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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 26, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at two o'clock. theresa may heads to the united states to become the first world leader to meet the new president. but donald trump's latest comments on supporting torture in his first interview as president are likely to complicate the visit. as tired as i am concerned we have to fight fire with fire. the number of prisoners taking their own lives in jails in england and wales reaches record levels. strong consumer spending helped the uk's economy to grow faster than expected at the end of last year. and tim peake reveals he's to return to the international space station for a second time as the module he used to transport him last time goes on display. i saw this spacecraft every single day because our docking port was
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right next to the window. for six months in space, every time i would open the window i would look out and see the spacecraft. i will be reporting live from westminster where senior politicians, dignitaries and religious leaders will gather for eight commemorative event to mark the holocaust. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. theresa may is expected to become the first world leader to meet america's new president this evening when she addresses republican congressmen in philadelphia. tomorrow she will travel to the white house for formal talks. the prime minister is expected to tell her audience tonight that a "sovereign, global" britain wants to enhance
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ties with its "old friends". but some politicians here have reacted to the meeting with misgivings, after mr trump said he supported the use of waterboarding in interrogations. here's our political correspondent, carole walker. theresa may said her meeting with president trump will be an opportunity to renew the special relationship come to discuss future trade deal of importance of strengthening defence and security cooperation. but how will she response of the new president's's remarks although some of it advises don't agree with them, donald trump has said he would consider methods such as waterboarding to international terrorism. when they are chopping off the heads of people because they are eight christian in middle east, when isis is doing things nobody has heard of this medieval times, would ifeel strongly about waterboarding 7 medieval times, would ifeel strongly about waterboarding? we have to fight fire with fire. i want
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to do everything within the bounds of what you are allowed to do legally. do i feel it works? yes. the prime minister did answer that question in the house of commons yesterday. she was very clear that oui’ yesterday. she was very clear that our principled position and our objection to torture remains unchanged. the prime minister has said she won't be afraid to stand up to the american president on issues where they disagree. yesterday, senior tory mp raised his concerns. president trump has repeatedly said he will back torture as an instrument of policy. when she sees him on friday, were the prime minister make clear that in no circumstances will she permits britain to be dragged into facilitating that torture as we were after 17 —— september the 11th. we have a very clear position on
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torture, we do not sanction torture, we don't get involved with that and that will continue to be our position. as the prime minister said the two discussed prism's leaving from the eu, she wants to get new global ties. theresa may knows progress on any future us trade deal will spend an important signal. progress on any future us trade deal will spend an important signalm is important for britain and the us we have better trading arrangements. they could be better. it is good we worked together on the main issues around the world. the prime minister will speak in glowing terms about the importance of the special relationship when she addresses senior republicans later. she will say the us in the uk working together to defeat evil have fulfilled the promise of freedom, liberty and the rights of man. she is under pressure to confront the american president over remarks which many believe fly in the face of those ideals. i we going to
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return to the worst days of guantanamo bay? it cannot be right that our message to the rest of the world is, torture is back on the agenda. i hope she is very clear with him about that. theresa may knows establishing a strong personal report will be hugely important. downing street say there may be some frank exchanges but it is clear renewing the special relationship will be the priority. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in westminster. no shortage of advice for the prime minister that at westminster on what she should say to donald trump. that is right. mps from all sides lining up is right. mps from all sides lining up to say to her she is going to have to be tough. the uk has close relationship with america but that doesn't mean you can't have frank discussions. that is what downing street was saying today. the close relationship goes back many decades and it does mean it allows her to be
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able to be frank with the new president. i am joined able to be frank with the new president. iam joined by able to be frank with the new president. i am joined by alex the international affairs spokesman for the snp. what would your advice to theresa may? this is the first time when neither the giver nor the receiver of the gift will be able to pronounce it. it is eight cup of kindness, it is the symbol of universal love and solidarity. how on earth cannot be appropriate to give such gift to somebody who has declared his support torture? it is an extraordinary difficult and awkward position that the prime minister has put herself into. what should she do? he is the president of america, we have close ties with the american. do you think she should go on the trip? she has given the impression she is desperate of its trade deal because of her weakness regarding the european union and the single market. i can
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say many things about donald trump but one thing, interesting week reading his book, you won't go into any negotiations from weak position otherwise he will take you to the cleaners. appealing to his better nature is going to come i think it is the futile attempt. you think he will not listen. there are the things people have said that she must tell him about climate change, about the way he has talked about women, you think he will not listen. the idea that theresa may is going to change the nature of donald trump is fantastic. what troubles me much more is the fact that on the trade side, she is going in with an incredibly weak negotiating had ever since we are coming out the biggest single market in the world where protectionism is rearing its head led by donald trump. from that we can negotiating position we are
