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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 26, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and jon kay. the us president, donald trump, has said he believes torture works when dealing with terror suspects. in his first tv interview since taking office, he said the us had to "fight fire with fire". i want to do everything within the bounds of what you are allowed to do legally, but do i feel it works? absolutely, i feel it works. the pm theresa may is travelling to washington to meet donald trump and has vowed to renew the uk's special relationship with the usa. she says she isn't afraid to have a candid conversation. good morning it's thursday the 26th of january. also this morning: children's health in the uk is lagging behind most other european countries, according to a major new report. we will get the latest economic
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growth figures later. they are expected to show the economy did pretty well at the end of last year, but with rising prices and a fall in the value of the pound, what will the value of the pound, what will the year ahead have in store? in sport, a wembley final for southampton. they knock liverpool out of the league cup with an injury time winner. it has taken tim peake to space and back. now the soyuz capsule is going to be landing in london. we'll be finding out why. and carol has the weather. good morning. today is a cold start to the day. we've also got a fair bit of cloud around. some of it will break to see some sunshine and a few of us will see some snow. wherever you are it will feel raw in the wind. more details in 15 minutes or so. good morning. first, our main story: the us president donald trump has said he believes that torture can
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work to get information out of suspected terrorists. but he said he would seek further advice before deciding whether to bring back techniques such as water—boarding. speaking to the american abc network in his first televised interview since becoming president, he also repeated claims he'd make mexico pay for a wall along its border with the united states. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. could america be set for a return to the interrogation methods of old? a d raft the interrogation methods of old? a draft executive order suggest it is, —— its commander—in—chief could be preparing to return to the dark days of water boarding a reopening the so—called black site prisons operated by the cia. in his first tv interview since becoming president, donald trump made clear he is considering scrapping an order by his predecessor, that terrorist suspects be treated in accordance with international law. torture
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works, the president declared. when they are chopping off the heads of oui’ they are chopping off the heads of our people and other people and chopping off the heads of people because they happen to be a christian in the middle east, when isis is doing things that nobody has heard of since middle eastern times, would i feel strongly about water boarding? as far as i'm concerned we have to fight fire with fire. reports suggest mr trump is also due to announce plans to close america's orders to refugees for a period at least and implement tougher visa restrictions on the distance from certain predominantly muslim nations with links to terrorism, what is known as extreme vetting. in an effort to quell the influx of illegal immigrants from mexico, is the trump has signed an executive order to begin work on building a war between the two nations. a multimillion dollar venture that he insist mexico will be made to pay for. —— building a wall. insist mexico will be made to pay for. -- building a wall. ultimately it will come out of what's happening with mexico and we will stop those
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negotiations soon and we will be fully versed by mexico. so they will pay us back? absolutely, 10096. fully versed by mexico. so they will pay us back? absolutely, 100%. that pay us back? absolutely, 10096. that has ruffled the feathers of america's seven neighbour. mexico's president said they have no intention of footing the bill. the mexican president is due in washington next week. he faces difficult discussions with an american counterpart clearly determined to reverse many of the changes brought about why barack obama. david willetts, bbc news, washington. —— willis. theresa may will call for a renewed special relationship with the united states, when she addresses republican politicians in philadelphia later. a day before she becomes the first international leader to meet president trump, the prime minister will argue for greater co—operation in the fight against terrorism. our political correspondent chris mason is at westminster. hi, chris. it is an important visit. we will
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hear special relationship endless is of the coming days. what can we expect? that is the favourite phrase of any british prime minister in any era, getting onto any plane and go to the us. we will hear references to the us. we will hear references to the us. we will hear references to the special relationship again and again. theresa may says it is that relationship that will allow her to be candid in her conversations with president trump. she set across the atlantic this morning with a bagful of questions from mps. they were suggested to her yesterday in the commons, specifically on torture, for instance, but also on climate change. first stop is philadelphia, this away day for republican politicians, the party of the president. we will see the prime minister emphasised what she sees as the importance of international organisations like nato and the un, that president trump has been sceptical about. she will also be in the business of making friends. and
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she will take a scottish artefact, and old cup. the word dates back to jaywick, the 17th century. that's a nod to the fact that president trump's mum grew up in scotland. all of that is about building bridges, given the team isn't so comp entry about the team, during the election, one of them calling him trump the chump. and something significant is happening in the building behind you. how significant is it really? what we will get this morning is all things brexit, because it doesn't go away. we'll get the first detail of the bill that will make its way through parliament and that's a result of what we heard from the supreme court, in a day that will have to be legislation in parliament in order to start the whole process
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of divorcing the eu, triggering article 50. today we will get the wording of that. it is only the start of the process. we won't get the start of the debate until next week. thanks for now. royal bank of scotland will take another financial hit for mis—selling risky mortgages in america before the financial crisis hit in 2008. the bank, which is more than 70% owned by the taxpayer, could be fined an additional £3 billion by the us department ofjustice. a major report into the health of children in the uk has found an "alarming gap" exists between the rich and poor, with one in five young people suffering as a result of poverty. the royal college of paediatrics and child health also suggests the uk is lagging behind most western european countries when it comes to measures such as infant mortality rates and obesity. our health correspondent, dominic hughes reports. i'm an emotional wreck. anxiety,
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depression and a need to be listened to. these are the themes of short play on mental health, devised by school students in liverpool. the issues they touch on reflect those in the day's report on the health of children and young people and paint a picture of the uk struggling to match other countries and even falling behind. the evidence have been developing for some time that all is not well with children's health. it is the first time we have put together a proper picture of ci’oss put together a proper picture of cross all four countries and the news is not good. some of the issues that raise concerns over the state of child health includejust that raise concerns over the state of child health include just 34% of babies rested to six months, this than half the rate in norway. 40% of children in england's most deprived areas are overweight or obese and half of adult mental health problems start before the age of 111. and for the drama group in liverpool, mental
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health issues are a real priority. mental illness is an illness of the brain and they are as valid as any other illnesses to any other part of the body. just because you can't see it physically doesn't mean it isn't there. our production will mainly be to get rid of that stigma about mental health and just educate the audience a bit more about mental health. the four governments of the uk are all challenged to consider the impact their policies will have on children. they've responded by restating commitments to improve children's health. ambulance crews are finding it "increasingly difficult to cope", an investigation into the service in england has found. the national audit office said rising demand, recruitment problems and wider nhs pressures meant crews were failing to hit targets. the number of cars built in the uk has reached a 17—year high, but investment fell last year amid uncertainty over the future of the economy following the brexit vote. around 1.7 million cars rolled off production lines last year
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and exports reached a record high. investment in in the —— in the industry fell last year because of continued uncertainty about the economy, following the brexit vote. almost half of all hospitals are failing to meet basic government standards for hospital food, according to data released by the department of health. the campaign for better hospital food warns the situation is "diabolical". the government says standards are improving. ant and dec won three gongs at the national television awards in london last night, while the bbc presenter graham norton was recognised for his services to broadcasting. it looked like a glamorous night! strictly come dancing's len goodman, who retired from the show in december, lost out as the public‘s choice of bestjudge to the great british ba ke—off‘s mary berry. sophie van brugen has more. please welcome your host for the
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night! the nationaltelevision awards bring out the great and the good of the television screen. a new category was introduced this year for period drama, won by call the midwife. best comedy went to mrs brown's boys and it was strictly come dancing that got the award for best talent show. best tv judge went toa best talent show. best tv judge went to a very surprised mary berry in herfinal to a very surprised mary berry in her final turn to a very surprised mary berry in herfinal turn on the to a very surprised mary berry in her final turn on the great british bake off. the first and foremost thing is to be fair, encouraging and honest. despite our television viewing habits changing, the average household what is about 3.5 hours a day. nights like these are chance to celebrate the best of what's on the
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box. ladies and gentlemen, the nation's heartthrob, mr graham norton! chatshow host graham norton collected the lifetime achievement award. and ant and dec won best tv presenter for the 16th year in a i’ow. presenter for the 16th year in a row. we are very lucky to have the three shows at the moment and law may it continue! we just want to keep making good telly. casualty! but the surprise of the night was casualty was mac win for best drama. the saturday night staple which turned 30 last year. —— for best drama. i think ithinka i think a lot of fun was had, including by ourteam. carol is up again this morning working! she is a hero. we need to get all of the gossip. too right. i've seen some pictures.
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not fit for early—morning consumption, i am told. we are talking about the league cup semi—final last night. liverpool seem to have lost their mojo. they've only had one win in seven this year. there was all this talk of maybe being the premiership champions, but not looking good at the moment. southampton beat liverpool 1—0 at anfield last night to reach the efl cup final. 1—0 up from the first leg, saints spent much of the match defending before before shane long scored in injury time. they'll play either hull or manchester united who play their second leg semi tonight. 14 111 years after last week in the australian open final, venus williams is back. —year—old seven—time grand slam champion beat coco vandeweghe in three sets. she's hoping to see her sister at in the final, because serena williams is on court shortly in the other
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semi—final. usain bolt is to lose one of his nine olympic gold medals, after the international olympic committee disqualified his jamaican relay team—mate nesta carter over a doping violation at the beijing games. the ioc says carter tested positive for a banned stimulant, in a re—test of samples from the 2008 olympics. england rugby union head coach eddiejones has named dylan hartley as captain of his side for the forthcoming six nations. he won't have played for nine weeks before england's opening game against france. six of those due to a ban for striking. you will be with us in a moment to look at the papers. let's get the gossip from carol! ben blakeley must! you look orjust! —— goodness! spill the beans. you know that what goes on tour stays on tour. we have a bitter wind coming up from
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the near continent. temperatures are not as low as yesterday but nonetheless, temperatures below freezing. you can see what is happening today. all this blew across europe are sure it is cold. with the wind, we are dragging in this air across the shores. i would show you how it will feel against yourskin, as show you how it will feel against your skin, as well as the temperatures. a lot of cloud around and we could see snowflakes here and there. nothing too substantial and also drizzle. if you are out early, watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. you can watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. you can see watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. you can see the temperatures below freezing. not quite as low as yesterday. for example except in the south—west. also looking at a cloudy start as we are across wales and northern england. a pocket of fog but not in the scale of this week. for scotland, the far north will have the lion ‘s share of the sunshine
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today. for northern ireland, a fair bit of clout and dampness in the air. some drizzle around. —— cloud. through the rest of the day, you can speak it will still be called. some of the cloud will break up. —— you can see. a bit of sunshine coming m, can see. a bit of sunshine coming in, especially for southern counties and wales. you hang onto it across the north of scotland. this is how the north of scotland. this is how the temperatures will feel against your skin. if you are stepping out in newcastle, minus six. the wind will be very strong, particularly in the north—west. it will be a windy day out towards the north—west as well. this evening and tomorrow, the wind veers to a northerly direction and you have a set of fronts coming m, and you have a set of fronts coming in, this complicated area of low pressure. that will turn the weather more unsettled. tomorrow, some early flecks of snow across eastern areas. they will tend to fade and there will still be a lot of cloud around. still a bit bank. he comes the weather fronts. in from the west
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bringing in some rain. —— dank. milder in the south and are still cool as we push further north. becoming less called than it has been. for saturday, we still have this unsettled picture. the nature of showers will mean not all of us will see one. could be early fog but some of us could see sunshine. i wa nt to some of us could see sunshine. i want to draw your attention to what is happening down here. there is still uncertainty as to the exact positioning of these that this is what we think at the moment, and it could change, we have rain rattling across southern counties. we will have that through sunday as well. move away from that, dry and bright and potentially the best day of the weekend, weatherwise, anyway. thank you carol. we didn't win a category this morning but did you have a good time? it was brilliant and it was lovely to see everybody. we missed you guys. yeah. you say that now. carol, thank you. we are
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going to get the gossip out of you, believe you me. the pictures i have seen, they look like they missed nobody. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: president trump has said he believes torture can work when dealing with suspected terrorists. the prime minister theresa may will call for a renewed special relationship with the us when she speaks to republicans in philadelphia later. she says she is not afraid of candid conversations. looking at the papers. the daily mail have story, a picture of mary, hardly believing her luck. george osborne, ex— chancellor, has taken
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ona osborne, ex— chancellor, has taken on a new banking role which the mail says stinks because they claim he had links to this company. the express has a picture of hollywood. there is a story here. all week stories about foods you can or can't eat. mushrooms are the superfood a p pa re ntly eat. mushrooms are the superfood apparently they can help against dementia. there are mushrooms on the front of the daily mirror as well. they are not talking about mushrooms in your breakfast but a horse or moan they say is being injected into some meat. they are calling it a scandal, a british meat scandal. —— hormone. also, donald trump and his interview last night with abc. the television channel. also the fact that theresa may will of course be speaking and meeting with president trump tomorrow and she is visiting
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republicans, calling for stronger times next robert ties between the two countries. the telegraph have transport story. after all of the trouble, there is a claim that ministers are planning to take over. then, look at that. i love these pictures of mary, yet in! —— get in! cani pictures of mary, yet in! —— get in! can i take you inside to a story which, it is about happiness. what do you think the secret to happiness is, cat? lots of sleep. in ourjob, definitely. apparently it's getting your kit off, according to this article. if you are somebody who regularly gets naked, you are a —— you are likely to be happy happier.
