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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  January 26, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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today at five: the prime minister heads to the united states to become the first world leader to meet president trump. theresa may will say britain and america have the chance to lead the world together again. but donald trump's latest comments on supporting torture in his first interview as president are likely to complicate the visit. would i feel strongly about waterboarding? as far as i'm concerned, we have to fight fire with fire. this is the scene in philadelphia, where the president is about to address members of the republican party. we'll bring you his speech live. the other main stories on bbc news at five. jeremy corbyn says labour mps will face a three line whip to vote in favour of a bill that will be the starting gun for the brexit process. and tim peake reveals he is to return to the international space station as the module that got him there last time goes on display. it's five o'clock.
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our main story: in a few hours‘ time, theresa may is expected to become the first world leader to meet america's new president when she addresses congressional republicans in philadelphia. tomorrow the prime minister will travel to the white house for formal talks. it is his first talks with another world leader. mrs may is expected to tell her audience tonight that a "sovereign, global" britain wants to enhance ties with its "old friends". but some politicians here have expressed misgivings, after mr trump said he supported the use of waterboarding during interrogations. here's our political correspondent, carole walker. theresa may says her meeting with president trump will be an opportunity to renew the special relationship, to discuss a future trade deal and the importance of strengthening defence and security cooperation. but how will she respond to the new president's latest remarks? though some of his advisers don't
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agree with him but donald trump says he would consider methods such as waterboarding to tackle international terrorism. when they're chopping off the heads of people because they happen to be a christian in the middle east, when isis is doing things nobody has ever heard of since medieval times, but i feel strongly about waterboarding 7 as far as i am concerned, we have to fight fire with fire. i want to do everything in the bounds of what we can do legally, but do i feel it works? absolutely, i feel it works. the foreign secretary says the government's stance is clear. the prime minister did answer that question in the house of commons yesterday, and she was very clear that our principled position and our objection to torture remains unchanged. the prime minister has said she won't be afraid to stand up to the american president on issues where they disagree. yesterday, a senior tory mp
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raised his concerns. president trump has repeatedly said that he will bring back torture as an instrument of policy. when she sees him on friday, will the prime minister make clear that in no circumstances will she permit britain to be dragged into facilitating that torture, as we were after september"? i can assure my honourable friend that we have a very clear position on torture. we do not sanction torture, we do not get involved with that and that will continue to be our president. to be our position. as the prime minister continues to negotiate britain's the from the eu, she has spoken about the importance of forging global economic ties, the eu is our biggest trading market, with more than £500 billion annually but theresa may knows the progress of a future us trade deal would send an important signal. it is very important for britain and the united states we have better trade arrangements,
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they could be even better with the right kind of deal and it is good that we work together on the main issues around the world. the prime minister will speak in glowing terms about the importance of the special relationship when she addresses senior republicans later. she will say the us and uk working together to defeat evil have fulfilled the promise of freedom, liberty and the rights of man, but she's under pressure to confront the american president over remarks which many believe fly in the face of those ideals. are we going to return to the worst days of guantanamo bay? it can't be right that our message to the rest of the world is that torture is back on the agenda. i hope she is very, very clear with him about that. theresa may knows that establishing a strong personal rapport will be hugely important. downing street say there may be frank exchanges, but it is clear that renewing the special relationship will be the priority. let's ta ke
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let's take you to philadelphia, where air force one has just landed. president trump is about to embark on his firstjourney an air force one. gary o'donoghue is in philadelphia where mrs may will address republican congressmen in a few hours. all eyes will be on what he has to say to the audience, but he is expected to hit the ground running, and he wants money from congress. yes, he wants money in particular to start building the border war with mexico. leaders here saying they expect that request to come in, i'm sure it will during his speech, and they are looking at up to $15 billion upfront. some of the estimates for the wall are much higher than that. we don't have any idea from congress or mr trump are about how they plan to get that
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money from the tax payer back from the mexican government, who have said time and again that they will not pay for it. the potential visit from the mexican president next week to the us may be injeopardy. theresa may will be looking for warm words on a trade deal, we have had warm words from senator mitch mcconnell, who said the trade deal was important, and that will be theresa may's main theme. discussions about torture and differences over iran, they want to minimise those, because all the political capital is invested in going home back to downing street and saying, we can do deals with people even when we are outside the eu. let me throw something at you. it looks as though donald trump is running late. it looks as though theresa may is in the same venue. what are the chances they would bump into each other tonight? it is
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possible. there could be a potential brush by, a diplomatic term, not a meeting, certainly that isn't scheduled to happen, but as you say, he is running late, and she will be here pretty soon, within the next aaron behalf, we think, so there is potential for that. —— the aaron behalf, we think, so there is potentialfor that. —— the next aaron behalf, we think, so there is potential for that. —— the next hour and a half. but the photo opportunity from the british side is in the oval office tomorrow, side—by—side, renewing the special relationship, the first foreign visit to invite to washington just six days after the inauguration of the new president. the chemistry will be fascinating. can you think of two more different personalities, more different people than theresa may and donald trump? it will be amazing to watch. we are just seeing the car, the beast, they call it,
