, temperatures down at zero and below. some widespread frost, and also quite a lot of fog around again. now, the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the dense fog for this morning, and the potential for that to freeze.
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it is fairly likely, as the temperatures is, as i mentioned, down at zero and below. out towards the east there is a bit more cloud, so perhaps not quite as much fog, but elsewhere the fog fairly stubborn. it may persist a little longer today, but if it does lift, we should see a bit of sunshine this afternoon. the temperatures still feeling cold, regardless. we are looking at a maximum of three to five celsius. overnight tonight, it is a repeat performance. the mist and fog will reform, the temperature will fall. so another cold night, towns and cities perhaps hovering just above zero, but out towards the countryside, zero and below. so a bit of frost tomorrow morning, and some dense patches. it should lift a little quicker, with some dry air moving in from the south, but it looks like a predominantly cloudy day. another cold night wednesday into thursday. a widespread, hard frost for thursday morning, but we should at least see a bit more sunshine. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it is back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. judgement day as the supreme court decides who has the power to officially
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begin brexit. downing street says the government should be allowed to start the process without a vote. but campaigners who‘ve brought the case say parliament must i‘ll be live at the supreme court. the 11 judges will reveal their decision at half past nine this morning. good morning. it‘s tuesday 24th january. tougher penalties are on their way for drivers caught well above the speed limit. in sport, it‘s goodbye to bernie. liberty media complete their £6.4 billion takeover of formula one — and remove bernie ecclestone as chief executive, ending his 40 year reign in charge of the sport.
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the cost of your cappuccino is on the up. coffee drinkers face big price rises because of bad weather, poor harvests and a weak pound. i‘ll look at what it means for our morning caffeine fix. and we‘re going to be talking about the happiest children in the world. studies suggest they live in the netherlands. but what makes children there so happy? we‘ll meet two mums who‘ve gone dutch to try to find out. good morning. it is a cold and frosty start across much of england. some patchy, dense freezing fog? . london northern ireland, much milder. i will have more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the supreme court will rule today on whether it‘s up to parliament or the government to start the process for exiting the european union. the government argues that ministers have the power to trigger the eu‘s article 50 exit clause. but opponents say they need parliament‘s approval to start negotiations.
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au revoir! the european union ignites strong passions. almost seven weeks ago, protesters gathered outside the supreme court as the 11 most senior judges in the land gathered inside. hour after hour of dense legal argument followed on the biggest question in politics. where does power lie? is it behind the door here in downing street? or inside here in parliament? the prime minister says she can start the uk‘s divorce from the eu herself but campaigners, led by the businesswoman gina miller, says mps and peers have to have a say first. this morning, we will find out who has won.
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if the government loses, they will also lose complete control of the timetable for starting the process of leaving the european union. it will have to rush its plan through parliament in the next few weeks. today is not about whether brexit should or will happen but who gets to press go. that is why it matters and that is why there was a lot of interest here in what the judges had to say. chris mason, bbc news, westminster. let‘s speak to our political correspondent, carole walker, who is outside the supreme court this morning. is there any indication yet about what the judges are expected to decide? it is going to be a fairly brief judgement, to the point. the expectation is that will go against the government. the prime minister will hope to go ahead, trickle —— trigger article 50 by the end of march. the expectation is the
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judgement will have to get the consent of parliament first. we don't expect mp5 or peers to try to block the process but they will try to amend, to shape the legislation, to amend, to shape the legislation, to change the prime minister's approach to those negotiations. that could delay the proceedings quite significantly. it could also affect exactly how she goes into those negotiations. there is also another important issue being decided here. that is, whether the government needs to consult or get the approval of the devolved nations, scotland, wales and northern ireland. scotland is demanding the right to stay in the single market. northern ireland, we are still awaiting elections at the beginning of march. it's not even clear who the prime minister would consult at this stage. all of could complicate the process when theresa may is determined to get on and begin those negotiations by the end of march. carroll, thank you.
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and in a few minutes we‘ll speak to the former deputy prime minister nick clegg to get his thoughts on the supreme court ruling. president trump has announced that america will formally withdraw from the trans—pacific partnership, one of the major pledges he made during the election campaign. the trade deal involving a dozen countries was agreed by barack obama. president trump has also cut funding for international groups that provide abortions, and has frozen the hiring of some federal workers. drivers caught driving well above the speed limit will face bigger fines after a review of the sentencing guidelines for courts in england and wales. the changes will allow magistrates to impose much tougher penalties on drivers and are intended to make sure the punishment for speeding is a lot higher for the worst offenders. sian grzeszczyk has more. thousands of motorists are fined for speeding on our roads every year. after hearing concerns from road safety campaigners, the sentencing
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council has decided that the current system isn‘t good enough. as a result, fines will be increased by 50% for the most serious speeding offences. the current limit for a speeding fine is 100% of the drivers weekly wage, up to £1000 or £2500 if they are caught on the motorway but when the new guidelines come into force on the 24th of april, drivers caught well above the speed limit can expect a fine of 1.5 times their weekly income. when the limit is 30, that means someone driving at 51 miles per hour. when the limit is 70, like on a motorway, that means travelling at 101 miles per hour but the upper limits of the fines still remain the same, at £1000 and £2500. in 2015, more than 166,000 motorists we re in 2015, more than 166,000 motorists were fined for speeding offences in england and wales, the average fine
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£188. and it's england and wales, the average fine £188. and it‘s notjust speeding offences. another change concerns people who don‘t have a tv license. thousands are fined but major streets will now be able to impose a non—financial pentiti, a conditional discharge in cases where people have made significant efforts to pay the fee. sian grzeszczyk, bbc news. bernie ecclestone has been replaced as the chief executive of formula one, after four decades in charge. the move was announced by the american company liberty media following its £6 billion takeover of the sport. mr ecclestone, who says he‘s been forced out, will be replaced by the vice—president of 21st century fox, chase carey. our sports editor, dan roan reports. having ruled formula 1 with an iron grip of the last 40 years, transforming the sport into a global commercial phenomenon and becoming superrich in the process, it seemed as if bernie ecclestone would somehow go on forever. but what the
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most remarkable rains and sport has reached the end of the road. in a statement confirming its £6 billion ta keover of statement confirming its £6 billion takeover of f1, new and american owner liberty media said chairman chase carey would now be chief executive, with ecclestone offered the title of chairman emeritus. that diminished role is unlikely to sat —— satisfy him, who said he has been deposed. he will not be in charge of the day running of the sport. the 86 enrolled billionaire‘s rise from second—hand car salesman to team owner and then f1‘s all powerful commercial rights holder is unique. able to pick up the phone to heads of state and royals and celebrities, he was the best connected man in the sport, expert beholding his various factions together and surviving many controversies including bribery trial in 2014. but declining television audiences and concerns over the predictability of races, liberty believes f1 needs a revamp
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and with chase carey saying it has multiple untapped opportunities, ecclestone has been driven out. some will feel he outstayed his welcome but others in the sport are indebted to him. we‘re hearing that approximately 100 flights have been cancelled at heathrow due to fog. the airport says that there is reduced visibility again today, and that passengers should check their flight status with their airline before setting off. flood management in england and wales is still fragmented, inefficient and ineffective according to a group of mps. the government still isn‘t doing enough to tackle the problem. that‘s according to a committee of mps who have criticised the government for a lack of action two months after they recommended major reform. the government says its plans will help protect 300,000 homes. the nominations for this year‘s academy awards will be announced later today. critics have tipped the modern musical romance la la land
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as a frontrunner. it‘s expected to face stiff competition from the domestic drama manchester by the sea and also from moonlight, a coming of age drama set in drug—torn miami. zookeepers at san diego safari park are caring for a miracle baby a bat delivered by caesarean section. the 12—day—old rodrigues fruit bat, also known as the flying fox, is being hand—reared following surgery. staff say he‘s a fiesty creature, who‘s quick to let them know what he wants. absolutely lovely. i need to clear up absolutely lovely. i need to clear up these back to facts before i pass them on to you. cavill will bring you all the weather in a few minutes‘ time. —— carroll. the supreme court will rule later whether parliament or ministers have the power to begin the process of leaving the eu.