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you are more likely to be happier about how you feel about life. for the sake of the nation's happiness, i think we should not try that. not on television. this is a double page spread. jinnah how quick it is all about statistics and how it to you work out how good a batsman is, you look at his average. also with a bowl. —— look at his average. also with a bowl. — — bowler. look at his average. also with a bowl. —— bowler. but how do you work out how good a fielder is? there has beena out how good a fielder is? there has been a computer programme that will work out how good a fielder is. this is in england's last match against india. that drop for england was 23 runs so india. that drop for england was 23 runs so he has got a —23 at gran steve fielding score in england selector's handbook. —— against his fielding score. a glimpse of the
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future for cricket. critics say... cricket critics say that the human side has been taken away and it's not much fun any more but other people are saying that this is where cricket is going and this is the future of the game. quite interesting. they work it out by calculating the runs multiplied by the difficulty of the catch. apparently he should have been 90% certain to have caught the ball and he didn't. thank you very much. we need more statistics. of course, today's the day that we get the latest stats on how the economy has been doing. this is the latest growth figures. ben's in central london this morning. how much should we read into these figures, ben? we are here on the rooftop of the
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i.e. the because it gives us a great advantage of the city and the rest of london. we will be watching closely to the economic growth figure —— iet. it might be able to make out the shard between those buildings, all the way down the south bank, the london eye. in the distance, in the darkness at this point the morning, is big ben and the houses of parliament. both fair and the city, they will be taking a close eye on the economic figure. it is for the last quarter of last year. it is expected to have grown by about 0.5%. down slightly from what we have seen before but after all the uncertainty with except, the squeeze on incomes, all the uncertainty with except, the squeeze on incomes, or all the uncertainty with except, the squeeze on incomes, or what it could mean for us. how will this feel for our pockets? we were out in
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manchester asking some of you hate you are feeling the squeeze. people haven't got that much money like they used to. obviously, having to cut back on what i spend. prices are going up all the time. what it used to be in the past, itjumping. cost of living going up. all right. just all right. not amazing. it's difficult with a baby because i don't work as many hours as they used to. but i'm ok. i think if you know where you shop —— know where to shop, you can find decent prices. struggling. why? just am. i think things will get tighter but at the moment, i things will get tighter but at the moment, lam things will get tighter but at the moment, i am not as well off as i was the same age and with all that is happening, it will get tighter. those are some of the issues facing us when it comes to money and a
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pocket. it will be the weakness in the pound and that makes things we import from overseas more expensive. that accounts for all the raw materials but also things like food and a lot of supermarkets have been telling us they might have to raise prices. there is also that uncertainty around brexit. what will it mean for business day to day. there is a lot of clarity they will get to work out their plans for things like expansion or hiring more staff. of course, ben perry the squeeze on our income as staff. of course, ben perry the squeeze on our income as well as inflation. —— vendor areas. we will talk about that over course of the evening. —— then there is the squeeze. evening. —— then there is the squeeze. join me in half an hour and we will talk through some of the figures. as second—hand vehicles go, it doesn't sound very promising — slightly scorched, 7a million miles on the clock and last seen in a field in kazakhstan. but the capsule which took major tim peake into space — and brought him safely back again — is an invaluable piece of british history.
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it's going on public display in london, as our science correspondent pallab ghosh explains. just over one year ago, tim peake set off for his mission to the international space station. within weeks of being in orbit, he became the first british astronaut to walk in space. it was the stuff of scientific history. then before you get the apm are off... now the cut shot has been brought by british science museum. the museum says it hopes the display will inspire those who see it. especially children. many of who might wish to follow in tim peake's footsteps. the unveiling of the capital will also be the first opportunity to hear from the
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british astronaut, following the announcement last week by the head of the european space agency, that tim would be expected to fly and other mission to the space station, sometime between 2019 and 202a. we'll be talking to tim peake after 8:00, and injust over an hour we'll hear from the first british astronaut, helen sharman. let's cross to the news teams around you to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. commuters using southeastern trains are being warned disruption will continue for the rest of the week— after a freight train derailed in lewisham on tuesday. network rail engineers have found extensive damage to the railway line. it means a 50 metre stretch needs to be completely rebuilt—
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which could take several days. meanwhile, major disruption is expected today on the central and waterloo & city lines— as some tube drivers go on strike. waterloo & city trains could be affected— and there's no central line east of leytonstone— with a reduced service on the rest of the line. the rmt union are walking out for twenty four hours— in a dispute over plans to move some train operators between depots. so let's take a look at how that's affecting services this morning. and you can see both the central and waterloo & city lines are disru pted— there is a shuttle bus running instead of trains between epping and chingford. we've also got minor delays on the piccadilly line between acton town and heathrow. southeastern trains are not stopping at new eltham, mottingham or lee— with a reduced service between sevenoaks and new cross as track repairs continue. this is how the a13 looks getting busy westbound heading out
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of dagenham into barking in other news:, construction work begins today on a major new housing development in enfield. 10,000 homes are planned as part of a regeneration scheme costing six billion pounds— enfield council says "a high proportion" will be affordable. imperial war museums has announced a programme of events to mark its centenary. its first museum was established in london in 1917—as the first world war was still being fought. the anniversary will be marked by a major exhibition looking at anti—war protest from the first world war to the present day let's get the weather with elizabeth rizzini. today will feel the coldest. another grey and cloudy day. we have lost the misty nest that there is still hill fog over the chilterns. temperatures hovering over the freezing mark. a very cold south—easterly wind. it will take the edge of that averages. highs
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will be between one and three celsius in central london. in practice, it will feel colder because of the winter chill. most of us will stay dry, perhaps a little bit of drizzle falling from the thickness of the clouds. some wintry. a bit of late brightness out towards the south—east just wintry. a bit of late brightness out towards the south—eastjust before the sunset. clear skies are the first part of the night. maybe a bit of rain spreading up on the south. wintry at times and an ice at risk into to morning and a few changes tomorrow. the wind will subtly shift directions and push up mild air tomorrow. it will feel less cold. there will be rain around this afternoon. a rather great a. —— in the afternoon. grey day. they will be also possible heavy showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to steph and jon. bye for now. of paediatrics and child health,
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who'lljoin us after 8am to explain why they're so concerned. and lift off! what goes up must come down, and the capsule which took tim peake to space and back is going on display in london. he'lljoin us along with britain's first astronaut, helen sharman to tell us how they hope it'll inspire future scientists. and from the outside it appeared to be an ordinary brixton flat, but for decades it housed an extraordinary secret. after 8am, we'll learn about the strange cult and the people who helped rescue those enslaved in it. all that still to come.
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but now a summary of this morning's main news. the us president donald trump has said he believes that torture can work to get information out of suspected terrorists. but he said he would seek further advice before deciding whether to bring back techniques such as water—boarding. speaking to the american abc network in his first televised interview since becoming president, he also repeated his pledge to make mexico pay for a wall along its border with the united states. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. could america be set for a return to the interrogation methods of old? a draft executive order suggests its commander—in—chief could be preparing to return to the dark days of water boarding, by reopening the so—called black site prisons operated by the cia. in his first tv interview since becoming president, donald trump made clear he is considering scrapping an order by his predecessor, that terrorist suspects be treated in accordance with international law. torture works,
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the president declared. when they're chopping off the heads of our people and other people, when they're chopping off the heads of people because they happen to be a christian in the middle east, when isis is doing things that nobody has ever heard of since middle eastern times, —— medieval times, would ifeel strongly about water boarding? as far as i'm concerned, we have to fight fire with fire. reports suggest mr trump is also due to announce plans to close america's borders to refugees, for a period at least, and implement tougher visa restrictions on citizens from certain predominantly muslim nations with links to terrorism, what is known as extreme vetting. in an effort to quell the influx of illegal immigrants from mexico, mr trump has signed an executive order to begin work on building a wall between the two nations. a multimillion dollar venture that he insists mexico will be made to pay for. ultimately it will come out of what's happening with mexico and we will start those negotiations relatively soon and we will be
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in a form reimbursed by mexico. so they'll pay us back? absolutely, 100%. that has ruffled the feathers of america's southern neighbour. in an address to the nation, mexico's president said they have no intention of footing the bill. the mexican president is due in washington next week. he faces difficult discussions with an american counterpart clearly determined to reverse many of the changes brought about by barack obama. david willis bbc news, washington. after 7am, we'll be getting the thoughts on this of the assistant head of the us and americas programme at chatham house. prime minister theresa may will be heading to the us, she is going today. she will call for a renewed special relationship with the united states, when she addresses republican politicians at their annual retreat in philadelphia later today. the prime minister is due to become the first world leader
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to hold face—to—face talks with president trump, when they meet at the white house tomorrow. she has said she's not afraid of having a candid conversation. the government will publish a bill today, to enable it to invoke article 50 and trigger the process of britain leaving the european union. the brexit secretary, david davis, has said the bill will be straightforward, although opposition parties will seek to make amendments. royal bank of scotland will take another financial hit for mis—selling risky mortgages in america before the financial crisis hit in 2008. the bank, which is more than 70% owned by the taxpayer, could be fined an additional £3 billion by the us department ofjustice. a major report into the health of children in the uk has found an "alarming gap" exists between the rich and poor, with one in five young people suffering as a result of poverty. the royal college of paediatrics and child health also
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suggests the uk is lagging behind most western european countries when it comes to measures such as infant mortality rates and obesity. the number of cars built in the uk has reached a 17—year high, thanks to continued economic recovery in europe. around 1.7 million cars rolled off production lines last year and exports reached a record high. but investment in the industry fell last year because of continued uncertainty over the future of the economy following the brexit vote. ant and dec won the prize for best tv presenter for the 16th year at last night's national television awards. can you imagine how big their trophy cabinet is? she is catching up! other winners included mary berry for best judge and strictly come dancing picked up the gong for best talent show. emmerdale was voted best soap and itv‘s this morning won best live magazine programme.