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pulling up at air force one, and he will be heading to where you are. but he still has difficulties, early days of his presidency, and not everything is going to plan? we have just had in the last half—hour an announcement from the state department that its senior management team in its entirety, and thatis management team in its entirety, and that is not a lot of people, for people, but its senior management tea m people, but its senior management team has resigned in a block. so you have lost a good deal, years of experience of corporate memory in the us foreign service there in one 90, the us foreign service there in one go, so that will be a blow notjust to mrtrump but go, so that will be a blow notjust to mr trump but the incoming secretary of state rex to liston, and companies around the world will notice that and see that as a vulnerability if senior people are leaving the administration. career civil servants are leaving the ministries, so he has that problem with around with the mexican
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government, and what he is having to full fill later today as an executive order following through on this idea of voterfraud. he has already said millions of votes were cast illegally, but not one of them, he says, for him, at all. he will institute an investigation and we will get something for more on that inafew will get something for more on that in a few hours. it is not very far from philadelphia airport to where i am in downtown philadelphia, he will be here and congressional leaders will be waiting to hear what his plans offer health care reform, the budget, etc. lots of work to be done. gary, thank you from all of us. with me now is nigel sheinwald, who served as the uk's ambassador to the united states from 2007 to 2012. we are keeping an eye on those pictures of air force one. nigel, you know what it is like behind—the—scenes when a british
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prime minister and an american president meet, but this particular meeting is so important. it is, and it is also something that you can't predict based on precedent, because there is no one quite like donald trump. he compares itself to ronald reagan, but so far he is not a ronald reagan, so we have to do suspend disbelief and see how it goes. i think that the prime minister will undoubtedly have an agenda concerning uk/ us relations, concerning the trade deal, but in a way, much more important than that is to work out whether there is a basis to work in an enduring way with a trump administration on the core issues. we can't have a special relationship if we have an american administration which doesn't want to work with us, if we have undermining of our key european allies in nato, which would stand up to russia and is promoting a breakdown of the international order, including the
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oldest trade rules, so i think there are some fundamentals here. mrs may will want to have a good, solid, friendly relationship with the us, it is very good that she has got this early access to president trump, but she will be wary and apprehensive to begin with, and rightly will need to size him up before she knows really quite how that relationship is going to work in the future. you know how obsessed we are with the body language. what can you tell on that firstjoint photocall about the personal relationship? as gary said, two more different people it is difficult to think of. the personal chemistry ultimately is important, and you have got to want on both sides to continue the discussions. after tomorrow it is important they are in regular contact on the phone or by video, it isn'tjust about regular contact on the phone or by video, it isn't just about tomorrow. and there has to be some sort of rapport between them. but there have
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been some unlikely partnerships over the years. when you think about margaret thatcher and ronald reagan, it wasn't as though that was a match inherently made in heaven. they did go together very well, partly because they were contrasting personalities, although they had a shared ideology, which may not be the same in this case. i can think ofa numberof the same in this case. i can think of a number of prime ministers and president two have grown into the role of friendship and communication. i don't think you can judge it only on tomorrow. she will wa nt judge it only on tomorrow. she will want to have a friendly and relatively easy relationship with him, but frankly tomorrow is a bright probing, it is about finding out whether those core elements in the relationship can be sustained. as well as promoting britain and making clear that there is a role for us in the future. and that is what a lot of people will be talking about, what is in it for britain? there is a lot when it donald trump,
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because this is the first of another world leader and will in some way set a template in his terms with the outside world. that is true, and it is another reason why our prime minister has to be a little bit careful, because she has to watch out primarily for opinion in this country, which won't want her to have too cosy seeming a relationship. angela merkel was criticised directly by donald trump la st criticised directly by donald trump last week, so she has to just criticised directly by donald trump last week, so she has tojust have an eye to opinion there, because we have a very important negotiation coming up with them, and that is probably the most important thing for britain, that our economy and international relations in the years ahead, so she won't want to look as though she is giving up on our partners in europe or doesn't care about them, and is putting all her eggsin about them, and is putting all her eggs in the donald trump basket. i think she has already got this in
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mind that she needs to appeal to a numberof mind that she needs to appeal to a number of audiences concurrently, and behave with a certain measured calm as she approaches the white house tomorrow. it is something of a tightrope, and you can only imagine her reaction when she heard what arnold trump had to say about waterboarding, because she doesn't need that sort of controversy over a visit like this. she doesn't, and thatis visit like this. she doesn't, and that is one of the issues, he won't have been thinking about her and her impending visit when he made those comments yesterday. this is one of the things an american president has to do, if you want to be the leader of nato and have a big role in the international system, you have to think about your alliances, think about the politics and reactions around the world, and notjust the instant reaction in the country you are in, that is part of the task of transitioning from a candidate to president, and i don't know whether president, and i don't know whether president trump will think that is important or whether he will learn in the job important or whether he will learn in thejob and important or whether he will learn in the job and adapt in the job as so in the job and adapt in the job as so many of his predecessors have.
