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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  January 24, 2017 1:00pm-1:16pm GMT

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the government loses its appeal at the supreme court — only parliament has the power to trigger the brexit process. eight of the eleven judges agreed that mps and peers, not the government, should be responsible for triggering article 50. the government cannot trigger article 50 without parliament authorising that course. outside the court, the ruling was welcomed by gina miller, the woman who'd challenged the government. today's decision has created legal certainty based on our democratic process and provides the legal foundations for the government to trigger article 50. david davis tells mps that there is no going back on brexit and legislation seeking their approval will be introduced quickly. we will within days introduce legislation to give the government legal power to trigger article 50 and begin the formal process of withdrawal. we'll be examining the significance
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of the supreme court ruling and asking what impact it will have on brexit. also this lunchtime: build in the usa — president trump tells car manufacturers, put your new factories on american soil. the massacre on a tunisian beach — an inquest into the deaths of 30 british tourists hears from a woman who played dead to survive. on the up — speeding fines for motorists driving well over the limit are increased by 50%. in sport on bbc news, bernie ecclestone says he was forced out as chief executive of formula one after a0 years following a takeover by liberty media. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one.
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in a landmark ruling, the government has lost its appeal at the supreme court over who has the authority to start the process of taking the uk out of the european union. eight of the eleven supreme court judges ruled that only mps and peers, not the government, have the authority to trigger article 50 and begin two years of negotiations. the president of the supreme court, lord neuberger, said that leaving the eu would change uk law and the rights of uk citizens — which meant parliament must be consulted. a short time ago, mps were told the government would introduce legislation within days to stop the formal process of leaving the eu. our political correspondent carole walker reports. this was a case with profound implications. who should decide the process for taking the uk out of the eu? the decision, taken by 11 of the most seniorjudges in the land, was delivered to the hushed courtroom. today, by a majority of 8—3, the
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supreme court rules that the government cannot trigger article 50 without an act of parliament authorising it to do so. article 50 begins the formal negotiations for leaving the eu, a process which the judges said would fundamentally change uk law. the referendum is of great political significance, but the act of parliament which established it did not say what should happen as a result. so any change in the law to give effect to the referendum must be made in the only where permitted by the uk constitution, namely by an act of parliament. the verdict was clear - thejudgment spells parliament. the verdict was clear - the judgment spells out why the court had rejected the government's case. the government will comply with thejudgment case. the government will comply with the judgment of the court and do all that is necessary to implement it. the woman who brought the case said the ruling reaffirmed that parliament is sovereign. this
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ruling today means that mps we have elected will rightfully have the opportunity to bring their invaluable experience and expertise to bear in helping the government select the best course in the forthcoming brexit negotiations. select the best course in the forthcoming brexit negotiationsm this a blow to the government's brexit timetable, sir? but the government will be relieved that the court ruled that there is no legal requirement for it to consult the devolved nations, scotland, wales and northern ireland. so the focus now switches to parliament. mps and peers will not try to block the brexit process, but they could delay it. opposition parties are already setting out the changes they will try to make to the coming legislation, changes which could affect the government's whole approach to the negotiations over britain's departure from the eu. we are very clear. we will hold them to account to protect jobs. are very clear. we will hold them to account to protectjobs. we will hold them to account to make sure british industry does have market access, and we will not allow
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ourselves to become some kind of offshore tax haven. that is not what people voted for. unless the government concedes a new deal for the british people so that the british people have a say over the final arrangements between the uk and the eu, i will vote against article 50. the snp say they will table 50 amendments. the prime minister set out last week a path towards the hardest of hard brexits. i don't believe there is a majority for that in the house of commons. i certainly don't believe there is a majority for that across the country, so this is an opportunity for the house of commons to assert itself and to have a say notjust on the narrow question, but on the broader terms of the negotiation as well. downing street said today's ruling will not affect the timetable for theresa may to begin negotiating with other eu leaders. the government will introduce a bill in the commons within days. this will be the most straightforward bill possible to give effect to the decision of the people and respect
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the supreme court's judgment. the purpose of this bill is simply to give the government the power to revoke article 50 and begin the process of leaving the european union. but the scene is set for some tough parliamentary clashes before the bigger battles with the rest of the bigger battles with the rest of the eu can even begin. carole walker, bbc news, westminster. well, in a moment we'll talk to our assistant political editor norman smith — but first our legal correspondent clive coleman. how much of an impact could this ruling have on brexit? well, as you heard, this is a ruling which removes power from well, as you heard, this is a ruling which removes powerfrom the government and gives power to parliament. the government didn't wa nt parliament. the government didn't want it this way, but they have got it this way. now they have to introduce a bill to parliament that could be subject to a number of amendments. the real significance of todayis amendments. the real significance of today is that this ruling has really defined the limits of executive power, the power of ministers and
