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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 25, 2017 5:45am-6:00am GMT

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start the brexit process. the judgement means the government cannot begin talks with the eu until mps and peers give their backing. the guardian says us president donald trump has infuriated environmentalists by signing executive orders that support two controversial oil pipelines. the new republican president backed the keystone xl and dakota access projects. the arab news reports that israel has approved the construction of 2,500 settler homes in the occupied west bank. prime minister benjamin netanyahu said they had agreed to the move in response to housing needs. the independent says close to £8 billion was wiped of the market value of bt, after the uk telecommunications giant said accounting errors in its italian business are far greater than expected. the guardian business pages say citigroup is deliberating over which new eu financial centre will relocate to as a result of brexit. the banking giant is in discussion with ireland, france,
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italy, spain, germany and the netherlands. pretty much the whole of the eu, it seems, write? —— right? and finally, hit hollywood film musical la la land has scored a record 14 oscar nominations. only two other films, titanic and all about eve, have received an equal amount. joining us is cornelia meyer, who is ceo of mrl corporation, a business consultancy. good morning to you. morning. have you seen the la la land? no. i am not a big movie—goer. you seen the la la land? no. i am not a big movie-goer. this whole brexit thing, and the supreme court ruling, apart from what it means for brexit, it is also very momentous in terms of saying who has real power in the united kingdom, and parliament was told you will be able to vote. yes, but i think the supreme court was quite clear they
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can't overturn the verdict of the people. it is a matter of process. it is parliament needs to give its blessing to triggering article 50. so there is another review of article 50, but it was not a ruling that said, ok, you can now sort of negate the will of the people, who sadly wanted to leave the eu. the issue, though, is about the law, isn't it? the fact that a lot of eu law is law in the country, domestic law. on the point is that ministers cannot change the law that has been approved in the uk parliament without the approval, without an act of parliament. so that was the actual issue, wasn't it? it was an eight issue of law. it was an issue of law and process. the government has said they will make the eu laws oui’ has said they will make the eu laws our own laws and deal with it later on. what i find interesting is how... one of the things is also,
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they said parliament should get a say. they said the government didn't have to go to the devolved powers. so they didn't have to go to scotla nd so they didn't have to go to scotland and wales, and so on, to get the go—ahead to trigger article 50. that was very important as well. here we come to the fallout. we have nicola sturgeon from scotland, tim farron from the lib dems and jeremy corbyn from the labour party and how they will be able to potentially affect how the government goes about negotiating brexit. because they have their own ideas. they have their own ideas, and it is good we area their own ideas, and it is good we are a democracy and good we are discussing it out, but we had a referendum. and i was a firm remainer, we had a referendum and said leave. we probably have to leave, and it is a bit disconcerting when certain parts say let's have
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another referendum. referenda are not things you can do and do until you get what you want. they are not asking for another referendum, but a route to stay in the single market, do you see what i mean? it is how we leave, but the lib dems asked for a second referendum. some of them even asked for a second referendum. says asked for a second referendum. says a lady from switzerland, where they have referenda every other day! that isa have referenda every other day! that is a different story. that is part of the problem, because we don't do referenda here so often. that is why we had to go back to the supreme court to get a ruling on how do we now deal with a referendum? court to get a ruling on how do we now dealwith a referendum? 0k, donald trump. do you want to take this? we know what the story is, the controversial pipelines. barack obama didn't want them, donald trump wa nts obama didn't want them, donald trump wants them, and also coal and that sort of thing. i think those two pipelines i would not be against those two pipelines. let's not forget, barack obama only nixed the
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keystone xl pipeline just before the paris agreement, so he had a better position. what i am worried about is, some of the things he wants to do may not necessarily be bad things, but the way he goes about it, the way he rams everything through, i have one, and nowi it, the way he rams everything through, i have one, and now i can do whatever i want. i am very fea rful of do whatever i want. i am very fearful of a huge backlash against the oil industry and against other energy industries, you know, in the next three to four years, because it is just round down. next three to four years, because it isjust round down. when next three to four years, because it is just round down. when you swing the pendulum too much to one side, it usually swings back quite violently. that sort of where i would stand on this. arab news. israel approves 2500 new settlement homes in the occupied west bank. that is their headline, talking about the announcement from benjamin netanyahu about the announcement from benjamin neta nyahu yesterday. give about the announcement from benjamin netanyahu yesterday. give us your ta ke netanyahu yesterday. give us your take on this. it is to do with president trump. it is to do with
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president trump. it is to do with president trump, who is clearly one of the most pro— israel presidents there ever were. two of his advisers, his son—in—law and steve bannon, are very much pro— israel, pro— settlement. it is also, as your correspondent said, to do with internal politics in israel. what it means, it is very bad for everybody who believes in a two state solution, this is very bad for a two state solution. because it infringes on what is palestinian territory. and the question is, how do you get toa and the question is, how do you get to a lasting peace? most people see a two state solution, including the secretary general of the un, c at two state solution as the way to get there. and if that is the objective, this is very bad news. a couple of days before this bt wiping off a brilliant pounds of its share value, i heard that bt broadband's prices are going up. as a bt customer i