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going to try and get to deal with the united states. we have got one of the few countries in the world of the uk actually runs surplus with. the last thing we want to is change these trade. it'll end up with more favourable position for the united states. going back to his comments about torture and he says he will take advice from his defence secretary he hasn't said he would prove its use yet. what concerns do you have how that might affect our relationship with the usa when it comes to intelligence sharing?m relationship with the usa when it comes to intelligence sharing? it is characteristic of donald trump to say, even if he won't do it, he want to declare it —— his support about it. we are bound by our own code of ethics, by international law and that sort of thing places obstacles in doing it. it isn't something that is confined to the progressive
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forces in politics or to the opposition benches. i saw the respected conservative mp only yesterday challenging the prime minister explicitly on this point. torture is only one area of difficulty, the two mentioned with the health agreements or hormones in b. donald trump would countenance trade agreement with the uk unless hormone injected beef had free reign in the british supermarkets. these are some of the difficulties the prime minister is going to plunge herself into. it is going to another subject, the publication of the bill which is going to trigger article 50. the snp said they were laid down 50. the snp said they were laid down 50 amendments to track the changes. you don't have the numbers to stop it. the numbers and a lot tighter than many people thought otherwise you wouldn't be getting white paper. that is because of the number of conservatives who signed up to the
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white paper. one of the amendment says we need the white paper before then is final parliamentary decision. that might attract support. i hope number of our amendments will catch supports from all over the house. that is eight concerning the commons and lords about what happens when we get it parliamentary vote in 18 months' time, if it is no agreement on the terms. you will end up with having the choice between eight bad deal and eight worse deal. that challenging, that notion, trying to get reset amendment in, it will attract support in the commons that israel attract support of the lords is. we have four political parties are in amendments. we will fight this tooth and nail. thank you very much indeed. but there will be debated for the first time on tuesday, an extra long sitting with mps sitting until midnight. we have
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just heard the controversial tweet from presidents trump and that is concerning mexico. he wants mexico to pay for his wall between the us and mexico and he has tweeted to say that the mexican president should cancel his forthcoming visit to washington if mexico refuses to pay for that wall, as presidents trump has insisted it must do. he said if mexico is unwilling to pay for the badly needed wall then it will be better to cancel the upcoming meeting. the latest from donald trump's twitter account. daniel lippman is a reporter for politico and a co—author of politico's playbook morning newsletter. he joins me now on webcam from washington. thank you very much indeed for joining us. let's look at this meeting that is about to happen in a
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few hours' time between theresa may and donald trump. the first meeting is always fascinating. these two characters appear on the face of it to be absolutely poles apart. how do you see it's going? it is the real test for both of them for trump he has two prove he is presidential and meeting if foreign leader and that is eight hours for him given it is left and right on various issues. he has not changed his retallick even though he's in the oval office. what i expect from the oval office. what i expect from the meeting tomorrow is what tone he strikes. theresa may is introducing herself to the american people as well, lots of americans think david cameron is the minister. that is very interesting. whenever there is aim meeting between the british prime minister and the american president, we always hear
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great deal about the special relationship that the uk has with the us. is it as specialfor the us? i think it is more special for you guys. it is almost like he relationship when one party is in love with the other little bit more. i think americans value britain and we love you guys and it doesn't seem like it is as important in america. we have so many other things on our mind we are not focused on uk's relationship with the us. we are focused on assessing trump and seeing whether he will be eight good president. a lots of americans are trying to resist him. that is going to have it wall of resistance where they don't cooperate with him. they call an illegitimate. that'll focus attention here and this visit might
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not make a lot of waves in the us. it is interesting for less that theresa may is the first foreign leader he is choosing to meet and to welcome in the white house. that is significant. it is interesting how that she is carrying out the brexit and a lot of people in america think trump's election in november was america's version of brexit. people are apprehensive about facing blowback from their own country and their people about meeting with him given he is so controversial. we see mps into these are made's own party who are criticising her and telling her to stick up for the uk's values. every foreign leader that this is trump from eight democratic... they don't forget tainted by trump
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given his inflammatory language at times. great to hear everything you had to say. thanks very much indeed for joining had to say. thanks very much indeed forjoining us. theresa may is on her way to the us for talks with president trump tomorrow. tonight the prime minister will give a speech to us republicans and we'll be showing it live here on the bbc news channel at 8.30pm. austrian police have arrested eight people in raids linked to potential connections with the militant group, so—called islamic state. 800 officers took part in the raids in vienna and graz in relation to investigations concerning suspected participation in a terrorist organisation. newsjustin. news justin. the government newsjustin. the government is planning to close more than one in ten jobcentres. the union planning to close more than one in tenjobcentres. the union says that puts potentially thousands ofjobs
