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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 25, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the top stories developing at 11am: president trump promises a "big day" on national security, saying, "we will build the wall" along the border with mexico. cross—party mps put pressure on theresa may to publish a paper on her brexit strategy for parliament to debate. a big jump in the number of people sleeping rough in england. figures show the problem outside the capital is growing. mps call for women employees to be given greater protection from sexist dress codes. also, counterfeit lego so convincing it even fooled one chinese boss. which one is yours? there are warnings some of the most famous high street brands are losing out on billions in trade due to fakes. and, homegrown hero — japan names its first native sumo wrestling grand champion in almost two decades. good morning, it's
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wednesday 25th january. welcome to bbc newsroom live. president trump has promised a significant day ahead on national security, including an announcement about his plans for a wall on the mexican border. he tweeted: "big day planned on national security tomorrow. among many other things, we will build the wall!" building a 2,000—mile wall along the mexican border was one of trump's key election promises. he's said the wall would cost $8 billion and will be up to a0 feet high. the new president is also expected to approve immigration restrictions on seven mostly muslim countries
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in the middle east and africa: iraq, iran, libya, somalia, sudan, syria, and yemen. and trump wants to make all us cities co—operate to deport illegal immigrants — a move aimed at so—called "sanctuary cities" like san francisco, where local police do not help with most deportations. our washington correspondent david willis has more. we're going to have our borders nice and strong. we're going to build a wall. we're going to build the wall. we have to build the wall, folks. it was the soundtrack to donald trump's unorthodox campaign for president, a call to build a wall along america's southern border with mexico. now he seems set to press ahead with measures he believes are vital to stemming the illegal flow of immigrants into the united states. the president on his twitter account said simply: "big day planned on national security tomorrow.
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"among many other things, we will build the wall." he's vowed to make mexico pay for it what's more, although the mexican government has refused to do so. we recognise that the united states has a right to build the wall, even though we don't like it. but it is another thing to get a neighbouring country to pay for its construction. we have said many times that this is unacceptable. it is the clear position of the mexican government and the mexican people. later in the week, to round off a busy start to his presidency, mr trump is expected to sign executive orders, closing america's borders to refugees, and limiting access to citizens from seven african and middle eastern countries, countries the administration believes export terrorism. they're mainly muslim countries, but the mantra of the trump administration is "america first". a country that traditionally
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has opened its doors to immigrants is about to head in the opposite direction. with me is our correspondent paul adams. let's start on the wall. he said all along it would only be built if it was paid for by mexico. what does it look like it's about to happen? he is going to sign an order today instructing the authorities to begin this. a lot remains unclear. the border is around 2000 miles. there is already 650 miles of war and fences and other barriers. without much ado he could complete a 700 mile stretch under an act passed by george w bush, so that is not very,
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get it. if he wants to extend it to 1000 miles, you have to remember this is a rugged border with lots of natural barriers, than he is going to have to find authorisation for that and that could mean going to congress in the first instance to pay for it. huge disparities in terms of what this might be. anything from the $8 million up to $24 million. then the question is, how does he make texaco pay for it if indeed he can quest interestingly, he needs to instruct authorities to look at the level of aid to mexico. 0f authorities to look at the level of aid to mexico. of course, the mexicans have said all along they do not intend to pay for this wall. 0n the extreme vetting he is talking about for people going to america from countries with terrorism
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issues, we ran through the list of countries. tell us more about how that could work. we have got an executive order, probably coming later in the week, not today. the other executive order today is the sanctity cities, but later in the week we expect him to carry out his pledge to introduce this notion of extreme vetting. it is not clear what that means in practice. the 0bama administration to give them step in the last couple of years to try to monitor exactly who is coming into the country, and president 0bama did increase the overall number of refugees to 85000 and ordered that 10,000 of those should be syrian refugees. a number of those have already come in. it is certainly within donald trump's gift to stop that process. he has said all along, until we know what is going on, i think he wants to reassure himself ha ps, going on, i think he wants to reassure himself haps, and the
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american public, that everything that can be done in terms of vetting refugees from countries with a history of terrorism is being done. thank you. stay with us. at 11:30am we will talk to two guests from the us and canada on donald trump's plans for two controversial new oil pipelines. we will have more on all the latest of element from the trump white house tonight at 7pm in our new programme. pressure is growing on theresa may to set out her negotiating position on brexit in a formal document, known as a white paper, which would be put before the house of commons. it follows yesterday's supreme court judgment, which ruled that the prime minister must give parliament a vote before triggering article 50, the formal process for leaving the eu. it's thought a brexit bill could be introduced as early as tomorrow. here's our political correspondent tom bateman. after thejudges ruled only parliament can start brexit, today a warning for mps —
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don't try to derail the plan. the supreme courtjudgement means a bill on triggering article 50, the start of britain's exit process, must be put before mps and lords. so what lies on the road ahead? the government says legislation paving the way for brexit will be tabled within days. that'll be voted on by both houses of parliament. theresa may wants article 50 triggered by the end of march. then britain has two years to leave the eu. so there can be no going back. the point of no return was passed on 23rd june last year. labour say they won't block article 50, but want to amend the bill to give mps more control of the process. if necessary, there will be hand—to—hand combat on this. we need to make sure that we get the best deal on behalf of the whole country and she can't say she acts on behalf of the whole country. theresa may also faces opposition from some of her own mps who want a formal exit document to be debated, but for now at least,
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ministers believe they are on track to get brexit triggered by the spring. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smithjoins me now from the houses of parliament. thank you. the day after the supreme court ruling, we are beginning to get a sense of the likely clashes ahead, and the one looming up is this issue of a white paper, in effect a government document setting out theresa may's objectives and her approach to quitting the european union, with number ten very firmly signalling they do not want to publish such a document. i am joined by the former labour leadership challenger norman smith. do you understand why the governor to supposed to publishing a white
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paper? it'll be important to not publish anything that undermine the national interest and undermine our negotiating position. the government was clear yesterday, they will be providing information, they will be working with parliament on all of these matters. they can do that in many ways which does not require a white paper. but every government, labour and conservative at every eu treaty renegotiation has published a white paper to inform mps about the board approach to the forthcoming talks. that's all it is, it is not a big deal. i have to say, looking back at the outcomes of those treaty negotiations, they have not always been particularly successful, so i am not sure thatjust because we have had a white paper in the past means that we need one now. i believe that it will be important for the government to provide information on its approach. the prime minister did that clearly in her speech. david davis yesterday said that there would be more information on the way. i don't think a white paper is needed. given
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that, that they are willing to provide more information, do you think this is a concession the government could, if pressed, actually make? the garment has shown itself on a number of occasions, ready to listen to other parties, ready to listen to other parties, ready to listen to other parties, ready to listen to backbenchers about their concerns. i am sure that'll be the case as we go forward with the debate on article 50, but the important thing is they must not be amendments tabled which are just a means to try to block this process from happening and frustrate the result of the referendum. i am sure the government would oppose that. owen smith, the suspicion is that the white paper is another way of trying to snag brexit. as you said, this is the most important in our lifetime, just about any of our lifetimes, and therefore it is entirely right that the government should publish a white paper. the other thing i can't understand the argument that is now being made,
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that the government cannot show their hand. theresa may did that la st their hand. theresa may did that last week. she said we will not be in the single market, we will probably not be in the customs union. she signalled that what they wa nt union. she signalled that what they want isa union. she signalled that what they want is a hard brexit, so i did see what the issue is about publishing those details in a white paper is the country can read it. a short speech made to the media last week does not replace, or in any way make up does not replace, or in any way make up fora does not replace, or in any way make up for a lack of a plan that the public can read, and that we parliamentarians can scrutinise properly. let's talk a little bit about labour's position because frankly it seems confusing. jeremy corbyn clearly wants his mps to back article 50. you, i think, corbyn clearly wants his mps to back article 50. you, ithink, have significant reservations, as do other labour mps. could you vote against article 50, despite what jeremy corbyn says? yes and i have been clear about that. i agree that we need a white paper and we should be tabling amendments to that effect. crucially, we need to see the government come clean on what they now think the economic impact
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is going to be on brexit. before the referendum, they said it would cost us referendum, they said it would cost us tom agro how do you square that with the result of the referendum? i am elected to parliament to represent my constituency to my best abilities. in my view, brexit will make the people in my constituency poorer. pontypridd voted 50—50 at most. one academic study showed it was marginally a remain constituency, but irrespective of that vote, i am convinced that brexit will make the people i represent poorer, and it will make out represent poorer, and it will make our politics poorer. it is giving into aggression and bigotry. did you accept that argument, that those mps whose constituencies were in favour of remain have a duty to represent their constituents? i believe that as mps we should respect the result of the referendum nationally. i was elected on a manifesto that said we should have a referendum and would implement the result. it is
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important that happens. the idea of overturning the result, the turnout was high, more people voted for leave than anything else in the history of democracy. we will have to leave it there, thank you. so, i guess no surprises will stop surelyjeremy corbyn will go on brexit at prime ministers questions. no other politics seems to get much airtime at all, so i suspect we are set for another session of brexit questions. yes, that sounds about right. prime ministers questions is that midday. the metropolitan police have arrested a 50—year—old man on suspicion of racially aggravated malicious communications. it follows a complaint made by a 51—year—old woman in november. although police won't confirm the identity of the complainant, the arrest is part of the same investigation that resulted in the arrest and release on bail of a 55—year—old man in swindon in early december. that was connected to online threats made against gina miller, the lead party in the brexit challenge brought at the supreme court. with me is our legal correspondent clive coleman. what we know is that officers from
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the met‘s anti—cyber crime unit, operation falcon, have today arrested a 50—year—old man in knightsbridge on suspicion of racially aggravated malicious communication. that arrest is in connection, we are told, with a complaint made to the police on november the sex. that was three days afterjean miller had won her original high court judicial days afterjean miller had won her original high courtjudicial review -- gina original high courtjudicial review —— gina miller. the complaint was made by a 51 your old woman. the bbc understands that indeed was gina miller relating to threats made online. the arrested man is currently in custody at a london police station. we are told that as part of the same investigation, the metropolitan police have released eight notices, cease and desist
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notices... if you continue with the conduct behaviour you are currently engaged in, then that could result in police action. i should just say that this is entirely separate to another arrest that was made in early december. that arrest was made during the course of the supreme court hearing. metropolitan police officers from the same unit, this is the vulcan unit, the anti—cyber crime unit, on that occasion arrested a 55—year—old man in swindon. he has been released on bail. so, to arrests made so far in that investigation. thank you. some breaking news about the editor in chief of vogue, who has just announced she will be stepping down. she will leave her role this summer. she will leave her role this summer.