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we‘ve been promised a red, white and blue brexit. a clean breakfrom european union membership, rather than a gradual withdrawal. but who has the power to fire the starting gun? the government, theresa may and her ministers? or parliament — the elected mps in the commons and their neighbours in the house of lords? both sides at court agreed that the case wasn‘t about in or out, just about how. if the government wins its case today, it will trigger article 50 and begin the process by the end of march. if it loses, it may still try to meet that deadline, but will have to consult parliament and will likely ask mps and lords to vote on a brexit bill. let‘s speak to former deputy prime minister nick clegg. he campaigned for a remain vote in the referendum and is now the liberal democrat‘s spokesman on brexit. good morning and thank you very much of your time on this. if the government does lose today, what will your party look to do in parliament? if the government loses
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and by the way, it‘s extraordinary that this even ended up in court, you would have thought it was normal to give parliament a say on something as momentous as this but if the government loses, if mps have a say, i don‘t think, given that the labour party have in effect written a blank cheque to the government and said they would support them come what may, there was no risk that parliament. article 50 from being triggered. the question is, in what kind —— and what kind of amendments will be tabled. there will be difficulties across parties, for instance, to make sure the government limits economic damage with what they are determined to do, which is pull the united kingdom after the single market. amendments to make sure mps have a look at negotiations while they are going on, notjust at negotiations while they are going on, not just at the negotiations while they are going on, notjust at the beginning and the end and as you know, the liberal democrats are they also believe that when a final deal emerges in years to come, that it is put to the
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people and the people have final say on they like or don‘t like the final deal that emerges from these negotiations. there might be many people watching this, thinking, just accept it. we understand you and many others did not want to leave the eu at the uk have voted to do that and that is now what is going to happen so stop arguing about it. what we are arguing about, you are right, i was disappointed by the outcome, but the complicated bit is how to pull us out of the european union. there are lots of different choices. the brexit campaign, boris johnson, nigel farage, michael gove, making promises about cuts to the nhs, vat, they went quiet but it is reasonable to say that at the end of
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this process, much as it was kicked off by the british people, it should also be signed off by the british people. it should not become something to decide upon at the end of the process. did theresa may make the plans clear? i am here, as you can see, just talking to vote to get under the skin of some of this because it‘s very well to say, you wa nted because it‘s very well to say, you wanted be a great global free trade in britain. and then the world‘s most successful free trading error, the single market, the eu, created by margaret thatcher, there are so many contradictions. i suspect the final deal looks substantially different to what theresa may has set up, which is the nature of negotiations. that is why we think it is important that people should have a say in the end on whether
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they agree or disagree on the final outcome of these talks. people have already had a say, haven‘t they? brexit has been decided. whatever changes you make, they will get through. i agree with you. mps, at this stage, will give their consent for the government to start the article 50 negotiations but as i say, if you look further forward, certainly two years hence, it is important to ask ourselves now how we should put the finishing touches as we like to this very complex negotiation. also, as you know, young people, they voted overwhelming numbers for a different direction of travel and it seems right that we do not know what the final deal is and we should give people a say and not keep it in the hands of politicians.
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you will see the prime minister on many of the front pages today saying she was aware of what happened with the trident misfire before she addressed mps in parliament. do you think she has a duty to clarify what she knew and when she knew it, and to address these issues? of course. it isa to address these issues? of course. it is a very serious matter if these missiles are now, at least some of them, misfiring. but to not have told parliament at a point when parliament was making a major decision, a decision which i happen to disagree with, about spending billions of pounds of british taxpayers‘ money in the future to replace the existing system, to not have told mps that there were some flaws, i‘m not actually convinced that it would have changed the decision in parliament that seems to me to have been a very relevant piece of information, that should have been made public. and they certainly should come clean now i
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think this endless ducking and weaving, they should stop digging now, the government, and come clean. appreciate your time on track list this morning. and in an hour we will get the other side of the argument, from the conservative mp iain duncan smith. and, as we have been hearing, the supreme court is expected to deliver its judgement around 9:30am this morning. you can follow it live on the bbc news channel, and keep up to date with the latest developments on bbc news online. here is carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. we know that flights are cancelled at heathrow. good morning to you. we have got some fog around this morning, some dense, patchy, freezing fog, causing some travel disruption and you can find out what is happening where you are on your bbc local radio station. it is fairly patchy so we are not all seeing it. at my house it was really dense but onto the m4 there was not much around, and we ran into more later on. quite a lot of patchy fog around as we push over towards the
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south—west. here it is misty rather than foggy and a cold and frosty start. for wales, a cold start away from the west. patchy had sent pieces of fog, a from close by so it is cloudy with the odd spot of drizzle but for northern ireland one thing you will notice is a much milder start to the day that it was yesterday. fairly cloudy. across scotla nd yesterday. fairly cloudy. across scotland a similar story. milder start with a weak weather front producing patchy rain and drizzle and as we head back into the north—east england, around the vale of york, for example, we do have some patchy fog. rather like yesterday, some of this fault will lift quite badly, some of it believed only in the low cloud and some of it will not clear at all. if you are stuck in an area where the fog doesn‘t lift, temperatures will struggle to break freezing but out towards the west, under the cloud, temperatures on the mild side, ten or11. as we temperatures on the mild side, ten or 11. as we push towards central and eastern areas, despite the fact there will be some sunshine, we are
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looking at a chilly six or seven. it sinks into northern england and north wales, producing again some patchy rain and drizzle. through the evening and overnight the wind strengthens towards the west. there will be quite a lot of cloud around, patchy fog, some drizzly bits and pieces as well so no problems with frost. as we push towards wales and the west once again, it will be a cold night, some pockets of frost but also some pockets of freezing fog. down towards dorset and all points south—east. tomorrow morning you will find that fog does exactly what it has been doing the last few days. some of it will clear quite readily, some of it will turn the low cloud and some of it will stick. for most it will be a dry day. we will see some sunshine towards the central swathes of the uk but another weather front towards the north—west will already be bringing in some rain by mid—afternoon. temperatures again in the west higher than they are likely to be in the east, where it will still feel cold. as we move from wednesday into
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thursday, watch how the isobars via towards more of a south—easterly. the weather front knocking on the doors of northern ireland, bringing some rain. the wind direction is salient because it will start to drag on some of that cold, continental air. so although on thursday it will be a dry day for most of the uk, it will be a fine day when we could see some sunshine. strongest winds towards the west. it will feel cold. this is what your thermometer will save between 1am and 7am, but this is what it will feel like if you are exposed to the wind, so —5, for example, in newcastle, because of the wind chill. so you need to wrap up warmly. our next story is a traumatic one. it is the case of claire throsell. her two children were killed in a house fire, started deliberately by their dad. claire had warned the authorities that their father posed a danger, but he was still allowed unsupervised access to them under a family court order. later today, she will deliver a petition urging the government to change the way courts handle cases such as hers. shejoins us now.