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that is one of the things we need to find out. when you are behind—the—scenes and you are there as that meeting takes place, is there a moment where you say, we will leave you two to it? very much so. will leave you two to it? very much so. i don't know what the stage—managed and will be tomorrow, but when i was doing otherjobs in out but when i was doing otherjobs in our system, i was thought the most important thing was to ensure that the two principals have enough time together. the relationship does depend on that good relationship at the top, and you can only get that if those people have a chance to talk privately and to get the measure of each other, and that is very important early on. that needs to bea very important early on. that needs to be a big chunk of the time, and the other part of the time is where you get cabinet members and others involved on the two sides, not least because it is a good thing to try to translate things which have been agreed between the two of them to a wider group so they can then be implemented, and part of the follow—up in the two governments,
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thatis follow—up in the two governments, that is one of the things that is important to mrs may. she will have a numberof important to mrs may. she will have a number of follow—up points for her own team another ten, her ambassador in washington, that our government back here, military and intelligence officials can follow up to keep the flow of communication going, because asi flow of communication going, because as i said, this is the beginning of the story, not a one—off. as i said, this is the beginning of the story, not a one-off. to be a fly on the wall of that meeting tomorrow! you would love it, wouldn't you ? tomorrow! you would love it, wouldn't you? i suppose! nigel, thank you very much for your time this evening. let's take a look at some of the other stories making bbc news at five. royal bank of scotland, which is more than 70% owned by taxpayers, has set aside a further £3 billion to cover expected fines in the united states following the misselling of financial products linked to risky mortgages before the 2008 financial crisis. campaigners for the victims of the birmingham pub bombings have been told their lawyers will be able to apply for legal aid because of a proposed change in the law.
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the inquests into the deaths of 21 people who were killed by the ira in 1974 are due to resume later this year. rescuers have pulled the last remaining bodies from the wreckage of an italian hotel which was destroyed by an avalanche last week. it means that 29 people are now known to have died in the avalanche, which was triggered by a series of earthquakes. eleven people survived. you are watching bbc news at five. let's move to events in mexico. it looks like the proposed visit by the president of mexico to the united states next week has been called off. we'll granted in mexico city. there is a lot of anger flying around, and this is the result? that is right, it has been a building war of words, war of tweets paps. it
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began with president trump tweeting that unless the mexican president was prepared to say they would pave the wall, then he should call off the wall, then he should call off the meeting. a couple of hours later, and he did exactly that, and i have got the tweets here. translated from the spanish, it basically says we have informed the white house that we will not take pa rt white house that we will not take part in the working party next week, but mexico reiterates its willingness to work with the us on things that benefit both nations, so wa nted things that benefit both nations, so wanted to move things forward, but this impasse is too big to get beyond. and there was a rather frea ky to beyond. and there was a rather freaky to eat from a previous mexican president, there is serious angen mexican president, there is serious anger, isn't there? yes, very earthy
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language coming from former president vicente fox, showing that mexicans up and down this country feel that they should in no way feel financially responsible for a wall that they no neither want nor called for. how will they pay for it, will it bea for. how will they pay for it, will it be a tax on remittances? will it be in the form of a tariff on trade moving back and forth? in what is supposed to be a free trade area, the north american free trade area that mr trump says he is very keen to red raft that mr trump says he is very keen to redraft the agreement on that. so there is a lot to be sorted out, not least of which are questions to do with cross—border security. a lot of the guns that run the drug war in this country come from the united states, a lot of the money that funds the drug war comes from the united states with the drugs that are sold there, so it is a very
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intertwined relationship, but if the two lea d e rs intertwined relationship, but if the two leaders can't even now sit down because of these arguments over the wall, it is going to be very prickly moving forward. will grant, thank you very much. the chancellor, philip hammond, says the uk's economy is robust and resilient, but he's warned there may be uncertainty ahead as britain adjusts to a new relationship with europe. official figures suggest the economy defied the expectations of some economists and grew by 0.6% in the final three months of last year, and by two percent over 2016. our economics editor, kamal ahmed, spoke to mr hammond at the microsoft headquarters in reading this morning. famously and rather sarcastically, it was napoleon who called britain a nation of shopkeepers. and frankly, philip hammond is probably glad that we are a nation of consumers. 80% of the uk economy has really lifted those growth figures. retail, restaurants,
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and travel agents have all been contributing to those growth figures. as you say, there were lots of gloomy forecasts about what would happen to the economy if we voted to leave the european union, which we did. i kicked off by asking the chancellor here in reading whether this was pain cancelled or pain delayed. of course we recognise that as we go into this period of negotiation with this european union there will be more uncertainty ahead. the fact that the economy is sober bust and resilient going in should give this great cause but optimism. of course, brexit and our negotiations for leaving