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she said, having edited it for me 25 yea rs she said, having edited it for me 25 years and steered it through the spectacular centenary has been a great privilege. she said it has been very hard to find a rational reason to leave what is unquestionably a fascinating and rewarding role, but last autumn i realised i wanted to experience a different life, and look forward to a future separate from vogue. my career has been everything i could wish. nicholas coleridge has said he democracy has been the longest serving and most successful editor of vogue in its 100 year history. so, alexandra shulman is leaving her role this summer. an announcement to her successor will be made in due course. we will get reaction to the news a bit later. three bodies have been discovered after a house fire
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in reigate, in surrey. the bodies of a man, woman and child were found in the ruins of a farm cottage following a fire which is believed to have burnt all night. donald trump has promised a big day national security council saying we will build the wall along the border with mexico. theresa may is facing growing pressure from mps to publish a formal white paper on her brexit strategy. and there has been a big jump in the number of people sleeping rough in england. figures showed the problem is growing fastest outside london. now the sports news. hello, good morning. the british number 0nejohanna konta is out of the australian open after losing her quarter final match with the six—time champion serena williams.
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konta had been on a nine—match winning streak, but came up short in herfirst meeting with the 22—time grand slam champion. she lost it in straight sets 6—2 6—3 afterjust over an hour out on court. serena williams is now on the hunt for a 23rd title. i think overall she played at a higher level than i did today, and i think she showed why she is arguably one of the best of all times, so yes, i've really enjoyed my time out there on court against her. i think i was able, well i hope i will be able to bring a lot away from it, things that i will be able to use. hopefully i will be able to use. hopefully i will get a chance to play her again. liverpool's philippe coutinho has signed a new five—year contract. the deal is worth about £150,000 a week and makes him the highest paid player at the club.
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the brazilian international has been hugely influential this season. an injured ankle coincided with liverpool's worst performance of the season. his managerjurgen klopp has described the playmaker as "world class." sir alex ferguson has been full of praise for manchester united managerjose mourinho. despite being sixth in the table, united are on a three—match unbeaten run in the league, and ferguson believes that's all down to the portuguese keeping control of his emotions. i think that he is finding the solution is now. there was a period in the season where he wasn't making decisions, and his emotions boiled over. he is an emotional person. when you see him now, he is calm, he is in control. that is the obvious
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observation i am making. the team is playing with great energy, determination. that is all the sport for now. more than half councils in england recorded a rise in rough sleeping in the year before. figures show that homelessness rates are rising at an appalling rate. let's look at some of these statistics. figures show rough sleeping has more than doubled since 2010, but there has been a 16% rise in 2016, compared with the previous year. there were more than 4000 roughs sleepers across the
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country. london has the highest number of rough sleepers, but outside the capital the number has risen by 20%, whereas in london it was 3%, which makes the increase in rough sleeping last year seven times greater outside london. with me is charity campaigner and labour mp john healey. what is your reaction to this increase? i feel ashamed, quite honestly, that in a country as decent and well off as ours, we have this spiralling look clay—macro level of people sleeping on the streets, and it does not need to be the case. it is a terrible testimony to housing policy failings over the last six or seven years. give us specifics on where you would point the finger. well, we have seen a rise every year since 2010. we have seen decisions from conservative housing ministers directly responsible for the rise is that we have seen. punitive cuts in housing
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benefit, a refusal to act to help private renters, which is the biggest source of homelessness now, and last year the lowest level of new affordable house building that we have had in this country the 24 yea rs. we have had in this country the 24 years. this is the reason, the underlying reason, why they have seen underlying reason, why they have seen this terrible rise in people sleeping on the streets, sleeping rough in parks, and really i think it shames us all. the government must act. it wants to try to relaunch its housing policy, and this must be the number one priority. so, if you were in power, what would you do? we would do what we did last time. when labour was in government before, we cut homelessness to record low levels. todayit homelessness to record low levels. today it has more than doubled since 2010. what is needed is partly the plan that i launched before christmas, a commitment, particularly for this rough sleeping problem, to double the number of homes available for people who are
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needing to leave homeless hostels, to try to re—establish their lives again. more help to reach people on the streets, but in the end we also have to do a great deal better in this country to build more affordable homes that people can affordable homes that people can afford to rent, and also to buy. the government is failing on all of these fronts. thank you. the mist behind in westminster that looks incredible. we will have a full weather update shortly. women are experiencing widespread discrimination when it comes to dress codes at work, according to a parliamentary report. mps heard from hundreds of women who reported that the dress codes they were subject to were sexist. they began an inquiry after a receptionist was sent home for refusing to wear high heels. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. what to wear at work? sometimes there's no choice and it's not always attractive. but what about being ordered to wear high heels? when nicola thorp arrived for her first day at work, she was told by her employment agency she must wear shoes
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with a two to four inch heel. when she refused, she was sent home without pay. what they state is it gives them a more professional look. a corporate, professional look. i'm not entirely sure why adding two or four inches to my height makes me more professional, or makes me walk in a professional manner. i don't think it affects how i come across. you can see me now, this is exactly what i would be wearing and if it's just a matter of a couple of inches, i can stand tall without wearing heels. she then started a petition which led to an inquiry by mps, who now want action from the government. we've come up with three recommendations. firstly, that the equalities act of 2010 obviously isn't quite addressing that bit. secondly, we want to raise awareness that wearing high heels or make—up may be a health and safety issue in the workplace. thirdly, we are going to hopefully if it doesn't work, then we will be taking people to court. there'll be tribunals. at this company, receptionists can
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wear what they like. in its evidence, the government said the existing law was clear, and that the dress code imposed on nicola was unlawful. but the mps are calling on the government to do more to make the law more effective in protecting employees from discrimination at work. let's look at some of today's other developing stories: grammar school head teachers in england have warned that they may ask parents for hundreds of pounds a year to cope with funding cuts. the grammar school heads association says proposed changes to school funding will see a majority of them lose money. a number of conservative mps are urging the government to change its plans. but the department for education says it's ending a postcode lottery in school funding. the screening age for bowel cancer in england, wales and northern ireland should be reduced to 50, according to the charity beating bowel cancer.
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scotland is the only part of the uk which screens from that age. the charity says that if other parts of the uk came into line, 4,000 patients a year would have the opportunity to be diagnosed earlier. for a full summary of the news, you can visit our website. coming up: and exclusive interview with a north korean diplomat. he thinks north korea's leader would be prepared to attack los angeles with nuclear weapon is his survival in power depended on it. kim jong-un, i think, will press the button of these dangerous weapons when he thinks his rule is threatened. in a moment we say goodbye
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to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with for a look at the weather. it is called across the south—eastern corner of the united kingdom, and there are still some dense patches of fog. that fog slowly lifting, but it will stay cold. sunshine too much of northern england and into the south—west, but largely fine and sunny. any rain is confined to the western areas. very mild, around 11 degrees in the north. quite windy too, dragging in afairamount of north. quite windy too, dragging in a fair amount of cloud overnight. there will be some breaks in the cloud and it will turn cold and frosty across england and wales. a race start to thursday with the odd spot of drizzle all snow. nothing will amount to much. 5 degrees on
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the face of it, but it will feel a lot colder than that. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 11:30... in promising a big day ahead on national security, including an announcement on his plans for a wall on the mexican border. cross—party mps put pressure on theresa may to publish a paper on her brexit strategy for parliament to debate. yesterdayjudges ruled that mps should be given a vote on britain leaving the eu. there's been a big jump in the number of people sleeping rough in england — and while london has the highest number of rough sleepers, the problem is growing fastest outside the capital. women are experiencing widespread discrimination over how they dress at work, according to a report into office discrimination. mps began an inquiry after a receptionist was sent home for refusing to wear high heels. three people have died in a fire at a house in reigate in surrey. the bodies of a man,
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a woman and a child were found in the same bed at a farm cottage. it's thought the fire had burned all night. and its board, serena williams has backed johanna konta to be a former australian open champion after knocking her out today. she was beaten in straight sets 6—3, 6—2 by the grand slam champion. the local‘s philippe catania has signed a new five—year contract worth about £150,000 a week, making him the most highly paid player of the club. his manager has described him as world class. in sir alex ferguson has been full of praise for manchester united manager jose mourinho. united are only three match unbroken run in the premier league and he believes that is down to the portuguese manager keeping his feelings in check. a high—ranking north korean diplomat who defected last year has told
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the bbc he believes kimjong un would be prepared to use nuclear weapons. thae yong—ho says north korea doesn't yet have working nuclear weapons, but it's getting closer, and he believes kim would press the button if backed into a corner. mr thae was speaking to our correspondent in seoul, stephen evans. my my relatives and my brothersa ncestors‘ my relatives and my brothersancestors' families by now are all sent to remote, closed areas of prison camps. # row my brothers‘ and my sisters‘ families. that is why i‘m very much determined now to do everything possible to pull down the north korean regime. in order to save not only my family members, but the whole north korean people from slavery.
