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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 27, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. theresa may becomes the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president. the prime minister says the two leaders can "lead the world together" but they cannot return to "failed" military interventions. we have the opportunity, indeed, the responsibility, to renew the special relationship for this new age. responsibility, to renew the special relationship for this new ageli responsibility, to renew the special relationship for this new age. i do not have my commerce secretary, they wa nt not have my commerce secretary, they want to talk trade. so i'll have to handle it myself. good morning. it's friday the 27th of january. also this morning: proposals to restrict knee and hip replacements for only those in the most severe pain. the royal college of surgeons says there's no justification for the decision.
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the babies who die before 2a weeks and their parents who are denied a birth certificate. asa as a mother, you want to protect your children. and we could not. we had no choice. good morning. you could be paying to get money out of thousands more cash machines if banks and atm operators fail to reach an agreement over fees. i'll be taking a look at why. in sport, it's a happy birthday forjose mourinho. manchester united reach the league cup final, with an aggregate victory over hull, so they'll face southampton at wembley next month. and carol has the weather. good morning. a cold and frosty start to the day. once again, pockets of fog around. cloudy. summer rain. the sunshine hanging around for the longest in the far north of scotland like yesterday. and i'll have the rest of your
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weather forecast details in 15 minutes. thanks, carol. good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will meet president donald trump at the white house this afternoon. she'll be hoping to prepare the ground for a smooth post—brexit trade deal. the two leaders will spend around an hour in the oval office, where they're also expected to discuss the role of nato as well as relations with russia and china. yesterday, the prime minister told senior republicans it was time for britain and america to renew their special relationship. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. she arrived on a blustery winter's evening in a city reeling from the effects of the new occupant of the white house. theresa may will meet with president donald trump less than a week after he came to office, a week as unpredictable as any in modern american history. and as the prime minister's motorcade went through the capital, she could be forgiven for thinking will the new relationship be more strange than special? in philadelphia, the city of the founding fathers, theresa may had a standing ovation for a speech
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that dwelt on the shared history of the two nations, a relationship which defined the modern world, all pa rt which defined the modern world, all part of a charm offensive which she hopes will pave the way for a trade deal with the us. hopes will pave the way for a trade dealwith the us. so i am hopes will pave the way for a trade deal with the us. so i am delighted that the new administration has many trade agreement with our country, one of the earliest priority is. a new trade deal with britain and america. it must serve both of us. later, she will become the first foreign leader to meet with donald trump at the white house. the streetwise new yorker who, when it comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always put america first. he and theresa may do have things in common, and it remains to be seen whether they can find common ground, just as the uk is preparing to negotiate its departure from the eu. david willetts, bbc news, washington. let's speak to our political correspondent, carole walker, who's in westminster. how significant is today's meeting? good morning. the prime minister has
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to walk a tightrope, doesn't see, between trying to get on with donald trump, the president, and also not annoying everyone here with what she says to him. absolutely. this be a very important and potentially very tricky meeting for the prime minister. the first world leader to meet president trump in downing —— and downing street are happy about that. she says she does not want to go back to the sort of foreign interventions we saw in iraq and afghanistan. that will be welcome back here. but she does want the us and the uk to continue to engage on the international scene, for example, confronting islamic state. that will be welcomed back here. but there is a lot of concern, notjust among opposition mps, but in her own party, about donald trump's
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comments, for example, on allowing waterboarding to end terrorism. many people have said they are opposed to it. it has provoked concern, not just about the future with intelligence sharing and defence agreements, but also how the prime minister is talking about shared values with someone whose views on those sorts of issues many people here find objectionable. what the prime minister will want to do will be to forge that new personal relationship. she talked last night about how sometimes opposites attract. she did not appear to pander to closely to the president to provoke a backlash here in the uk. thank you. we will speak to you shortly later on. shortly after 7am, we'll be asking tony blair's former chief of staff just how significant this first meeting is likely to be. the labour mp and party whip, jeff smith, has said he'll defy jeremy corbyn and vote against the government bill that'll