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the european union are key. the chancellor told me there were some concerns about business being delayed because of worries about that uncertainty, but i asked him whether that period of uncertainty was now seeming a little shorter than it had initially. i sense that the period in which our european partners were wanting to chastise us has passed, has moved on and actually people are looking for a practical solution that works for us, works with the european union and will make all our people more prosperous in the future. i think now philip hammond will be looking towards is his next big event, the budget in march. better growth figures for 2016 mean that the government will have a bit more money to play with. the government's receipts will have increased from taxes. it doesn't mean we are out
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of the wards, the bank of england is still saying that growth next you will be lower than forecast this year, but for the moment the uk economy is certainly continuing with that strong and robust growth that we seen today. our economics editor. the number of cars being built in the uk has reached a 17—year high amid the continued economic recovery in europe. the society of motor manufacturers and traders says more than one—point—seven million vehicles were made last year — but they warned that investment in the industry is falling due to uncertainty about brexit. our industry correspondent john moylan reports. built in britain, but tested the countries around the world. here in southampton, they ship about 17,000 ca i’s southampton, they ship about 17,000 cars a week. as the uk's biggest car export terminal, a gateway to the world. the ability to store the cars
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and get them away from the uk rapidly is essential for the supply chain. that demand has brought carmaking to a high, 17 million cars we re carmaking to a high, 17 million cars were made and we exported 70% of them, more than half to the eu. that investment fell to £1.6 billion, down a third in recent years, despite nissan's decision to build two new models here. they are sitting on their hands, waiting to see what the future will hold, and we are looking for that greater certainty about the future relationship, especially with europe. today these cars can be exported to anywhere in europe without customs checks and tariffs because we are part of the eu single market. but the prime minister has made clear that we are leaving the single market, raising the possibility of new taxes for
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exporting or importing vehicles, and even the possibility of conflict customs arrangements. that is a concern for the industry. at the uk's largest car—maker, midlands —based jaguar land rover, they want the trade agreement to deliver some of the key features they already have. we have been a beneficiary of the arrangements in place for a long time now, and our expectations moving forward is that the government can negotiate an ongoing tariff free environment. the industry says worldwide demand could soon industry says worldwide demand could soon see car industry says worldwide demand could soon see car production overtake record levels last seen back in the 70s. but with concern over trade putting some investment on hold, that future now looks less certain. survivors of the holocaust and other
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people who have survived genocide have been commemorated in a commemorative event here in westminster. this comes the day before holocaust memorial day, and i am joined by the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby. archbishop, the value and purpose of remembering. well, you were here as well. it is such an overwhelmingly powerful moment which holds up a mirror to powerful moment which holds up a mirrorto our powerful moment which holds up a mirror to our times. that is one thing it does. and the second thing it does is it plays in our ears the tunes, the notes of evil, and enables us to recognise them when they are played today. you yourself travels for the third time recently to auschwitz. what are your
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reflections after leading a pilgrimage there? they are almost too deep for words. one of my colleagues there said that took us to the edge of words. i think the most profound thing that struck me was the sheer mechanistic efficiency and the normality for those who did these terrible things, the accountants, the doctors, the architects. they just the accountants, the doctors, the architects. theyjust did their jobs, and they never really focused on what those jobs were. and that job was executing millions of people. it was absolute destruction of humanity, and their own humanity, though they didn't know it. that was very powerfully seen. and i think that has to say to us, we must be alert and we must speak out. the
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secretary of state for communities and local government began his speech by saying that the holocaust did not begin in a gas chamber, it began with words. isn't that right, that the way we treat each other as common humanity is where these kind of evil actions actually start? you are so of evil actions actually start? you are so right. and many of us know, andl are so right. and many of us know, and i have seen that in other places. in ryan dow, it began with calling people cockroaches. —— in rwanda. in other places it begins with demeaning people. butjust avoiding the negative isn't enough. it is that deep—set expression, that reaching out in friendship and love that makes such events as we remember today impossible. the
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archbishop of canterbury speaking to our religious affairs correspondent martin bashir. this is bbc news. coming up later this hour: air force one has touched down in philadelphia and president trump will be addressing members of the republican party there shortly. we will bring you that live as soon as it starts. time now for the weather with helen willetts. good afternoon. it is cold, but you don't need me to tell you that. will you be getting any warmer? —2 in the persistent cloud in the south of england, so the recipe there, all the ingredients for some frosty weather, some icy weather, some hill fog as well across the welsh marches, the peak district, northern england, look at the temperatures. a bitter night again, just like last night. towards the west, rather more
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cloud tomorrow, giving us a few showers, but for the bulk of us, another cold start with ice, particularly in the eec and south—east, and it will be cold in these areas as well. again, the best of the sunshine could be in the north. it does get a little milder in the south—west later, the weekend looks less cold, but there will be some rain. i will have more later. this is bbc news at 5pm. the headlines — theresa may is on her way to the us ahead of her meeting with president trump tomorrow, with the message that the uk and the us can "lead together again". donald trump's latest comments on supporting torture in his first interview as president are likely to complicate the visit. the president of mexico has cancelled his meeting with mr trump next week — after the us president re—enforced his plan to have mexico pay for a border wall. jeremy corbyn says labour mps will face a three—line whip to vote