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they look quite surprised to win. it was a brilliant category to be in. our lot had a very good time and we will get the gossip about carol, as she went to the awards and is in this morning looking bright eyed and bushy tailed, perhaps with the same make—up on! now to the morning's sport. southampton are through to the final of the league cup, which is amazing when some of the big names weren't playing. a big name they lost, they lost their manager over the summer, but they seem to have carried on an ruffled. here they are in the league cup final. southampton beat liverpool 1—0 at anfield last night to reach the efl cup final. 1—0 up from the first leg,
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saints spent much of the match defending before shane long booked his side's trip to wembley. they reached the final without conceding a goal. southampton will play either hull city or manchester united who play their second leg semi tonight. it's not. it's fantastic. fantastic. and happy for the squad because they worked very hard since the beginning of the season, and played every three games, —— days, which is very difficult. celtic have stretched their lead at the top of the scottish premiership to 22 points. they beat stjohnston 1—0 in the first game in the league since the winter break and have now gone 26 domestic games unbeaten, equalling their own record. meanwhile, in the scottish cup, hearts came back from 1—0 down to beat championship raith rovers 11—2 in extra time of their scottish cup fourth round replay. they'll host edinburgh rivals hibs next. serena williams is on court
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in melbourne right now, looking to book her place in the australian open final. she's up against world number 79 mirjana lucic—baroni, who is in herfirst grand slam semi—final in 18 years. the pair last played each other at wimbledon, in 1998. serena the winner that day and she has an early break in the first set. she took it 6—2. she took it 6-2. if she wins it will set up an all williams grandslam finalfor set up an all williams grandslam final for the first set up an all williams grandslam finalfor the first time set up an all williams grandslam final for the first time in 2009, because venus williams is awaiting the winner. she beat coco vandeweghe in three sets. usain bolt is to lose one of his nine olympic gold medals, after the ioc disqualified his jamaican relay teammate nesta carter over a doping violation at the beijing games. the ioc says carter tested positive for a banned stimulant in a re—analysis of samples from the 2008 olympics. carter and bolt were teammates on the winning 4x100
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metres relay team. as a result, the jamaican team, including bolt, has been stripped of its gold, meaning he can no longer claim to hold the famous "triple triple". you can't rerun race and get those medals back. an usain bolt‘s case we all know that what his last olympic games. so it has gone from the medals which was unbelievable to eight medals, at what he has achieved is still amazing. captain eoin morgan captain says the current england one day side is best he's played in. england lost the od! series 2—1, but ended on a high with a five run win in kolkata. they play the first of three t20 games in kanpur in a few hours. we have a long way to go. it is the best white ball team i've been apart. we have a lot of talent.
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extracting that talent and converting it into wins and results is the challenge for us. britain's millie knight and guide brett wild won downhill gold on the opening day of the para alpine skiing championships, in italy. the 18—year—old visually impaired skier beat the five—time paralympic champion henrieta farkasova of slovakia. knight was britain's youngest athlete at the sochi paralympics and has dominated the world cup circuit in recent months winning 11 medals, seven of them gold. when we came into this we thought we just wanted to be pleased with our arms and we wanted to come down, finished the bride and think i'm a yes, imb is to that, we couldn't have gone any faster and the result looked after itself. what we got with those feelings today, so chuffed! the records were a bit sketchy but we think that is britain's first ever world para scheme title. ——
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pa raskiing ever world para scheme title. —— paraskiing title. thank you. keeping up with schoolwork can be stressful for any young person, but how do those caring for a loved one balance their education with their home life? research from the carers trust has revealed almost three quarters of young carers take time off school to look after relatives, while more than half struggle to meet deadlines. holly hamilton has been to meet two sisters who care for their mum to find out how they cope. meet claudia and leonie. did mum ta ke ta blets ? meet claudia and leonie. did mum take tablets? just nine and 13, they have big dreams of becoming actresses. but right now theirjob is taking care of their mum. when she had a heart attack she got tunnel vision and then it is hard for her, because she can't see.|j tunnel vision and then it is hard for her, because she can't see. i do a lot of tidying, packing things away and keeping things off the floor, because when things are on
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the floor she will trip over them easily. i was the kind of mum that did everything for her children, the running around, but picking up, and they relied on me for everything. and then suddenly i couldn't do anything for them and found that they were having to do things for me. that's what we've been learning about. the two are young carers, like more than 700,000 children in the uk. many providing care for over 50 hours a week. so it is no surprise that a survey by the carers —— ida on sound more than half of those aged 16— 25 were struggling to with school work. homework is the thing i struggle with because i'm a lwa ys thing i struggle with because i'm always doing loads of chores and stuff and then i have to find time to do all my homework. local council
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bosses say it is vital young carers are identified so they can get the support we need to achieve their life ambitions. you see everyone and you think, oh, they're so lucky, they can do all of that, but then you think i might wait, i can't do that. but then i also think it is important that i help her out and i like being responsible for her, because it makes me feel special. claudia and leonie are getting help from their school, which means they can focus on their schoolwork and looking after mum. what does the word ca re looking after mum. what does the word care mean for you? well, when i think terror i think it's not normal, a normal life. —— think carer. like when you are an actress you have a big role to play, but then when you finish doing that part you need to stop, but it's like
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you're doing that role forever. claudia and leonie, talking to our reporter. holly mentioned the research from carers trust. joining us now is gail scott—spicer, who's chief executive of the carers trust. hearing their story, it's really heartbreaking. how common is a story like that? there are 700,000 children upto the age of 18 but also as young as five who caring. caring forfriends, family, as young as five who caring. caring for friends, family, somebody as young as five who caring. caring forfriends, family, somebody in their life who they love dearly. it's a real challenge for them. the data we have produced today and that we have seen from carers trust is showing that young carers are a danger, not only to their education, not fulfilling their life ambitions. there might be children up during the night that have been looking after perrett and now had to be
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hitting their bag ready. what should teachers be looking out for as far as checking all these kids are getting the support they need once at school? we know from the data that half of children are having problems coping with schoolwork. we know that they are struggling with deadlines. these are the things that children can look —— teachers can look after. you might find that some of these young carers are not moving it into school. maybe they are hiding it, showing they are coping. maybe it's hard to spot. it is but we do lots of work with schools to help spot the signs. there might be some carers watching this morning as they go through what they need to to support their family. they can reach out to schools because schools know how to support them. they can do that in confidence and they run a lot of charities around like carers
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trust. they can reach out in confidence. we also have online forums where they can come on and be anonymous. that is the first step for young carers sometimes to reach out and get support. they must realise crucially they are not alone. that is the way. if you can go on for and speak to other people, you can make a difference. there was a change in the law around giving more support and essentially assessment to young people. has that made a difference and tell us, yes, haven't it ready difference? they came in to support children for the first time to give them rights in law. it is crucial now the government hold local authorities to account to realise both law and the principles and ambitions of those acts. it is very varied out there. sometimes we see buried a lot of
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great work going on to support ca re rs great work going on to support carers but in other places, there is a lot more work to do. gale from the c/o's trust, thank you. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. carroll, you are looking gorgeous considering how many hours sleep you have had. how many hours sleep? 3.5. you legend. it is because of the national television awards, i have two ad. —— ——3. we are importing cold winds from a cold continent. they are dragging it in on the south—easterly wind. very windy across the north—west once again today but the west of the uk
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generally windy. there is a lot of clout for us, we also have drizzle. —— cloud. we will also see the odd flurry of snow. we wait all see it. —— we won't. there is the risk of ice first thing this morning. watch out for that underfoot and if you are driving. there are also pockets of fog but not on the scale that some of us have seen. cloudy start across some of us have seen. cloudy start a cross m ost some of us have seen. cloudy start across most of us. also in northern ireland. scotland, too. the north of scotla nd ireland. scotland, too. the north of scotland is sticking out of the cloud. he refused. here we will see the lion ‘s share of any sunshine as we will through the course of the day. the rest of the day, cloudy for the morning. gradually, though, we start to see the cloud break up across southern counties and we will see sunshine. some of that extends into wales. we will hang on to war this cloud and although we see temperatures largely above freezing,
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when you add on the wind chill, how it will feel against your skin when you are out, —5 in newcastle, freezing in cardiff. remember to wrap up warmly if you are just a stepping out. as we had on through thursday and into friday, we hang on to quite keen to win. then we have the complex area of low pressure. it is coming in from the west. we start off on friday, possibly the odd pockets of fog and nothing substantial. any snow flurries in the east will tend to fade and then we have weather front coming in from the north and west and they will introduce some rain. also some milder conditions, particularly in the south—west. although we will still feel cold in central areas, it will feel less than it did today. saturday, showers but the nature of showers mean we were not all see them. some of us will see sunshine. look at this. it looks as though we
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will see the next area of low pressure sweeping will see the next area of low pressure sweeping across will see the next area of low pressure sweeping across the southern counties of england and wales. the timing and position of this will change. deep in touch with the weather forecast. further north, not a bad day at all. carroll, should we have a look at how we went last night? a beautiful picture of the gang. everybody looking top dollar. that was before the party began. tell us what it was like. laughter. you are getting no change out of me about anything. it was a good night, a good night, great. you have the party line down. and so used to it because they are westj et a and so used to it because they are westjet a grilling from you guys! i'm glad you had a lovely time. figures out later this morning are expected to show the british economy finished the year strongly. if so, it would be the latest
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data to suggest the uk economy is remaining resilient despite the brexit vote. ben is in central london for us this morning. just how significant could these figures be ben? you have a cracking view over the city. a bit cold that you have your gloves on. what are we expecting? carol is not fibbing, it is freezing but the economy is going to be faring a bit better. we had the concerns about a fall in the value of the pound and that uncertainty surrounding brexit. the latest thing is that word in inflation. we will hear a lot about it this year as prices start rising. we have had warnings from retailers including supermarkets, saying they might have to put prices up. on economic growth, we get the figure at 930. it is for the last quarter of last
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year, expected to show that the economy grew for about 0.5%. we have city —esque burts with me. you are a cold, windy rooftop. thank you for putting up with it. city experts. we have seen headlines about what inflation and brexit could mean. the end of 2016 has been good and so will the beginning of 2017, as we have seen. everybody is pretty upbeat but inflation has doubled between october and december so i think we will see wages squeezed because inflation is rising higher and rising more than wages at the moment. people will feel a bit poorer and it is consumption that has been driving the economy so i am worried about that going forward. the fact that manufacturers are getting towards capacity constraints and labour is a bit short. there are
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two stories on today because when we look at things like brexit, there is uncertainty for business, we don't know what is going to happen and if you are a business with, you either embrace it or worry. which way should you be going? these are challenging times but exciting times. refer to what bronwyn said, it is uncertain. we unfortunately, london is the only standard bearer. we need a much more mixed and balanced economy. we need to find labour in the right places so we can give construction and industrial print duction a real boost. i'm really upbeat long—term. —— production. wages is only at 2.6%. have some courage, it will be fine. catherine, you are nodding along to
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some things but as far as consumers are concerned, some things but as far as consumers are concerned , we some things but as far as consumers are concerned, we may feel a squeeze. are concerned, we may feel a squeeze. we will see a large to start —— decline. businesses might not see it. these things take a long time to ramp up. consumers are doing heavy lifting at the moment. whether it can continue, we don't know. we are not going to delay spending because of an article 50 ruling, for example. thank you very much. we will speak more to you guys later in the programme. we will delve into the programme. we will delve into the idea of consumer spending. it is all of us who is going out and spending in the shops that has helped prop up the economy. big questions about whether we will carry on doing that. delve into the flat and get some heat. it is freezing. you're watching breakfast. time to get the news, travel and
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weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. commuters using southeastern trains are being warned disruption will continue for the rest of the week— after a freight train derailed in lewisham on tuesday. network rail engineers have found extensive damage to the railway line. it means a 50 metre stretch needs to be completely rebuilt which could take several days. meanwhile, major disruption is expected today on the central and waterloo & city lines as some tube drivers go on strike. the rmt union are walking out under a dispute waterloo & city trains could be affected and there's no central line east of leytonstone with a reduced service on the rest of the line. the rmt union are walking out for 26 hours in a dispute over plans to move some train operators between depots. so let's take a look at how that's
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affecting services this morning. and you can see both the central and waterloo & city lines are disru pted— there is a shuttle bus running instead of trains between epping and chingford. we've also got minor delays on the piccadilly line between acton town and heathrow. southeastern trains are not stopping at new eltham, mottingham or lee, with a reduced service between sevenoa ks and new cross as track repairs continue. kennington repairs continue. lane is blocked northbound kennington lane is blocked northbound after an accident. and tulse hill is closed northbound from the south circular to brixton water lane— there's a burst water main. in other news: construction work begins today on a major new housing development in enfield. 10,000 homes are planned as part of a regeneration scheme costing six billion pounds. enfield council says "a high proportion" will be affordable. imperial war museums has announced a programme of events a set of special stamps are to be issued in honour of david rowley. he was born in bricks and and died in
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beckenham and died injanuary last year. let's get the weather with elizabeth rizzini. today will feel the coldest. another grey and cloudy day. a chilly south—easterly wind. we have lost the misty nest that there is still hill fog over the chilterns. temperatures hovering over the freezing mark. a very cold south—easterly wind. it will take the edge off the temperatures. highs will be between one and three celsius in central london. in practice, it will feel colder because of the winter chill. most of us will stay dry, perhaps a little bit of drizzle falling from the thickness of the clouds. some wintry. a bit of late brightness out towards the south—eastjust before the sunset. clear skies are the first part of the night. maybe a bit of rain spreading up on the south. wintry at times and an ice at risk into tomorrow morning and a few changes tomorrow. the wind will subtly shift directions and push up mild air tomorrow.