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trigger article 50. the mp said he wasn't convinced the government had a proper plan for brexit. the shadow transport minister, daniel zeichner, has also said he'll oppose the legislation, while tulip siddiq has resigned from the front bench over the issue. the royal college of surgeons has described as "alarming" plans to restrict the number of hip and knee replacements in one part of england. the move by three clinical commissioning groups in worcestershire is designed to save money, but they insist operations will continue to be carried out elsewhere. andy moore has the details. hip and knee operations can be a godsend to do is to get them, but also expensive, up to £6,000 each. three groups in worcestershire want to decrease those bills because they said they were spending far more than other areas. it is important that they consider operations
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restricted to those who were in such pain they could not sleep. in the end they did not go that far. but it is understood that criteria is used in many areas. a spokesman for over 50 said they should examine their consciences. they said it was an outrage even to suggest inability to sleep should be used in deciding eligibility for an operation. the royal college of surgeons said it was worried this example of health rationing was only the tip of the iceberg. the statement went on like this. a health spokeswoman in worcestershire said many patients would benefit from physiotherapy and weight loss before considering therapy. she also said there was a clear appeal system. andy moore, bbc news. a committee of mps is calling for a tougher approach to taxing the richest people in the uk. the public accounts committee says the amount raised each year
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from wealthy individuals has fallen by a billion pounds. it's urged hm revenue and customs to do more to fight tax avoidance and evasion. head teachers in england, who have been warning of a deepening funding crisis, have been angry to discover that hundreds of millions of funding promised to schools last year were taken back by the treasury, when the government was defeated in its plan to turn all schools into academies. education correspondent, sean coughlan, has the story. head teachers in west sussex and other parts of the country have been warning that schools are running out of cash. but only last year, the government announced an extra £500 million, as part of their plan to turn every school into an academy. school leaders have been asking whatever happened to that money? but it has now emerged that most of the
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money was in fact taken back by the treasury. the education department said this was the right thing to do. the schools are receiving record levels of funding, according to them. head teachers are furious that so much money could appear and disappear when schools are struggling to make ends meet. sean coughlan, bbc news. girls are less confident in their ability than boys by the time they start school. a study found that by the age of six, girls are much less likely to associate their gender with activities that require brilliance. gender stereotyping from the media, teachers, and other children, means less women aspire to professions that require subjects such as philosophy or physics. the current cold weather appears to be bringing unusual migrant birds to britain such as waxbirds. aid charity is holding an annual bird count in the world's largest wildlife survey. ——a. relocating can be stressful at the best of times, but residents in ghent, belgium,
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have found an inventive way to help their local library move down the road. more than 1,200 people formed a human chain over a distance of 250 meters to move books from the old library building to the new. you could say they had the situation covered. do you think they would be better to just put them in a lorry? that is a much better idea. i guess this one brings the community together. exactly. it is like a big game of pass the parcel. do you get to look at the books? it is a nostalgic day. the tennis. and now football, a throwback to 1976. a repeat of the league cup final. manchester united versus southampton. that famous day when robbie stokes scored an upset to win. jose mourinho might have a few more grey hairs, but his manchester united team, are in the final of the efl cup. it was a close shave for mourinho celebrating his
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54th birthday yesterday. united lost their 17—match unbeaten run, but did they beat hull city, on aggregate, over the two legs, and so they'll play southampton in the final next month. arsenal manager, arsene wenger, will accept an fa misconduct charge today. he said he was "big enough" to say he hadn't behaved well, when he verbally abused and pushed an official, during his side's 2—1 win over burnley. eoin morgan led england's cricketers to victory, in their first twenty20 international against india in kanpur. the captain's half—century made him the first england player to reach 1,500 runs in the shortest format of the game. and will there be a roger and rafa final at the australian open? a throwback to those days at the australian open. federer won his semi—final in melbourne yesterday, nadal plays the in—form grigor dimitrov in the next few hours. all the pundits and fans are hoping