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government. and it has underscored the foundation of our unwritten constitution. we don't have a written constitution in this country, but we have one founding principle to our constitution, which is that parliament is sovereign. parliament creates the law and only parliament creates the law and only parliament has the power to change the law. and it was that that came through in the ruling of the eight supreme court justices through in the ruling of the eight supreme courtjustices who ruled against the government today. the government now has a much more difficult task ahead of it, and far less control over the process. norman smith is in westminster. the government lost today. how confident is the prime minister going to be that they can still stick to the timetable, this date in march?m that they can still stick to the timetable, this date in march? it is a funny old paradox. you are right, the government was defeated, and yet frankly, ministers are oozing with confidence that they can get article
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50 triggered and yes, by mrs may's self—imposed deadline of march. the reason for that above all is because parliamentary opposition in this place to triggering article 50 is by and large crumbled. tory rebels don't want a fight now. peers in the house of lords don't want to be seen to be defying the result of the referendum, and crucially, the labour leader has said his party will not stand in the way of triggering article 50, even though some of his mps will rebel against that. and on top of that, the court decided that the scottish parliament did not have a right to have a vote. so ministers are extremely confident, and the expectation is that a pared down bill will be introduced in the next few days. a word of warning, though. one thing we have learned from the whole brexit process and successive prime ministers have learned in our relations with europe — nothing ever goes smoothly. parliamentary
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trapdoors can still open without warning. norman smith, thank you. six months after the eu referendum, what the voters make of today's ruling? our correspondent danny savage has been finding out. when it came to the decision on whether to leave the eu or stay, leeds voted to remain, but only just. months later, what do the 49.7% who voted to leave think now that the issue is going back to parliament? reverted to get out, so why can't we get our? it is simple. we voted for the prime minister come m, we voted for the prime minister come in, the prime minister comes in. we look to leave, and a store and stall. it's wrong. a lot of countries want to do business with england, trump for starters. we don't like the guy, but that's not the point. let's get back for us. never mind other people, let's get this country going again. but
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remember, the majority in this city voted to stay and many haven't changed their mind. shamal is from iraq and thinks europe should stick together. i don't know what is going together. i don't know what is going to happen. would you rather they stopped brexit now and kept in europe? yeah. i was totally opposed to brexit and i voted against leaving the eu. at a nearby butchers, jim believes things would be different if we had known then what we know now. i know people who voted for brexit who did not understand the circumstances and consequences of understand the circumstances and consequences of what we were voting for. i think before the referendum, we we re for. i think before the referendum, we were not totally told what it implied with brexit and what it means to stay in the eu or to leave. do you wish brexit would just go away? if i could do you wish brexit would just go away? ifi could turn do you wish brexit would just go away? if i could turn the clock back 12 months and start all over again, i think the lead up to the referendum should be different. broadly speaking, those who voted
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for brexitjust broadly speaking, those who voted for brexit just want the broadly speaking, those who voted for brexitjust want the government to get on with it unhindered. those who didn't are still against it, but see it as inevitable. danny savage, bbc news, leeds. let's get reaction from the rest of europe with our correspondent damian grammaticas, who is in brussels. what have they made of the ruling there? here, what we have heard from there? here, what we have heard from the european commission is that they will not comment on internal legal matters of a member state. they are waiting for that article 50 negotiation. but they did make clear in their view, once the 50 trigger happens, there will then first beer negotiation about separating. only after that, negotiations on a trade deal. the eu commission said if you spit and want to remain on good terms, you have to settle things first and then your future relationship. one thing the ruling today has not clarified as whether once article 50 is triggered, it can
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be revoked. can you go back on that? the assumption in the ruling is that you trigger article 50 after two yea rs you trigger article 50 after two years you are out of the eu am a good deal, bad deal, whatever. there isa good deal, bad deal, whatever. there is a question that some are raising in the uk and was raised to date singer that can be revoked? here, they would not be drawn on it, but expect more challenges through european courts, perhaps, on that issue. damian grammaticas, thank you. president trump is meeting american car manufacturers today in a bid we are going to leave the one o'clock news now in order to bring you our special oscar nomination programme. we will find out in the next few minutes who has been nominated. i'm joined by the film criticjason solomons. we will be discussing the nominations. the countdown is under
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way. we will find out the news from los angeles within the next five minutes. we know what did well the golden globes. it was la la land. let's look at some of the films in contention this year. # city of stars # are you shining just for me? # city of stars # there's so much i can't see. so, that's lee chandler? the lee chandler? it was my impression you'd spent a lot of time here over the years. your brother has provided for patrick's upkeep. i don't understand. i can't be his guardian. i assumed joe had discussed this with you. he didn't. that's the whole point. you've got to decide for yourself who you're going to be. can't have nobody make that decision for you. you going to tell him why the other
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boys kick his ass all the time? i'm starting to remember. our beautiful boy. we are very proud of you, son. all but forgotten. are you ok? i had another family. a mother, a brother. i can still see their faces. just a suggestion as to the films they may be hearing about in the next few minutes. a different format this year. they may look different for all of us. no one is getting up at the crack of dawn in los angeles, they are doing things differently. we will explain more in a moment. lion, la la land, moonlight, could
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all be in the running for tom lawrence. —— awards. hello, and welcome to this bbc news special programme. i'mjane hill and we are minutes away from learning who has been nominated for the 2017 academy awards. the film criticjason solomons is with me, we'll be getting his insight into who should — and perhaps shouldn't — be short listed. let's have a quick thought about main contenders. and worth flagging the different format this year.

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