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at risk. that is news coming in. one in tenjobcentres due to be closed and that is coming from the union, the pcs. the headlines on bbc news: theresa may is promising to renew the uk's relationship with the us as she heads to the us with talks with presidents trump. the record number of people killed themselves in prisons in england and wales last year with 119 self—inflicted deaths. the uk economy grew by .6% during the fourth quarter of last year partly due to strong consumer spending. in sport, ahab century from eoin morgan help england to 87 wicket win over india in the first 2020 international. they did it with 11 balls to spare. roger federer is into the first men's singles finals in australia. he beat wawrinka and this one win away from may five
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triumph in melbourne. serena williams will meet her older sister malvinas, any grand slam finalfor sister malvinas, any grand slam final for the first sister malvinas, any grand slam finalfor the first time sister malvinas, any grand slam final for the first time since 2009. selina says she will be facing the toughest opponent. i will be back with those stories to after half past. the chancellor philip hammond says the uk's economy is robust and resilient, but he's warned there maybe uncertainty ahead as britain adjusts to a new relationship with europe. his comments come as official figures show that the economy defied the expectations of some economists and grew by 0.6% in the final three months of last year and by 2.0% over 2016. 0ur economics editor, kamal ahmed is at the microsoft headquarters in reading. the chancellor was there on a visit this morning. it was napoleon that called britain
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a nation of shopkeepers. frankly, philip hammond is probably pretty glad we are amy she and of consumers. it has been the services sector, 80% of the uk economy, that has lifted those growth figures. retail, restaurants and travel agents have all been contributing to those growth figures. as you say, there were a lot of gloomy forecasts about what had happened to the economy if we voted to leave the european union. i kicked off by asking the chancellor here in redding, whether this was pain cancel or pain delayed. we recognise that as we go into this period of negotiation with the european union and as we absorb the impact of the pre—season of stirling last year, they will be more uncertainty ahead during the course of this year. the fact the economy is so robust and resilient going in should give us great cause for
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optimism of ourfuture. brexit and an negotiations for leaving the european union are one of the big earners for the uk economy. the tiles were told me there were concerns about business investment being delayed because of worries about that uncertainty. —— the chancellor. i asked him whether that period of uncertainty was no seeming little shorter than it had initially. i sense that the period in which our european partners were wanting to chastise us has passed, it has moved on. what people are looking to do now is look for any practical solution that works for us, works for the european union and will make all our people more prosperous in the future. i think now, of course, philip hammond will be looking towards his
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next big event and that is the budget. that is in march was the better growth figures for 2016 mean the government will have little bit more money to play with because the government ‘s's receipts will have increased from taxes. it doesn't mean we're out of the woods, the bank of england are still growth for next year will be lower than forecast for this year. but for the moment the uk economy is certainly continuing without strong robust growth that we have seen today. the comedian, rory mcgrath, has been given a suspended prison sentence for harassing a married woman for more than a year. the 60—year—old, who's appeared on the bbc panel show they think it's all over, pleaded guilty at the start of his trial at huntingdon magistrates court in cambridgeshire. the court heard he sent the woman messages and followed her in the street. mike cartwright is at huntingdon magistrates court in cambridgeshire. this is harassment that lasted more
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than payet. it involved a marriage mother in her 40s who worked in the media. we can't name herfor legal reasons. the court said mcgrath and her had an affairfor more reasons. the court said mcgrath and her had an affair for more than five yea rs her had an affair for more than five years but then the woman wanted to break it. the court was told she thought he had become difficult and unpleasant company. she was insistent that we heard he he pursued eight conduct that was tempestuous. they both shared intimate photos and messages and mcgrath had promised to do the dose. in the months after he threatened to print glossy images of birds. he said two of them back to the woman saying, you look amazing. numerous e—mails, texts and calls were made. 0n e—mails, texts and calls were made. on one occasion he tailed her as she went for iran with her teenage
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daughter. but —— four dave ryan. the court heard about his deep shame, his deep remorse, how his marriage had been threatened. afterwards, standing outside the court, next to his wife. his solicitor spoke on his behalf. this has been dark time and tha nkfully this has been dark time and thankfully it is now over. i wish to thankfully it is now over. i wish to thank thejudge thankfully it is now over. i wish to thank the judge and apologise to my wife and family and to thank them for the incredible support during this time. i now want to move on with my life. thank you. he was ordered to pay £200 in costs underfive year he was ordered to pay £200 in costs under five year restraining order was also imposed. the number of prisoners who killed themselves injails in england
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and wales last year has reached record levels. the ministry ofjustice says there were 119 suicides, the highest number since records began in 1978. our home affairs correspondent tom symonds reports. last year the bbc was given rare access to one of britain's most troubled prisons. it did not take long for our team to come across the mental health problems driving today's rise in prisoners killing and harming themselves. help. this man had cuts across his body. another inmate has smashed up his cell, painted its walls. he said his conditions had been diagnosed but not well treated. i am asking for health but the service seems so slow. from this picture of life behind bars to the figures which measure the problem. 354 deaths were