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we see a final between them. but, there might be something to say about that. i was hoping it was at eight o'clock but they started a 30. a quick look at the papers. —— 830. the times. are a lot of interest in to reason may‘s speech last night speaking to republicans in philadelphia. donald trump was the warmup act. he appeared before theresa may. she gave her speech to them. then the face—to—face meeting will be taking place later today. story about hip operations. patients will be denied hip or knee operations unless there pain is so severe they cannot sleep. we will talk about that. no more wars like iraq. that was one of the lines they came out of that speech in
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philadelphia. people will be looking very closely at just what message philadelphia. people will be looking very closely atjust what message it is she is sending out. what have you got? a glimpse of what it might look like in the future for the british economy. what happened last year is looking big in the papers. consumer spending sending the country to grow. that was predicted in the last few months of last year, growing the economy 0.6%. people were surprised because they didn't think we would grow. we have talked about consumer spending four years. that is what is propping up the economy. they say it isa propping up the economy. they say it is a surprise but it seems to be the one thing that is strong in the uk. if life is not great for you at work at the minute, you can escape the rat race. are you not happy at work? my application is in. look at this. this island, they are looking for someone this island, they are looking for someone to live on the island. they have been looking for them for a while. they need them to look after
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the puffins. 24 nesting species. you can have up to £70,000, accommodation provided for free, and two motorboats to get around. when you say look after a penguin... dodos are good! it is going so well. iimagine it dodos are good! it is going so well. i imagine it requires a lot of counting. he would have to climb the cliffs to get to their nests. have you done this before? apparently they have full mobile phone reception and the internet. nothing is sacred. i don't know if anyone could have a betterjob than that. do they need expertise with puffins? i don't know. laughing. they are calling it timewarp thursday. no one thought they would see the williams sisters in a final against each
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other and potentially rafael nadal against roger federer. the semi—final in the australian open. nadal still has to get there, and three months ago there was a lovely interview with roger federer, they we re interview with roger federer, they were playing mini tennis in spain and they joked that were playing mini tennis in spain and theyjoked that they were playing mini tennis in spain and they joked that they would were playing mini tennis in spain and theyjoked that they would love to meet again and they would have to set upa to meet again and they would have to set up a charity match. rafa nadal was playing with one arm, and that are playing with one leg. it is so reassuring, in a world that is changing fast tennis is giving us a little bit of what we used to know. 5000:1 were the odds for the williams sisters to make it to the final and for nadal and federer to make it as well. sister act part 28,
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their first make it as well. sister act part 28, theirfirst since 2009. make it as well. sister act part 28, their first since 2009.|j make it as well. sister act part 28, their first since 2009. i have another animal story which has suddenly appeared. we were obviously obsessed with it. this one is a bit... you know if you are at work and wondering how your dog might be at home, your dog or cat, and you are thinking i hope they are enjoying themselves? now there is a ball you can get where you can be at work and on your phone and you can make the ball moves and do tricks, and it can even have your face on it. you can actually entertain your pet while you are sat in a boring meeting. can the ball looked at the pet? you can, because even see what they are up to, although it is a bit ofan they are up to, although it is a bit of an invasion of privacy for the dog. if they are up to something they shouldn't be? here is one that eve ryo ne they shouldn't be? here is one that everyone up. supposedly the roundabout with the worst potholes in the uk. this is in staffordshire. 100 in one roundabout complex. if
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you have been across this you must know what it is like. a lot of people saying it is shocking. when cyclist is have to go around it you literally have to navigate in amongst gigantic potholes. literally have to navigate in amongst gigantic potholesm literally have to navigate in amongst gigantic potholes. it livens up amongst gigantic potholes. it livens up the journey. well done finding a positive spin. we will see you both a little later on. have you stopped talking now? thanks, mike. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: theresa may heads to the white house for her first face—to—face meeting with president trump. plans to restrict the number of hip and knee replacements are described as alarming by the royal college of surgeons. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather.