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if and when kim jong—un slavery. if and when kimjong—un get slavery. if and when kim jong—un get the bomb properly, and missiles to deliver, is he capable of pressing the button and destroying los angeles? 0h, kimjong—un and destroying los angeles? 0h, kim jong—un knows and destroying los angeles? 0h, kimjong—un knows quite well that nuclear weapons are the only guarantee for his rule. and kim jong—un, i think, guarantee for his rule. and kim jong—un, ithink, will guarantee for his rule. and kim jong—un, i think, will press the button of these dangerous weapons when he thinks that he —— his rule and his dynasty is threatened with collapse. how do you think kim jong—un will end his days? is he going to die
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peacefully in his own bed tee no. —— no. peacefully in his own bed tee no. -- no. how? iam sure -- no. how? i am sure that one day kim jong—un‘s regime will collapse by people‘s uprising. a number of female mps have told the bbc they have received physical and verbal threats and fears for their safety following the death of the labourmpjo safety following the death of the labour mp jo cox. ina labour mp jo cox. in a survey by bbc radio five live, some said they had also experienced sexist language in the commons and also consider giving up theirjob at also consider giving up theirjob at a time when more women are being encouraged to go into politics. how off—putting is that? our political correspondent has been finding out. it wasn‘t easy getting women the vote. it was even longer to get women into parliament. the first woman to take a seat, nancy astor, was elected 90 yea rs a seat, nancy astor, was elected 90 years ago. eventually, more would follow. gives me the greatest
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pleasure to introduce to use the new nationalist women members. then, of course, they didn‘t have social media, like the 195 female mps today. right, what you are looking at our tweets, the abusive tweets that my team screenshot it. and mclauchlin mp won‘t receive the abuse she receives —— won‘t read the abuse she receives —— won‘t read the abuse you received online. it is deeply personal and she does not wa nt to deeply personal and she does not want to share it. it takes a lot of strength that too. it takes a lot of strength that too. it is very tempting if you are alone at night and nobody can see you, to just have a look, but why would i do that to myself? i have to say, i very much see the silver lining in not getting re—elected. that's all lining is that i may never have too put up with that sort of abuse again in my life, because it doesn't happen unless you have got some kind
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of high profile, and then people think they have carte blanche to just call you whatever they want to call you. but it is not as hurtful insults and social media. there is an even darker side of death threats and violence. jo cox was murdered outside her constituency survey last june. two thirds of female mps we spoke to said they have felt less safe ever since. well over half have received physical threats from a member of the public. this is the room where i hold my surgeries. julep sadik begrudgingly now make sure she has security whenever she holds constituency surgeries. -- tulip surgeries. —— tulip siddiq. do you feel safer now? this building is a secure building. the staff are very supportive, so i do feel safer here. it wasn‘t my staff members who opened the letter, and quitea staff members who opened the letter, and quite a young staff member, and i felt very sorry for the person who opened it and had this letter saying they wanted to budget me, butjoe my family and then the office quickly
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got in touch with me and said we needed to report this to the police and we took swift action. the police we re and we took swift action. the police were quick to respond and it makes you think, who has the time to sit and write a letter to an mp saying i wa nt to and write a letter to an mp saying i want to kill you and your family? it all paints rather a grim picture, and certainly, the majority of mps we spoke to said they were concerned that hearing about this sort of abuse might put off new people and women from wanting to become mps. a third of those we have heard from said they had considered giving up theirjob in said they had considered giving up their job in parliament said they had considered giving up theirjob in parliament because of it. and yet none have. in the majority we heard from say that, despite the difficulties, the job majority we heard from say that, despite the difficulties, thejob is a privilege, and well worth the flak. delaet upgrade to the radio system used by the emergency services in england, scotland and wales, may cost taxpayers £175 million a year. mps on the public accounts committee say the planned new system isn‘t used by any other country needs to
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be properly tested to make sure it works under pressure. fiona langdon reports. be 105 police, fire and ambulance services in england, scotla nd ambulance services in england, scotland and wales communicate using a radio network known as airwave. but these contracts expire in two years‘. in its place. the emergency services network, and at that its smartphone system run by 4g on ee. it is hoped they will help the emergency services be able to stream live video, relay patient data and access blueprints to buildings. but the public accounts committee is calling on ministers to address what they see as real security concerns. our real concern about the new syste m our real concern about the new system is that at the moment, at the time we have our hearing, there was no deal stuck and there still is not, about the london underground, and there are still question marks about the undergrounds around the country. if it doesn't work underground, it is both a risk to people and our emergency services,
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you need to contact each other in real time in case of emergencies such as 7/ seven. 0n such as 7/ seven. on top of this, it probably won‘t be ready in time, so the old network may have to be extended at an annual cost of up to £475 million. the public accounts committee say that the home office has not budgeted for this. in a statement, the home office say: when it is up and running, the uk will be the first in the world to replace their front—line radios with what effectively is an adapted smartphone. president trump has re—ignited a major environmental dispute in the united states. he‘s used executive orders to re—launch projects to build controversial oil pipelines in north dakota and nebraska. protests against the plans have already begun, with demonstrations
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in new york and washington. the president has also reportedly banned staff at america‘s environmental protection agency from posting on social media, while a series of tweets on climate change from the twitter account of the badlands national park in south dakota have been deleted. let‘s speak to two people closely involved in the debates over this pipeline. jesse coleman, an activist with greenpeace usa, is in san antonio in texas. lee carter is a journalist in toronto and joins us now. first of all, league, give us in the background of the pipelines and the controversy and what is going to mean now that donald trump is giving the go—ahead? well, from the canadian perspective, the keystone axel domont 0r pipeline was trumpeted and promoted very much by the previous conservative government here but was finally stopped by the 0bama administration
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and rejected by it. and so, it had become almost a bit of a nonissue here, and ironically, the cabinet of justin trudeau, the liberal prime minister hughes government has held power here since late 2015, was holding a retreat concisely to discuss how to deal with the incoming trump administration when they got to the news that president trump had decided to go ahead with the keystone project. interestingly, they receive no notice of this at all. they found out through the us media that this was happening. i think it is largely welcomed by the trudeau government. canada is an energy producing country and this would be a large project for a part of the country that has been depressed because of low oil prices,
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but as you say, it is hugely controversial in terms of the environment and has a lot of hurdles yet to overcome. jesse coleman from greenpeace, economic benefits in canada, and donald trump says 28,000 jobs as a result of it, as well as strengthening energy supplies for americans. what is your view? well, those have been called "alternative facts", i believe. it was found that the keystone xl pipeline would create just 35 permanentjobs, pipeline would create just 35 permanent jobs, the rest pipeline would create just 35 permanentjobs, the rest being short—term construction work. there are stilljobs that would exist, albeit not forever. yes, forever reshot amount of time. the truth of the matter is, the cylinder stri alone in 2015 created more jobs than the entire fossil fuel industry did in the us, so it is unnecessaryjobs fuel industry did in the us, so it is unnecessary jobs perspective. —— the solar industry. so what reaction our environmental
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groups like yours going to promise to this announcement? we will stand with the standing rock protesters and others who will stand in the way of these pipelines. that is the way we see the movement going forward , is the way we see the movement going forward, standing alongside the many, many thousands of people that will be getting in the way of these two pipelines. and more broadly, and donald trump‘s administration and the messages coming out, what is your reaction to what is going on with social media, and apparent constraints being put on various groups? well, frankly, it is very troubling. as you mentioned, he has shut down the ability for the epa to communicate with the outside world. many journalists cannot reach communicate with the outside world. manyjournalists cannot reach them for comment. the environmental protection agency. that's right. so we are really
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seeing an attempt to shut down immune occasion on science and facts of environmental concern. —— shut down communication. lee, i know you arejoining us from the canadian perspective, but as a journalist, tellers amid more about what reaction there has been too constraints on social media and where the directive is coming from. is it clear? no, i mean, the fact that prime ministerjustin trudeau was having that hoddle means that, of his cabinet, in the canadian city calgary, it means that the government here is looking at the trump administration with a great deal of nervousness, because it is very unpredictable and nobody knows quite what this kind of policy and the fly really means. and of course, canada has an enormous trading relationship with the united states. it isa relationship with the united states. it is a trading relationship with about $2 billion a day, and when
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trump talks about protectionism and putting up fences and putting up walls, canada wants to know and needs to know whether that means them as well. a senior trump official bid join at this retreat and tried to reassure the canadians, but apart from oil, there is also the huge auto pact between the two countries, so from an economic perspective, i think canada is still looking at the trump administration with a great deal of nervousness, and of those, the two leaders are ideological you very far apart as well. this is probably the most left of centre government in canada since justin‘s father pierre was in power in the late 60s and early 70s. and a final thought on that freeze that donald trump has introduced on implementing at least 30 environmental rules that were finalised in the dying months of president 0bama‘s time in office.