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thought, well, that is the market, but i wonder if it knew it was about to become public? probably not, but what this shows is that you really need to have, as a company, you need to get your account is clear. and when you have bad news you need to make sure you understand that the bad news is, and you communicated immediately to the market. because this drip, drip, and then we were wrong, that totally goes against investor confidence. and having 20%... investor confidence. and having 2096. .. it investor confidence. and having 20%... it was investor confidence. and having 2096. .. it was a shocking 2096... it was a shocking announcement, and the market reacted accordingly. 2096 of the market value. and it was, because they first said it was 145 million, and thenit first said it was 145 million, and then it was sort of four times more. soi then it was sort of four times more. so i think that is... that shows that when you have bad news, it is very important that you first get your together, and that you communicate effectively. shall we
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move on to... you want to look at films? we have to talk about citigroup, and then the oscar nominations. quickly on citigroup, it will be very interesting to see how citigroup and other banks, fea rful of how citigroup and other banks, fearful of the passporting rights within the eu, my favourite is dublin. the frankfurt people think frank that is so good but the trouble with frankfurt and paris is that the labour laws are so difficult. once you have hired someone difficult. once you have hired someone it is very hard to fire them again and if you have a trading room you need to be able to immediately hire our lot of people and then immediately let go of them. financial markets are fickle, and your headcount has to reflect that. so dublin is probably the easiest to do those sorts of things. do you like musicals? yes, i do like
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musicals. did you ever see titanic? idid musicals. did you ever see titanic? i did when it came to the small screen. and la la land has equalled the number of nominations of titanic and all about eve. i did enjoy it, but because it has had so much publicity and has all these awards, i expected to be completely wowed, andl i expected to be completely wowed, and i wasn't. at as you said, when we had a quick chat before, hollywood loves hollywood. it is about hollywood, so of course they love it. thank you very much indeed. the film i would choose to take you to is predator versus aliens on a massive screen. see you soon. hello. wednesday will start quite windy across northern and western parts of the uk, and continue that way. whereas into parts of southern england, the midlands, east anglia, it is
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troublesome fog once again. some freezing fog patches at that, dense in places. and that could be having an impact on travel again, so check the situation before you head out, you can see the fog showing up here. but, if you are in scotland and northern ireland, you can see the wind arrows indicating a strong, quite gusty wind in places, keeping the fog at bay. that is also into the far west of wales and the far south—west of england. where we have the thickest fog is where we have the frost as well, and that could be giving the icy stretches on untreated surfaces. look at the strength of wind, though, into the far south—west, into the western parts of wales. could be a few fog patches into the welsh marches, into a few spots in yorkshire. it is a windy picture through scotland and northern ireland, north—west england, too. plenty of cloud around, could be quite drizzly in places first thing. now, as we go on through the day, the fog will gradually lift into low cloud, but a cloudier, colder—feeling day into east anglia and the south—east compared with tuesday. some brighter skies, though, into much of south—west england, wales, parts of northern england, keep a fair amount of cloud in northern ireland and scotland.
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a largely dry picture, but some outbreaks of rain coming into northern ireland and scotland late in the day, and gusty winds. 11 degrees in stornoway, ten in belfast. just six, though, in london. now, as we go through wednesday night, there will be a frost developing again for many of us. and just a subtle shift in the wind direction, connecting with colder air freezing continental europe, means we draw in some colder air to the uk for thursday, and quite brisk south—easterly winds, so it is going to feel quite raw. there could be a few snow flows around the beginning in some spots, a few icy stretches, too. many of us will improve the sunny spells. it won't help the feel of the weather on thursday in that brisk south—easterly flow, as temperatures for some will struggle to get above freezing, and if you add in the impact of the wind, it will feel like it is below freezing, for that raw feel on thursday. not quite so chilly on friday, but still chilly, definitely, down the eastern side of the uk. towards the south—west we bring in more cloud. the risk of getting a few showers as we go on through friday. that is a bit of a change heading into the start of the weekend. a weather disturbance
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coming our way. still a lot of uncertainty about the detail, but that could bring some heavier downpours into parts of england and wales at the start of the weekend. sunday, at the moment, looks quieter, more of us dry. so a risk of some showers, at least to start the weekend. some sunshine around. less chilly at the weekend, but still the scope for getting some overnight frosts, and some fog patches around, too. that's it, bye bye. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the government prepares to put its plan for brexit before the commons. yesterday, judges ruled that mps should be given a vote on britain leaving the eu. it's thought a bill could now be introduced as early as tomorrow. ministers are urging members of parliament not use that bill as a chance to frustrate or delay the process, but critics, including some conservatives, are putting theresa may under pressure to give them even more of a say on exactly what kind of brexit she delivers. good morning, it's
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wednesday 25th january. also this morning: president trump promises a big day ahead on national security, including an announcement about his plans for a wall on the mexican border.
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