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it certainly felt chilly for lots of people. look at that. that is the 13 ican people. look at that. that is the 13 i can see that. that is a good numberfor us. i can see that. that is a good number for us. it certainly is. good morning all. steph is quite right. it isa morning all. steph is quite right. it is a chilly start to the day, some temperatures as low as —5 but yesterday, look at this gorgeous weather watcher's picture, sent in from glen morriston in the highlands. as we came that bit further south, we had seen more like this, —1 and a lot of frost around. todayit this, —1 and a lot of frost around. today it is not going to be as cold, but it is going to still be cold. what is happening is, if you remember yesterday, france was all blue, indicating it was cold, and dragging in the south—easterly winds. today the green and yellow are reappearing. it is still cold but not as cold so that is being dragged across our shores by the
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south—easterly wind. increasingly today we will see more of a south—westerly wind developing around this area of low pressure, so things are going to turn less cold through the day. we have a weather front coming an associated with that area of low pressure which will slowly be ringing some rain and drizzle from the west, very slowly moving east. so first thing this morning there is a fair bit of cloud around, it is cold, some frost and pockets of fault as well, especially the east midlands and lincolnshire, where it is dense in this increasing fog. watch out for ice in east anglia, on damp surfaces and a lot of cloud across northern ireland, with the rain knocking on the door across northern england and cold across northern england and cold across scotland. for most of us we are getting off to a decent start, with some sunshine. through the day, as this weather front approaches slowly, bringing rain across northern ireland, the cloud will build and we also have something else coming up, more rain across the channel island in across southern
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areas. the cloud building ahead of both of these systems, the far north and east of scotland and northern england we are going to see the best of the weather today. temperature—wise, down in the highlands we are not looking at 13, neither are we looking at minus one. so through the course of the evening and overnight our two systems join forces and the whole lot will be drifting slowly towards the east, ringing some rain. some snow in the pennines and also above about 400m across scotland, and increasingly we are looking at clearer skies behind, the risk of ice on untreated surfaces, more especially in the west. as we go through the weekend west. as we go through the weekend we continue with the less cold theme. it will be breezy at times as well, with some rain. to translate that onto the charts, our system coming in from the west moving slowly towards the east, taking some rain with them. behind them it will brighten up. quite a lot of cloud at
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times, some sunshine in the west but nonetheless some showers as well, so it will not be bone dry. sunshine chases away that cloud. temperatures between about five and nine celsius and for sunday we have rain coming in from the south—west and the south, slowly moving northwards. it looks like this is where its northern extent will be. the south—westerly is coming our way, bringing in milder conditions but in the north we will see the best and driest of the weather, if that is your definition of what is best, with temperatures that little bit lower. less cold is my favourite bit of that weather broadcast. thank you very much. see you in a bit. losing a child is perhaps the most painful experience any parent can go though. but if a baby is born earlier than 24 weeks into a pregnancy, and doesn't manage to survive, they won't receive a birth or death certificate. that made the situation even more upsetting for sarah henderson when her daughter arrived at 23 weeks, but without a heartbeat. she has been speaking to breakfast‘s graham satchell about her loss, and why
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she is calling for a change in the law surrounding stillbirths. we had the opportunity to take photographs of her, which we will treasure for ever. and handprints, and footprints, and we held her. she was very small, but she was perfectly formed. to us she was perfect. she was our daughter. sarah gave birth to her daughter at 23 weeks and four days. she was born without a heartbeat.|j weeks and four days. she was born without a heartbeat. i don't know how many times i told her i was sorry. as a mother, you ought to protect your children. and we couldn't. we had no choice. over what happened, how it happened. sarah was told she wouldn't get a
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birth or death certificate for her daughter. legally, the birth of a child is registered after 24 weeks, the age of viability. sarah started to petition to change the law. it now has more than 300,000 signatures. it is a recognition that your child existed at all, acknowledgement that they were here. no matter how short the time. it really would have helped for the grieving process, the fact that she was acknowledged, the fact that our grief was acknowledged, that we had lost. like millions of others, sarah has been watching harrowing scenes on coronation street. michelle,, played by kym marsh, loses her son at 23 weeks. she also asks for a birth certificate, and is refused. what touched me so much was knowing that she had actually experienced that she had actually experienced that in her real life. one of the reasons i felt rave enough to share my story, and to do the petition,
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was if kym was brave enough to do that, then i could use my voice. —— brave enough. a meeting with zoe clark coates from the charity saying goodbye. what we all want is grieving parent is very much that every baby gets the recognition they deserve. together we can make a difference. registering all births before 24 weeks would mean issuing certificates in abortion cases, so charities have been working on compromises. a new national certificate available to parents who wa nt certificate available to parents who want it. it will give parents a certificate, formal certificate. we wa nt certificate, formal certificate. we want to a formal, legal document thatis want to a formal, legal document that is given to any parent who requests it, and a new register be created. sarah is hoping for more signatures for her petition, and change. not having legal recognition for her daughter has been devastating. there is no... there is