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good morning to you. thank you very much for coming back. i know we talk to you about it a year ago. remind us, for viewers who don‘t remember, what happened to your two young boys. they were on an access visit to their father and in the two hours when he was having them he barricaded the house and set 14 separate fires and trapped the boys in the attic upstairs. jack tried to get out and save his brother, u nfortu nately get out and save his brother, unfortunately he fell through the hatch, and he was 56% burnt. so paul died two hours later in my arms, and jack died five days later in manchester. it is a brutal and terrible story. i know we have heard it before but hearing it again, it doesn‘t change the facts of the
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case. how much have you flagged up your concerns about your ex—husband with the authorities?” your concerns about your ex—husband with the authorities? i have elected up with the authorities? i have elected up with everybody, social services, the police, they all knew. thejudge was aware as well. it is actually in my court case that i said i thought he would either kill or significant harm the boys. he was on the edge. he had threatened to commit suicide couple of earlier. and he just wasn‘t in the right place at the time to have safe contact with the two boys. in the organisation which represents children in family court cases, so what is it you hope to see changed? what needs to change is that children‘s voices need to be heard. it is all too easy in a complicated separation that the children‘s voices get lost somewhere down the process. but what we need to do is make sure children are at
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the heart of every decision made, and that they are allowed their voice. jack never had his voice heard until he was in the fire and heard until he was in the fire and he said to the foam and my dad did this and he did it on purpose. the day that jack was supposed to be having his interview was the day i held him in his arms as he died. that can‘t be allowed to happen. what we need to do is change the legislation and make family courts are safer legislation and make family courts are safer process, legislation and make family courts are safer process, both for the families and for the children that are currently going through separation. i'm sure all our viewers feel for you, as you describe your own story. do you think it is right that, in principle, family courts try and make sure that both parents of easily get access to the children, that is the overriding principle, isn‘t it? children, that is the overriding principle, isn't it? yet it is, and so it should be. there are lots of dads out there that are fantastic dads, and children should see both their parents. but there is a balance between people who love and
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ca re balance between people who love and care for the children, and people who just can‘t fit to have their children. and the children‘s voices must always be heard in those cases. their wishes and feelings must be taken into their wishes and feelings must be ta ken into account. their wishes and feelings must be taken into account. i suppose when you go to downing street today, do you go to downing street today, do you expect or hope for a kind of quick change, if they were to be changed? quick change, if they were to be changed ? because these quick change, if they were to be changed? because these things do ta ke changed? because these things do take a while, don‘t they? changed? because these things do take a while, don't they? they do. i mean, we‘ve launched the campaign a year ago. the petition with 38 degrees, and we got 38,000 signatures, and hopefully the government will take this on board and move them through, as you say, as quickly as possible. some changes are going through beforejune, the new cross questioning and practice direction should be changed quite soon, and hopefully on the back of that the family court system will change as they go along. thank you. and a statement from them, which i‘m
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sure you have heard before. coffee —— claire throsell‘s case was tragic and we have written to her and listen to her concerns. we acknowledge the findings of the coroner and a serious case review that no agency had failed in its duty but accept that is always there are duty but accept that is always there a re lessons duty but accept that is always there are lessons to be learned from such terrible cases. thank you again for coming in and talking to us this morning. you are watching breakfast. carol will tell you about the weather shortly, it is called for most of us. —— cold. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m claudia—liza armah. two men have been arrested on suspicion of arson, after an explosion at a block of flats in hornchurch in east london yesterday evening. firefighters rescued 25 people, while several were taken to hospital. the building partially collapsed,
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forcing homes to be evacuated, with many residents having to spend the night with family and friends. now, after yesterday‘s triggering of the highest pollution alert for london by mayor sadiq khan, today, one of his major schemes to tackle the problem has been criticised as too expensive and ineffective. the ultra low emission zone, which comes into force in 2019, will charge the oldest, dirtiest vehicles entering central london, but the mayor plans to extend the zone to the north and south circulars. however, the conservatives claim the £800 million cost could be better spent, and will only improve air quality by 10%. the mayor says the zone will make a huge difference to air quality. a murder investigation has been launched after a 15—year—old boy was stabbed to death in north—west london yesterday. police were called to doyle gardens, in kensal green, just before 3:30pm in the afternoon. the boy was taken to hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. officers are appealing for witnesses. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. first up, on the tube, there are severe delays on the district line
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between ealing broadway and earl‘s court. that is because of signal failure. on the trains, a freight train has derailed near lewisham, leaving south—eastern trains delayed. no trains can run from orpington to charing cross or cannon street. on the roads, the a127 remains closed between the m25junction 29 and gallows corner, following last night‘s explosion in hornchurch. there is still some local access. while at poplar, one lane closed on the a12 southbound, just before the blackwall tunnel, because of a burst watermain. and another foggy start this morning. that has caused disruption to some flights. 100 have already been cancelled at heathrow. do check before you travel. let‘s have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is another cold start to the day, temperatures down at zero and below. some widespread frost, and also quite a lot of fog around again. now, the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the dense fog for this morning, and the potential for that to freeze. it is fairly likely, as the temperatures is, as i mentioned, down at zero and below.
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out towards the east there is a bit more cloud, so perhaps not quite as much fog, but elsewhere the fog fairly stubborn. it may persist a little longer today, but if it does lift, we should see a bit of sunshine this afternoon. the temperatures still feeling cold, regardless. we are looking at a maximum of three to five celsius. overnight tonight, it is a repeat performance. the mist and fog will reform, the temperature will fall. so another cold night, towns and cities perhaps hovering just above zero, but out towards the countryside, zero and below. so a bit of frost tomorrow morning, and some dense patches again. it should lift a little quicker, as some drier air is moving in from the south, but it looks like a predominantly cloudy day. another cold night wednesday into thursday. a widespread, hard frost for thursday morning, but we should at least see a bit more sunshine. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast
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with louise minchin and dan walker. the supreme court will rule today on whether it‘s up to parliament or the government to start the process for exiting the european union. the government argues that ministers have the power to trigger the eu‘s article 50 exit clause. but opponents say they need parliament‘s approval to start negotiations. thejudgement is significant, as it goes to the heart of where power lies in the uk and could disrupt the prime minister‘s brexit timetable. earlier, nick clegg told the programme his party wants a referendum on any final brexit deal. the brexit campaign, nigel farage, michael gove, borisjohnson, the brexit campaign, nigel farage, michael gove, boris johnson, they make commitments like pots of money to the nhs and cuts to the vat, things they have fallen silent on but they were articulate —— were not
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articulate about what it means. at the end of this process, much as it was kicked off by the british people, it should be signed off by the british people and not something for politicians to decide upon at the end of the process. and in around half an hour we‘ll speak to the conservative mp iain duncan smith. we‘re hearing that approximately 100 flights have been cancelled at heathrow due to fog. the airport says that there is reduced visibility again today, and that passengers should check their flight status with their airline before setting off. drivers caught driving well above the speed limit will face bigger fines after a review of the sentencing guidelines for courts in england and wales. the changes will allow magistrates to impose much tougher penalties on drivers and are intended to make sure the punishment for speeding is a lot higher for the worst offenders. president trump has announced that america will formally withdraw from the trans—pacific partnership, one of the major pledges he made during the election campaign. the trade deal involving a dozen countries was agreed by barack obama.