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it will feel less cold. there will be rain around this afternoon. a rather grey day. on saturday, brighter spells. they will be also possible heavy showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more news, travel and weather on our website. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and jon kay. the prime minister vows to renew the uk's special relationship with the us as she travels to america to meet donald trump. theresa may will say the two
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countries can "lead together again" and propose greater co—operation in the fight against terrorism. in his first tv interview since taking office, president trump has said he believes torture works when dealing with terror suspects. i want to do everything within the bounds of what you are allowed to do legally, but do i feel it works? absolutely i feel it works. good morning. it's thursday, the 26th of january. children's health in the uk is lagging behind most other european countries, according to a major new report. we will get the latest growth
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figures later. they are expected to show the economy fared pretty well at the end of last year, but with rising prices and that uncertainty around except what does the next year have in store? in sport, it be an all—williams showdown in melbourne. venus williams is through and in the last few minutes serena williams got to the first final where they will play each other in eight years. it has taken tim peake to space and back. now the soyuz capsule is going to be landing in london. we'll be finding out why. and carol has the weather. good morning. this morning it's a cold start to the day again. watch out for ice on untreated surfaces. a fairly cloudy start, producing drizzle. a few of us seeing snow. later it will brighten up in the south. the overriding factor is it will feel cold in a bitter wind. more in 15
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minutes. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will call for a renewed special relationship with the united states when she addresses republican politicians in philadelphia later. a day before she becomes the first international leader to meet president trump, the prime minister will argue for greater co—operation in the fight against terrorism. our political correspondent chris mason is at westminster. this is the reason they officially meeting president trump. she has already said she isn't afraid of a frank conversation with him, but still wa nts frank conversation with him, but still wants to renew their special relationship. how is it going to work do you think west that phrase special relationship will tumble out of her lips many times in the next 48 hours. the plane carrying the prime minister is leaving heathrow about now. first stop is philadelphia, this away day for senior republican politicians. a
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chance for her to address them. people who might be able to bend the earand people who might be able to bend the ear and influence the president over the next four years. she will talk about how for her international organisations are really important. the united states and the uk were central in setting her up. the un and the defence alliance, nato, for instance. president trump has been sceptical about any international organisations. the other thing she will be keen to do is just build a working relationship with the president. the human connection is hugely important and she starts it with some awkwardness, because she was not, entry about him in the past. so she turns up with a hamper, from her retreat in buckinghamshire, com plete from her retreat in buckinghamshire, complete with a belt —— bakewell ta rt, complete with a belt —— bakewell tart, i'm told, and she will also carry an ancient scottish artefact,
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a nod to president trump's mum who was from scotland. so attending to make friends and build bridges. one of her team described him as trump the chump before he was let in. now of course things have changed. —— he was elected. it is another important day for brexit because of course we have a big announcement at 9:30am? yes. the prime minister might be flying across the atlantic, but that doesn't mean brexit stops. the whole process ru m bles doesn't mean brexit stops. the whole process rumbles on. what we get this morning is the publication of a bill. the start of the process of creating a law that will allow the prime minister to press go on the wrecks that process by the end of march. we will get the wording of that in the next few hours. the debate amongst mps and those in the house of lords to follow from next week. as ever, lovely to talk to you. when she visits washington tomorrow, theresa may has said she is not afraid of having a candid
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conversation with president trump, who said he believed that torture could work to get information out of suspected terrorists. donald trump said he would seek further advice from the cia, before deciding whether to bring back techniques such as water—boarding. speaking to the american abc network in his first televised interview since becoming president, he also repeated his pledge to make mexico pay for a wall along its border with the united states. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. could america be set for a return to the interrogation methods of old? a draft executive order suggests its commander—in—chief could be preparing to return to the dark days of water boarding, by reopening the so—called black site prisons operated by the cia. in his first tv interview since becoming president, donald trump made clear he is considering scrapping an order by his predecessor, that terrorist suspects be treated in accordance
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with international law. torture works, the president declared. when they're chopping off the heads of our people and other people, when they're chopping off the heads of people because they happen to be a christian in the middle east, when isis is doing things that nobody has ever heard of since medieval times, would i feel strongly about water boarding? as far as i'm concerned, we have to fight fire with fire. reports suggest mr trump is also due to announce plans to close america's borders to refugees, for a period at least, and implement tougher visa restrictions on citizens from certain predominantly muslim nations with links to terrorism, what is known as extreme vetting. in an effort to quell the influx of illegal immigrants from mexico, mr trump has signed an executive order to begin work on building a wall between the two nations. a multimillion dollar venture that he insists mexico will be made to pay for. ultimately it will come out of what's happening with mexico
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and we will start those negotiations relatively soon and we will be in a form reimbursed by mexico. so they'll pay us back? absolutely, 100%. that has ruffled the feathers of america's southern neighbour. in an address to the nation, mexico's president said they have no intention of footing the bill. the mexican president is due in washington next week. he faces difficult discussions with an american counterpart clearly determined to reverse many of the changes brought about by barack obama. royal bank of scotland will take another financial hit for mis—selling risky mortgages in america before the financial crisis hit in 2008. the bank, which is more than 70% owned by the taxpayer, could be fined an additional £3 billion by the us department ofjustice. a major report into the health of children in the uk has found an "alarming gap" exists
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between the rich and poor, with one in five young people suffering as a result of poverty. the royal college of paediatrics and child health also suggests the uk is lagging behind most western european countries when it comes to measures such as infant mortality rates and obesity. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. hi, i'm sophie. and i'm an emotional wreck. anxiety, depression and a need to be listened to. these are the themes of a short play on mental health, devised by school students in liverpool. i need help... the issues they touch on reflect those in today's report on the health of children and young people. it paints a picture of the uk struggling to match other countries and even falling behind. the evidence has been developing for some time that all is not well with our children's health.
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it's the first time we have really put together a proper picture across all four countries and the news is not good. some of the issues that raise concerns over the state of child health include just 34% of babies breast fed to six months, less than half the rate in norway. 40% of children in england's most deprived areas are overweight or obese, and half of adult mental health problems start before the age of 14. and for the drama group in liverpool, mental health issues are a real priority. mental illnesses are an illness of the brain and they're as valid as any other illnesses to any other part of the body. just because you can't see it physically it doesn't mean it isn't there. our production will mainly be to get rid of that stigma about mental health and just educate the audience a bit more about mental health. the four governments of the uk are all challenged to consider the impact their policies will have on children. they've responded by restating commitments to improve children's health. the number of cars built in the uk has reached a 17—year high,
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due to continued economic recovery in europe. around 1.7 million cars rolled off production lines last year and exports reached a record high. but investment in the industry fell last year because of continued uncertainty about the economy, following the brexit vote. almost half of all hospitals are failing to meet basic government standards for hospital food, according to data released by the department of health. the campaign for better hospital food warns the situation is "diabolical". but the government says standards are improving. in 2014 food standards became mandatory in english hospitals. this is an attempt to find out what progress has been made since then. it says there is more to do, but claimed that has been immeasurable improvement in food quality. for
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example in 89% of hospitals patients said theirfood example in 89% of hospitals patients said their food was good or very good, but up 5% from 2013. 55% of hospitals are fully compliant with standards recommended i dieticians, but up 14% from 2015. and 52% of hospitals are fully compliant with basic government standards on food quality and nutrition. nearly 40% are said to be hardly compliant. but the campaign for better hospital food excel on that same statistic, saying it shows nearly half of hospitals don't meet basic standards. —— picks up. the organisation claims nearly one third of patients are at real risk of malnutrition. the department of health says food standards in hospital are legally binding. the campaigners claim the legal framework for schools is more rigourous. they say that means healthy children in schools get more and legal protection on food standards and six children in hospitals. it was a big night for the tv
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industry last night. ant and dec won the prize for the best tv presenters for the 16th year in a row. imagine how big their trophy room is! it was the national television awards in london last night, while the bbc presenter graham norton was recognised for his services to broadcasting. itv's itv‘s programme got best magazine. we were at the awards. arm happy to say allah team still had a brilliant time. ——i say allah team still had a brilliant time. —— i am happy. carol was there, she pulled on all night. not for the first time! we will be getting the weather forecast from her, if she is still awake, in a
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couple of minutes. it was controversially sanctioned by president bush, banned by president obama, but now president trump has said he believes "torture works". in an interview with the us network abc, he said he supports the reintroduction of interrogation techniques, currently banned in the us. donald trump also repeated his stance that mexico would pay for a 2,000 mile wall along it's border with the us. though the mexican president has rejected the idea. we'll discuss this in more detail in a moment, but first here he is speaking to abc news. when isis is doing things that nobody has ever heard of since mediaeval times, would i feel strongly about water boarding? as far as strongly about water boarding? as faras i'm strongly about water boarding? as far as i'm concerned i think we have to fight fire with fire. i've spoken as recently as 24 hours ago, with people at the highest level of intelligence, and i asked them the question: does it work? does torture
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work? and the answer was yes, absolutely. you are now the president. you want water boarding? i don't want people to chop off anybody‘s heads in the middle east. the mexican president said in recent days that mexico will absolutely not pay adequate against their dignity asa pay adequate against their dignity as a country and their dignity as mexicans. he has to say that. but i am just telling you there will be a form, perhaps a complicated form. you have to understand, what i'm doing is good for the united states and it will also be good for mexico. we wa nt and it will also be good for mexico. we want to have a stable and solid mexico. when will construction begin? as soon as we can. as soon as we can physically do it. months? i would say months, yes. banning is starting immediately. —— planning. jacob parakilas is assistant head of the us and americas programme at chatham house. hejoins us from our london newsroom.