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no record of her anywhere. so she is not in ourfamily tree, she no record of her anywhere. so she is not in our family tree, she will never appear in not in our family tree, she will neverappear in an not in our family tree, she will never appear in an birth register or death register in any way. it is like legally she didn't exist, that she was never a person. of course, to us she was, and will always be. that was sarah henderson, sharing her story with brea kfast‘s graham satchell. if you or someone you know is affected by this, you can find details of organisations offering support at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free at any time to hear recorded information on 0800 560190. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: we all know there is no such thing as free money, but now withdrawing cash could become more costly. we will find out why with sean, before 7:00am. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a 15—year—old boy has been charged with the murder of quamari barnes, who was stabbed outside his school in north—west london. quamari, who was also 15, was attacked outside the capital city academy in willesden on monday, and died later in hospital. the boy accused of his murder is due to appear at willesden youth court later today. a dutch psychotherapist who has been living and working in the uk for 40 years has told bbc london she feels rejected by this country following the brexit vote. emmy van deurzen is due to receive her british citizenship today, but previously had her application rejected twice. she says the vote to leave the eu has caused her a great deal of concern. it is as if that trust you have built up between yourself and the
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country that you have adopted, and that you think has adopted you, suddenly rejects you and doesn't wa nt to suddenly rejects you and doesn't want to acknowledge that contribution any more. that's incredibly painful. there is no woolwich ferry today, as staff have gone on strike. employees are planning to walk out every friday till mid—april, over what the unite union calls a culture of bullying and sexual harassment. briggs marine contractors limited, who run the service, says it takes health, safety and welfare extremely seriously. well, let's take a look at the rest of the travel now. there is no bakerloo line between piccadilly circus to elephant & castle, and severe delays on the rest of the line, because of a signal failure. there are no overground trains between romford and upminster. still no south—eastern trains between sidcup and hither green, after a freight train derailed on tuesday. let's take a look at the a13 in limehouse, where we have got roadworks. it is down to one lane. and, just coming off the eastbound north circular at staples corner flyover, that is also down to one lane. let's have a check on the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini.
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hello, good morning. yesterday, away from central london, many of us stay below freezing all day. today won't below freezing all day. today won't be quite as bad, feeling a bit better, not so unpleasant the cold. just a touch milder and most of us should stay dry as well. but we did have a bit of rain around first thing, and of course a widespread frost. so some of that rain is going to re— freeze onto the roads and pavements. we have met office warning about ice, or chapters on slippery surfaces and perhaps a few patches of freezing fog as well. but other than that we should stay mostly dry. a rather grey day, slight change in wind direction. so temperatures will be up to between five and seven celsius, maybe a few outbreaks of rain just towards western areas, really, as we head through the late afternoon and the first part of the evening rush—hour, where the rain will spread just about everywhere through the course of the night. just light outbreaks of the night. just light outbreaks of it on and off, the night to come.
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we will start of the day above freezing, about four or five celsius. so this saturday, rather grey and cloudy day, some outbreaks of rain first thing and it will probably brighten up a little bit later on the afternoon. we could hit double figures again over the course of the weekend so feeling, but rather unsettled. there will be some rain around on sunday as well. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it is back to charlie and steph. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. it's on friday 27th january. coming up on breakfast today: the soldiers came in, took all of it, and put it on my head. thankfully, the atrocities of the holocaust have been condemned to history, but worrying research suggests more than a quarter of survivors living in the uk still experience discrimination. we'll hearfrom some of those affected. it's the old adage. "men are from mars, women from venus." and it seems, when it comes to confidence,
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the difference between boys and girls can become worlds apart from just six—years—old. we'll find out why after 8am. and before nine. hollywood actor, neil patrick harris, as you've never see him before. the star of the hit comedy, how i met your mother, will be here to tell us about his new children's drama and what it's like to play a villain. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. theresa may will today become the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president. the prime minister told republicans yesterday of the importance of the special relationship between the two countries, but says they cannot return to "failed" military interventions. mrs may will be hoping to lay the ground work for a trade deal after brexit. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. she arrived on a blustery winter's evening in a city reeling from the effects of the new occupant of the white house. theresa may will meet with president trump less than a week after he came to office, a week as unpredictable as any in modern american history.
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and as the prime minister's motorcade wound its way through the streets of the capital, she could be forgiven for thinking will the new relationship be more strange than special? in philadelphia, the city of the founding fathers, mrs may earned a standing ovation for a speech that dwelt on the shared history of the two nations, a relationship which had defined the modern world, all part of a charm offensive which she hopes will pave the way for a trade deal with the us. so i am delighted that the new administration has made a trade agreement between our countries, one of its earliest priorities. a new trade deal with britain and america. it must serve both of our sides and interests. later, she will become the first foreign leader to meet with donald trump at the white house.