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president trump has also cut funding for international groups that provide abortions, and has frozen the hiring of some federal workers. flooding has caused billions of pounds of damage and ruined thousands of homes recently. but the government still isn‘t doing enough to tackle the problem. that‘s according to a committee of mps who have criticised the government for a lack of action two months after they recommended major reform. the government says its plans will help protect 300,000 homes. the citizens of this country want to see the government to protect them against flooding. we have made recommendations and it is their responsibility to protect its citizens and as far as we are concerned, it is not adequately done that so far and explained how it is going to do it. two men have been arrested after an explosion at a block of flats in east london monday. four people were taken to hospital
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and 25 people had to be rescued from the partially collapsed building in hornchurch. transport for london said debris had been scattered across nearby roads. the cause of the explosion is not yet known. the nominations for this year‘s academy awards will be announced later today. critics have tipped modern musical romance la la land as a frontrunner. it‘s expected to face stiff competition from brooding domestic drama manchester by the sea starring casey affleck and also from moonlight, a coming of age drama set in drug—torn miami. our colin will be here on the sofa later on. sally is here now. there is bernie ecclestone. he is chairman emeritus. bernie, i‘ve looked up the
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job title. chairman emeritus means you are the honorary boss. liberty needy it‘s all change in formula one. liberty media have completed their £6.4 billion takeover and made one huge decision already. after 40 years running the sport, bernie ecclestone is no longer chief executive. he‘s been replaced by chase carey. ross brawn, former mercedes team principal, has been appointed as managing director. double olympic gold—medallist boxer nicola adams has turned professional. at last year‘s rio games she became the first british boxer to successfully defend an olympic title in nearly 100 years. ifeel like i have achieved everything i wanted to achieve in the amateur ranks. commonwealth games champion, double olympic champion, number one, it‘s the best way to leave the sport. there are a lot of goals in the professional ranks to achieve. becoming a world champion and european champion. so many goals to achieve
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in the professional ranks. james haskell‘s hopes of playing in england‘s six nations opener against france have been dealt a blow. he‘s notjoined the squad at their training camp in portugal, despite making his comeback in wasps‘ champions cup win at zebre on sunday. he had been out for six months with a foot injury. england play france on february fourth. not too long now. the wales back row sam warburton says not being national captain will help make him a hungrier player. warburton led wales for nearly six years but has handed the armband over to alun wyn jones. the cardiff blues player‘s in the squad for wales‘ opening game against italy but knows he‘s got competition for his place in the side. i want to have those nerves whether ido i want to have those nerves whether i do not know if i am in the starting 15 because that is what drives me every day. you are training at home, you are a
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professional. you want to play for wales. that is why think it will make me more hungry and not to have the captaincy. andy murray‘s unlikely to play in great britain‘s davis cup tie in canada next week — according to his captain leon smith. the provisional tea m captain leon smith. the provisional team will be announced later today. murray was knocked out of the australian open by mischa zverev who plays roger federer in the last eight this morning. in the women‘s draw, venus williams is through to the semi—finals after beating russia‘s anastasia pavlyuchenkova in straight sets earlier. england women are in action later today. they take on sweden in a friendly in spain. it‘s all part of the preparations for this summer‘s european championship. will not be
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as ready as we can be right now.” feel very sorry to jordan right there. she was obviously standing under a shadow. maybe they like the view because it is such a beautiful place to beat. what she is saying makes perfect sense. world number two rory mcilroy has pulled out of the dubai desert classic as he recovers from a rib injury. he missed the aberdovey championship last weekend. ryan mason have thanked well—wishers for their support after what they described as a dramatic row was. the whole city midfielder underwent surgery after sustaining a fractured skull at sta mford sustaining a fractured skull at stamford bridge on sunday. he was injured ina stamford bridge on sunday. he was injured in a clash of heads with chelsea defender gary kay hill. he was carried off after eight or nine minutes. he is conscious and talking and has had visitors as well. gary kay hel has been in to see him. the really good news is, he was in
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theatre just one hour after it happened. those pictures we saw of him being carried off one—hour afterwards. it is the best possible care. great to see it. good news. fingers crossed. are your kids happy? i think so. my favourite phrase at home is, i am doing my best! i am just doing my best. the reason they ask you that is because... i might move to the netherlands. some of the happy as children are apparently raised in the netherlands according to unicef study. what we want to know is what is the secret of the dutch success story. to mothers who live there have written a book to find out. our correspondent, anna holligan has been to meet them and to see what
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happens when you place children at the centre of society. this doesn‘t take much, according to the dutch. they have got the most contented babies, the happiest kids and, as adults, the best work—life balance. the lessons start with breakfast. they place a high value on family life, and on communication between the members of the family. and so part of eating together is about talking together. and the dutch scored the highest on children who ate breakfast before they went to school, and that sets them up for the day. so at the end of the day it doesn‘t matter if it‘s chocolate. chocolate sprinkles clearly contradict the healthy eating advice, and yet dutch kids have some of the lowest obesity rates, which may be linked to the fact that so many cycle to school. but, as you can see, bikes and cars have separate lanes, so parents don‘t have the same worries about sending kids out on two wheels. and, when they get to school, dutch pupils don‘t face academic pressure, things like tests and homework, until much later. when there‘s not so much pressure, children start school by a positive way, by enjoying it, by feeling this is something nice to do, and i think that lasts your whole life.
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and that is backed up by the unicef statistics, which suggests these children are more likely to go on to further education than their british counterparts. you will see lots of fathers at the school gates. the dutch government legislates for unpaid "daddy days," which encourage families to share the childcare. and then there is the freedom. it‘s actually wonderful. and plus, we always read in all of these books, right, that they should play outside. so i‘m happy that it‘s part of our culture, that they‘re expected to be out and playing. is it because, in the netherlands, it is safer? we can‘t send kids out to parks in london or the heart of birmingham, can we? i think so, actually. in a sense, you have to trust your own society, right? back—to—basics parenting is what it‘s all about. you don‘t have to try so hard. and the byproduct of giving kids greater independence — more time for yourself.
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at least, when they‘re a little older. head due west from here, and you‘ll reach essex. the uk may be geographically close, but there are of course fundamental differences between our societies, and not all of the lessons from here can simply be exported over there. but they mayjust inspire you. that was anna holligan reporting with the help of her six month old baby zena. so how practical would it be for children to be raised the dutch way? thank you very much feel time. wendy, the dutch system, pa rents would time. wendy, the dutch system, parents would be thinking, that would be lovely but in this country, we are far down another road, too far to reverse? i don't think so. it
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is all about the priorities be set. it think it is really simple. it is what makes a good life so in holland, success is all about self—worth and confidence and independence and following your own interests and academic achievements are part of it but it's not the be all and are part of it but it's not the be alland end are part of it but it's not the be all and end all. in the uk, are part of it but it's not the be alland end all. in the uk, we have made success all about academic achievement and it's actually only a small part of the equation. i personally think we can shift priorities and achieve something over here. i actually calling for the child to be at the centre of everything. it is possible to bring change. it may not be the —— it may not be easy. your husband works full time, you work part—time. not be easy. your husband works full time, you work part-time. is it practical? a lot of the ideas which are prevalent in the netherlands, we had in the 705. we all used to play
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out a lot. i'm not sure how we lost that. as a parent, we don't really let our children do an awful lot. we keep them in. i think in the netherlands, they basically cycle everywhere, they have a lot more free time, they are not watched over all the time. we are scared to let them play out by themselves.” all the time. we are scared to let them play out by themselves. i was in the netherlands last year and you are right, everybody cycles everywhere. she had one strapped to her back. are we overprotective we
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are so risk averse in this country. my mum could walk two miles. your parents could go to the shops and within those kind of three generations, we are now in a situation where children are not even allowed out of their own back gate and we have to question why that is. actually the most dangerous place is in their own homes. especially in a row and bedrooms. why have we created these restrictions? what about letting your children roam free?” restrictions? what about letting your children roam free? i have a nine—year—old, and she should be getting to the point where she should be able to walk to the shops.