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good morning. he hasn't even been in position for one week and we've had co nsta nt position for one week and we've had constant tweeting and announcements and executive orders signed. is he going about this with an amazing, an unusual amount of energy? if you are calling to the nine when obama took office, he signed a number of things including torture techniques, calling for the closure of guantanamo bay. some of those things and notably the closure of that detention centre, didn't. it is normalfor a president to begin their term with a flurry of activity because it sets out the agenda and it also, in some ways, they are in their honeymoon period. they set up their honeymoon period. they set up their agenda and they can reinforce it over the course of their term. that go through some of the things they have been talking about. let's start with torture. shall we be surprised by the strength of some of his words in that interview? no,
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it's entirely consistent with what he said during the campaign. the interesting thing is the internal dynamics. he said in that interview that he would listen to the press secretary general mattis and his cia director mike pompeo. both of those said they would be bringing back water boarding. also bringing back the acted that would bring any interrogation which bans water boarding or other forms of torture. for the moment, it sounds by kuwait push for any harder to the reintegration of. —— he won't push any harder. the number of republicans, especially john any harder. the number of republicans, especiallyjohn cain, have pushed for the continuation of the ban. so he might not intend to deliver it but is he just trying to appeal directly to his voters, his
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supporters, at the moment, and throw them some red meat? think you straight to appeal to his supporters and also set out what he sees as the position of toughness. set out this idea that he will be aggressively defending america's national interest. all of this is continued on the current political situation. there is general turnover in cabinet posts. we don't know whether mike pompeo or general mattis will last both terms. we don't know who else might get into crucial national security posts. he is talking about the wall and talking about building it within months. if that realistic? no. it's absolutely a huge construction project. much of it is through in hospitable territory. there is also the problem that a lot of the land is not owned by the federal government. it is private land owners. housing estates. it is
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compensated legal process. securing land rights. you can't do is that land rights. you can't do is that land and then start putting up a concrete barrier. so, he will be able to begin construction on certain segments of the wall beyond the 700 or so miles of war that already exist. it is not something he will be able to get done quickly. in terms of effectiveness, most undocumented immigration in the us is not from people crossing the border that people coming on student visas or work visas and overstaying so visas or work visas and overstaying so the wall will not stop any of that. a lot for donald trump and theresa may to talk about when she hits the white house tomorrow. as we speak, she is getting on a plane. thank you for your time. and taking a hamper with her. what would you wa nt a hamper with her. what would you want ina a hamper with her. what would you want in a hamper? tarts. carol, what
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would you like in a hamper that would you like in a hamper that would impress you ? good morning. if you arejust stepping out, it is called start the day. temperatures are widely around freezing orders below or above. it will get down to the bitter wind. it is coming off a cold continent and it has been dragged across our shores from south to north. if you arejust stepping out, make shores from south to north. if you are just stepping out, make sure you ta ke are just stepping out, make sure you take something warm with you. cloudy start to the day. thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle and the odd snow flurry. most of us will miss it anyway. we also have the odd pocket of log around, not to the level of what we have seen lately. as you can see across southern counties, a lot of cloud. that is called in exeter as it was yesterday. over into wales, a lot of cloud. the pennines and the vale of york, a bit of
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drizzle but a lot of hill fog. you will have into the sunshine through the day for the north of scotland but the rest of scotland and northern ireland, some drizzle and cloud. talking through the day, it will be windy, especially out towards the west and the north—west. don't forget, all of us, if exposed to the wind, feel cold. london's temperature is at three celsius and in the wind will feel like more like minus one. for newcastle in the wind, —6, that is the field. —— feeling. into tomorrow, still windy collette —— conditions. we will start off in the morning began with the odd pocket of frost, like this morning, the risk of ice. in the west, what you will find is the rain
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coming in, courtesy of the front. it won't be too heavy and any snow flurries will move away. in the south—west, milder conditions, less call than it has been across central and eastern areas but if you are outside, it will still feel cold. on saturday, we start to see a more u nsettled saturday, we start to see a more unsettled dealing. a few more showers around, it won't be as cold and we will equally the sunshine in between the showers. i will draw your attention to this area of rain. this is a next area of low pressure which at the moment looks as though it will sweep across other southern parts of england and wales through sunday. the timing and position of that could change so don't be gutted if that's what you see and you have outdoor plans, it may move further south. at the moment, it looks like it is the northern half of the country that will see the driest and brightest conditions with some sunshine. is it fair to say it is quite fresh at the moment? fresh!
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that is an understatement it is perishing. as you fresh today? i'm very fresh, steph, thank you for asking. there is a reason we are saying is, it was the tv awards last night and carol was there. she was there last night and she looks brilliant. as second—hand vehicles go, it doesn't sound very promising — slightly scorched, 74 million miles on the clock and last seen in a field in kazakhstan. but the capsule which took major tim peake into space — and brought him safely back again — is an invaluable piece of british history. it's going on display at london's science museum today, where our global science correspondent rebecca morelle is for us this morning. global science correspondence
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doesn't do itjustice. it's gone beyond global! yes, i am here science museum and behind me you can see the soyuz capital that brought tim peake up to space and more importantly, brought him back down—to—earth. apprising the small when you see it up close. she gets a sense of what it must have been like in there. three people crammed in. you can see the scorch marks outside where it re—entered backstreet the atmosphere when temperatures reached up atmosphere when temperatures reached up to 5100dc. we'll be talking to little later but a select group of people that had the delight of going up people that had the delight of going up into space and had the amazing experience of going up in one of these. one is them is doctor helen sharman. visit bring back memories?
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—— does it? sharman. visit bring back memories? -- does it? we do get the chance to get up close to see one up close even for astronauts. inside, get up close to see one up close even forastronauts. inside, it looks like the real thing in the simulators but to have one that has actually flown into space is a real excitement stop here at the science museum, you have this. ways it important to get these pieces of space history on display? this is space history on display? this is space history on display? this is space history but actually, it's not just history. this is something that really happened in our lifetime. it's very recent history. people can remember not just the thing it's very recent history. people can remember notjust the thing but it's very recent history. people can remember not just the thing but what it signifies. this is a british astronaut, tim peake, he put britain back into the realms of human spaceflight where we are competing again on the international stage. we
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we re again on the international stage. we were so again on the international stage. we were so proud of him and it will inspire many more people to do more things, notjust associated inspire many more people to do more things, not just associated with space at all that space offers and the excitement of science and engineering technologies and mathematics that you need to understand in order to make missions like this possible. it's interesting that tim peake might have another chance to go back up, maybe in a soyuz maybe in another capshaw. would you like to go back up? every single astronaut would like to go back up. everything goes back to normal except for one thing and that would be a longing to go back. normal except for one thing and that would be a longing to go backm anything on the earth ever the same again afterwards? space is so different to anything that you do in life. there are many exciting things in life, of course there are. but there is this opportunity to do
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something that you will never be able to do again. it isjust the most natural and relaxing thing to be able to float around in space. all these things that you can do in science. thank you, helen. a piece of space history that will be unveiled to the public later this morning, bought from the russian space agency for an undisclosed amount. thank you, rebecca. amazing to hear from amazing to hearfrom helen sharman. such an amazing woman. have tim peake on such an amazing woman. have tim pea ke on later such an amazing woman. have tim peake on later in the show as well. backin peake on later in the show as well. back in the capshaw, see how it feels. —— capshaw. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning, we'll meet nine—year—old leonie. homework is the thing i struggle with because i'm always looking after staff. she's one of 700,000 young carers — many of which are struggling to
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balance school with helping at home. —— stuff. with her sister, claudia. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news. i'm sonja jessup. commuters using southeastern trains are being warned disruption will continue for the rest of the week— after a freight train derailed in lewisham on tuesday. network rail engineers have found extensive damage to the railway line. it means a 50 metre stretch needs to be completely rebuilt which could take several days. meanwhile, major disruption is expected today on the central and waterloo & city lines as some tube drivers go on strike. the rmt union are walking out under the rmt union are walking out for 24 hours so let's take a look at how that's affecting services this morning. now, there's no central line
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between leytonstone to epping or woodford via hainault. with severe delays on the rest of the line. the good news is, at the moment, it seems the waterloo & city line is running a normal service. but we've still got minor delays still anti—clockwise on the circle line. and minor delays on the overground— between liverpool street and enfield town. southeastern trains are not stopping at new eltham, mottingham or lee, with a reduced service between sevenoa ks and new cross as track repairs continue. let's take a look at the roads in kennington — kennington lane is blocked northbound — and kennington road is down to one lane in both directions after an accident. and tulse hill is closed northbound from the south circular to brixton water lane— there's a burst water main. in other news: construction work begins today on a major new housing development in enfield. 10,000 homes are planned as part of a regeneration scheme costing six billion pounds. enfield council says "a high proportion" will be affordable. a set of special stamps are to be
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issued to honour david bowie. royal mail says it's the first time it's dedicated an entire issue to an individual music artist. the star — who was born in brixton and grew up in beckenham, died in january last year. let's get the weather with elizabeth rizzini. today will feel the coldest. a chilly south—easterly wind. a rather grey and cloudy day. we have lost the mistyness that there is still hill fog over the chilterns. temperatures hovering over the freezing mark. a very cold south—easterly wind. it will take the edge off the temperatures. highs will be between one and three celsius in central london. in practice, it will feel colder because of the wind chill. most of us will stay dry, perhaps a little bit of drizzle falling from the thickness of the clouds. some may be wintry. a bit of late brightness out towards the south—eastjust before the sunset.
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clear skies are the first part of the night. maybe a bit of rain spreading up on the south. wintry at times and an ice at risk into tomorrow morning and a few changes tomorrow. the wind will subtly shift directions and push up mild air tomorrow. it will feel less cold. there will be rain around this afternoon. a rather grey day. temperatures back up to double figures for the course of the weekend. on saturday, brighter spells. they will be also possible heavy showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more news, travel and weather on our website. goodbye for now. hello. this is breakfast, withjon kay and steph mcgovern. theresa may will call for a renewed special relationship with the united states, when she addresses republican politicians at their annual retreat in philadelphia later today. the prime minister is due to become the first world leader to hold face—to—face talks with president trump, when they meet at the white house tomorrow. she has said she's not afraid
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of having a candid conversation. meanwhile, donald trump has said he believes that torture can work to get information out of terrorism suspects. in an interview with abc news, the president said the us had to "fight fire with fire". but mr trump said he would seek further advice before deciding whether to bring back techniques, such as water—boarding, that were banned by president obama. are have spoken as recently as 24 hours ago with people at the highest level of intelligence and i ask them the question: does it work? does torture work? and the answer was yes, absolutely. the government here will publish a billm, to enable it to invoke article 50 and trigger the process of britain leaving
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the european union. the brexit secretary david davis has said the bill will be straightforward, although opposition parties will seek to make amendments. royal bank of scotland will take another financial hit for mis—selling risky mortgages in america before the financial crisis hit in 2008. the bank, which is more than 70% owned by the taxpayer, could be fined an additional £3 billion by the us department ofjustice. ambulance crews are finding it increasingly difficult to cope, according any —— according to an investigation into the service. the national audit office said rising demand, recruitment problems and wider nhs problems meant crews were failing to reach their target. nhs england says it is trying a new response strategy to reach the maximum number of people in a short amount of time.
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the number of cars built in the uk has reached a 17—year high, thanks to continued economic recovery in europe. around 1.7 million cars rolled off production lines last year and exports reached a record high. but investment in the industry fell last year because of continued uncertainty over the future of the economy following the brexit vote. almost half of our hospitals are failing to meet basic government standards for hospital food according to new data released today by the department of health. the campaignfor by the department of health. the campaign for better hospital food warned the situation is diabolical. the government says the standards are legally binding and that performance is improving. it was the national television awards last night. no surprise — ant and dec won the prize for best tv presenter for the 16th year. other winners included mary berry for best judge and she was very chuffed. strictly come dancing picked up the gong for best talent show. there were lots of surprises as
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well. on that delighted many was that emmerdale won the best soap. and itv‘s this morning won best live magazine programme. world unto them, well done to the tea m world unto them, well done to the team and our lot had a great night. —— well done to them. we weren't invited, what we had a good time watching. we're holding the fort... over to the sport. serena and venus williams are through to the final of the australian open. you would be forgiven for thinking you've gone back ten years. and rafael nadal and roger federer are going strong as well! venus and serena have played themselves so many times, the last
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time they played in a grandslam final was ten years ago. venus williams is 36, serena is 35. in the men's draw, there's only one person who is left under 30. so it is one for the veterans. william. —— brilliant. it's serena versus venus at the australian open, the first all—williams final since the wimbledon showdown eight years ago. serena, a six time winner in melbourne, comfortably beat the world number 79 mirjana lucic—baroni in underan hour. baroni was playing in herfirst grand slam semi—final in 18 years and couldn't match the pace and power of the world number two. so, serena williams going through. and at the age of 36, her older sister venus williams is through. look at her delight. the seven—time grand slam beat coco vandeweghe in three sets. she said it would be a dream to see serena on the other side of the net on saturday.
