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tv   Wednesday in Parliament  BBC News  January 26, 2017 2:30am-3:01am GMT

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as he promised during the election. mr trump said the barrier would deter illegal immigration and drug cartels, adding that the day is over where they could stay and wreak havoc. president trump has said he believes torture absolutely works, but he would defer to his defence secretary and the director of the cia on whether to reinstate interrogation techniques such as water—boarding. in an interview with abc news, mr trump said the us had to fight fire with fire. a giant super tanker aircraft on loan from the us has arrived in chile to help tackle the worst wildfires in the country's modern history. a state of emergency‘s been declared in a vast area south of the capital, santiago. chile's president ordered extra funds and resources to fight the fires. now on bbc news, wednesday in parliament. hello, and welcome to wednesday in
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parliament. the main news from westminster: the prime minister vows to demands for a policy document on brexit. i can confirm to the house that our plan will be set out in a white paper published this month. the labour leader is worried about what the government has in mind for brexit britain. the prime minister, mr speaker, is threatening the eu that unless they give in to her demands she will turn britain into a bargain basement tax haven of the coast of europe. also on the programme: rousing words from the chief minister of gibraltar. my blood is red but i'm red, white and blue inside out and so is that rock and we will never ever come to us changing that —— countenance. come and see for yourself! but first,
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when the brexit secretary david davis came to the commons on tuesday after the government lost its case in the supreme court, mps from all parties call for a white paper, setting out a strategy for brexit. david davis batted away their requests, pointing to a speech the prime minister made last week. well, it looks as though in just one day there's been a change of heart. the prime minister laid out a clear and bold plan for brexit in her speech last week. honourable members, quite rightly, want an opportunity to scrutinise that plan. does the prime minister agree that the best way of facilitating that scrutiny would be a government white paper, laying out oui’ a government white paper, laying out our vision for a global britain based on free trade in goods and
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services that will be for the benefit of us and other european countries? prime minister. my honourable friend raises the question of parliamentary scrutiny, i have been clear, as have senior ministers, that we will ensure parliament has every opportunity to provide that scrutiny on this issue as we go through this process but i reckon eyes, i set out that bold plan for a global britain last week andl plan for a global britain last week and i reckon eyes there's an appetite in this house to that plan recognised in a white paper, the question last week in the same vein, ican question last week in the same vein, i can confirm to the house our plan will be set out in a white paper published this month. the prime minister has wasted 80 days between the time of the originaljudgement and the appeal, and is now finally admitting today after pressure from all sides that there's going to be a white paper. could we know when this
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white paper. could we know when this white paper. could we know when this white paper is going to be available to us? and why it's taken so long to get it? prime minister! cani get it? prime minister! can i say to the right honourable gentleman, he asked for debates, i was very clear there would always be debates in this house and there have been and there will continue to be. he asked for votes, there have been votes in the house, the house voted overwhelmingly for the government to trigger to go 50 before the end of march this year. he asked for a plan, i set out, my honourable friend from croydon south said, a clear plan for a bold future for britain —— article 50. i have been clear they will be a white paper. what i'm also clear about is that the right honourable gentleman also asked about process, about the means to an end. i am this government are focused on the outcomes. —— and.