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well, the truth is, the united states is still a country with a very strong rule of law, and there are going to be significant court challenges that we will have to go through, and i think there is a very good chance, that there is a tremendous amount of overreach by the trump administration, and a lot of things he has already promised and these freezes, going forward, will have to be fought out in a court room. facts will have bearing in that case, so i am hopeful about those actually being enacted. thank you both very much. and we will have more on all the latest developments from the trump white house tonight at 7pm in our new programme, 100 days, with our correspondent in washington and london. they are the tiny figures that have made a danish toy firm iconic across the world,
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but could you tell the difference between a real lego figure and a copy? the man in charge of making them at lego‘s huge new factory in china couldn‘t, which shows you the challenge lego is facing as it tries to expand aggressively in asia. here‘s our shanghai correspondent, robin brant. billions and billions of these little plastic bricks have been sold the world over, and now lego is betting big on china. what started out with hand—cut bricks in denmark in 1949 is now a $100 million state—of—the—art operation near shanghai but they are not the only ones doing it. copies like this and fakes or counterfeits are prolific in china. lego is currently suing the firm behind this copycat star wars model. so, how easy is it to spot the difference? we bought a real one and a copycat and asked the experts. if you have to ask me to guess,
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i would say this one, maybe. which one do you think is real? you think this one is real. you‘re right. the truth is, they look and feel almost identical. the copy‘s so good, in fact, that even the boss of that huge new lego factory can‘t tell. have a little look at that for me. what do you think of that? it looks like a mini figure to me. what do you think of him? two men. which one‘s yours? just have a guess for me. i would say this is lego and this is not. 0k. this is lego. no, this is lego. bought from toy‘r‘us yesterday, built by my daughter.
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that‘s not real. it‘s not lego. it is trying to be lego, is my assessment of it. lego is not the only foreign firm investing big in china but having trouble with local copycats. land rovers are now made here. white evoques like this sell particulalrly well. but the british firm has been powerless to stop this. tucked away on a shanghai side street, this is a land wind. it‘s similar on the inside and very, very similar on the outside but a lot cheaper. this is our copycat that caught people out. you can buy him and the real thing on the huge online retailer, alibaba. they took down thousands of links to copycat lego products last year alone, but the toy maker is still pursuing manufacturers in the courts because even the boss cannot tell the difference. ina in a moment, a summary of the
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business news. but first, the headlines. president trump promises a big day on national security, promising to build a wall along the border with mexico. theresa may places pressure from mps to publish a white paper on her brexit strategy. and a jump in the number of people sleeping rough in england. figures show the problem is growing fastest outside london. in the business news... sa ntander has warned of a challenging year ahead in the uk after its profits in 2016 dived following the eu referendum. earnings in britain fell by almost 15%, largely because of the weakening of the pound against the euro following the brexit vote injune. however, its global profits rose by 4% after a strong performance in brazil. investment in the uk‘s car industry fell in 2016 after several years of strong growth, that‘s according to the head of the industry‘s trade body. the society of motor manufacturers and traders, predicts a further fall in investment this year.
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despite nissan‘s decision to build two new models in sunderland, the smmt believes companies are waiting for clarity about the uk‘s post—brexit trading arrangements. and travel stores have given wh smith a boost — they‘ve upgraded full—year profit forecast after shops at railway stations and airports performed well over the holiday period. like for like sales were up 5%, compared to the high street smiths, where sales were down 3%. hello. thanks for joining hello. thanks forjoining me this morning. what do bricklayers, carpenters and electricians all have in common? we don‘t have enough of them. research by the federation of master builders say members are having serious problems hiring all of the above plus roofers and plasterers. it‘s not necessarily bad news — it comes as the construction sector posts 15 consecutive quarters of growth. let‘s speak to kallum pickering, a senior uk economist
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at berenberg bank. thank you forjoining us this morning. we keep hearing about this skill shortage, but in spite of this, the construction sector continues to grow. is that in spite of the shortage, or is it the case that if we had more skilled people, the sector would be growing even faster? i think it would be growing even faster. there is an upside and a bad side to this. the upside is that are still spending. if you are spending on construction, it means you‘re another word about the future, so following the brexit vote, it is good that the construction industry doing well. but remember that the key thing is this economy needs our houses, and there is no supply —— shortage of supply in construction. that is a big long—term economic talent. what is causing this growth in the construction sector? is a simple is blind and? we‘re there is a housing shortage. is there more to it than
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that? the economy is doing right well —— quite well. it is not as good as we would like, but we have less depth than previously, and people often starting to feel like normal again. people are starting to invest and spend. indeed, they haven‘t responded in a negative way to the brexit shock that we thought, so this is really good news. what we need now is really skilled labour into the economy so this can continue without supply and pricing pressures getting even worse. and briefly, how would you get that skilled labour into the market? well, one through migration, and it this is a major concern that if we we re this is a major concern that if we were to high barriers to eu migrants, they have provided the skilled labour for the construction industry in the past, maybe these problems get worse over time and not better. thank you very much weird time. before we go, let‘s take a look at the markets. there has been some very good movement and sterling this morning. it is up at its highest level for about six weeks against the dollar. you can see that come up
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$1.25. two things driving that, yesterday‘s ruling by the supreme court that the government must consult parliament before triggering article 30 has given more clarity, and had of resident trump‘s meeting with theresa may this weekend, positive sentiment anticipating that, the pound is. thank you very much for that. japan has named its first home—grown sumo grand champion there‘s some flash photography coming up. kise—nosato, who‘s 30, was promoted to the topmost yoko—zuna rank after his win in the first tournament of the year. mariko 0i reports. sumo is japan‘s national sport, dating back hundreds of years. wrestlers are ranked in the ultimate goal is to become a yokozuna. and there hasn‘t been a japanese wrestler to reach the sport‘s highest rank in nearly two decades.
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until this guy. ? ?macr01 two becomes the 72nd yokozuna in history, joining three others who are actively competing in tournaments. iam actively competing in tournaments. i am physically fit, and they needed to go further. i feel i will get stronger and stronger as i considered this new start. the head of the sport‘s association, which decides about the promotion, said it is a deeply emotional time. translation: we felt that kise—nosato would continue to do well, and is therefore fit to become a yo kozu na. in the last 19 years, five wrestlers, one american summer in and four mongolians were promoted to be yokozuna. the hope is, kise—nosato‘s promotion would boost to sport‘s popularity. ina in a moment, we will go live to the
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house of commons for prime minister‘s questions, where theresa may will be facing mps that the first time since their supreme court ruling yesterday on brexit. more from our assistant political editor norman smith in westminster‘s central lobby. thank you. i suppose jeremy corbyn could go on the a p pa re ntly jeremy corbyn could go on the apparently misfiring trident missile, he could go on suggestions gps might want to charge patients to see them, but let‘s be honest, he won‘t. we know what he will go on will stop it surely has to be brexit. more questions, in particular, about whether there will bea particular, about whether there will be a white paper. i‘m joined by the conservative mp james be a white paper. i‘m joined by the conservative mpjames cleverly. this idea of a white paper setting out misses me‘s approach to brexit is a good idea, isn‘t it? well, the idea ofa good idea, isn‘t it? well, the idea of a white paper was initially floated prior to the lancaster house speech, in which she set up many things i think it white paper would lay out. i‘m not sure what more could be
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addedin i‘m not sure what more could be added in terms of detail which then would not actually be counter—productive when it comes to the negotiations. 0ne the negotiations. one other area of concern for the government has to be what happens in the place behind you, the house of lords. how much potential is there, do you think, for peers to cause mrs may grief over article 50? it is the difference between what could happen in theory and what will happen in practice. in theory, it could be very problematic. the government does not have a house of lords majority. there are a very large number of lib dem and labour mps passionately opposed to brexit. in practice, i think it would be very, very foolish for the house of lords to overrule people from their own parties, the labour party, for example, in the house of commons, because it would be people at our end of the palace of westminster who will be punished at the ballot box if they don‘t deliver on brexit. briefly, do you think mrs may is almost on cruise control in terms of meeting her deadline of article 50 triggered by the end of march, that
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it is almost a done deal? well, nothing in politics is a done deal. we have learned that in the last few years. but i think the prime minister has played this very, very well. i think she is well on track to hit the deadlines that she has set will stop i have no doubt that article 50 will be triggered soon. there we go. i‘m sure it will be another brexit blastoff. thank you very much, norman. and we will have full coverage as soon as it all blasts off. right now, let‘s catch up with the weather. hello there. relatively mild in the north—west of the uk, but not in the south—east. cold and frosty to start. still frosty, and dense patches of fog linger into the afternoon. pretty slow on the roads and at some of the airports. fog slowly lifting into low cloud, underneath which will stay pretty chilly. a swathe of much by the weather, mist and fog towards the north—east of england. more cloud for scotland and northern ireland, any cloud in the far north—west.
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temperatures, 11—12, or even 13 in the north. into this evening, more cloud drifting across the uk. the breeze will push rain away from the north—west, and it will still turn quite cold again across much of england and wales. cold and frosty for some, and the art flick of snow, the odd spot of drizzle, but neither will amount to too much. we start tomorrow grey again. there could be drizzle and the odd flake of snow, but sunny spell all day in northern scotla nd but sunny spell all day in northern scotland and a bit of sunshine developing further cell. you may see 4-5d developing further cell. you may see 4—5d in your thermometer, but it will feel colder in the wind. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories at 12pm: president trump promises a "big day" on national security, saying, "we will build the wall" along the border with mexico.