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she hasn't yet. i have also got fired and sexy rolled and i think social services would be called if you let them play by themselves. we live near a busy road. i really would not like them out by themselves. we live in a gated development and when we moved there, i thought they could play on bikes and things. is that you stopping them? no, it's me. i don't know why. it isjust the them? no, it's me. i don't know why. it is just the way we are. and the focus on academics, it is quite difficult if you don‘t agree with that to get out of the system. do you think that is the case? they call it in the book rat race childhood. i think this rush to get children into learning, i mean, there is actually no evidence to show that getting children learning earlier has better results later on. that is the weird thing. rushing
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children into formal learning early can actually be detrimental. most other countries, 90% of countries in the world, start their children in formal learning at school at six or seven, and they give them structured play in the interim. actually they achieve more later on. we have kind of got it the wrong way around and we are putting huge pressure on pa rents we are putting huge pressure on parents and children which isn‘t justified and doesn‘t make them happy, healthy people. so many people getting in touch, thank you very much for your time. lots of feedback, jones says you are supposed to be a parent, stop pandering to them. matt says maybe if pa rents pandering to them. matt says maybe if parents took interest in their children they would be happier. max says children should be having good, old—fashioned fun. just turning the television off at the weekend, playing a board game or card game can help relax a busy family after a week. and jones says cut the working
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week. and jones says cut the working week for parents, like in australia. the first "very high" pollution alert has been issued for london by the city‘s mayor, under a new system that warns people about poor air quality. carol is there for us this morning. and the sky looks magnificent. very different to what we were looking at yesterday with all that fog. that's right, a beautiful start to the day out here but we were talking air pollution. i need to talk to the expert, andrew grieve. what are the air pollution levels like today? yesterday we had very high pollution levels in the south—east but also very high levels across england as well. they have dropped a little overnight at as rush—hour starts we are starting to see those levels climb back up again. what is causing this? we have had this high-pressure syste m this? we have had this high-pressure system for over a week, very cold, calm, still conditions, which has
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allowed the pollution levels to build—up. allowed the pollution levels to build-up. are their health risks attached to this? yes, there was a big study done into the 2014 episode, when we were last here, which found there was a doubling in the rise of hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular events, and these episodes always perfect the very young and the very elderly. so in france, in paris, they are doing something with cars about this, giving one car access and one can‘t not, is that right? yes, and in madrid as well. they start to restrict traffic, who can come in, starting to make public transport free as well. that is something we can consider in the uk as well.” will let you go and grab a cup of tea but here in london, as then said, there is dense fog around this morning so if you are travelling, do bear that in morning so if you are travelling, do bearthat in mind. morning so if you are travelling, do bear that in mind. it is patchy, dense fog but a lot of it is
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freezing as well, and especially across parts of england and also wales. if we start the forecast at 9am, you can see that we do have a fair bit of fog around. it may lead to some travel disruption. it has already, a lot of planes cancelled, already, a lot of planes cancelled, a lot of flights out of heathrow. through the morning we will see an improvement in the fog, but still at the moment we have got that. as we travel further north into northern england, there is some fog across the vale of york, for example, but as we sweep over towards wales and northern ireland there is a fair bit of cloud around and for northern ireland and scotland a much milder start to the day. in scotland a weak weather front is producing some patchy, light rain and drizzle, some of that getting of the north—west of england. through the day we see an improvement in the fog. like yesterday, some of it will clear altogether, some of it will only lift into low cloud, and some of it will hang around. if you are in an
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area where the fog hangs around it will feel cold. some of us will see some sunshine, with temperatures highest in the west and lowest in the east. through the afternoon we will see some more light, patchy rain and drizzle getting down in the north—west england and north wales. through the evening and overnight in the north and west there will be more cloud. we‘re looking at breezy conditions so no problem with frost here, but particularly if you take a loa n here, but particularly if you take a loan from the wash down towards dorset and points south—east, it will be cold. once again we will see some fog forming, patchy, freezing fog. tomorrow, rather like today, it will be slow to lift. that will depress the temperature but moving away from that we will have some drier and brighter conditions. windy out towards the west and we will see the arrival of a weather front coming in across north—west scotland. so again, norwich only four but ten or 11 as we push on the western areas. by the time we get to
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thursday, any fog which has formed will tend to lift. by thursday will be pulling in some cold continental air. despite the fact that you can see the temperatures between one and seven on the charts it will feel much colder than that when you add on the strength of the winds. for example, in newcastle, despite the temperatures you can see that, it will feel more like —5. out towards the west weather front waiting in the west weather front waiting in the winds will be coming our way as a weakening feature during the course of friday. it looks very much now like by the end of the week we should lose our problems with fog and it will turn that bit milder. thank you very much, it does look rather lovely this morning. a beautiful sunrise. and you will leave it to me, as there is the wonderful smell of coffee in the studio. and it could cost more, which is not making us particular
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happy. your morning coffee could soon cost you more. it is because of a poor harvest and the weak pound. it has prompted nestle, that makes nescafe, to raise its prices, and others could soon follow. it could mean rises of up to 30% for some coffee. simon bower is managing director of sheffield—based wholesalers pollards. nice to see you, good morning. good morning. let's talk about what is driving this. it is the weaker pound, but also poor harvest. it is a bit ofa pound, but also poor harvest. it is a bit of a perfect storm, isn‘t it? the real story is this is the post brexit drop in the exchange rate. coffee is traded and shipped in dollars and we have to buy it in pounds, about 17% more and if you
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look at what the industry is doing, nestle look at what the industry is doing, n estle ha d look at what the industry is doing, nestle had a 14% price rise, and thatis nestle had a 14% price rise, and that is all explainable by the exchange. there is a little bit of fundamental news, not an awful lot. there have been a few weaker harvests in east africa. but fundamentally this is about exchange. when it comes to demand and supply we have seen demands in many countries which traditionally we re many countries which traditionally were not coffee drinkers, so that means demand goes up as well. china, one of the legacy elements of the beijing games is that china is a huge consumer of coffee whereas before it was on. india is now a net consumer. brazil consumes all the lower grade coffee that it can grow. the coffee consumption patterns are changing and with that there is a bit of supply chains as well. climate change having an effect on countries like honduras, which are
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planting millions of hectares of coffee and producing some really good coffee, it is becoming a serious part of their economy. we have had parts of east africa, brazil, they are sort of balancing out. it reminds us how global trade is, especially when it comes to coffee, and it is affected by conditions all over the world. we are bang in the middle, coffee trading at $1.55. in the last four yea rs trading at $1.55. in the last four years it has between $1.20 and $2.05. we are bang in the middle. last time i was here when all of the concerns with the stock markets were around, investors were piling out of stocks and shares and into coffee. that is not happening so much this year. and like gold, like oil, like
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everything else, you buy coffee. and they don‘t take delivery of it. so people going down to their local coffee shop, how much more will it cost? taking a morning coffee or cappuccino, if the price of coffee doubled and was passed on all the way down the line, you are looking at between 3p and 7p increase in your cup. many people will still say it is worth it for that morning caffeine fix. nice to see you, thank you very much for that. i will keep the smell over this end of the studio. i note damned hate the smell of coffee, —— i know dan hates the smell of coffee. something else, as well as coffee and bringing up of children, something else very much exercising of this morning is cycling and whether you should or
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shouldn‘t do it on the pavement. one police force will be, if they see cyclists on the pavement, instead of giving them find they will ask them why, so maybe they can change. clare says as a dog walker and pedestrian, bikes on pavements are a huge problem. the worst thing is meant on bikes with safety gear and helmets hammering on without a bell. and pedestrians don‘t like us on the footpath is, we can‘t really win. we we re footpath is, we can‘t really win. we were looking at the netherlands where they seem to have separate cycleways, possibly why lots of children there are riding their bikes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i‘m claudia—liza armah. two men have been arrested on suspicion of arson, after an explosion at a block of flats in hornchurch in east london yesterday evening. firefighters rescued 25 people, while several were taken to hospital. the building partially collapsed, forcing homes to be evacuated, with many residents having to spend
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the night with family and friends. now, after yesterday‘s triggering of the highest pollution alert for london by mayor sadiq khan, today, one of his major schemes to tackle the problem has been criticised as too expensive and ineffective. the ultra low emission zone, which comes into force in 2019, will charge the oldest, dirtiest vehicles entering central london, but the mayor plans to extend the zone to the north and south circulars. however, the conservatives claim the £800 million cost could be better spent, and will only improve air quality by 10%. the mayor says the zone will make a huge difference to air quality. a murder investigation has been launched after a 15—year—old boy was stabbed to death in north—west london yesterday. police were called to doyle gardens, in kensal green, just before 3:30pm in the afternoon. the boy was taken to hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. officers are appealing for witnesses. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. first up on the tube,
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there are severe delays on the district line, which have now cleared. on the trains, a freight train has derailed near lewisham, leaving south—eastern trains delayed. on the roads, the a127 remains closed between the m25junction 29 and gallows corner, following last night‘s explosion in hornchurch. there is still some local access. and another foggy start this morning. that has caused disruption to some flights. 100 have already been cancelled at heathrow. do check before you travel. let‘s have a check on the weather now, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is another cold start to the day, temperatures down at zero and below. some widespread frost, and also quite a lot of fog around again. now, the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for the dense fog for this morning, and the potential for that to freeze.