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in favour of a bill that will be the starting—gun for the brexit process. and tim peake reveals he's to return to the international space station — as the module he used to transport him last time goes on display. the government has published legislation paving the way to allow the government to start the brexit process. it was introduced after the supreme court argued that parliament input was needed. some in the party say they will oppose it. we have breaking news. we can speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young. an mp from north london has written tojeremy an mp from north london has written to jeremy corbyn
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an mp from north london has written tojeremy corbyn saying she came into politics to make a difference and represent her constituency, one which voted very much to remain in the european union. she says she is writing a letter of resignation with a heavy heart. she says on the announcement of the three line whip, she feels she has no ties but resigned from her front bench role as shadow minister. she says she does not support the triggering of article 50 and cannot reconcile herself to the front bench position. jeremy corbyn says he wants to show leadership and thinks it is right the labour party respect the result of the referendum, that no vote in the referendum, and he's ordering his mps to vote in favour of article 50. there has been speculation of other members of the shadow cabinet, including clive lewis who said last week he didn't think article 50 was the right thing for him or his pro—remain constituency of norwich. this is what he had to say.|j
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pro—remain constituency of norwich. this is what he had to say. i have got my views on the opinion on the relationship we should have with the single market. and other areas of europe. i think that is what the supreme court decision was about, giving parliament a say on that. i am going to do that with the interests of norwich and the country and when it comes to the final vote on whether we trigger article 50 and what it looks like, i will make my decision based on what is in front of me. he is saying that next wednesday when the first vote on all of this comes, the onejeremy corbyn has said, labourmps of this comes, the onejeremy corbyn has said, labour mps must back article 50, clive lewis says he is willing to do that because parliament should have a say and should debate these issues. the building goes rash the bill then goes through a process but he is willing to wait until the end of the process , willing to wait until the end of the process, what is called the third reading, to make sure any changes that have been made and how he will
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vote. forjeremy corbyn, this will be tricky, he knows his party is divided over all of this and it goes to the heart of what an mp is here to the heart of what an mp is here to do. many think they are here to represent their constituents, others say they have to respect the will of the people in the referendum. this isa the people in the referendum. this is a tricky dilemma for the labour party. they have been the first casualties really of this big debate on europe, not the conservatives. we're just keeping an eye on events in philadelphia, awaiting president trump where he will be addressing congressional republicans and we will take you to that as soon as it gets underway. sport now, here's will perry. there are very few people we would interrupt you for but the president as one of them! moeen ali took two
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wickets of the hosts were restricted to 147-7. wickets of the hosts were restricted to 147—7. eoin morgan hit a half—century. nick parrott reports. it has been all smile so far during england's tour of india. it initially looked like it might be another bruising encounter. that flattening was a foretaste of things to come but for once, it was england left standing. moeen ali's andrew bridgen was vital as he took the key man. india captain virat kohli out for 29, turning things into england's favour. india were restricted to a modest total. england replied with all the fears ofa england replied with all the fears of a champagne cork from a bottle, captain eoin morgan leading the way. top scoring with a half—century that saw him become the first england player to reach 1500 runs in the shortest format of the game. had england had a higher total to chase,
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joe root might have got 50 as well but the had to settle for the winning run. victory on sunday will wrap up the series. roger federer will go for a fifth australian open title this weekend after beating stanislas wawrinka in a five set thriller. federer led by two sets in melbourne before wawrinka levels. federer took the deciding set and will face grigor dimitrov or rafa nadal in the final. i am in the final and nadal in the final. i am in the finalandi nadal in the final. i am in the final and i know that and i know i will have a chance to win on sunday. that is a great position to be in regardless who it will be against. one is sued over his first grand slam or the battle with nadal. whether i can win on sunday is all i think about. —— all i care about. what a day for the williams family asbos venus and serena made a women
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is singles final. serena dominated in her match. they will meet in a grand slam final for the first time since 2009. britain's form and his american partner wagner won the paralympic finals. arsenal manager arsene wenger will attend a personal hearing for his misconduct charge tomorrow. wenger accepted a charge tomorrow. wenger accepted a charge for pushing an official in his side's match against burnley. but he wants clarity for when a manager is sent to the stands. the only thing i can say, when i was sent off, i was surprised and i was in the tunnel because i thought i had the right to be in the tunnel. last time, i was sent off formerly,
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2009, i had to go in the stand at old trafford and i didn't know where to go. nobody tells you what you have to do when you are sent. west ham and burly have had offers accepted ham and burly have had offers a cce pted by ham and burly have had offers accepted by hull city for robert snodgrass with middlesbrough are also making an offer today. the bids are in the region of £10 million. hull city sold jake livermore to west brom. we will see if snodgrass will be in the hull team to face manchester united in the efl cup semifinal. you can keep up—to—date with that and all other stories on the bbc website. more for you in sportsday at 6:30pm. let's return to our main story — theresa may's trip to meet donald trump. in a speech tonight, the prime minister is expected