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recorded in 2015—16, up more than aphid, a record number. 0ne recorded in 2015—16, up more than aphid, a record number. one of self—inflicted, another record. they we re self—inflicted, another record. they were more than 25,000 assaults. yet again, the record. the governments's focus has been on restoring members of prison officers which had been previously been cut. we are investing £100 million, 2500 extra prison officers across the estate so that we are able to have caseload of one prison officer for every six prisoners enabling us to give support and challenge to help them turn their lives around. but is making sure they are kept safe while they are in prison. it is the crisis? it is very serious situation and they acknowledge that.“ crisis? it is very serious situation and they acknowledge that. if she's going to be serious about saving lives and making prisons saver and make prisons work better serve eight purpose, putting in more staff is only one thing. she has in the end
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to reduce the number of people in them as the prisoners are overflowing, they are rat infested and they are festering with crime. getting tough with prisoners is easy politics for the government. increasing officer numbers is achievable but brings financial pressures but cutting the number of people in prison, that isas real challenge. —— that is real challenge. well, you can find out more about the pressures on the prison system in a special report online by the bbc‘s home affairs correspondent danny shaw. that's at bbc.dot.co.uk/prisons. ahead of tomorrow's holocaust memorial day in the uk, a national commemorative event is being held in central london involving genocide survivors, high profile political and religious figures and celebrities. this year's theme explores the treatment of survivors of the holocaust and other genocides. a survey by the holocaust memorial day trust says one in four survivors has experienced discrimination or abuse here in the uk, because of their religion and ethnicity.
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0ur religious affairs correspondent, martin bashir, is at the queen elizabeth ii in central london. good afternoon from westminster for this special commemorative event. senior politicians, dignitaries and religious leaders will be coming here for service that begin in 13 minutes. iam here for service that begin in 13 minutes. i am joined here for service that begin in 13 minutes. iamjoined by here for service that begin in 13 minutes. i am joined by chief rabbi. good afternoon, sir. why is it so important we remember those horrific events ? important we remember those horrific events? it is important we paid tribute to the memory of 6 million dues and others who perished is that they're concerned that as the passage of time and as time passes, our memories fade. 70 years
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ago is along time. it is that concern which is inspiring today's events. it is not concerned that is inspiring the government to initiate wonderful project which is the national memorial and learning centre which we are establishing alongside the houses of parliament together with many other activities. there is something like 6000 events taking place tomorrow on holocaust memorial day right across the uk in places as far fetched as museums to railway stations, even in prisons. the theme of this year is how can life go on? particularly quoting the great holocaust survivor. he said, death is not the problem, we learn to live with death, the problem is to live with death, the problem is to adjust to life. they will be people in this service will be reflecting how it is possible to
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live beyond the horrors of genocide. what can we learn from them? then i going to be some amazing people in these —— this service. many thousands of them have paved the way for us to have the positive mindset to be inspired by them and also we have the responsibility to guarantee their legacy will live on. u nfortu nately, their legacy will live on. unfortunately, they are not going to live forever. remembrance is key and guaranteeing the lessons will be internalised to prevent this from happening again is so important. we are standing just happening again is so important. we are standingjust in happening again is so important. we are standing just in front of what is the wall of quotes. tell us what this represents. they were made by family members of survivors. they represent thoughts, memories and experiences, lovely handiwork. it is one of many artistic works which have been fashioned to inspire us to rememberfor the have been fashioned to inspire us to remember for the sake of the future. i know he will be contributing so i
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will allow you to go. thank you so much. back to the studio. time now for the weather. this incision across much of scotland, into the west of wales and some southern coast of england should see some brightness as we had through the afternoon. temperatures on the face of itjust above freezing the tiny add—on that wind chill it will feel like minus the minus four. it could be the odd rain of snow coming out of the cloud. if similar picture as we had through this evening to stop a sharp frost, most this evening to stop a sharp frost, m ost pla ces this evening to stop a sharp frost, most places drying. it could be quite an icy starter for some others especially towards the south—east. through the day on friday, we've got more cloud moving into northern
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ireland with outbreaks of light rain. the best of the brightness of the north—east were lit be cold, 2 degrees in newcastle. we will see highs of eight or nine towards the south—west. hello, this is bbc news. let's ta ke let's take you back to the united states now, we are hearing from senior republicans in philadelphia, house speaker paul ryan and the senate jordy house speaker paul ryan and the senatejordy reid mitch mcconnell. reacting to daily comments, what the speaker has done, which i entirely concur with, is to lay out a game plan through the recess of what we have tried to accomplish. for myself, i intend to make as much progress as i myself, i intend to make as much progress as i can. reporter: the president of mexico
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has said that they will not build a wall and he will cancel an upcoming meeting. can the president salvage this relationship with mexico?” meeting. can the president salvage this relationship with mexico? i do not have advice to give to the president on that issue. we are moving ahead. as the speaker pointed out yesterday, in a meeting of roughly 12—15, we attend to address the wall issue ourselves and the president can deal with his relations with other countries on that issue and other issues.|j relations with other countries on that issue and other issues. i think it will be fine. reporter asks question.