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it is fairly likely, as the temperature is, as i mentioned, down at zero and below. out towards the east there is a bit more cloud, so perhaps not quite as much fog, but elsewhere the fog fairly stubborn. it may persist a little longer today, but if it does lift, we should see a bit of sunshine this afternoon. the temperatures still feeling cold, regardless. we are looking at a maximum between three and five celsius. overnight tonight, it is a repeat performance. the mist and fog will reform, the temperature will fall. so another cold night, towns and cities perhaps hovering just above zero, but out towards the countryside, zero and below. so a bit of frost tomorrow morning, and some dense patches of fog again. it should lift a little quicker, where some drier air is moving in from the south, but it looks like a predominantly cloudy day. another cold night wednesday into thursday. a widespread, hard frost for thursday morning, but we should at least see a bit more sunshine. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it is back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast,
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with louise minchin and dan walker. judgment day as the supreme court decides who has the power to officially begin brexit. downing street says the government should be allowed to start the process without a vote. but campaigners who‘ve brought the case say parliament must have a say. i will be live at the supreme court we re i will be live at the supreme court were 11 seniorjudges will deliver their verdict at 9:30, a judgment which will shake the whole process of britain‘s departure from the european union. good morning, it‘s tuesday 24th january. also this morning, tougher penalties are on their way for drivers caught well above the speed limit. in sport, it‘s goodbye to bernie. liberty media complete their £6.4 billion takeover of formula one and remove bernie ecclestone as chief executive,
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ending his 40—year reign in charge of the sport. the cost of your cappuccino is on the up. coffee drinkers face big price rises because of bad weather, poor harvests and a weak pound. i‘ll look at what it means for our morning caffeine fix. the bbc‘s winterwatch is back, and this murmaration of starlings is one of the stars of the show. before nine, we‘lljoin michaela strachan and chris packham live on set in dorset. and is it ever acceptable to cycle on the pavement? we‘ll speak to a police officer who‘s pedalling a new approach to the problem, and we‘ll find out what you think. and carol has the weather. good morning from the roof of broadcasting house in london, a cold start of the day across england and wales, some pockets of frost, some dense freezing fog, most will it, some of us will see sunshine. for
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scotla nd some of us will see sunshine. for scotland and northern ireland, much milder, a lot of clout, patchy rain, but we will see sunshine in places through the day. more details in 15 minutes. a lovely sunrise as well! good morning. first, our main story. the supreme court will rule today on whether it‘s up to parliament or the government to start the process for exiting the european union. the government argues that ministers have the power to trigger the eu‘s article 50 exit clause. but opponents say they need parliament‘s approval to start negotiations, as our political correspondent chris mason reports. au revoir! the european union ignites strong passions. almost seven weeks ago, protesters gathered outside the supreme court as the 11 most seniorjudges in the land gathered inside. hour after hour of dense legal argument followed on the biggest question in politics. where does power lie? is it behind the door here in downing street? or inside here in parliament?
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the prime minister says she can start the uk‘s divorce from the eu herself, but campaigners, led by the businesswoman gina miller, says mps and peers have to have a say first. this morning, we will find out who has won. if the government loses, they will also lose complete control of the timetable for starting the process of leaving the european union. it will have to rush its plan through parliament in the next few weeks. today is not about whether brexit should or will happen but who gets to press "go". that is why it matters, and that is why there was a lot of interest here in what the judges had to say. as chris was saying, huge interest. let‘s speak to our political correspondent carole walker, who is outside the supreme court this morning.
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chris was talking about both sides of the adamant, any indication as to what might be announced this morning? well, we won't know for certain until we get thatjudgment at 9:30, key figures including the attorney general have arrived here in the last few minutes, but the expectation in government circles, and amongst legal analysts, is that thejudgment will go and amongst legal analysts, is that the judgment will go against the government, will essentially say that the prime minister has to get the consent of parliament before she can trigger article 50 to start that formal negotiation over the process of brexit. and theresa may has made it clear she wants to do that by the end of march. we don‘t think that i‘d peers or mp5 will try to block brexit, but what is clear is that the opposition parties will try to amend any bill that goes through parliament. and we heard earlier, here on breakfast, from former lib dem leader nikolay, who made it
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clear what they would try to do. —— nick clegg. the brexit campaign, michael gove, borisjohnson, they made commitments about pots of money for the nhs every week, cuts for vat, things they have now fallen silent on. but they went articulate about what the deal actually means, so about what the deal actually means, soi about what the deal actually means, so i think it is reasonable to say, much as it was kicked off by the british people, it should also be signed off by the british people, notjust a thing signed off by the british people, not just a thing for politicians to decide at the end of the process. we know the labour party will also try to amend any legislation as it goes through. i should say that one other important issue in the judgment is how much the government needs to consult the devolved nations. scotland, wales, northern ireland — scotla nd wa nts scotland, wales, northern ireland — scotland wants to remain in the single market, in northern ireland we are still awaiting elections for a new government, so that could complicate the whole process. thank
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you, carol, some interesting art behind you as well! and in ten minutes, we‘ll speak to the conservative mp iain duncan smith. that‘s at 8:10am. president trump has announced that america will formally withdraw from the trans pacific partnership, one of the major pledges he made during the election campaign. the trade deal involving a dozen countries was agreed by barack obama. president trump has also cut funding for international groups that provide abortions, and has frozen the hiring of some federal workers. drivers caught driving well above the speed limit will face biggerfines after a review of the sentencing guidelines for courts in england and wales. the changes will allow magistrates to impose much tougher penalties on drivers and are intended to make sure the punishment for speeding is a lot higher for the worst offenders. sian grzeszczyk has more. thousands of motorists are fined for speeding on our roads every year. after hearing concerns from road—safety campaigners, the sentencing council has decided
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that the current system isn‘t good enough. as a result, fines will be increased by 50% for the most serious speeding offences. the current limit for a speeding fine is 100% of the driver‘s weekly wage, up to £1000 or £2500 if they are caught on the motorway, but when the new guidelines come into force on the 24th of april, drivers caught well above the speed limit can expect a fine of one and a half times their weekly income. when the limit is 30, that means someone driving at 51 miles per hour. when the limit is 70, like on a motorway, that means travelling at 101 miles per hour, but the upper limits of the fines still remain the same, at £1000 and £2500. in 2015, more than 166,000 motorists were fined for speeding offences in england and wales. the average fine was £188. and it‘s notjust speeding offences.