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alfie hewitt and gordon reid will face—off with their respective partners in a wheelchair tennis. southampton beat liverpool 1—0 at anfield last night to reach the efl cup final. 1—0 up from the first leg, saints spent much of the match defending before shane long booked his side's trip to wembley. they reached the final without conceding a goal. southampton will play either hull city or manchester united who play their second leg semi tonight. it's not bad, huh? it's fantastic. fantastic. i'm happy for the squad because they worked very hard since the beginning of the season, and played every three days, which is very difficult. celtic have stretched their lead at the top of the scottish premiership to 22 points. they beat stjohnston 1—0 in the first game in the league since the winter break
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and have now gone 26 domestic games unbeaten, equalling their own record. meanwhile, in the scottish cup, hearts came back from 1—0 down to beat championship raith rovers 4—2 in extra time of their scottish cup fourth round replay. they'll host edinburgh rivals hibs next. usain bolt is to lose one of his nine olympic gold medals, after the ioc disqualified his jamaican relay teammate nesta carter over a doping violation at the beijing games. the ioc says carter tested positive for a banned stimulant in a re—analysis of samples from the 2008 olympics. carter and bolt were teammates on the winning 4x100 metres relay team. as a result, the jamaican team, including bolt, has been stripped of its gold, meaning he can no longer claim to hold the famous "triple triple". you can't rerun race and get those medals back. in usain bolt‘s case, we all know that was his last olympic games. so it has gone from nine medals, which was unbelievable, to eight medals, but what he has achieved is still amazing. captain eoin morgan captain says
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the current england one day side is best he's played in. england lost the od! series 2—1, but ended on a high with a five run win in kolkata. they play the first of three t—20 games in kanpur in a few hours' time. that starts at 11am this morning. britain's millie knight and guide brett wild won downhill gold on the opening day of the para alpine skiing championships, in italy. the 18—year—old visually impaired skier beat the five—time paralympic champion henrieta farkasova of slovakia. knight was britain's youngest athlete at the sochi paralympics and has dominated the world cup circuit in recent months winning 11 medals, seven of them gold. when we came into this we thought we just want to be pleased with our runs. we wanted to come down, finish the line and think, "yes, i managed to do that.
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"we couldn't have gone any faster and the result looked after itself." but we got both of those feelings today, so chuffed! brilliant and understandably the favourite to win at the winter olympics next year. can you think of anything more terrifying, not being able to see properly and skiing at 100 mph down a mountain? brilliant. you're going to stick with us because we are going to talk american football. iam american football. i am trying to pass myself out and look little bit taller, but i don't think it will work. it is as quintessentially american as hot dogs and cowboys, but american football continues to grow in popularity here in the uk. nearly 3.5 million british viewers now tune in to the super bowl. the nfl's fan base tops 13 million in the uk. tickets for the first nfl game in london in 2007 sold out injust 90 minutes. and that has been replicated
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by subsequent sell—outs ever since. but if you're still not convinced, we'll speak to two former super bowl winners in a moment about next week's game. first, here's a taste of the last one. welcome to the stadium as we are getting set for super bowl l. the ball is free! touchdown! he lea ps the ball is free! touchdown! he leaps and scores! touchdown! in trouble! to the end zone! touchdown! they are the world champions. they
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have just one super bowl l. —— won. they know how to sell it. it is the drama. former super bowl champions osi umenyiora and jason bell join us now. good morning and thanks for coming in. osi, you are an ambassadorfor the nfl to the uk. that means you have to sell the game in the uk? that's what i am trying to do and so forehead has been easy. nfl is a fantastic game. -- so far it has been. why do you think it is popular here? you have to understand the dynamics of american football. it has something for everybody, with the ur vig, tall, fast, slow, whatever. —— whether you are big. so when they see the incredible athleticism on the field they enjoy it and obviously it's a very american game. there's a special relationship between america and the
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uk... we've been hearing about that! i think that's why they enjoy it. maybe you can get the big ambassador job in london as well! for someone who doesn't understand it, a lot of the uk audience, give us the basics. the basics? follow the ball. always follow the ball. you look at the line scrummage, the big guys at the front, and you see whoever is moving forwards and backwards, that's usually who is winning the game. the nfl, there's a lot of talk about it, like cricket, and it comes across as more complicated than it is. if you watch it you can pick it up quite easily. there are millions of people watching it in the uk. our people getting out and playing it? does it translate to people having a go on the pitch? absolutely. maybe about two or three weeks ago i looked to the left and saw a big field and people were playing with their full kit and gear people were playing with their full kitand gearand people were playing with their full kit and gear and that threw me,
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because i had never seen that before. so from what i understand a lot of universities are playing it, a lot of kids, the game is increasing in popularity and we are really happy. do you think perhaps people see it as a slightly safer version of rob d, because you have the helmets, the pads? —— rugby. is it safer than rugby? we've been talking a lot about concussion and head injuries. the risks are obviously there. are you safer with a helmet on? i don't know if it is safer. i know it is definitely a better sport, but i don't know if it is safer. in all fairness rugby is a great sport, i enjoy watching it as well. but the nfl, there's really no comparison. you are part of the bbc highlights show. when you are doing the punditry, is it different doing it in the uk? it is. you've got to get the basics down. i forget how ha rd get the basics down. i forget how hard the basics are, you take it granted because you've been playing
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it for so long, but then you explain it for so long, but then you explain it and you feel it is intricate, but it and you feel it is intricate, but it is fun and exciting. there are so many stops and starts. i enjoy watching it when it's happening, but i look back on 1.5 hours and i think i waited more time in the gaps. i look back on 1.5 hours and i think i waited more time in the gapsm gives you time to talk to your friends! it gives you time to do the commentary. you get to do all the things you want to do. that's why you have to watch these guys on the highlights programme. we can't let you go without asking... these guys have won the super bowl. we have some enormous events in the uk, the fa cup, grand slams in tennis, nothing quite compares to the scale of the super bowl. what does it feel like to win the super bowl? incredible. other than the world cup there's really no other sport like that, there's no other game like that, there's no other game like that in the world. to be able to win
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that, and all of these little kids dream about playing this game for their entire life and once you get out there and you can do it and win at twice, twice! there's absolutely no feeling like it. it is an incredible completion. you feel like you are in paradise. one day i will achieve something that is minutely on the scale. we achieved something. we came on this show with you guys and it is almost like the super bowl! we should stop the interview there. thank you. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. this morning is a cold start to the day. in cardiff, it is plus three, edinburgh, plus one. today, wherever
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you are, it will feel cold. largely down to the bitter wind. again, it is coming up from this cold continent and it is dragging the cold air right across our shores. first thing this morning, it is cloudy as well is called. watch out forice cloudy as well is called. watch out for ice on untreated surfaces because it has been damp, a wee bit of drizzle. some of us could also see some snow flurries. there will be —— went to be enough to build a snowman. be —— went to be enough to build a snowman. breezy be —— went to be enough to build a snowman. breezy across be —— went to be enough to build a snowman. breezy across most of the country. northern scotland is standing out. from the word go, you will see some sunshine. one of two brighter breaks as you come south. essentially, fairly cloudy across the bulk of england but across southern counties, later in the morning and into the afternoon, you will see the cloud breakup and a sunny spells developing. don't be full, it will feel better despite
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the fact we have sunshine and temperatures up to about six. for wales, we will also see some sunshine come through but for most of wales and in towards past of the midlands, we hang on to the cloud. as we head into northern ireland, a cloudy and damp day. the newcastle, the maximum temperature is freezing but if you are exposed to the wind, it will feel against your skin more like -6 it will feel against your skin more like —6 because of the wind chill. as we had on through the evening and overnight, it will still be fairly windy. then we have the next cluster of weather fronts coming our way ringing unsettled conditions as we had on through friday. friday we will start off on a cold note. maybe the odd pocket of frost and fog around. one ortwo the odd pocket of frost and fog around. one or two wintry flurries in the east that they won't last. out towards the west and the north, we will see the weather fronts coming in, introducing patchy, light
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rain. with those, we will see higher temperatures in the west and it will become less cold in central and eastern parts of the uk. i'm using the terminology wisely because it won't be mild. in between showers, bright spells and sunshine. as is the nature of showers, you can see the nature of showers, you can see the next area waiting in the wings. it will bring rain across other parts of england. dry and brighter with sunshine, john and steph. thank you very much indeed, carol. we will be finding out more about how the economy will be doing. figures out later this morning are expected to show the british economy finished the year strongly. ben is in central london for us this morning. as carol was saying, you must be freezing. it isa
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it is a freezing this morning. we are on the rooftop of their institution of engineering and technology. we will be keeping a close eye on the figures. we get the figures to the end of last year, the last quarter of last year. it is the economic growth figures, the gdp figures. it will show us how we fared as a country economically but there are a lot of questions about there are a lot of questions about the year ahead because of uncertainty because of brexit and also the fall in the value of the pound could have fed —— affect the money in our pockets. we have experts for us. london, the money in the pocket. 2016 was quite a good year but concern about the coming year. inflation, uncertainty. a lot to contend with. yes. 2016 was a good year. much better than most economists was expect in. inflation
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is rising, double between october and december last year. some people are talking about 3.5%. wages are rising, everyone is doing quite well but prices are rising faster than wages. consumer demand which has been driving this economy is probably going to be a bit lower. we are probably going to be a bit lower. we a re really probably going to be a bit lower. we are really looking for it to tail off in the second half of the year but good figures today. david, we will feel the fall in the value of the pound, which we? it will squeeze our incomes because things will get more expensive. that is the flipside. .. is more expensive. that is the flipside... is down more expensive. that is the flipside. .. is down about 12.596 against the euro. we are starting to feel it through the supermarket and also some of the stores. a definite feeling of pain. people are much more discerning, we have seen horrible figures come out. you will
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find because 84,000 people lost their job find because 84,000 people lost theirjob at the beginning of 2016 out of a workforce of 2.4 million out of a workforce of 2.4 million out of a workforce of 2.4 million out of the retail sector. people are on theirguard. as out of the retail sector. people are on their guard. as bronwyn says, the ability to have disposable income will be very much more carefully watched as it is done today and it will likely effect of gdp. i won't be the prophet of doom. the beautiful city of ours will have billions of tourist spending lots of filthy money. i hope it leads through to give everybody an upbeat feeling about life. there is an element that we will deal with this come what may. there are a lot of things for the economy to content with that we have been through worse. the 2008 financial crisis and have come through. this isjust worse. the 2008 financial crisis and have come through. this is just one of the things. it is robust but we are ata of the things. it is robust but we are at a point where the global economy is doing much better. european economy, is to risk it. the
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uk is doing well. they have ready put up interest rates in the us. they may have to put up interest rates in the uk because some manufacturers are reaching capacity constraints and so that usually means that inflation will go higher. if it does. we might see the bank of england raising rates. ithink it will be constrained. a lot will depend on whether the pound takes another beating and import prices going up. a lot of uncertainty around. we will chat more later. you might be able to see london coming to life behind me. everybody commuting into the city. i have noticed a fair fewjoggers wearing short shorts this morning. i would rather them than me because it is lolling freezing down here on the banks of the thames. —— lolling. it is 753. you are watching
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brea kfast. it is 753. you are watching breakfast. just before eight aem, lots of people will be heading off to school to begin their works to the day. for many kids, they mate the day. for many kids, they —— might have been looking after their mum or dad who might be poorly. and that affects people doing their schoolwork. research from the carers trust show that more than half struggled to meet deadlines. holly —— holly hamilton has been to meet two sisters who care for their mum — to find out how they cope. meet claudia and leonie. did mum take her tablets? just nine and 13, they have big dreams of becoming actresses. but right now theirjob is taking care of their mum. when she had a heart attack she got tunnel vision and then it is hard for her, because she can't see. i do a lot of tidying,
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packing things away and keeping things off the floor, because when things are on the floor she will trip over them easily. i was the kind of mum that did everything for her children, the running around, the picking up, and they relied on me for everything. and then suddenly i couldn't do anything for them and found that they were having to do things for me. that's what we've been learning about. the two are young carers, like more than 700,000 children in the uk. many providing care for over 50 hours a week. so it's no surprise that a survey by the carers trust found that more than half of those aged 16—25 were struggling with school work. homework is the thing i struggle with because i'm always doing loads of chores and stuff and then i have to find time to do all my homework.