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i don't agree, he changes his opinion every day but with the core agenda, we are coordinating the health and the senate, we have done it in conjunction with the administration, we ran on these issues in 2016, there are no surprises and the president agrees with the agenda, we have laid other issues not only that we will be focusing on but the timeline, which is consistent and has not changed. reporter asks question. we are in a good place on tax reform. it can get complicated when you get into the details of tax reform but once you go through how tax reform works, and
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what it is going to take to get the kind of competitive tax estimate metrical system and tax rates, most people would agree that it is the right approach —— competitive tax system. reporter: president trump has said that he wants to look at and modify the ban on torture. is this a debate your members want to have? the director of the cia has made it clear that he will follow the law. i believe that virtually all of our members are comfortable with the state of the law on that issue now. torture is illegal. torture is not illegal. we agree with that. the lady in the glasses? reporter: just lady in the glasses? reporter: just how important will it
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be regarding british policy? the la st be regarding british policy? the last part be regarding british policy? the la st pa rt of be regarding british policy? the last part of your question is not pa rt of last part of your question is not part of the trump administration, we have a special and unique relationship with great britain. we value this relationship and i think the fact that the prime ministers meeting with us today is testament to the fact that this is a very important relationship which we value and we believe going forward that we can do more things like trade and the rest to increase the ties between our two nations. reporter: speaker ryan has laid out an aggressive agenda, that the senator is not always on the same timetable... really? laughter could you address the agenda as laid out? and whether the senate can move
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at that speed? the two biggest issues were moving forward with repealing and replacing 0bamacare and tax reform, we anticipate both of those having little or no democratic cooperation so we are working with the house to make sure that these measures are reconcilable. and that the speaker understands the challenges of getting things through the senate which has been true for 240 years. but we are aware of the challenges and we think that we can move forward. in addition, we have all of this are the responsibility which the house does not have. appointments which are subject to confirmation. 0n appointments which are subject to confirmation. on top of the other challenges of moving forward, that is why you can anticipate two reconciliation measures in the last six months. let mejump on that, we are ina six months. let mejump on that, we are in a house where we respect that they have a different rule system, and it takes more time and they have
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additional responsibilities, as the majority leader just additional responsibilities, as the majority leaderjust said, in mexico they will have judges coming through and lower—level appointments, 1200 altogether. 0ur agenda —— they will havejudges coming altogether. 0ur agenda —— they will have judges coming through. altogether. 0ur agenda —— they will havejudges coming through. we can appreciate the differences between the house and the senate would responsibilities. we have a good agenda and timetable in store. reporter asks question. with the cost of the war, will that be offset? we do not want to set arbitrary deadlines on things, we wa nt arbitrary deadlines on things, we want to get that right. —— the cost of the wall. there are deadlines that we clearly have to deal with.