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theresa may is about to face prime minister‘s questions — she‘s under pressure to publish a formal white paper on her brexit strategy. a man‘s arrested over alleged threats against gina miller, the woman behind the brexit legal challenge. british vogue editor alexandra shulman is to step down as editor—in—chief after more than 25 years. good morning, it‘s wednesday 25th january. welcome to bbc newsroom live. let‘s cross live to the house of commons where theresa may has about two answer prime minister‘s
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questions. there was that supreme court ruling yesterday that there must be a vote by mps for triggering article 50, which kicks off the negotiations of getting out of the european union. let‘s just see if there is a first question now to the prime minister. we will have a listen. he is accompanied by a delegation of his parliamentary colleagues... let‘s bring in norman. you are confidently addicting it is going to be brexit. yes, because pretty much all other politics now seems to be continually and repeatedly overshadowed by brexit. at the start of the week we had the government unveiling its industrial strategy, and that seems
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to have disappeared without trace because of brexit. theresa may is on her feet. iam sure her feet. i am sure that the whole house will join me in sending our thoughts to the police officer who was shot over the police officer who was shot over the weekend. mr speaker, this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others. in addition to my duties in this house, i shall have further such meetings later today, and later this week i will travel to the united states for talks with president trump. may ijoined the prime minister in sending good wishes to the police officer who was shot in belfast. they are the best drivers of social mobility. 99% of rated good or outstanding, and 65% of their places are in the most deprived areas of this country. so why is the prime minister introducing cuts that
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threaten the very existence of maintained nursery schools? is it not true that when it comes to social mobility, her actions speak far louder than her words? i want to ensure that we see good quality of education at every age and at every stage for children in this country. that is why we are looking at improving the number of good school faces. she talks about my record speaking louder than words. can i point out to the honourable lady that i was very proud as chairman of an education authority in london in the 1990s to introduce nursery school places for every three—year—old and four—year—old whose parents wanted one. the prime minister laid out a clear and bold plan for brexit in her speech last week. honourable members
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quite rightly want an opportunity to scrutinise that plan. does the rye minister agree that the best way of facilitating that scrutiny would be a government white paper, laying out our vision for a local britain based on free trade in goods and services that will be to the benefit of us and other european countries? my and other european countries? my honourable friend raises the question of parliamentary scrutiny. i have been clear, as has senior ministers, that we will ensure that parliament has every opportunity to provide that scrutiny on this issue as we go through this process. but i recognise i set out that bold plan for a global britain last week, and i recognise there is an appetite in this house to see that plan set out ina this house to see that plan set out in a white paper. my honourable friend‘s question and they questioned last week in the same vein, andi questioned last week in the same vein, and i confirmed to the house that our plan will be set out in a
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white paper. mr speaker, ijoined the prime minister in condolences to the prime minister in condolences to the family of the police officer who lost his life over the weekend in northern ireland. mr speaker, the prime minister has wasted 80 days between the time of the original judgment and the appeal, and is now finally admitting today after pressure from all sides that there is going to be a white paper. could we know when this white paper is going to be available to us? and why has it taken so long to get it? prime minister. can i say to the right honourable gentleman, he asked for debate and i was clear there
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would always be debate in this house, and there have been and will continue to be. he asked for votes, and there have been vote in this house. the house voted overwhelmingly for the government to trickle article 50 before the end of march this year. he asked for a plan, i set out a clear plan for a bold future for britain. he and others asked for a white paper, i am clear that there will be a white paper. but what i am also clear about is that the right honourable gentleman always asks about process, about the means to the end. i and this government are focusing on the outcomes. we are focusing on a truly global britain, building a stronger future for this country, the right dealfor britain, future for this country, the right deal for britain, and future for this country, the right dealfor britain, and britain out of the european union. mr speaker, my question wasn‘t obligated. i just asked mr speaker, my question wasn‘t obligated. ijust asked when the white paper will come out. and will
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it be published before or at the same time as the bill that is a p pa re ntly same time as the bill that is apparently about to be published? mr speaker, last week i asked the prime minister repeatedly to clarify whether her government is prepared to pay to secure tariff free access to pay to secure tariff free access to the single european market. she repeatedly refused to answer the question. so i asked her again, is her government ruling out paying a fee for tariff free access to the single market, or the bespoke customs union that she outlined also in her speech? can i first of all say to the right modern woman in his reference to the timing issue —— right honourable gentleman. these are separate issues. the house overwhelmingly voted that article 50 should be triggered before the end of march 2017. a bill will be provided before this house and there will be the proper debate in this chamber and
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will be the proper debate in this chamberand in the will be the proper debate in this chamber and in the other place on that bill. there is a separate question of actually publishing the plan that i have set out, a bold vision for britain in the future. i will do that in a white paper, and the right honourable gentleman knows that one of our objectives is the best possible free—trade arrangements with the eu, and that is what we will be out there negotiating for. some of this is worrying too many people in this house, but more importantly, it is worrying too many others. for example, the chief executive of nissan was given assurances by her business secretary about future trade arrangements with europe, but now says they will have two re—evaluate the situation about their investment in britain. the prime minister, mr speaker, is threatening the eu that unless they give in to her demands she will turn britain into a bargain basement tax havens off the coast of europe. well, mr speaker, we on this side of
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the house are very well aware of the consequences that would have. the damage it would do two jobs and living standards, and our public services. is she now going to rule out the bargain basement threat that was in her speech at lancaster house? i expect us to get a good dealfor house? i expect us to get a good deal for trading house? i expect us to get a good dealfor trading relationships house? i expect us to get a good deal for trading relationships with the european union. what i also clear about is that this judgment will not sign up to a bad deal for the united kingdom. as to the threats that the right honourable gentleman claims about what might happen, and he often talks about this, he uses those phrases, talks about workers‘ rights, patsy should listen to his former colleague in this house, the mayor of london, sadiq khan, who today said, to give credit to the government i don‘t think they want to weaken workers‘ rights, and he goes on to say, "i have seen no evidence from the conversations i have had with senior members of government that that is their aspiration or their intention,
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or something they want to do". that is good. as usual with labour, the right hand is not talking to the far left. mr speaker. mr speaker, the evidence of what the tory party and this government really thinks about workers‘ rights was there for all to see yesterday. a private members bill under the ten minute rule bill bya bill under the ten minute rule bill by a tory mp to tear up part of the international labour organisation convention, talking down my friend the memberfor grimsby‘s convention, talking down my friend the member for grimsby‘s bill to protect european workers‘ rights that have been obtained in this country. that is the real agenda of the tory party. mr speaker, what the primary step is doing is aiming a threat at our public services with
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her threats about a bargain basement britain. is her priority our struggling nhs, those denied social care, children having their school funding cuts, or is it, once again, further cuts in big business taxation to make the rich even better off? i would simply remind the right honourable gentleman the issue of workers‘ rights, i have been very clear that this government will protect workers‘ rights. indeed, we have a review of modern employment law to ensure that implement legislation keeps up with the modern labour market. one of the objectives i set out in my plan for our big shifting objectives was to protect workers‘ rights. but he talks about threats to public services. i will tell him what the threat to public services would be, it would be a labour borrowing £500 million extra. that would destroy our economy and mean no funding for
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our economy and mean no funding for our public services. the threat to workers‘ rights, mr speaker, is there every day. 6 million earning less tha n there every day. 6 million earning less than the minimum wage. many people, nearly 1 less than the minimum wage. many people, nearly1 million, on zero hours contracts. what they are doing is offering once again the bargain basement alternative. we‘ll be prime minister also take this opportunity today to congratulate the 100,000 people who marched in britain last weekend to highlight women‘s rights after president trump‘s inauguration. they expressed their concerns about his misogyny. because many have concerns, mr speaker, that in herforthcoming meeting with president trump she will be prepared to offer up for sacrifice the opportunity of american companies to come in and take over part of our nhs or our public services. will she
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assure the house that in any trade deal, none of those things will be offered up as a bargaining chip? again, i point out to the right honourable gentleman that it is this government that has introduced the national living wage, and this government made changes to 0—hours contract. 0n the issue of my visit to the united states of america, i am pleased that i am able to meet president trump so early in his administration. that is a sign of the strength of the special relationship between the united kingdom and the united states of america. a special relationship on which he and i intend to build. and i also say to the leader of the opposition, i am i also say to the leader of the opposition, iam not i also say to the leader of the opposition, i am not afraid to speak frankly to a president of the united states. i am able to do that because we have that special relationship. a special relationship that he would never have with the united states.