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to tell her audience that a "sovereign, global" britain wants to enhance ties with its "old friends". with me now, talk about how the prime minister should approach this meeting with the new president, is jenni russell — columnist at the times. you don't think he will be someone theresa may will find easy to deal with? i don't think they will be soul mates. if he wasn't the president of the united, she would probably turn her back on him. she is the slightly puritan... and he has appalling views on sexually assaulting women and he believes in torture etc. she probably needs him now more than he needs her so how does she approach it? it is difficult because britain has always had two strategic partners in the world. the one is europe in terms of
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trade and security on the other is america. we havejust blown up trade and security on the other is america. we have just blown up our relationship with europe and seem unable to decide how to repair it. that makes is now dependent on america, for security or trade or whatever else. theresa may is going to washington as a supplicant, she desperately needs a trade deal from donald trump, even if the effects are not good for britain, she has to have one that looks good. donald trump in some ways is very foolish but he is very good and knowing who has the power in negotiation. he spent his whole life knowing who is ina spent his whole life knowing who is in a position of strength before negotiating starts and he is in a much stronger position than theresa may. she is the first world leader to be meeting him. it feeds his ego in some way. he considers himself to be the new ronald regan and she is the new margaret thatcher. —— ronald reagan. i think that would flatter
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him enormously. ronald reagan was in many ways a very popular president. the country like to many things he achieved and he was an astute politician. donald trump is still fumbling his way into a new role. if he wants to see them in these roles, he wants to see them in these roles, he will bathe her in a flattering light as they potential mrs thatcher. this will set the tone for his meetings with other world leaders so he has to play carefully? does he ever play anything carefully? in a way, he wants to have a successful first meeting because he wants success in everything, plaudits, people to like him and looked as if he's being a great figure. he will also want to get some sort of trade deal presented, even if it is just
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notional and there is nothing substantial behind it, because he has had a lot of criticism that america is now going to be quite protectionist and he wants to put america first. he once to be coming up america first. he once to be coming up with some sort of statement saying that britain is on his side. whether that will end with anything substantial, is a different thing. trump often says things that he can then turn his back on a couple of days later. should theresa may play to that ego? i am sure she will offer a state visit. theresa may is famous for her inability to charm people easily. she has no small talk and she doesn't volunteer things to people or find it comfortable talking to people. she isn't easy in people's company. she says what she thinks, though. that is not the same
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as charm though, is it? she waits for other people to approach her and she rather like them paying court heard. that isn't going to work with donald trump. but if you appears eager to please him, he will sense that. he's good at sensing power and he will treat her as less important. goodness knows how the famed chemistry the british foreign office and british diplomats and politicians are talking up will actually work out in practice. what about his request to play golf at balmoral watched by the queen? donald trump is 70, going onto three. that is i said that. you are reading your newspaper or looking at your phone and they are shouting, look at me, look at me. balmoral is the queen's private residence. because he wants a photo opportunity to rival ronald reagan riding with the queen when he came to britain, he is asking to play golf at the
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balmoral private golf course. so the queen, who is no golfer, is watching him. it is the ultimate toddler fa ntasy. him. it is the ultimate toddler fantasy. the most famous woman in the world, board, watching you while you show off. what will the opening gambit be tomorrow? they will all be smiling at each other. looking very happy for the cameras. what may needs to get out of this is a trade deal and also some joint action on terror and she will also be hoping to get a commitment from him about how important he now thinks nato is because he has flip—flopped on nato. that is a matter of the most tremendous importance to europe. russia is a real threat, poland and ukraine is worried. all of the baltic nations are scared of what russia might do if it doesn't understand that america will back nato up and if russia attends to
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threaten those countries, they will have a powerful army behind them. theresa may will want to get a trade agreement to help compensate us for the tremendous loss of trade and income we will get from leaving the eu and she will want an agreement on nato's importance. just looking at philadelphia. these are live pictures coming in. philadelphia. these are live ictures comin in. i'm philadelphia. these are live pictures coming in. i'mjust philadelphia. these are live pictures coming in. i'm just hearing from laura koons berg, travelling with the prime minister. this theresa may was asked about donald trump's remarks on torture and theresa may told journalists on the plane that, we condemn torture. she also says, also asked if the uk could still share intelligence with america if they allowed torture
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against our foes and she said again she was very clear. the prime minister, when asked if they could work together given their different sta nces work together given their different stances on things and the prime minister said, sometimes opposites attract. president trump has never been flattering about any woman whether they —— unless they are young and nubile. in some ways, this isa young and nubile. in some ways, this is a gift to theresa may that president trump has come out with these appalling comments about torture because it allows her to ta ke torture because it allows her to take the moral high ground, something the rest of the world will back her up on. most leaders would also do that and it gives her a bit of power in relation to trump because don't forget, his very own defence secretary has said he doesn't agree with torture. this is a man who spent his career in the army and he doesn't think it works.