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september 30 that we clearly have to deal with. september30 is an that we clearly have to deal with. september 30 is an important statutory deadline, they will clearly help to guide us and the reason why we have a 200 day agenda now rather than 100 days is to appreciate that the senate is to do more things. we are anticipating a supreme court justice, they more things. we are anticipating a supreme courtjustice, they have to do that and we have all of the cabinet. that is why we have adjusted to filling most of the counter to 2017. it's bold and aggressive and we feel that we have an obligation to make good on the commitment we made in the campaign. we are trying to fix peoples problems in this country. health ca re problems in this country. health care is collapsing and we need to fix it. tax reform is necessary for faster economic growth, higher wages, more jobs, people faster economic growth, higher wages, morejobs, people asked us faster economic growth, higher wages, more jobs, people asked us to do this and we want to follow up. that is why it will take more than 100 days. studio: speaker of the
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house paul ryan and mitch mcconnell, those senior republicans and senior republican congressional leaders which theresa may will be addressing later in philadelphia where they we re later in philadelphia where they were speaking. interesting comments about the war that —— wall that donald trump wants to address. saying that congress is moving ahead with 12- $15 billion to saying that congress is moving ahead with 12— $15 billion to finance the building of that very controversial wall between the united states and mexico. and comments about the other main issue of the day, president trump's comments about waterboarding, saying that he was behind the use of torture. paul ryan there saying clearly that torture is not legal and that we, the republicans, agree with that. a couple of words about the arrival of theresa may with paul ryan, saying that he hoped the visit would help
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to increase our bonds and ties with the uk. let's get more now on theresa may's visit to america. the prime minister will tell republican leaders tonight that the uk and the us can renew their special relationship — in what she'll describe as a "new age" — after brexit and the election of president trump. tomorrow the prime minister will become the first world leader to hold face—to—face talks with mr trump at the white house. let's get the latest on all of that from our political correspondent, vicki young is at westminster where mps have been queueing up to offer advice to the prime minister on what she should say to donald trump? yes, and the timing of his comments on torture have not helped her, as she crosses the atlantic to go to the delphi and washington tomorrow. downing street were delighted that she was the first foreign leader to be invited to the white house shortly after his inauguration —— to
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go to philadelphia. it will be an interesting meeting with big differences in 0pinion. and brownjoins me now. do you think that she should not have gone? because they have had disagreements could schumacher think it is —— because they have had disagreements? it's a trade or that he will not deliver, he has made it clear that it is america first and we seem to be thrashing around looking for something to hold onto, given that we are excluding ourselves from the biggest single market on our doorstep. downing street say that she can go there and be open with him and have a frank conversation and influence what he thinks? we will see how french is prepared to be in private and in public. will see how french is prepared to be in private and in publiclj will see how french is prepared to be in private and in public. i think angela merkel has struck the right tone, being polite about president trump but has made clear that germany and britain should be the
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same, our democracy is based on certain values which included an absolute aberration of torture. and some of the other things he has been going on about. in the commons today, the bill which will trigger an score 50 and begin brexit negotiations has been published today. labour does not want to be seen to be blocking the process, i am missing that you will not follow jeremy corbyn's instructions chris rock i will not vote to destroyjobs and prosperity across the country. it's catastrophic for our economy in this country, there is no way that i can support that. some would say it is easierfor you can support that. some would say it is easier for you with a remain constituency in exeter, you are a remain campaign and it is easy enough for you to follow your conscience. but for others it is tricky, they are in constituencies where people had voted to leave, they have to reflect their
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constituents and labour is divided? i appreciate the difficulties that some of my colleagues have in constituencies which voted to leave. but as mps we are responsible to use ourjudgment but as mps we are responsible to use our judgment as to but as mps we are responsible to use ourjudgment as to what we believe is in the best interests of our constituencies and the country. in my view, it is a catastrophic hard story brexit which will damage jobs and prosperity. but all parties need to think carefully before they vote —— tory. to think carefully before they vote -- tory. that debate begins next week, what would you lie to see when it comes to amendments and changes, the snp will put down 50 amendments, what do you want to see the government agreed to? the government 's decision to limit debate on the single biggest issue facing the country in our lifetime will affect generations to come to just three days? that is totally outrageous and we should be opposing that but clearly, i would like to see an amendment on the single market and the customs union which is the most important things for me and how the
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government treats parliament going forward , government treats parliament going forward, and how much parliament is consulted and the kind of vote that we will have at the end of the process as well. then bradshaw, thank you. yesterday i spoke to a shadow cabinet member who said that they would be willing to resign from they would be willing to resign from the post in order to defy they would be willing to resign from the post in order to denyeremy corbyn because they feel so strongly that article 50 should be opposed. there could be trouble here next week forjeremy corbyn... there could be trouble here next week forjeremy corbyn. .. vicki young, thank you. discussing what mps are saying about theresa may's visit to the usa and her forthcoming meeting with theresa may's visit to the usa and herforthcoming meeting with donald trump. as we have been hearing, she's on her way right now to philadelphia, and will be giving a speech to us congressional leaders, republicans in congress, and we will show you that speech at 8:30pm tonight on the bbc news channel. as we've heard, president trump has