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mr speaker, we would never allow written to be sold off on the cheap. how confident is she of getting a good dealfor global how confident is she of getting a good deal for global britain from a president who wants to put america first by american, and build a wall between his country and mexico? article 50 was not about a court judgment against this government. what it signified was the bad judgment of this government, but bad judgment of this government, but bad judgment of this government, but bad judgment of pirate i think or put tax cuts over investment in national health and social care. the bad judgment of threatening european partners whilst offering a blank cheque to president trump. the bad judgment of wanting to turn britain into a judgment of wanting to turn britain intoa bargain judgment of wanting to turn britain into a bargain basement tax havens. so, will she offer some clarity and some certainty that she will not
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turn us into the bargain basement. we will be out around the world with the eu, america and other countries negotiating good free trade deal for this country that will bring prosperity to this country. the right honourable gentleman wants to talk about brexit. he is the leader of the party, you can‘t even agree with his shadow chancellor about exit. the shadow chancellor can‘t agree with the shadow brexit secretary. the shadow brexit secretary. the shadow brexit secretary disagrees with the shadow home secretary. and the shadow home secretary has to bring up the leader and tell him to change his mind! he talks about us standing up for britain. they can‘t speak for themselves. they will never speak for britain. thank you, mr speaker. on the 27th
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of december, another young woman lost her life driving to the west country on the a 303. in the past decade, more than 1000 people have been killed or injured on that road. for 40 years, governments have promised to dual the lethal parts of the road where two lanes become three and go back to two with no central reservation. queues on the road are also legendary, and i know the governor is committed to an upgrade, but can the prime minister assure us upgrade, but can the prime minister assure us that the proposed tunnel beneath stonehenge will not hold up essential work elsewhere ? beneath stonehenge will not hold up essential work elsewhere? my honourable friend raises an important issue. he is right to do that. i can assure him we are working to improve the safety of our roads. he refers specifically to the issue of the a303, and the tragic incident that happened on december the 27th. we have committed to creating a dual carriageway on the
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a303 from the m3 to the m5. highways england recently launched a consultation into the root under stonehenge, and my honourable friend will want to look closely at that issue. this is part of our £2 billion investment in road improvements that will improve connections in the south—west, but i assure him that we have road safety at the forefront of our minds. they are "wishing everybody a very happy burns day, and extending congratulations to the scotsman newspaper which is celebrating its bicentenary today. yesterday, the government lost in the supreme court. today there is a welcome u—turn on the white paper in regards to brexit. in the spirit of progress for parliament, in advance of meeting president trump, will be prime minister tell parliament what she wants to achieve in a uk — us trade deal? can ijoin the right
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honourable gentleman in his good wishes for a happy burns day to everybody. and also in recognising the bicentenary of the scotsman and sure everyone in the house would join me in that. what we want to achieve in terms of our arrangements with the united states. we want to achieve an arrangement that ensures the interests of the united kingdom are put first, and that is what i will be doing, and that we see a trade arrangement with the united states, as we will be looking for with other parts of the world, that can increase our trade, bring profit parity —— is prosperity, and make sure the economy works for everyone in every part of the united kingdom. the european union has, amongst the highest food safety standards anywhere in the world, and we are proud on our continent to have public national health systems. the united states is keen to have health systems which are fully open to private conversation. they want to export genetically modified organisms, we‘ve raised with growth
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hormones, and checking meat washed with chlorinated water. we‘ll be prime and instead tell president trump that she is not prepared to lower our food and safety standards, or to open health systems to privatisation. 0r, or to open health systems to privatisation. or, does she believe that this is a price worth paying for a that this is a price worth paying fora uk— that this is a price worth paying for a uk— use us trade deal? that this is a price worth paying for a uk- use us trade deal? we will look for a trade deal that improves trade between our countries, that will bring prosperity and growth to this country, and ensure that we can bring jobs to this country as well. ican bring jobs to this country as well. i can assure the right honourable gentleman that in doing that we will put uk interests and values first. historic per capita spending in our regions, including yorkshire, when compared to london, is up to 40% lower for our local authorities, 50% lower for our local authorities, 50% lower for our schools, and 60% lower for our local authorities, 50% lowerfor our schools, and 60% lower for our transport projects. does the prime minister agree that if we want
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to build a country that works for everyone, we need a fairfunding deal that works for everyone? everyone, we need a fairfunding deal that works for everyone ?|j recognise the issues my honourable friend has raised, and i can assure him that our commitment in relation to the northern parts of england, including yorkshire, is absolutely clear. we want to back this disgrace right across the north. we are backing the northern powerhouse to help the great cities and towns of the north to pull their strength and ta ke the north to pull their strength and take on the world. yorkshire has received an extra funding from the government this week, and we are spending a record £13 billion on transport across the north. as a result there are more people in work in yorkshire and humber than ever before, and the payment rate is at a record high. that is good news for people in the region, and good news for the economy as a whole. the european medicines agency provides a single drug licensing system for 500 million people, and results in the uk having drugs
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licensed 6—12 months ahead of countries like canada and australia. yesterday, the health secretary stated that the uk will not be in the bma, so can the prime minister confirmed this and explain how she will prevent delayed drug access for uk patients? there are a number of organisations that we are part of as mentors of the eu, and as part of the work that we are doing to look at the uk in the future when we have left the eu, we look at the arrangements that we can put in place in relation to those issues. we want to ensure that we continue to have a pharmaceutical industry in this country which is an important part of our economy, as are the ability of the people to access these new drugs, and i saw the honourable lady we looks as at this and we will make sure we have got the that we need. too few british aren‘t winners are connecting with the capital they need to start and grow. dash—macro
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entrepreneurs. we‘ll be prime lister order a review of the enterprise investment scheme in the hope that they can be simplified, helping to create large pools of buccaneering b british industry needs? dash-macro buccaneering capital? this is an important issue, and he has long been a champion of entrepreneurship in this country. i can tell him that in the industrial strategy we are committed to providing the best environment for business. the treasury has established a patient capital review, for example, chaired by a a panel looking at the barriers that exist to long—term investment, and we are increasing investment in venture capital by £400 million, in order to unlock £1 billion of new finance. the treasury will publish a consultation in the spring examining these issues, and i am sure my honourable friend will wish to
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contribute and respond to that. 4.5 years ago, my constituents chris and lydia leek were on a family holiday on the greek island of sunday when their son jamie holiday on the greek island of sunday when their sonjamie was hit and killed by a speeding motorbike. it was his ninth birthday. the rider was convicted, but has appealed against his sentence, and to date remains a free man. we‘ll be prime minister agreed to meet with chris and lydia to discuss how they can finally secure justice forjamie? and lydia to discuss how they can finally secure justice for jamie ?|j say finally secure justice for jamie?” say to the honourable lady, i am very happy to look at this case. it isa very happy to look at this case. it is a tragic case she has described, and our thoughts must be with chris and our thoughts must be with chris and lydia at the terrible loss they experienced. as to the issues of what is happening in terms of the greek criminaljustice system, that isa greek criminaljustice system, that is a matter for the greek authorities, but we will look seriously at this case and see if there is anything the foreign office
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can do in relation to this. president trump has repeatedly said he would bring back torture as an instrument of policy. when she sees him on friday, will be prime minister make clear that in oak circumstances would she permit britain to be dragged into facilitating that torture, as we we re facilitating that torture, as we were after september the 11th?” facilitating that torture, as we were after september the 11th? i can assure my honourable friend that we have a clear position on torture. we do not sanction torture, and that will continue to be our position. 70% of my constituents voted remain. 1596 70% of my constituents voted remain. 15% are citizens of other eu countries, and almost all don‘t trust her government to negotiate a deal that secures the future prosperity of london and the uk. will she give this house a veto on the deal she does, or will she put that deal back to a referendum with the british people?
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the people voted differently across the country, parts voted to remain and part voted to leave. what we now do is unite behind the result of the vote that took place. we come together as a country, we go out there, we make a success of this, and we ensure we build a truly global britain that will bring jobs to his constituency. this week, milton keynes celebrates its 50th birthday. we have been the most successful of new cities and are the lima have one of the highest rates of economic growth. will the prime minister agree that milton keynes has a great future and will be central to delivering this government‘s ambitions? cani government‘s ambitions? can ijoin my honourable friend in marking milton keynes‘s 50th birthday, and i understand he has secured a westminster hall debate
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later on this subject. i think that milton keynes is a great example of what you can achieve with a clear plan and with strong local readership. we are providing additionalfunding for readership. we are providing additional funding for the east—west rail project and he supported that, as well as for the oxford to cambridge expressway road scheme. milton keynes has had notjust a great 50 years, but i‘m sure we‘ll have a great future as well. last week a freight train arrived at barking from china, using the channel tunnel, and demonstrating the possibilities of rail freight. but britain‘s rail network has two small a loading gauge. will be a minister consider giving support to the scheme that would provide a large scale freight line to link the regions of britain to europe and asia beyond and to take 5 million lorries off button‘s road each year?
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the honourable gentleman has raised an issue which has been an issue for some considerable time. we want to encourage freight on rail. we have been encouraging freight on rail and will continue to do so. the ministry of cake in my constituency of taunton deane, a £30 million turnover company, has recently been bought by a french company called madame ezell desert. they trade across the europe and into china. does this not demonstrate confidence in our economy, in that a european company has bought into it, it demonstrate that we can unlock global trade, and it demonstrate that the south—west isa it demonstrate that the south—west is a terrific place to do business?