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we're focusing on a truly global britain building a stronger future for this country, the right deal for britain and britain out of the european union. jeremy corbyn was critical of the prime minister's negotiating stance. the prime minister, mr speaker, is threatening the eu that unless they give in to her demands she will turn britain into a her demands she will turn britain intoa bargain her demands she will turn britain into a bargain basement tax haven of the coast of europe. well, mr speaker, we on this side of the house are very well aware of the consequences that would have, the damage it would do two jobs and living standards and our public services. is she now going to rule out the bargain basement threat that was in her speech at lancaster house? prime minister. i expect us to get a good deal with trading relationships with the european union but i'm clear that this government will not sign up to a bad
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deal with for the united kingdom and as for the threats about what might happen, and he often talks about this, he uses those phrases and talks about workers' rights, perhaps he should listen to his former colleague in this house, the mayoral london, sadiq khan, who has today said to give credit to the government, i don't think they will weaken workers' rights and goes on to say i don't see any evidence from conversations i've had with senior members of the government that that is their aspiration, intention, members of the government that that is theiraspiration, intention, or something they want to do, which is good. as usual with labour, the right hand is not talking to the far left. the prime minister is heading to the united states on friday to meet the president, donald trump. she's one of the first foreign leaders to meet the new president. 0n the agenda are discussions about trade deals and security. the prime minister insists she will not be afraid to speak her mind. i'm
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pleased i'm able to meet president trump so early in his administration. that is a sign of the strength of the special relationship between the united kingdom and the united states of america, a special relationship on which he and i intend to build. but cani which he and i intend to build. but can i also said to the leader of the 0pposition, i am can i also said to the leader of the 0pposition, iam not can i also said to the leader of the 0pposition, i am not afraid to speak frankly to a president of the united states. i am able to do that because we have that special relationship. a special relationship that he would never have with the united states. mr corbyn. mr speaker, we would never allow britain to be sold off on the cheap. how confident is she getting a good deal for global britain from a president that wants to put america first, by american and build a wall between his country and build a wall between his country and mexico? yesterday the government lost in the supreme court and today we have a very welcome u—turn on a
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white paper in regards to brexit. so in the spirit of progress for parliament, in advance of meeting president trump, will the prime minister tell parliament what she wa nts to minister tell parliament what she wants to achieve in a uk/ us trade deal? it's very simple, we want to achieve an arrangement that ensures the interests of the united kingdom are there, will be put first, that's what i will we doing and that we see trade arrangements with the united states, as we'll be looking for with other parts of the world, that will increase trade, bring prosperity and growth to the united kingdom and my aim for this government is doing sure that economy works for everyone in every part of the united kingdom. ed miliband. it brings... it brings... the right honourable gentleman never knew he was quite that popular! ed miliband! i was going to say, mr speaker, it brings back memories actually! can i say to the prime minister that as the first
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foreign leader to meet president trump she carries a huge responsibility on behalf not only of this country but the whole international community in the tone that she sets. can i ask her to reassure us that she sets. can i ask her to reassure us that she will say to the president that he must abide by and not withdraw from the paris climate change treaty. and in case it is helpful, can she offer the services of uk scientists to convince the president that climate change is not a hoax invented by the chinese. prime minister. well, i recognise the role the right honourable gentleman has played in looking at this issue of climate change and i hope he recognises the commitment this government has shown to this issue of climate change with the legislation we've put through and the changes that we have brought about in terms of the energy sector and uses of different forms of energy. the 0bama administration obviously signed up to the paris climate change agreement, we have now done that. i would hope all
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parties would continue to ensure that that climate change agreement is put into practice. gibraltar‘s chief minister has been speaking passionately to mps about the historic links between the people of gibraltar and the uk. he was giving evidence to the committee on exiting the european union. gibraltar voted to remain in the eu because of concerns, the chief minister said, about spanish intentions. he was asked about the border between the british overseas territories, which is not a member of the customs union and spain, which is. gibraltar has always had what i see now described as a hard frontier in the context of potential future relationships with the uk and the european union. but that doesn't mean that goods don't flow into gibraltar, they take a little longer, those involved in the logistics of getting things into gibraltar know that they need to allow two or three hours for their vehicles to come through the commercial gates. they will be
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inspected, there will be documentation to prepare, but if you get into the rhythm of things, this can be quite easy, although of course there are days if the gibraltar football team have scored a goal, where we might find the frontierfor some reason a goal, where we might find the frontier for some reason doesn't work as well as it might. this is more about goodwill than it is about the rules necessarily. would i be correct in understanding that difficulties occur at the border when politicians, the spanish, choose to be difficult, is that correct? that would be absolutely the way the people of gibraltar have traditionally understood it since the border open 35 years ago. traditionally understood it since the border open 35 years agom traditionally understood it since the border open 35 years ago. if the spanish are cooperative can it operate fluidly? yes, it doesn't interfere and it enables people to move interfere and it enables people to m ove a cross interfere and it enables people to move across the frontier and for goods to move across without more