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another change concerns people who don‘t have a tv licence. thousands are fined, but magistrates will now be able to impose a non—financial penalty, a conditional discharge in cases where people have made significant efforts to pay the fee. we are hearing this morning that approximately 100 flights have been cancelled at heathrow due to the fog, the airport says there is reduced visibility again today, and if you are travelling, passengers should check their flight status with their airline before they set off. the unmistakable smell of coffee is wafting in, ben has been throwing his beans all around the place. there are worse things to smell of! we are talking about the price. the price of coffee beans has risen,
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partly due to the weak pound, it is normally priced in dollars, so a fall in the value of the pound means it is more expensive. and it also means that transport and fuel costs, everything that gets it from the field to the coffee shop, that is going up by about 30%. it is also because of weak harvest in countries where it is grown, particularly kenya, but also brazil, so demand is rising, supply has been falling. but it is interesting, i have been speaking to guests this morning, two other things at play, global demand has gone up, china has become a copy thinking nation for the first time, a legacy from the olympic games, they suddenly have a taste for it now. other countries are producing more, so this is very much a cyclical thing. the thing that matters to me and louise, and not you! ican you! i can appreciate your needs!
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it is about how much it will cost us, it could be about 10p, between 5-10p us, it could be about 10p, between 5—10p on a couple of coffee. if you add up three and a every single day, it is a big difference. i would like to see you without your morning coffee! no, you would not like to see it! ben, thank you. the nominations for this year‘s academy awards will be announced later today. critics have tipped the modern musical romance, la la land as a front runner. it‘s expected to face stiff competition from the domestic drama manchester by the sea and also from moonlight, a coming of age drama set in drug—torn miami. the supreme court will rule later whether parliament or ministers have the power to begin the process of leaving the eu. we‘ve been promised a red, white and blue brexit. a clean break from european union membership,
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rather than a gradual withdrawal. but who has the power to fire the starting gun? the government — theresa may and her ministers? or parliament — the elected mps in the commons and their neighbours in the house of lords? both sides at court agreed that the case wasn‘t about in or out, just about how. if the government wins its case today, it will trigger article 50 and begin the process by the end of march. if it loses, it may still try to meet that deadline, but will have to consult parliament and will likely ask mps and lords to vote on a brexit bill. let‘s speak now to iain duncan smith, who campaigned for britain to leave the eu. hejoins us now from our westminster studio. good morning to you, thanks for joining us. which way do you think it will go today? nobody knows. i was in government for six years as a secretary of state, and innumerable cases ended up in the supreme court, and we were never able to tell which way they would go. quite often we
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we re way they would go. quite often we were surprised, and on a number of occasions we were told we have lost the case definitely, then we have found we had won. it really is a matter of utter secrecy, and they are not telling anybody, they haven‘t told the government, so today will be a surprise to everybody, i suspect. let's talk either that or he, if it did go against the government, i am sure you are preparing for that, what is the immediate impact? well, actually, there two levels of impact. the first is to do with triggering article 50, and the second is, ithink, that triggering article 50, and the second is, i think, that goes missing in these discussions, the wider constitutional implications of a clash between what essentially is the powers of parliament and the powers of the supreme court, who is supreme powers of the supreme court, who is supreme in this matter. if we deal with the europe is you, i don‘t think it will have a massive affect in terms of timings, because even if we had to put a bill through both houses, i am pretty certain it would be very simple, at most two clauses,
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and time would be allotted to get it through both houses. i suspect, without too much doubt, the prime minister will reach a deadline of triggering article 50 by the end of march, and the opposition, and the majority of parliamentarians, have said they are not going to block it outright. the other is a bigger issue, which is this is a moment where even someone issue, which is this is a moment where even someone like lord judge, who is no longer with us, but who was the lord chiefjustice, has criticised in the past the supreme court, for straying into what he believed to be parliament‘s position. it has generally been accepted that it is not the right of judges to tell parliament how to go about its business, parliament will decide that, whether they have acts of parliament, whether they call the government to account. this is right on the edge of the supreme court telling parliament not just on the edge of the supreme court telling parliament notjust that they should, but how to do their business. the question will be, do they just support the high
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business. the question will be, do theyjust support the high court in saying parliament should have a vote, or do they go further and say that parliament has to enact legislation? that would be an enormous step into the territory marked the supremacy of parliament. are you saying that it might trigger a constitutional crisis in some ways ? a constitutional crisis in some ways? well, i think it is already in that territory right now, in the sense that this is really the marginal debate about who is supreme. marginal debate about who is supreme. in our constitution, it has a lwa ys supreme. in our constitution, it has always been the case that the elected body is supreme, and the courts essentially assess what parliament has decided and decide whether it is workable, whether changes need to be made, and they will tell parliament if that is the case. here is is where the debate exists, and if it wasn‘t about the european union, i think it would be the more interesting debate, which is what is going to happen — you know, this is notjust, have a vote, we did that before christmas, and over 370 members of the house of
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commons voted to trigger article 50 in the timescale, so this is actually come and do they stray further than that and say, this is not good enough, in which case they are telling parliament what to do, and it is a big issue. the prime minister is due to go to america later this week. we‘ve heard president trump say buy america, hire american, where does this leave the uk in trade negotiations? actually i think that if you very carefully sift through what he, that‘s president trump and his advisors are saying, i think you start to get a clearer picture about what he means. i think where the president is, concerned about what has happened, he thinks with various trade agreements where american companies have off shored a lot of production and that‘s left areas, swathes of the united states, i don‘t know if you go there much, but i have been to the rust belt territories where there is real problems, poverty, difficulty, high levels of unemployment. what‘s
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interesting at the moment, everyone goes on and on about how american unemployment has fallen to below 5%, that‘s true, but there is a bigger problem in the united states which we don‘t have, the proportion of those of working age who are working has not been lower since the second world war. it is 68% or 69%, here in the uk we are at record high levels. there is a huge gap between the numbers who are of working age, in work and those who could be in work and that‘s the bit, i think, where the trump admission is saying this isn‘t good enough. they have a point. so they will be looking at competition in terms of what they call the low wage economy. that‘s not really about the uk. the uk will bea not really about the uk. the uk will be a natural fit for them in terms of trade and high—level financial services, a lot of high technology stuff. we compete at pretty much the same level. iain duncan smith thank you very much for your time on brea kfast. you very much for your time on breakfast. as we have been talking
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about it all morning, the supreme court is expected to deliver its judgement. nobody knows what it is at 9.30am. you can follow it live on the bbc news channel and keep up—to—date with the latest developments on the bbc news online. there will be repercussions either way. the first high pollution alert has been issued by london‘s mayor. carol has the weather. it is rather cold. some of us are starting off on a cold note particularly across england and wales. in scotland and northern ireland, you‘re milder. yesterday morning the lowest temperature in katesbridge was minus 7.1 celsius. this morning, it was plus eight, so you‘ll notice a real difference. as
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well as the sunshine, some of us have got dense fog around this morning. now, it is fairly patchy. not all of us are seeing it, but if you run into it, you will know all about it. like yesterday, it will ta ke about it. like yesterday, it will take its time to lift. so it‘s already caution some travel disruption as we have heard at heathrow airport. it may cause further disruption perhaps on the roads and you can find out more about what‘s happening where you are on your bbc local radio station. at 9am you can see where we have got dense fog. it is patchy. not all of us catching it and some of it is freezing fog. as we move further north, yes, there is patchy fog around the vale of york, north—west england, we‘ve got more cloud at times. for northern ireland, it is cloudy and mild. as we move into scotland, here too, we‘ve got some rain. draped across some western areas around the central lowlands as well. as we go through the course of the day, the weather front producing the day, the weather front producing the rain will slip further southment again patchy rain and drizzle
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getting in across the rest of north—west england and north—west wales. the fog in the south will lift for some of us. for others, it will only lift into low cloud and if you‘re stuck under it and it doesn‘t shift, then it is going to feel cold with temperatures struggling to break freezing. but generally speaking, it‘s milder in the west. it's speaking, it‘s milder in the west. it‘s still cold as we drit over towards the central and eastern parts of the country. now, through this evening, and overnight, well, we‘ll quite quickly see the winds strengthen and we‘ve got rain, showing its hand across parts of the north—west. whereas in the south east, you take a like from the wash down towards dorset, we‘re once again going to have patchy fog and some of that will be freezing. so ta ke some of that will be freezing. so take it easy if you‘re travelling first thing in the morning. tomorrow rather like today with the fog, some of it will lift readily. some of it will clear slowly. some of it will lift into low cloud and some of it will stick. tomorrow you‘ve got a
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better chance of it clearing because we‘ve got more of a south easterly breeze. out towards the west, we‘ve got the rain coming in as well and windy. by the time we get into thursday, well, we really will have a noticeable wind out in the west. some rain not too far away and once again, with the wind coming in from the near continent which is cold, it‘s going to feel cold. despite the fa ct it‘s going to feel cold. despite the fact that you can see temperatures around about one to seven celsius, it will feel more like minus something depending on where you are and if we pick on newcastle, it is one in newcastle, but it will feel more like minus five celsius with the wind—chill, dan and lou. thank you. i‘m mesmerised by the sunshine behind you. it looks like it‘s cold out there. cyclists choosing to ride on the pavement instead of the road often face angry stares from pedestrians, not to mention falling foul of a fine. but the metropolitan police in camden have decided not to punish every bike rider who swaps the tarmac for tiles.