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trump is quite isolated in this position and i think some of his staff will be appalled by what he says today. thank you. pretty much the same vision you had a moment ago, of the podium. this is where donald trump will be talking to congressional republicans. it looks as though some of those on the podium are taking to the stage which would suggest he is not far behind them. let's talk in fact our system political editor norman smith in westminster. interesting that theresa may clearly arriving in the united states with a clear view as to how she will approach things. striking and the briefing she has given to reporters as she was arriving, signalling she will not back down over this issue of torture. she remains convinced, a
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long—standing british opposition to torture, saying it will not be condoned regardless of the circumstances and regardless of what president trump says. she also appears to go along with the argument we hear from westminster today that if president trump does sanction the use of techniques like waterboarding, that could potentially compromise the ties between the british security services and those of the americans. because british intelligence services would no longer be to take advantage of american intelligence because it might have come from torture. theresa may seemingly agreeing with that. she was asked how she would get on with donald trump and she said jokingly, opposite is often attract. so maybe this will be another maggie, ronald reagan relationship. we don't know. in terms of theresa may and the team
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she is taking with her, is itjust the trade deal? what do she need to come back with so she can claim it has been a good visit? she is wanting more than a trego, she is wanting more than a trego, she is wanting to forge the closest possible ties with trump administration, because with our departure from the eu, we need new, strong alliances and so on awful lot is being banked on our relationship with the us and the briefing which number ten sent out overnight of the speech mrs may is to make two leading republicans this evening, she basically sees america and britain as the two key countries to now lead the world. she was almost harking back to an era where britain and america where the two superpowers. she says, together, they created the modern world and gaveit they created the modern world and gave it many of the modern institutions and values and we can
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do that again. she is also aligning brexit with the trump revolution, saying both marked a moment of renewal where both nations are trying to rediscover self—confidence and their place in the world. it goes much further than simply wanting a trade deal, which is important. she sees a renewed special relationship as a substitute for our exit from the eu. special relationship as a substitute for our exit from the eui special relationship as a substitute for our exit from the eu. i hate to do this to you butjenny russell from the thais was just sighing when you said that. you are not necessarily in agreement?” you said that. you are not necessarily in agreement? i think so much of it is so much hogwash. may has to say this because what else can she say? we are a lot less useful to the us now than we were because we cannot offer them access to the eu market or influence europe as we did before. we are a smaller geopolitical player than we were
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before. the idea that we can lead the world is a bit like a chihuahua bouncing up to a great day in and say, let's be in partnership. —— great dane. i take the point that we are very much going there looking for something, whereas to beyond this, we are probably not very high on the agenda donald trump. she is the first there. exactly so. but the brutal truth is, in the post—brexit era, we absolutely need a rock—solid relationship with the united states and frankly, if that means swallowing reservations about donald trump, theresa may will do that. because she knows we are going to need new alliances and also new trade deals and if that means having to go cap in hand, so be it. kind of people would say she is just being pragmatic. of course she is and she
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has to be. we have to accept she didn't lead the opposition to the european union and she finds herself having to lead a brexit government. you might argue whether she doing the right thing taking so far out of europe but she isjust the right thing taking so far out of europe but she is just trying to play the best and she has got. what we also have to bear in mind, the donald trump —— for donald trump, flattery is almost everything because he is remarkably insecure. one of the most striking things that happened this week was in the first official press conference his white house press spokesman gave, he explained that the president's feelings had been hurt by the coverage over the past few days. this is absolutely incredible. this isa this is absolutely incredible. this is a president who has such a thin skin that he is saying to the nation, you haven't made me feel
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good. he not thinking, how do i make america, feel good? that is his achilles heel. if may can make you feel that he is fantastic, he will puff up his little bullfrog personality and he will respond to that. underneath that pomposity and fragility, there is also somebody who is a very acute deal—maker. he has promised america that he will make them more prosperous and he said we will buy america and higher americans. so he will make sure whatever deal he offers britain, it will put america first which implies it won't necessarily be in our favour. he is a tough negotiator. no matter what warm words may come out of the next few days and statements about close relationships and hammers trade will happen, let's remember, america will be ferociously clear its interest have to come before ours. if we have to