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i absolutely agree with my honourable friend. i think the investment that she has referred to, ofa investment that she has referred to, of a french company into a company in her constituency, shows the confidence that people have in our economy for the future. it shows the fundamental strength of our economy, and also shows that we can unlock global trade. of course, the south—west is a very good base to do business. robert burns once spoke, whatever damages society, that is my measure of iniquity. would be prime minister agree that that description applies perfectly to the tax system recently found illegal by british courts, under which asylum seekers were not given a under which asylum seekers were not givenafair under which asylum seekers were not given a fair trial and many subsequently suffered torture. the issue of the detained fast track system in the asylum is one i looked
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at as home secretary, and we did make a at as home secretary, and we did makea number of at as home secretary, and we did make a number of changes. it is built on a very simple principle, which is that if there is somebody whose case for asylum is such that they are almost certain to be refused that asylum, then we want to ensure that they can be removed from the country as quickly as possible, hence the detained fast track. i would like to ask my friend the prime minister if she would assist in trying to get an enterprise zone in michael stich in c is part of industrial strategy, because it turns out that the labour council, who were talking about an enterprise zone project in the area has not even applied for any funding whatsoever. would my right honourable friend please assist with this endeavour? i know what a champion for his constituency he is, and i am sure that the chancellor and the business
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secretary will look at the issue he has raised. but i also say how sad it is that labour councils are not willing to put forward proposals to increase the prosperity and economic growth in their area. question 11. i will meet the first minister and leaders of the devolved administrations of the joint ministerial committee on monday, but of course, we regularly engage with the scottish government on a wide range of issues. when she does eventually meet with the first minister, will she confirm whether she, the prime minister, supports the principle of the scotland act that whatever is not reserved as devolved? and therefore, will she be able to tell the first minister what powers will come to the scottish parliament in the event of brexit? and can she confirmed that the great repeal bill will not bea that the great repeal bill will not be a great power grab? i have been very clear, and this was echoed yesterday by my right honourable friend the secretary of state for accessing the eu that no powers that are currently the bother going to be suddenly taken back to
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the united kingdom government. —— that are currently devolved. what will discuss with the devolved administrations is how we deal with those powers which are currently in brussels when they come back to the uk, and what we want to ensure is that those powers are dealt with so that those powers are dealt with so that we can maintain the important single market of the united kingdom. thank you, mr speaker. it is currently an offence to assault a police officer, an immigration officer or a prison of this, but it is not a specific offence to assault and nhs worker, whether a doctor, a nurse, or a paramedic. and nhs worker, whether a doctor, a nurse, ora paramedic. does the prime minister agree with me, we should consider extending a specific offence to these people to make it absolutely clear that these people that the public will not tolerate violence towards our hard—working nhs workers? my nhs workers? my honourable friend raises an important point. we condemn any assaults on anybody, of course, but
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the secretary of state for health has heard the case and will be happy to look at that particular issue he has raised. when she introduces a uk agricultural policy, because we are out of the common agricultural policy, will be duke of westminster still receive £407,000 a year? will the duke of northumberland still receive £475,000 a year? and will the earl of either still receive £915,000 a year from the british taxpayer? the honourable gentleman seems to know a lot about these matters! most interesting. i know a lot about these matters! most interesting. lam know a lot about these matters! most interesting. i am fascinated by the reply. 0ne reply. one of the tasks that we will have, and the honourable gentleman is right, when we leave the eu, is to decide what support is provided to agriculture as a result of being outside the common agricultural policy. i can assure him that we are taking the interest of all parts of the uk into account milligan that system and water should be in the future. a hampshire night, i think. future. a hampshire night, ithink. sir gerald howarth. last weekend, our
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right honourable friend the secretary of state for defence made a very welcome visit to the ukraine —— to ukraine, where he said freedom and democracy are not credible commodities. as we mark the 25th anniversary of relations between our two parliaments, can i invite my right honourable friend to declare the support of the united kingdom for the maintenance of independence or in state in the ukraine, which has been subjected to the most outrageous taxation apart as property by russia ? lam very property by russia ? i am very happy tojoin my honourable friend in confirming my commitment to the independents offering stage of the ukraine. the foreign secretary has been doing a lot of work with other foreign ministers on this particular issue. we do so with —— we do supply substantial support in the uk, and i hope to talk to president poroshenko sooner hope to talk to president poroshenko sooner rather support. last week, the prime minister said
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that parliament would get a vote on the final deal between the uk and the final deal between the uk and the european union. could she set out for the house what would happen if parliament said no to the terms of that deal? would she in those circumstances negotiate an alternative deal, or would hurt no deal option mean falling back on world trade organisation rules, which mean 10% tariffs on cars, 20% on food and drink, and a host of other barriers to trade, investment and prosperity in the uk? as i'll and prosperity in the uk? as i‘ll so said in my speech last week, i expect we will be able to negotiate a good deal in terms of trade with the eu, because it will be in our interest and those of the european union as well. there will bea european union as well. there will be a vote on the deal for this parliament, but then, if this parliament, but then, if this parliament is not willing to accept a deal that has been decided and agreed by the united kingdom government with the european union,
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i have said that if there is no deal, then we have to fall back on other arrangements. it isa other arrangements. it is a great pleasure to welcome my honourable friend the prime minister and hercabinet to honourable friend the prime minister and her cabinet to dais very earlier this week, and and her cabinet to dais very earlierthis week, and i and her cabinet to dais very earlier this week, and i welcome the government's industrial strategy, which will bring high wage, high skilljobs that will help close the north — south divide. the messages that britain is open for business. i thank my honourable friend. i am the whole cabinet were very pleased to be able to visit. i was pleased to be able to visit. i was pleased to be able to visit. i was pleased to be able to sit down and meet with small businesses on that particular site and to hear the support they have what the government is doing in the industrial strategy. we should be very clear, britain is open for business. we will be out there trading around the world, a global leader in free trade, bringing jobs, economic growth and prosperity to every pa rt economic growth and prosperity to every part of this country. thank you, mr speaker. we are all aware of the hundreds of thousands
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of women around the world that marched on behalf of women‘s rights last weekend. in this house, we have been logged by —— lobbied by members of the women against state pension inequality. can the prime minister tallis family in pisa lodged petitions urging her to act? i have to say to the honourable gentleman that i think the number of petitions presented in this parliament as a matter for house authorities, but he also knows that the government has already taken action relation to the issue of women‘s pensions, to reduce the changes that will be experienced by women and button next to money into that. following her excellent eu speech la st following her excellent eu speech last week, will the prime minister consider unilaterally guaranteeing the rights of eu citizens living and working in the uk? this isn'tjust the decent thing to do, but by taking the moral high ground, this will be a source of strength going forward in the negotiations, and we can always return to the issue of non—reciprocation by the eu if
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necessary, later in those negotiations. i recognise the concern he has raised in relation to this issue. but my position remains the same as it always has been. i expect and intent and want to be able to guarantee the rights of eu citizens living here in the united kingdom, but as the british prime minister, design right that i should give consideration to the rights of uk citizens living elsewhere in the 27 remaining member states of the eu, and that is why i want that reciprocal arrangement, but as i said my speech last week, i remain open to being an issue that we negotiate at a very early stage in the negotiations. i think there are a great number of other european member states who want that too. some don‘t, but i‘m hoping we will be able to do this at an early stage. thank you, mr speaker. as chair of the all party parliamentary group on iran, we recently compiled an important enquiry report —— on disability, into having the
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employment gap. research shows this pledge will not be met for 50 years. today, no minister has met with the appg to discuss the report. will the prime minister place people with disability at the heart of policy and ensure that her ministers engage with the appg and its recommendations? the honourable lady raises an important issue about the question of disabled people in the workplace. it is one we are aware of and of course, as we see the number of people in unemployment going down, that changes the ratios to an extent. but the secretary of state for work and pensions is looking very seriously at this issue of how we can endure that we are —— ensure that we are seeing more disabled people actually in the workplace, and i‘m sure he will see the requests she has made in relation to the appg. can i welcome the feminist meeting with the president of turkey on saturday? we can show our solidarity in the
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fight against terrorism, deep in our trading leisure ship, and can the prime minister also seek support for a united and independent cyprus free from turkish troops? i think my honourable friend for raising that. there are important issues i will be discussing with president ed wang and with the prime minister of turkey when i meet them on saturday. —— residents e. he raises the issue of cyprus. i hope they talks will be able to come closer to a solution than before. i have spoken bow to prime minister set and president ? ?macr01 about the need to ensure that we are creative and needs to find a solution. i had and needs to find a solution. i had a further telephone call over this weekend about the issue. we stand ready as a guarantor to play our pa rt ready as a guarantor to play our part in making sure we see a successful conclusion of these talks, and see that the unification of cyprus, which people had been working for a prolonged time.”
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drank the prime minister in wishing a speedy recovery to the police officer who was shot and injured in my constituency in north belfast on sunday night. thankfully, he was not killed, but that was not the intention of the terrorists, of course. it is the clear, mr speaker that the political instability brought about by sinn fein‘s colla pse brought about by sinn fein‘s collapse of the assembly in one‘s interest in northern ireland, and it is also clear that their intelligence advisory ride the past. will she make it very clear that the one—sided legal persecution of police officers and soldiers who did so police officers and soldiers who did so much to bring peace to northern ireland will not be allowed to continue? i say to the right honourable gentleman that as he indicates, the political stability in northern ireland has been hard earned over some considerable time, and nonowners want to see that thrown away. he raises the issue of the current situation where there area number of the current situation where there are a number of investigations by the psni into former sailors and their activities in northern ireland. i think it is absolutely
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right that we recognise that the majority of the people lost their lives did so as a result of terrorist activity, and it is important that that terrorist activity and looked into. that‘s why one of the issues my right honourable and the secretary of state for northern ireland and looking at his legacy question of how the issue of investigation on all sides can take place in the future. social care provided by labour led derbyshire county council is failing miserably. the serious errors in process lead to quite frankly shameful consequences for some of my most vulnerable constituents. this is clearly not about funding as they sit on reserves of about £230 million. will my right honourable friend instigate an urgent review of social care practice at the county council, because the people of derbyshire deserve better? my derbyshire deserve better? my honourable friend has made an important point in relation to this issue, which is that successive
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social care is not wholly about funding. it is about actually the practice on the ground, and that is why we are very clear that it is important to see that integration between social and health care at a local level, and local authorities should be playing their part in delivering that. this is an issue that we need to see addressed for the longer term as well. frankly, it has been blocked by governments for too long in this country, and that is why this government is determined to bring forward a sustainable programme for social care in the future. the right honourable gentleman never knew he was quite a popular! i was going to say, it brings back memories, actually. can i say to the prime minister that is the first foreign leader to meet president ron, she carries a huge responsibility and a half not just of this country but the whole
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international community, in the tone that she sets? can i ask her to reassure us that she sets? can i ask her to reassure us that she will say to the president that he must abide by and not withdraw from the paris by mid change treaty —— climate change treaty, and in casey is helpful, can she offer the services of you uk scientists to commence the president that i'm a change is not a hoax invented by the chinese? well, i recognise the role the right honourable gentleman has played and theissue honourable gentleman has played and the issue of looking at climate change, and! the issue of looking at climate change, and i hope he recognises the commitment this government has shown to be issued with the legislation we have put two and the changes that we have put two and the changes that we have brought about in terms of the energy sector, and uses a different forms of energy. the 0bama administration obviously signed up to the paris climate change agreement, and we have now done that. we would hope that all parties would continue to ensure that that climate change agreement is put into practice. order.