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indicated he would support the water—boarding of terrorism suspects — if his defence secretary and the director of the cia want to reinstate the interrogation technique. mr trump told a us television network he "absolutely" believed that torture worked — arguing "we have to fight fire with fire". joining me via webcam is shane 0'mara, professor of experimental brain research at trinity college dublin, and author of ‘why torture doesn't work: the neuroscience of interrogation'. thank you very much indeed for joining us this afternoon. if we can for a moment put aside the morality of using torture, why doesn't it work? we need to be clear on what we mean by saying torture does not work, historically torture has worked well if you want to force people to repeating it a political point of view or confess to crimes that they have not committed or say a scientific fact is not so, like
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the earth going around the sun. but where torture fails is as an information gathering tool. if you wa nt information gathering tool. if you want reliable information from the long—term memories of the people you are interrogating, we know that the imposition of states like sleep deprivation, states that involve severe pain, these kinds of things, they all cause really grave problems for cognition and mood, and memory. all the kinds of things that you wa nt all the kinds of things that you want people to have access to during interrogations. and what about waterboarding specifically? does it have a specific effect? waterboarding is possibly one of the worst tortures which can be imposed ona worst tortures which can be imposed on a person. when you put into the waterboarding position, you are tied toa waterboarding position, you are tied to a table and your feet are above the level of your head so your blood pressure is reversed relative to normal blood flow. this position has
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been explored very well in risk their tree physiology for hundreds of years. their tree physiology for hundreds of yea rs. we their tree physiology for hundreds of years. we know that it is profoundly dangerous and we know from testimony of people who have been waterboarded that it has terrible effects on them. you are subjected to a repeated course of near drowning. your viewers should know that all of the data shows that you can be drowned by as little as the contents of a cup of water if it is applied appropriately. the opposition is clear, wide eu think it is being countenanced again in the us? -- it is being countenanced again in the us? —— why do you think?|j the us? —— why do you think?” suspect but i do not know this, people talking about it misled, and what they have not done is looked at the internal evidence available to them. the office of the inspector general report from 2004 was the first internal cia document which looked at the utility of the torture
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programme and the e—mails disclosed. all of those documents show the information yield relative to other methods was astonishingly poor. worse than that, in addition to the trauma upon those who were tortured, the effects of imposing torture upon someone was deeply traumatic. professor 0'mara, we have to leave it there. thank you forjoining us. britain's economy grew by 0.6% in the final three months of last year and by 2.0% over 2016, according to new figures from the office for national statistics. some economists had forecast a slow—down after the brexit referendum. based on the numbers published at the end of last year, car production in the uk is trending towards a 17 year high. last yearjaguar land rover overtook nissan to be the uk's biggest car—maker — tripling production
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in about five years — and the us overtook china as the second biggest market. our business presenter, vishala sri—pathma is at the jaguar land rover plant in solihull... that's right, i am here at the jaguar land rover plant, a lot of machines hard at work behind me, 1.7 million cars were made in britain last year, the highest since 1999. 30% of that figure was made by jaguar land rover. we exported a lot of these cars to the eu, they are currently one of our biggest customers. joining me now is leslie batchelor from the institute of export, do you think that negotiating a new deal with europe is going to be perhaps one of the biggest challenges to the car industry? i suppose i do. but i do not think it is insurmountable. i think that industries are used to
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dealing in big terms and being able to do with europe is something that they are used to. it is interesting that 30% of the figure has come from jaguar land rover, it is quite an aspirational car. what do you think is driving that amount? is it because we are earning more or borrowing more? what is fuelling that? there two things. you are right, it is aspirational and very much it is a question that unfortunately we are borrowing a lot of money but it means that we feel confident about the economy which is a good sign and we don't want people not to feel confident about that. also it is about the quality and we wa nt also it is about the quality and we want to be associated with quality goods. we keep hearing that the falling value of the pound is a good thing for exporters. is that the case? i think if the exporter is only manufacturing from the uk materials, it's great and a useful tool materials, it's great and a useful tool, there are two elements and the
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first really has to be that you are importing raw materials which will have a higher cost, the dollar rate is high, and the euro is high which will cause issues. if you sell purely on price, that can cause problems as well. you want to be concentrating on selling with quality and not the institute rates. thank you. that's all from solihull this hour, plenty more to come throughout the afternoon. thank you. he spent 186 days in space on board the international space station — and the british astronaut tim peake says he's going back for more. the 44—year—old says he's excited about returning and looking forward to seeing the spectacular view of planet earth again. he's been talking about his plans at london's science museum where the soyuz spacecraft that launched him into orbit and returned him to earth went on public display today. 0ur science correspondent rebecca moralle is there. i'm at the science museum and behind
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me, you can see the soyuz capsule, the very spacecraft that carry tim peake into space and back down again. you can actually see how small it is. a crew of three people sitting inside white snuggly. you can see the charred areas on the outside because as the capsule entered the earth ‘s atmosphere, it got really scorched with temperatures over 1500 celsius. looking inside, this space is so small. what is exciting is that tim peake small. what is exciting is that tim pea ke announced he small. what is exciting is that tim peake announced he would go up to the space station again. it's been to the space station and back, and now the final leg of its epicjourney. the capsule that sent tim peake into orbit and brought him back safely. the soyuz has landed — at the science museum in london. it's like unwrapping a christmas present for the staff here, revealing a singed, scorched piece of britain's scientific history.