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control than necessary. goods to move across without more controlthan necessary. during the two hours of questioning the chief minister paid tribute to the conservative former prime minister sirjohn major, calling him a champion of the rights of the people of gibraltar. thank you for what you said about the former prime minister, so easy to airbrush people and it is nice you said what you did so and it is nice you said what you did so thank you very much. i will soon expect to be discarded as well and i hope people are kind to me about what i have done in a similar way in political life. indeed. there's a lwa ys political life. indeed. there's always a chance of revival! i wouldn't worry too much about that. the former tory cabinet minister michael gove joining the former tory cabinet minister michael govejoining in the former tory cabinet minister michael gove joining in the laughter there. there was applause when the chief minister defended the right of gibraltarians to british citizenship. why should we change? we are born british and that rock is red white and blue for us, there's nothing else we know. the system of government and education we know, the make up of my understanding of the make up of my understanding of the world is british, how can i
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suddenly now do something else? i can speak fluent conversational spanish but i don't speak professional or political spanish in the wake i might be expected to should i need to navigate the waters of the spanish system. look at the spanish political system today, it doesn't have much to commend it to the people of the world. the british system, we criticise ourselves so co nsta ntly a nd system, we criticise ourselves so constantly and so constructively that we make it stronger and that's the system we believe in and that's the system we believe in and that's the rule of law we believe in. the supreme court that ruled yesterday, everybody respects the views of that, that is what makes up the gibraltarian. my blood is red but i'm red, white and blue inside out and so is that rock and we will never ever countenance changing that. applause that was a less passionate answer... come and see for yourself. eloquent answer. the committee chair labour's hilary benn speaking after clapping and desk banging. a very unusual sight at such a hearing. you're
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watching wednesday in parliament with me, christina cooper. schools in every constituency are going to lose money, labour has warned. the party's shadow education secretary angela rayner said that flew in the face of a promise made by the previous prime minister david cameron before the general election in 2015. a pledge that was repeatedly made by the last row minister, the one who actually fought an election, and he was very clear what it meant. —— prime minister. he can tell you with a conservative government the amount of money following your child into school will not be cut. there's one question the secretary of state has to a nswer question the secretary of state has to answer today, will she keep her pa rty‘s to answer today, will she keep her party's promised to the british people? the national audit office has told us the national audit office has told us their answer, they have revealed that on the current spending settle m e nt that on the current spending settlement there will be an 8% cut in pupilfunding
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settlement there will be an 8% cut in pupil funding between settlement there will be an 8% cut in pupilfunding between 2015 settlement there will be an 8% cut in pupil funding between 2015 and 2020. that was the same conclusion that was reached by the institute of fiscal studies. this means that there will be schools in every region, every city, every town, and yes, every constituency losing money because of the failure of this government to protect funding for our schools and make some progress. so will the secretary of state tell us so will the secretary of state tell us whether she intends to keep that ma nifesto us whether she intends to keep that manifesto pledge? we want to see a child do well regardless of weight they start academically or in the country. resources need to reflect the high ambitions we have for every child and are distributed to that effect. indeed, because of the economic policy that has seen job growth and management of economic fans, which
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is how we protected school budgets in real terms, is how we protected school budgets in realterms, in is how we protected school budgets in real terms, in fact, the investment is the largest ever on record, totalling over 40%. investment is the largest ever on record, totalling over 4096. david cameron's promise was that the funding per pupil would be protected at it has not be in my constituency it has been reduced further. why has the promise being broken? it has been reduced further. why has the promise being broken7m it has been reduced further. why has the promise being broken? it is not. we are protecting that funding as well and we know that in relation to making sure funding is fairly apportioned between schools, it is time we now look at the school funding formula to make sure we rectify the current system which is unfairand our rectify the current system which is unfair and our —— outdated. rectify the current system which is unfairand our —— outdated. funding is not distributed evenly across our
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country right now and it does not ta ke country right now and it does not take account of pupils needs. we heard complaints about problems faced by travellers on southern rail with months of delays and industrial action. there has been a novel solution by appear. driverless vehicles. i beg leave to ask the question. my lords, we have no current plans to commission such a study. however, we are investing over £100 million in research and development into autonomous vehicles. and in two infrastructure to keep pace of with technology and we continue to invest in rail infrastructure with projects to meet
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ever increasing passenger demand. infrastructure with projects to meet ever increasing passenger demandlj grateful ever increasing passenger demand.” grateful to my noble friend to the access he gave me to officials and contractors and congratulate him on the progress made on projects what would my noble friend not agree that the successful pilot currently under way at heathrow demonstrates the potential of such vehicles to serve on lines. if we demonstrate success, we should have an industry which would be in a great position with worldwide applications which is what we are trying to do with the industrial strategy. we are of course welcoming the cutting edge