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local council bosses say it is vital young carers are identified so they can get the support they need to achieve their life ambitions. you see everyone and you think, oh, they're so lucky, they can do all of that, but then you think, oh, wait, i can't do that. but then i also think it is important that i help her out and i like being responsible for her, because it makes me feel special. claudia and leonie are getting help from their school, which means they can focus on their schoolwork and looking after mum. what does the word carer mean for you? well, when i think carer i think it's not normal, a normal life. like when you are an actress you have a big role to play, but then when you finish doing that
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part you need to stop, but it's like you're doing that role forever. what wonderful young children. holly hamilton reporting. after 8:30 we'll be joined by the chief executive of the carers trust to find out more about their concerns and discuss what can be done to make life easierfor young carers. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: you are feeling it fit, steph. the former dentist who took up sprinting in his 905. 90s as in his age, not the era! now a world record holder, charles eugster will be here to tell us why he's refusing to slow down in old age. refusing to slowdown., i think. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news.
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i'm sonja jessup. commuters using southeastern trains are being warned disruption will continue for the rest of the week— after a freight train derailed in lewisham on tuesday. network rail engineers have found extensive damage to the railway line. it means a 50 metre stretch needs to be completely rebuilt which could take several days. meanwhile, major disruption is expected today on the central and waterloo & city lines as some tube drivers go on strike. the rmt union are walking out under the rmt union are walking out for 24 hours in a dispute over plans to move some train operators between depots. so let's take a look at how that's affecting services this morning. now, there's no central line between leytonstone to epping or woodford via hainault. with severe delays on the rest of the line. the good news is, at the moment, it seems the waterloo & city line is running a normal service.
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but we've still got minor delays still anti—clockwise on the circle line. and minor delays on the overground— between liverpool street and enfield town. southeastern trains are not stopping at new eltham, mottingham or lee, with a reduced service between sevenoa ks and new cross as track repairs continue. let's take a look at the roads in kennington — kennington lane is blocked northbound — and kennington road is down to one lane in both directions after an accident. and tulse hill is closed northbound from the south circular to brixton water lane— there's a burst water main. in other news: construction work begins today on a major new housing development in enfield. 10,000 homes are planned as part of a regeneration scheme costing six billion pounds. enfield council says "a high proportion" will be affordable. a set of special stamps are to be issued to honour david bowie. royal mail says it's the first time it's dedicated an entire issue to an individual music artist. the star — who was born in brixton and grew up in beckenham, died in january last year. let's get the weather
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with elizabeth rizzini. today will feel the coldest. a chilly south—easterly wind. a rather grey and cloudy day. we have lost the mistyness that there is still hill fog over the chilterns. temperatures hovering over the freezing mark. a very cold south—easterly wind. it will take the edge off the temperatures. highs will be between one and three celsius in central london. in practice, it will feel colder because of the wind chill. most of us will stay dry, perhaps a little bit of drizzle falling from the thickness of the clouds. some may be wintry. a bit of late brightness out towards the south—eastjust before the sun sets. clear skies are the first part of the night. maybe a bit of rain spreading up on the south. wintry at times and an ice at risk into tomorrow morning and a few changes tomorrow. the wind will subtly shift directions and push up mild air tomorrow. it will feel less cold. there will be rain around the afternoon. a rather grey day. temperatures back up to double figures for the course of the weekend.
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on saturday, brighter spells. they will be also possible heavy showers. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to steph and jon. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and jon kay. the prime minister vows to renew the uk's special relationship with the us, as she travels to america to meet donald trump. theresa may will say the two countries can "lead together again", and will propose greater co—operation in the fight against terrorism. she will leave downing street for the states very soon. in his first tv interview since taking office, president trump says he believes torture works when dealing with terror suspects. i want to do everything within the bounds of what you're allowed to do legally. but do i feel it works?
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absolutely i feel it works. good morning, it's thursday, the 26th of january. also this morning: children's health in the uk is lagging behind most other european countries, according to a major new report. we get the latest growth figures later today. they are expected to show the economy third pretty well at the end of last year, but a rise in the cost—of—living, if all so might fall in the cost—of—living, if all so mightfall in in the cost—of—living, if all so might fall in the value of the pound, what does this year have in store ? it's a serena and venus williams final at the australian open, as both win their semi—finals this morning. it is the first time they have met ina grand it is the first time they have met in a grand slam finalfor eight yea rs. it's taken tim peake
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to space and back. now the soyuz capsule has landed in london. we'll be finding out why. carroll might want to get inside and have a little sleep because she has been up most of the night for the national television awards!m been up most of the night for the national television awards! it is a cold start to the day—to—day and it is also fairly cloudy. we have some ice on untreated surfaces, a little bit of drizzle and the odd snow flurry. later, some of us will see some sunshine, but it is going to feel chilly. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will call for a renewed special relationship with the united states, when she addresses republican politicians in philadelphia later. a day before she becomes the first international leader to meet president trump, the prime minister will argue for greater co—operation in the fight against terrorism. our political correspondent chris mason is at westminster. this is really important for both
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sides, isn't it? for president trump and theresa may. what can we expect to come out of this visit? crucially, it is a chance for the two lea d e rs crucially, it is a chance for the two leaders to get to know one another. it is often in underestimated how important the personal relationship is. the two leaders need to get to know one another. and overcome some differences. not least the criticisms that theresa may has made of now president trump in the past. but also on specific aspects of policy. i know you've been talking this morning about what donald trump has been saying about the potential reintroduction of what is known as waterboarding, what many people see us techniques of torture. the british government has been very explicit in the past. it doesn't cooperate with foreign governments that use techniques that are seen as torture, or are seen as cruel and
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degrading. potentially tricky spot the former prime minister. on a personal level, it is a chance —— a pretty tricky spot for the prime minister. it is a chance to get to know donald trump in this away day at philadelphia, and one a human level, a chance to get to know one another, there has been an exchange of gifts, we are told the prime minister is taking a hamperfrom her country retreat in buckinghamshire. ba kewell tarts amongst the country retreat in buckinghamshire. bakewell tarts amongst the things that hamper i'm told. she is also going to take an agent scottish a rtefa ct, going to take an agent scottish artefact, it is a cup. it dates back to the cilic language in the 15th and 16th century. that is a nod to president trump's mother, originally being from the isle of lewis. she heads west with the bakewell parts. in the building behind you, in parliament today, they are thinking the other way across the channel, about europe and brexit. what is the significance of this paper which is going to be introduced before mps
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today? what we are going to get in the next couple of weeks is what we could describe as a lot of westminster around brexit. the building behind me needs to draw up a new law to make this process of brexit start, the so—called triggering of article 50. today, we get the outline of that new law, what is known as a bill. the government will publish that in the next couple of hours. from then, the debate can truly begin. we will get proper debate in the commons and the lord of all of this starting next week. chris mason in westminster, thank you. when she visits washington tomorrow, theresa may has said she is not afraid of having a candid conversation with president trump, who said he believed that torture could work to get information out of suspected terrorists. donald trump said he would seek further advice from the cia before deciding whether to bring back techniques such as water—boarding. speaking to the american abc network in his first televised interview since becoming president, he also repeated his pledge to make mexico pay for a wall along its border with the united states. here's our washington
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correspondent, david willis. could america be set for a return to the interrogation methods of old? a draft executive order suggests its commander—in—chief could be preparing to return to the dark days of waterboarding, by reopening the so—called black site secret prisons operated by the cia. in his first tv interview since becoming president, donald trump made clear he is considering scrapping an order by his predecessor that terrorist suspects be treated in accordance with international law. torture works, the president declared. when they're chopping off the heads of our people and other people, when they're chopping off the heads of people because they happen to be a christian in the middle east, when isis is doing things that nobody has ever heard of since mediaeval times, would i feel strongly about water boarding? as far as i'm concerned, we have to fight fire with fire. reports suggest mr trump is also due to announce plans to close america's
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borders to refugees, for a period at least, and implement tougher visa restrictions on citizens from certain predominantly muslim nations with links to terrorism, what is known as extreme vetting. in an effort to quell the influx of illegal immigrants from mexico, mr trump has signed an executive order to begin work on building a wall between the two nations. a multimillion dollar venture that he insists mexico will be made to pay for. ultimately it will come out of what's happening with mexico and we will start those negotiations relatively soon and we will be in a form reimbursed by mexico. so they'll pay us back? absolutely, 100%. that has ruffled the feathers of america's southern neighbour. in an address to the nation, mexico's president said they have no intention of footing the bill. the mexican president is due in washington next week. he faces difficult discussions
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with an american counterpart clearly determined to reverse many of the changes brought about by barack obama. david willis, bbc news, washington. let's have a look at some of the other stories this morning. royal bank of scotland is taking another financial hit for mis—selling risky mortgages in america before the financial crisis hit in 2008. the bank, which is more than 70% owned by the taxpayer, will be fined an additional £3 billion by the us department ofjustice. a major report into the health of children in the uk has found an "alarming gap" exists between the rich and poor — with one in five young people suffering as a result of poverty. the royal college of paediatrics and child health also suggests the uk is lagging behind most western european countries when it comes to measures such as infant mortality rates and obesity. our health correspondent, dominic hughes, reports. hi, i'm sophie.