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this is notjust any soyuz capsule. it is tim peake's soyuz capsule. he was inside when he first experienced the wonders of space. and he was looking through this very window when he saw what it was like to re—enter the earth's atmosphere. and now he's been told he'll be given another mission to the space station, in a few years' time. it's great news for myself and my colleagues that we're going to get the opportunity for a second mission back to the international space station. it's wonderful news for the future of european space travel. the science museum want the display to be an inspiration for schoolchildren. it already is. absolutely amazing. what do you like about it? well, just knowing it's been in space. you can actually really smell the capsule. it smells of burnt metal.
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it's smaller than i expected as well. tim came back to earth in his capsule last year. it is now a celebration of britain's recent history of sending astronauts into space. the return to earth is the most exciting ride of all time in space. you feel the g build—up and you can see the outside surface bubbling away as you come through the atmosphere. the parachutes open up and you bump down on the ground. many of the children here want to follow in tim and helen's footsteps, but not all of them. who wants to be an astronaut? many children: me! not me. thank you. since we've been here this morning the public have been flocking to see this piece of space history. let's find out more about it... doug mill arden is the curator of space here at the science museum. why have you
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decided to actually purchase this? you have not said how much it has cost, why put it on display? in order we've been loading to this spacecraft and this is the first time that the uk has owned this kind of spacecraft. it is a really important story for the country and we are very important story for the country and we are very proud that the science museum is in a position to be able to put it on display. have you seen something of a tim peake affect here at the museum ? something of a tim peake affect here at the museum? there was great enthusiasm generated but have more people come in and do you expect to see more people to come in and see it? yes, this raised the level of interest in the uk with space exploration quite dramatically. we
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are expecting further interest now we have this spacecraft. it looks like tim is going to go for a second mission. does that kind of enthusiasm stays sustained? have we hit peak peake? he is very good at what he does, he uses a lot of resources and it is intensive. there isa resources and it is intensive. there is a lot more to look forward to. the history behind this is interesting as well, built in the 19605 but when he goes up again, he might go in something completely different, it is all change? yes, the design is about 50 years old but has been improved incrementally. we are now on to the next version of soyuz at the moment. tim will be flying whenever he goes in the ms, this is an ma design. one notch
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better still. thank you very much for that. as we heard, all change with space technology here, but a piece of space history on display. the public have been really excited about this this morning. 0ne the public have been really excited about this this morning. one group of school kids, as they heard it was here, they came running through the building to see it. this is the first time tim peake has seen the soyuz capsule since he landed in kaza khsta n last soyuz capsule since he landed in kazakhstan last year. an exciting morning here at the science museum. studio: rebecca mac, thank you. a look at the weather. for many across the country the weather is uninspiring. it is called with a lot of cloud around. this is walton on thames in surrey. not everywhere has cloud, in scotland, a good deal of sunshine with our second weather watcher picture coming from the highlands of scotland where there is beautiful blue skies and sunshine. a
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big contrast in temperature, 12 degrees in northern scotland. currently —2 in parts of kent, as we had three the afternoon, a bit more sunshine in southern england, brighter in western wales and scotla nd brighter in western wales and scotland but elsewhere it a lot of cloud. some snow here and there, but we should see some brightness, but it feels chilly wherever you are exposed to that brisk south—easterly wind. it feels cold in the midlands, in the north—east of england, some brightness in north—west england, northern ireland should stay largely dry through the afternoon perhaps with some glimpses of sunshine. for most of us, temperatures above freezing but feeling colder, —3, minus four degrees when you add that wind chill. feeling cold, a cold evening, areas of cloud drifting from the south and at times, that will produce light drizzle, and a bit of light snow. that falls on
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cold surfaces and we may see some stretches of ice across eastern and south—eastern parts of the morning. high pressure dominates on friday, situated in central parts of europe. this weather front brings in more cloud, outbreaks of rain to northern ireland later in the day, to west wales and south—west england. it is also turning more mild and towards the north—east, still chilly, 2 degrees or so in newcastle. 0n saturday, it clears towards the east and then back into sudden shine and scattered showers. temperatures just about double figures. 0nto the second half of the weekend, this weather front moves in across the southern half of the country, bringing wind and rain at times. and uncertainty about how far north it will go but it looks largely dry across scotland and northern ireland, six or 7 degrees, ten or 11 in the south. turning milder through
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the weekend but watch out for another cold night to night, and widespread frost and some icy stretches... this is bbc news. the headlines at three. theresa may heads to the united states to become the first world leader to meet the new president. but donald trump's latest comments on supporting torture in his first interview as president are likely to complicate the visit. would i feel strongly about waterboarding? as far as i am concerned, we have to fight fire with fire. the number of prisoners taking their own lives in jails in england and wales reaches record levels. strong consumer spending helped the uk's economy to grow 0.6% in the fourth quarter of last year, according to figures from the 0ns. iam here i am here in solihull at the jaguar land rover plant. i will be here all
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afternoon to find out more about those growth figures out this morning. and tim peake reveals he's to return to the international space station

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