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nature of transport innovation in the rail sector in particular. we talked about new systems and operations in heathrow and politics being used there and there are other parts, such as the dlr and others, there will be the use of technology and autonomous vehicles in what i believe it will be controlled environments. he mentioned further innovation in terms the wider network and it is important to recognise to see how technology can be adapted on existing systems. the closing down of tax officers has been questioned. it is reducing its services from 177 to 13 officers in regional cities as well as for specialist centres. 0fficials
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regional cities as well as for specialist centres. officials say the changes could save the taxpayer around £500 million. 0ne mp doubted that figure would be achieved. 0riginally it was assumed there would be savings of about 500 million pounds. already, that has reduced to £212 million so this looks to me like it bears all the hallmarks of a case where they need data, they are divided and they are slightly illusory. do you believe this will be achieved or will disappear to zero? think it will be significantly more than £200 million. the rat advantages because you want to be involved early. —— there are. you want fluidity. we would expect our current estimates close to £300 million. it started
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off as £500 million, then it became £212 million and now you are saying £300 million. we need to put together a business case to go to the chief secretary by march and you will have further data then. majority of staff will have to move offers. isn't that too much too quickly? it is spread over five years and for the majority they are not moving that far. the average is 18 miles. let's say you have someone in an office in st ives, cornwall and you move to bristol we did inverness to edinburgh and let's say you have some expertise in that office, is there a risk to corporate
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memory? yes. how do you manage that? how we ask people... it is something we have to solve. we will recruit more people. i have to find some way in which the knowledge that you have built up over the years can be translated into systems or the wisdom of giving it to other people. at the moment we do not have a solution to that risk. parliamentary housekeeping starting to worry mps— how to carry out renovation works that westminster so badly needs. there are a host of problems in the heritage site. the release which caused interiors and the electrical system is faulty. —— there are
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lea ks. system is faulty. —— there are leaks. good system is faulty. —— there are lea ks. good measure, system is faulty. —— there are leaks. good measure, there is asbestos that needs to be removed. chris bryant says the best and cheapest way is to move out. chris bryant says the best and cheapest way is to move outm chris bryant says the best and cheapest way is to move out. it is not falling down though the clock tower is inclined little. the electrical system are ready well past their use by date and their risk of catastrophic failure such as flood or fire rises exponentially every five years we delay. we should be in absolutely no doubt there will be in absolutely no doubt there will bea be in absolutely no doubt there will be a fire. there are regularly fires and people control the building 24 hours per day to make sure we catch these fires. they want to set up a committee to look at the problems. the report recommended everyone should move out. two days mps and
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peers hold this building in trust. it is not ours. 0ur predecessors got it hideously wrong in the 19th century. they kept delaying works and that the late maggie the fire in 1854 not only possible but inevitable. and so we lost st stephens chapel and other very beautiful artefacts. the new building was built around it. lying delays and massive budget overrun. but some think of in the —— some parliamentarians should remain. we should at all time retain a presence. it was briefly alluded to
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that there is an alternative expert point of view that instead of building what i would deem a foley ofa building what i would deem a foley of a replica chamber in the courtyard of richmond house, that we should, as in the war, use the house of lords chamber. we reached a point where it makes to amend is not an option. that approach has already been taken, it has led to decades of underinvestment which we are now forced to (inaudible). much of the infrastructure is passed its life expectancy. government has overtaken to provide time for a full debate and a vote in due course. laughter. in due course. time is always of a
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premium and! in due course. time is always of a premium and i note he will recollect that from duties in this place. particularly so at the moment with developments. it is all very well but to be honest, due course is the kind of phrase that weasels use because it means you do not tend to do it in any expeditious way. responding to the accusation, the ministerfound responding to the accusation, the minister found another phrase, promising the matter will be considered as soon as possible. until next time, goodbye. good morning. not as much fog around
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this morning at a frosty start and a bitterly cold wind coming in from the south—east from near continent where it has been freezing. a lot of cloud around as well and add in the fa ct of cloud around as well and add in the fact of the wind and it really will feel quite raw. sunshine across the far north of scotland and eventually southern england. it will fill more like these temperatures way below freezing in some spots. as we move out of her stake in to friday, the wind direction changes subtly. allowing these fronts to from the atlantic. cold in northern and eastern areas. more cloud towards the south. shari outbreaks of rain and the introduction of something milder. —— shower we. take care. a very warm welcome to bbc news, broadcasting to our viewers in north america and around the globe. my name's mike embley.
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our top stories: putting pen to paper. donald trump signs an order to build his border wall and says mexico will end up paying. in his first interview since taking office, the president insists torture works, but there's unease in the intelligence community. chile suffers its worst wildfires in half a century, the us sends the world's biggest air tanker to help fight the flames. and mary tyler moore, the groundbreaking american television and film star, dies at the age of 80. president trump has been outlining how he plans to make good on two of his controversial campaign pledges.
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