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and i'm an emotional wreck. anxiety, depression and a need to be listened to. these are the themes of a short play on mental health, devised by school students in liverpool. i need help... the issues they touch on reflect those in today's report on the health of children and young people. it paints a picture of the uk struggling to match other countries and even falling behind. the evidence has been developing for some time that all is not well with our children's health. it's the first time we have really put together a proper picture across all four countries, and the news is not good. some of the issues that raise concerns over the state of child health include just 34% of babies breast fed to six months, less than half the rate in norway. 40% of children in england's most deprived areas are overweight or obese, and half of adult mental health problems start before the age of 14. and for the drama group in liverpool, mental health issues are a real priority. mental illnesses are an illness
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of the brain, and they're as valid as any other illnesses to any other part of the body. just because you can't see it physically, it doesn't mean it isn't there. our production will mainly be to get rid of that stigma about mental health, and just educate the audience a bit more about mental health. the four governments of the uk are all challenged to consider the impact their policies will have on children. they've responded by restating commitments to improve children's health. almost half of all hospitals are failing to meet basic government standards for hospital food, according to data released by the department of health. the campaign for better hospital food warns the situation is "diabolical". the government says the standards are "legally binding" and performance is improving. the spacecraft which took major tim peake to and from the international space station is going on public display today. the soyuz capsule, still scorched from its re—entry into the earth's
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atmosphere injune, is now at the science museum in london. our global science correspondent rebecca morelle is there. i should say extraterrestrials science correspondent! it must be an exciting day, having a good look at matt? it is an amazing thing, really. just behind me we have got tim peake reunited with his soyuz spacecraft. this is a craft that took him up into space and safely back down again. it's incredible, it's pretty small, really. you can imagine three people crammed in there on the way up, sitting on top of 300 tonnes of rocket fuel, and on the way back down again, flying through the atmosphere, temperatures reaching 1500 greece centigrade. you can see the scorch marks all down the side there. this is a piece of
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spacious history that is being put on display. it is bought by the science museum from the russian space agency for an undisclosed amount, they are not saying how much they paid. for tim, amount, they are not saying how much they paid. fortim, it amount, they are not saying how much they paid. for tim, it must be quite an emotional moment seeing it. we we re an emotional moment seeing it. we were talking to helen sharman, the first brit in space, she said you get a patch to the spacecraft, it is essential for the most dangerous pa rt essential for the most dangerous part of the mission —— attached to the spacecraft. it is now on display for everybody to come and see, a piece of history at the science museum, and tim peake with it. banks, rebecca. we will be talking to major tim peake himself, hopefully in about ten minutes. he looks a bit busy at the minute! we'll let him do his tours. do you think they got a discount for the scorch marks on the scratches on the side of it when becks marked its not exactly a new vehicle. before we finish this section of the ant and dec won the prize for best tv presenter for the 16th
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year at last night's national television awards. do they always win at?! they literally storm it every year, don't they? other winners included mary berry for bestjudge, what a lovely lady, she was over the moon. and strictly come dancing picked up the gong for best talent show. emmerdale was voted best soap, and itv‘s this morning won best live magazine programme. beating us at! but we don't mind, because we just love ourjobs, it's lovely to be here. we didn't get to go to the party, but we're not bitter. it's not the winning that counts. it's not even the party that counts, it's just being counts. it's not even the party that counts, it'sjust being here counts. it's not even the party that counts, it's just being here with you every day. sincerity is in from every pore! children's health in the uk is injeopardy, with higher death rates and levels of obesity than in much of europe.
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that's the warning from the the royal college of paediatrics and child health. in a major report out today, the body also highlights a growing gap between rich and the poor children. let's find out more on this from dr ronny cheung, who's from the royal college of paediatrics and child health. thank you very much indeed for joining us here this morning. these are bold warnings and claims. what makes you so are bold warnings and claims. what makes you so sure are bold warnings and claims. what makes you so sure that things aren't as bad as the picture that you are painting? well, this is the first opportunity to manage and really pull together all of the data around child health in this country. across all four nations. across 25 health indicators across the board, what we have seen is that for many of them, we are not doing as well as we have been doing, and certainly not as well as compared to our neighbours, our comparable neighbours in western europe. for instance, in terms of
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our child mortality levels, the rate of child deaths in childhood, we have gone from being amongst the best in europe, 20 or 30 years ago, the now being amongst the worst. as you have said earlier on, the gap between the outcomes for the poorest and the most affluent children in this country is growing. again, that pattern is replicated across all indicators. we have a statement from the department of health, who say it is a top priority for the government. they say they have dealt with tobacco, a soft drinks levy, obesity strategy. we have similar statements from devolved governments. if all thatis from devolved governments. if all that is going on, why do you say we are not seeing the improvements? we welcome a lot of the strategies and policies that have come through from the government, but we don't think that some of them have gone far enough. we need to be bolder in some of our strategies and policies that
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come through. for instance, things based in good evidence, such as minimum alcohol pricing, thinking about a tax levy on high sugar and high fat foods, and reducing the advertising of those foods to young children. it goes a little beyond that. we'd like to see, firstly, a focus on tackling child poverty. as isaid focus on tackling child poverty. as i said earlier, poorer children are unhealthy children. and they will become the unhealthy adults in 20, 30 years. we are storing up problems if we don't tackle this now. we should think about a unified national strategy, a cross government strategy for child health which looks at all areas of policy and has child health embedded in all of those, be that in health, the
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economy, in social care, and also education. you say in this report that we are falling behind other countries in western europe — what are they doing? are there lessons that we can learn or is this a cultural, social thing? that we can learn or is this a cultural, socialthing? with all of these things, it is different... there are lots of different causes. we know that poverty is an issue, but we also know that public health, in other words, an investment in services that help tackle the causes of ill health, has been reducing significantly in this country in the recent past. i think if we don't manage to reinvest that money and that support for families and young children, we will not be able to manage... we won't be able to get on top of the problem and we will be chasing after it by investing more in health care and health care problems in the future. thank you for joining problems in the future. thank you forjoining us.
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i wonder what time it feels like to carol. she has had three hours sleep. i saw a picture of her in a 24—hour supermarket. what time did you get to bed after the tv awards? quarter to midnight. what might you look very fresh. —— quarter to midnight. what might you look very fresh. -- you look very fresh. how was the weather? very fresh! today, it will feel quite bitter. we are pulling in all this cold air from the near continent and it's going to sweep across our shores. wrap up warmly. you will feel it. i will show you that in a second. there is also a lot of clout. here
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and there are, it is they can offer drizzle or the odd snow flurry. there is the risk of ice on untreated surfaces, roads and pavements alike, first thing this morning. in northern scotland, a cold but beautiful day from the word go. the rest of scotland and parts of northern england will see some brea ks of northern england will see some breaks in the cloud, but there is a lot of cloud around. the cloud will start to break up in southern counties of england, and some of us will see some sunshine. the far south of england and into the south west. although there are temperatures of four celsius in barnstaple, in the wind, it will feel colder. a lot of cloud in wales still, despite the breaks. there could be some doubt and drizzle in northern ireland. three celsius is
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the maximum temperature in glasgow. with the wind chill, it will feel more like freezing. through the evening and overnight, still quite a windy one in prospect, then we have a cluster of weather fronts moving in from the north and the west. they will introduce more unsettled conditions in the form of rain. it is still quite windy. this cold continental wind is still coming our way. a frosty start for some tomorrow. milder air way. a frosty start for some tomorrow. milderairstarts way. a frosty start for some tomorrow. milder air starts to sweep into the west. less cold air moves across central and eastern areas. it is certainly not going to be mild in central and eastern areas. on saturday, a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. then you can see what is waiting in the wings for sunday. there is still some uncertainty as to where this low pressure will end up. we think
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at the moment it will bring rain to parts of wales in southern england. it might get this far north, but it might stay further south. if you are doing something outdoors, do keep in touch with the weather forecast. further north, it looks at this stage like it will stay dry and find with some sunshine. temperatures continue to climb. the maximum temperature in london today is run about one celsius. by sunday, it will be a leading celsius. carroll, one more to go and then it is home time! the spacecraft which took major tim peake to and from the international space station is going on public display today. the soyuz capsule, still scorched from its re—entry into the earth's
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i should say extraterrestrials science correspondent! it must be an exciting day, having a good look at it is really cool seeing that union jack going outside. there he goes! major tim peake is at the science museum for us. good morning. and stood in front of it, does it bring back brilliant memories when you see your capsule? good morning. yes, it certainly does. i arrived good morning. yes, it certainly does. iarrived here good morning. yes, it certainly does. i arrived here about 30 minutes ago, and this was the first timei minutes ago, and this was the first time i had seen this capsule since the 18th of june time i had seen this capsule since the 18th ofjune in kazakhstan, and it has brought back all the memories of the mission. we have seen some pictures of your trip to space. tell
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us about the capsule. it looks fairly small to, —— fairly small, to be honest. it comprises three pieces. the other two pieces separate just before we come back to the's atmosphere and they burn up. the heat shield was jettisoned before landing as well, and this is the only part that comes back to earth, with the three crew members and about a hundred kilos of cargo. above me is also the huge canopy which brings the capsule back to earth safely. obviously, an important part of your life, but a brilliant bit of science and british history for everyone to see now. brilliant bit of science and british history for everyone to see nowm is, it is wonderful to see this actual back in the uk. for everybody who gets to visit, i hope it will be a great source of inspiration and will maybe so the seeds for young
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people. i remember seeing this type of exhibit in museums as a child and being inspired. it has done a fair few million miles in its time — what is actually inside it, then? inside is actually inside it, then? inside is just about enough room for the three crew members. i looked in the window this morning, and it even has the seat liners that were moulded to our bodies. they are still in there. in addition, the control panels and all the other bits and pieces that enable us to control this spacecraft during launch and re—entry. it really does have one careful user, it is in great condition. it is the incredible to see it here and this cd scorch marks. coming back into the's atmosphere is very punishing that any space vehicle, so to see the punishment this capsule has been through this morning is incredible. doing what you did is very rare and
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very expensive — tell us a bit about why your trip was so important, what was the return on investment. from an economic sense, it makes absolute sense for the uk to be involved in human space flight. we get a huge return on our investment — around 2-1. in return on our investment — around 2—1. in addition to the economic return, it is great for our industry to be involved and for the science community to be involved. we are doing great science on board the space station. we have started dna sequencing and genetic research. also, for educational inspiration was not so there are many great benefits in being involved in the space benefits in being involved in the space programme, now and benefits in being involved in the space programme, now and in the future. and i understand you are going back to space in the future? yellow like the space station is going to go until 2024 at least. the
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european space agency and the uk will be involved until then. it gives us a second opportunity to go back to the space station. in fact, some of my colleagues are already going back for their second mission next year. it is great for european astronauts to be able to go back and continue our involvement in the space continue our involvement in the space programme. continue our involvement in the space programme. an absolute treat aduu space programme. an absolute treat adult you. thank you forjoining us. i would buy a used space capsule from him! hello there, good morning. cold is the theme of it across the board today. particularly when you factor in the wind. that wind is coming
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in from the near continent, where of course it has been really cold recently. and that cold air is heading our way. it's also dragging in a fair bit of cloud to start the day today, as you can see on the satellite sequence. although the north of scotland is showing something a little bit brighter. but pretty extensive cloud elsewhere, fairly low cloud, so some fog over the hills. not the really poor visibility at low levels that we've seen recently, but a cold start today. we're still hovering around about freezing for many. maybe not quite so cold towards the far south and west, but still, pretty chilly in the wind, which is strongest towards the west. and through the morning, that low cloud mightjust produce the spot of drizzle, maybe the odd flake of snow. but most places will be dry, bit on the grey side. but there is sunshine to be had in northern scotland. we will keep that going into the afternoon. elsewhere, it's a pretty grey afternoon. but there is a lot of dry weather to be had. we will see the cloud beginning to break for the southernmost counties in the afternoon,
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the western side of wales also beginning beginning to brighten up. on the face of it, we're just about creeping up above freezing. but for most places it will feel like it is a subzero day. feeling particularly cold in northern england. and then through this evening we start to see the wind switch around to a more southerly direction. but still quite a noticeable wind into the day on friday. we start off with a touch of frost, and it will feel pretty chilly once again. although out west we are beginning to see a bit of a change. the weather fronts trying to push in, bringing thicker cloud and some rain. and slightly milder air. we will see 8—10d in belfast, and in cardiff. but head towards the north—east, and it's still pretty chilly. saturday starts off a bit wet and windy in the south—eastern corner. that moves away, and then it's sunny spells and showers. and temperatures are beginning to recover. we will see another spell of rain spreading across much and wales as we go through saturday night and into sunday morning. this is business live from bbc news, with aaron heslehurst and sally bundock. tax wars — can brexit britain and trump's united states beat the likes of ireland at their own game and lure back the multinationals and their billions? live from london, that's our top story on thursday 26th january. can the president force
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through the tax cuts he says will help boost and fuel the world's biggest economy? another big fine — royal bank of scotland says its mis—selling in america's sub—prime crisis will now cost more than $8 billion.
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