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accept the fact america wash all of their chicken in chlorinated water, which stop them making an agriculture deal with the eu, if we are willing to accept their lower hygiene standards which the eu wasn't willing to accept, then we can say, yes, come and invade our markets with your lower standard goods because we have no other way to make a big deal with anybody. our total trade with america at the moment is worth £41; billion a year. with the eu it is 170. we would have to do an incredible amount of extra trade with america to even begin to make upfor trade with america to even begin to make up for the fact that if we put ta riffs make up for the fact that if we put tariffs on our trade with the eu or it declines, we will suffer tremendously. does theresa may do
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flattery? it is interesting to work at the likely dynamic between them. theresa may is not really one for schmoozing. she doesn't give much, in terms of chitchat. that is not really what she does. that sort of business of trying to get along with people isn't necessarily her strongest suit. she is much better in the more formal stand and deliver speech kind of setting. i am sure she will probably go down pretty well when she addresses the senior republicans tonight in that format. ina funny republicans tonight in that format. in a funny sort of way, i think donald trump might quite like her. i don't quite know why. i think it is because she is very traditional, she is very straight, she clearly feels passionately about the special relationship and because i think she buys into the sort of trump argument
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that now is a moment of change in the western world, that people are tired of business as usual. she buys into that argument of brexit, that people, as well as wanting to leave the european union, they were profoundly fed up with the way they we re profoundly fed up with the way they were governed. she sees brexit as on the same page as the trump success. i suspect she will like that —— he we re i suspect she will like that —— he were like that as well. i have a gut instinct that actually, they will get on quite well and be able to strike upa get on quite well and be able to strike up a working relationship. thank you. norman makes an interesting point that he might like theresa may's. .. i interesting point that he might like theresa may's... i was talking to someone very theresa may's... i was talking to someone very prominent in new york social circles and they said what frustrates trump is the fact that people at the top don't take him seriously and don't accept him. he
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has never broken into new york's elite social circles, which has he is, they consider him to vulgar. theresa may is a traditional english woman, the prime minister of britain, she represents a kind of order and tradition and he might feel so flattered simply by that, that he will be delighted by her, evenif that he will be delighted by her, even if she is in herself not particularly charming. america as a whole doesn't know anything about theresa may. nor do many people in britain! she has got a selling actor do in america. that is true. the fa ct do in america. that is true. the fact she is the first leader to meet president trump will of course make an impact on americans and they will look at her through the lens of thatcher because they only tend to have noticed a couple of prime
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ministers. one is of course thatcher and the other is tony blair. they scarcely noticed david cameron or john major. they will think, is this mrs thatcher, marco two? we all make that comparison. there will never be anything like that, though, will they? who knows. when you introduce two friends, you wonder if they will get on, i think we will have to wait and see. we already know donald trump at the end of his meetings likes to have these rather agonisingly awkward photographs where he stands with his thumbs up grinning at the camera, as he did with michael gove and many other people he has met, nigel farage etc. what is theresa may going to do in that situation? donald trump will wa nt to that situation? donald trump will want to put his arm round her and he will grin. how will she stand? we
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will grin. how will she stand? we will be watching with considerable interest. thank you forjoining us. we will keep an eye on this. coming up we will keep an eye on this. coming up on bbc news channel, we will bring you outside sauce with ros atkins for the international news on bbc one, george alun guy will bring you that. welcome to outside source. president trump has just arrived welcome to outside source. president trump hasjust arrived on welcome to outside source. president trump has just arrived on air force one. this is the live feed coming to the bbc newsroom. whenever the president begins to speak, you will see it here. the mexican president is on twitter telling us the meeting is on twitter telling us the meeting is off, he won't be travelling, and perhaps that was inevitable after mr trump goaded him over us plans to make mexico pay for the border wall
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thatis make mexico pay for the border wall that is going to be built. we will be live in mexico city, philadelphia and washington in the next few minutes. we will also turn to west africa, because the gambian president is heading to his

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