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ed miliband asking last question at prime minister‘s questions thereto to raise me. i think it might be the first question he has asked in prime minister‘s questions on the back bench like that. let‘s bring in norman. norman, obviously the big news is the fact that theresa may has announced there will be a white paper on brexit. got it in very quickly, and rather wrong—footed jeremy corbyn on it, didn‘t she? yes, no wonder labour folk were looking a bit deflated and jeremy corbyn seems to be struggling to keep his line of attack, because clearly, he had lined up a whole load of questions on the white paper to try and hammer misses me for refusing to give parliament this document setting out her approach to brexit. lo and behold, gets a tory mp, straightaway and says, how about a brexit white paper? misses me, yes, i acknowledge there is an appetite for a white paper, we will publish one after all. and you kind of sense it was a setup job, wasn‘t
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it? it was a great big elephant trap forjeremy corbyn, and so he was left kind of struggling to come up with a line of questioning. honestly, i have to say, i am not as a prize, because a white paper is really not a massive concession. every government publishes a white paper before they go into eu negotiations. mrs may has pretty much said what she will do anyway, so much said what she will do anyway, so putting it down in writing is not a huge extra step. i rather suspect that the government was always willing to make this concession. the only thing that surprises me is mrs me has done it now. i thought she might hold it back until mps were actually debating the article 50 bill as a sort of surprise concession to keep her mps on board. as it is, wrong—footed the labour leader and she has defused a looming revolt on her own backbenches where there were probably maybe a dozen or so there were probably maybe a dozen or so tory mps prepared to side with the opposition to get that white paper. thank you very much.
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president tom has promised a significant day ahead in terms of national—security, including plans for his role on the mexican border. he tweeted: building a 2000 mile long ball along the mexican border was one of his key election promises. he said it would cost $1 billion and that it would be up to 40 foot high. the new president is also expected to approve immigration restrictions and seven mostly muslim countries in the middle east and north africa. and the last few minutes, he has tweeted: donald trump said some of those registered to vote had been dead for a long time. prominent republicans have attacked his claims, saying there is no evidence of any fraud. the president also said he will announce his nomination for the next supreme courtjudge next thursday. we can speak to the former white house aide
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christopher smart, now at the foreign policy think tank chatham house. he is in our studio in london. lots to talk about, as much is emerging about what you‘ll say letter about illegal immigrants in the united states. let‘s first talk about the claims of voter fraud. why is he sticking so strongly to this? we are hearing that he is tweeting about it and saying that they will be looking into it, but there has been absolutely no evidence to support the claims. no, that hasn‘t. we‘re all learning to the new president‘s words and weeks —— to interpret his words and weeks —— to interpret his words and weeks and try to understand what is driving him on particular issues, even when there is no evidence to reopen some of these things, whether it is inauguration attendance at some boat issues. what he is raising is that there are indeed questions about registration lists, and whether they have been cleaned up or account for people in move to state
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—— from state to state. but that is very different from any evidence that someone who cast a vote who was not supposed to be, and there is no evidence at all of that. we will see what an investigation that he launches turns up, but there are neither republicans nor democrats who will seem to support this. what do you think it is doing to his currency? right at the start of the presidency, taking on the media and to be making such a big deal about this? it sort of indicates that this issue about the popular vote has got under his skin? well, it has. what is difficult for many of us to interpreters, he certainly has a stubbornness to him, and a willingness to confront washington institutions, which is not unpopular across the country. so i think not unpopular across the country. so ithink in not unpopular across the country. so i think in many cases, this is not going to shake his base at all, at
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least at this early stage. the question is whether he adopt this strategy over time. it begins to chip away at his credibility, not just with washington insiders, but with his base and the folks who are trying to get him to shake things up, if he is not able to deliver any real progress on some of the issues you get is about, which are wages, economic recovery, in our industrial heartland, and security. then, i think he will face a real problems. so security will be the big focus for today, and border controls. talking about extreme batting for people coming into the country from countries with a history of terrorist issues. —— extreme vetting. also, we‘re getting a bit more detail on what is expected later on, the number of immigration
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and enforcement agents to be tripled, the refugee capped a big cut in half for the forthcoming fiscal year down to 50,000, and donald trump is expected to seek aggressive enforcement against illegal immigrants living inside the us away from the border. what do you think about the focus there? well, ithink what do you think about the focus there? well, i think this is something that has been very much pa rt something that has been very much part of his campaign rhetoric. what is lost in the debate of the frankly, the 0bama administration have been very involved in stepping up have been very involved in stepping up getting procedures for immigrants —— vetting procedures, for immigrants coming from the middle east. the crackdown on illegal immigrant coming into the country, there has been a big step up of that under president 0bama. what remains to be seen is exactly what he plans to be seen is exactly what he plans to announce in these today, and exactly how it isn‘t lamented. as i look at it, there is a lot more rhetorical framing around a strategy thatis rhetorical framing around a strategy
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that is already in place. u nfortu nately, that is already in place. unfortunately, the rhetorical framing also shifts political debate in ways that i think tend to bring out some of the worst tendencies in our political debate and probably don‘t help us in terms of our international issue ships. ikea very much forjoining us. we will have more on all the latest developments from the trump white house tonight at 7pm in our new programme, 100 days. 0ur correspondent ‘s are in washington and london. that is at 7pm on the bbc news channel. four schoolchildren all under the age of 13 have been taken to hospital after it was feared they may have taken cocaine, believing the powder was sherbet. it happened at broadstone middle school. what happened, duncan? be very strange and potentially disturbing story. it did happen on january the 3rd, although we are
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only being told about it now, maybe because of ongoing police enquiries. a combination of information from the headteacher and police suggests that a child turned up at the school, the pupils being aged nine and 13, with this white powder substance. three other children are somehow introduced to this as well. at some point, the alarm was raised. it was discovered or assumed this powder is cocaine. south west ambulances were called, the children we re ambulances were called, the children were checked over here at the school, but then taken to a local hospitalfor school, but then taken to a local hospital for further checks, and released without any problems to their health. police are saying it does not seem as though any of these four children had ingested this white powder. they then took it away and have now confirmed that it is cocaine. the headteacher has said — she is called dawn wilkes dashed she would like to reassure parents the incident was dealt with swiftly and in line with our policies, and she said that police enquiries were
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ongoing regarding this incident, and as such, we are unable to comment any further. the police have told us in addition to all that that 32—year—old man has been arrested drugs offences charges. he has been bailed until february through pending enquiries, and a too are not commenting any further on this incident. thank you very much, duncan. a high ranking north korean diplomat who defected last year has told the bbc he believes kim jong—un would defected last year has told the bbc he believes kimjong—un would be prepared to use nuclear weapons. thae yong—ho says north korea doesn‘t yet have working nuclear weapons, but it‘s getting closer, and he believes kim would press the button if backed into a corner. mr thae was speaking to our correspondent in seoul, stephen evans. my relatives and my brothers and sisters‘ families by now are all sent to remote, closed areas or prison camps. that really breaks my heart.
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that is why i‘m very much determined now to do everything possible to pull down the north korean regime. in order to save not only my family members, but the whole north korean people from slavery. if and when kim jong—un get the bomb properly, gets the bomb properly, and missiles to deliver, is he capable of pressing the button and destroying los angeles? 0h, kimjong—un knows quite well that nuclear weapons are the only guarantee for his rule. and kimjong—un, i think, will press the button of these dangerous weapons when he thinks that his rule and his dynasty
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is threatened with collapse. how do you think kim jong—un will end his days? is he going to die peacefully in his own bed? no. or how? i am sure that one day kim jong—un‘s regime will collapse by people‘s uprising. in a moment, a summary of the business news. four has been causing problems across central and eastern in them. a weather watcher captured some fog banks in wales, with the high hills sticking out into the sunshine here. in somerset, we have had clear,
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blue, sunny skies. thanks to nick for sending in the picture. so another day with a big priority of weather across the country. this cloud is associated with fog across central and eastern england. a slice of sunshine for western england and wales. northern ireland and scotland staying cloudy. among these gloomy skies across central and eastern areas today, we‘re getting some spots of drizzle. there could even be the snowflake falling from a cloud. further west, dry be the snowflake falling from a cloud. furtherwest, dry weather with sunshine, the final day here. quite breezy around the western coast of wales. northern ireland and scotla nd coast of wales. northern ireland and scotland staying the cloudy site, with winds locally, temperatures in the highlands getting up to 13 degrees. they will be pretty mild for some loss. overnight tonight, extensive cloud moves northwards across the uk, thick enough for some flurries of snow falling from it. no great amounts, just some flakes and a bit of frozen drizzle possible as well. a chance of hill fog in wales, but many areas will be fog free. it
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will however be a cold night, and in rural areas, we are looking at frost and temperatures down to —4 minus five. maybe —6 into the highlands of the skies stay clear. so ice could be quite a risk as we go into thursday. certainly a gloomy start the day. again, if you flakes of snow falling. the sky is bright another day goes on, but the wind will make it feel cold and like the two bridges are below freezing in the coldest spots. —— the temperatures. through the week, we will see the atlantic begin to exert his influence more from the south—west, and will probably see more in the way of cloud, outbreaks of rain, not farfrom northern ireland, wales and south—west england by the end of the afternoon. north—easterly winds coming up the atla ntic north—easterly winds coming up the atlantic are read it milder, so temperatures pushing 29—10, but still pretty cold. in in north—east england. for the weekend, still pretty cold. in in north—east england. forthe weekend, heavy showers to start, quite cloudy. some of them will fall as snow across the
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hills of scotland. cooler, but should be dry. america will build a wall on the mexican border, says president trump, as he prepares to unveil plans to bolster national security. he‘s expected to set in motion his election pledge to build the 2,000 mile long wall and explain how it will be paid for. and it‘s understood he‘ll sign executive orders to restrict immigration and impose tougher visa regulations on a number of mainly muslim countries. we will have the latest from washington and from mexico. also on the programme this lunchtime.... ican i can confirm to the house that the plan will be set out in a white paper published to this house. a climb—down for the prime minister as theresa may says she will publish her plan for brexit in a white paper for parliament‘s scrutiny. high heels, make up and revealing clothes — women are experiencing widespread discrimination when it comes to dress codes at work say mps.
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