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instead, they are asking what led them to leave the road in the first place. so is it ever ok to cycle on the footpath? we asked people in manchester what they thought. i choose not to cycle on the pavement. i don‘t agree with people that do cycle on pavement, but maybe there should be more facility for people to park in cycle lanes, and stuff like that. i'm a cyclist myself, so probably i have been known to, you know, be a bit naughty like that at times. i tend tojust go on the pavement. i have occasionally been stopped by a policeman though. i feel much safer on a bike than in a car as far as police are concerned! i don‘t think cyclists should be on the pavement particularly whenever they have made all of the cycle lanes and everything. it‘s more difficult whenever you‘re in places where there aren‘t cycle lanes and i think if they feel trapped by traffic then sometimes they might, but it‘s difficult then for pedestrians. i was always told to get off my bike when i was cycling on the pavement. i can actually remember
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going down there, and i turned that corner and there was a huge policeman and i was about 14 and he said, "get off your bike." we‘re joined now by sergeant nick clarke from the metropolitan police, who‘s in camden this morning, and tompion platt from the campaign group living streets. nick clarke, so if you could explain to us. you‘re going to stop people and you‘re going to have a chat. what‘s the idea? and you‘re going to have a chat. what's the idea? so fundamentally, the key issues we received a complaint about people cycling on the pavement following some of our looking at close passing of cyclists with another operation. rather than going over there and putting a plaster over it and sticking out some tickets for cycling on the pavement, we wanted to look at why the people were cycling on the pavement to get them off the pavement to get them off the pavement and become on to the roads. so that the pedestrians were safer,
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but if you just take an enforcement—only approach, you‘re not going to solve it because you‘re just going to be doing a short window. whereas if you look at the reason behind it and tackle those, you can then deal with that problem and hopefully it goes away. that‘s the aim. loads of people have been getting in contact with us today. again, it is quite balanced on both sides of the argument saying i can‘t cycle on the road because it‘s not safe and car drivers saying cyclists don‘t really care and they are a law on to themselves. what have people been telling you, similar things?” wa nt been telling you, similar things?” want to be really clear. we want more people cycling and we want to have streets that are safe for cycling. however, it's when you mix people walking and cycling together that that can cause conflict, anxiety and fear and sometimes even serious injury and we do have a lot of our older supporters in particular who get in touch and say it isa particular who get in touch and say it is a problem in their area. particular who get in touch and say it is a problem in theirarea. in particular who get in touch and say it is a problem in their area. in a
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nutshell, we want safer streets for cycling, but don't want to have that at the expense of people walking. nick mentioned close passing. and that‘s when things get problematic? that's about making it safer to cycle on the road, but the bigger issue here is tackling the sources of road danger for cyclists. so things like introducing 20mph speed limits and segregated cycle lanes so they don't feel like they need to cycle on the footway. no one would expect a young kid cycling to school to be told to cycle on a busy road. but what's also important, i think, is local authorities aren't let off the hook in some way with tackling the hook in some way with tackling the source of road danger and slowing down traffic by saying you put cyclists on to the footway. as someone put cyclists on to the footway. as someone cycles past behind you on the pavement! you should have stopped him and handed out a fine,
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nick! i can‘t see behind me. very good. enforcement of the law, because lots of people getting in contact saying that cyclists ignore in many ways and just go about their business wherever they want to go, whether that‘s on the road or the pavement. what would you say to that? 0k, first pavement. what would you say to that? ok, first of all, we're not saying for a second that cycling on the pavement isn‘t illegal. it still is. it isjust the pavement isn‘t illegal. it still is. it is just about using our discretion. the guidance since 1999 has been that we should apply it appropriately. to say a swathe of people obey the law is ridiculous. there was one cyclist behind me was cycling on the pavement, but how many more were cycling legitimately. you can‘t tar them with the same brush? if someone is cycling on the pavement and they are doing it in an
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inconsiderate fashion, that‘s a different ball game. we are talking about the casual cyclist who is feeling intimidated by the volume of traffic and the close passing of hgvs, we‘re trying to find out why they‘re doing that and we can feedback through the connell and through transport for london where the infrastructure needs improving. do you think there maybe just certain places that cyclists feel worried about for example? well, yes, i think it is really clear. when we started doing our close pass stuff, twitter came alive with people saying, "try this road. try that road because that‘s where i get the worst problems." the statistics for killed and seriously injured people reflect that. we know you're busy. we‘ll let you get on with your job. let‘s get the news, travel and
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weather wherever you are. good morning. still a wintry elements to our weather, particularly across much of eastern england and, yes, fog is still an issue, not as widespread as yesterday, but still dense in some places, and it may lingerfor much of the day. if that happens, temperatures really will be suppressed. hopefully most of it will live, some brightness, maybe a few glimpses of sunshine through the day across central and eastern england, the odd spot of drizzle through north two wales, southern
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scotland, north—west england, 10—11 is the high, further east, a maximum of six. through the night, pretty much the same thing again across eastern england, we could see fog forming again, more breeze in the west, temperatures holding up, 89 degrees. it stays breezy and cloudy to the west with the spittle spot of rain, once that early—morning fog lifts away, there will be try, —— drier, brighter weather. where we keep the fog, temperatures struggling. subtle change in the wind direction will bring more dramatic stories as we move into thursday, the wind coming from the south—east, where it is still bitterly cold in europe, and is cold, dry airwill bitterly cold in europe, and is cold, dry air will move through the country, wince strengthening, feeling pretty chilly indeed, despite there being a lot of dry
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weather, weather fronts trying to make an impression from the west, but not making inroads. there will be some sunshine but breezy, and add on the strength of the cold wind, temperatures in some places will feel more like minus two or minus three. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and rachel horne. the united states pulls out of what could be one of the world‘s biggest free trade deals, but australia and new zealand says that doesn‘t mean its dead in the water. live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday the 24th of january. the tra ns—pacific partnership was set to cover 40% of the world‘s economy. will the other 11 nations go ahead
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without the us? or can it be replaced by bilateral deals that donald trump says he wants? also in the programme, despite corruption allegation and exploding phones, samsung

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