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the streetwise new yorker who, when it comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always put america first. he and theresa may do have things in common, and it remains to be seen whether they can find common ground, just as the uk is preparing to negotiate its departure from the eu. david willis, bbc news, washington. shortly after 7am, we'll be asking tony blair's former chief of staff just how significant this first meeting is likely to be. donald trump's first week as president has been described by the former labour leader, as "dizzying" and "not normal times." speaking on the bbc‘s newsnight programme, he also criticised theresa may for positioning herself so closely to the president's policies. her speech was a perfectly decent speech if it had been normal times. but to align yourself so closely with his project, which is what she
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did, that, ithink, was a mistake. jeremy corbyn faces more dissent in the labour party today, as the party whip, jeff smith, says he'll defy the leader and vote against the government bill that will trigger article 50. the mp said he wasn't convinced the government had a proper plan for brexit. the shadow transport minister, daniel zeichner, has also said he'll oppose the legislation, while tulip siddiq has resigned from the front bench over the issue. the royal college of surgeons has described as "alarming" plans to restrict the number of hip and knee replacements in one part of england. the move by three clinical commissioning groups in worcestershire is designed to save money, but they insist operations will continue to be carried out elsewhere. a committee of mps is calling for a tougher approach to taxing the richest people in the uk.
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the public accounts committee says the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen by a billion pounds. it's urged hm revenue and customs to do more to fight tax avoidance and evasion. head teachers in england, who have been warning of a deepening funding crisis, have been angry to discover that hundreds of millions of funding promised to schools last year were taken back by the treasury, when the government was defeated in its plan to turn all schools into academies. the rspb says the current cold weather appears to be bringing unusual migrant birds to britain, such as waxwings. the charity is holding its annual bird count this weekend, when more than half a million people are expected to take part in what's claimed to be the world's largest wildlife survey. relocating can be stressful at the best of times, but residents in ghent, belgium, have found an inventive way to help their local library move down the road. more than 1,200 people formed a human chain over a distance of 250 meters to move books from the old library building to the new. you could say they had the situation covered. that is quite a long way. i think it
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isa that is quite a long way. i think it is a good idea. it gets everyone involved. and as you are passing the books you might think, hey, this one looks good. the complete works of shakespeare might be quite heavy to move that way. we are about to step into the weird and wonderful world of jose into the weird and wonderful world ofjose mourinho. the final score, you will hear written a moment, it was hull, two, man u, one. bearthat in mind. manchester united are into the efl cup final after beating hull city 3—2 on aggregate. 2—1 on the night. united led 2—0 from the first leg and after hull scored a penalty, paul pogba struck what would be the decisive goal. oumar niasse ended united's 17—match unbeaten run, but that didn't stopjose mourinho reaching his first final as united manager. and on his birthday,
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too, although he's not accepting their winning streak is over. he is even saying that that wasn't the real score. we did not lose. it was 1—1. the real score. we did not lose. it was1—1.1—1. i the real score. we did not lose. it was 1—1. 1—1. i only the real score. we did not lose. it was1—1.1—1. i only saw two goals. pogba's one. and the guy in the far post coming... 1—1. we are still unbeatable. why did you not count the first goal? i did not see it. winning after winning is the
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toughest thing. that is what leicester has proven to be difficult this season. but they still, in cup competitions, as we saw in the champions league, are formidable opponents on their daylj champions league, are formidable opponents on their day. i put on the best team. the best team. that is because we need to go to the cup. we need to get confidence. because we lost so many matches in the last days. arsenal manager, arsene wenger, will attend a personal hearing for his misconduct charge later today. wenger says he'll accept the charge for verbally abusing and pushing an official during his side's win over burnley last weekend, but he wants clarity on the rules for when a manager is sent to the stands. when i was sent off, i was surprised. i was in the tunnel. i
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thought i had the right to be in the tunnel. in 2009 i had to go into the stands in old trafford. i did not know where to go. nobody tells you what you have to do when you are sent off. he looked a little bit lost when he went to the stands. just, where do you go? former england captain steven gerrard says he's "very excited but nervous and anxious" about his new role as liverpool youth coach. gerrard, who made more than 500 appearances for the club, will start next week. i think the key to it is liverpool are prepared to help me. they want to help me become a better coach and a better manager. you know, they welcomed me with open arms. but at the same time, i have to put in all the same time, i have to put in all the hard work and tried to improve as well. —— try. england cruised to a seven—wicket victory in their first twenty20 international against india in kanpur.
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captain eoin morgan led by example, top scoring in the match. his half century made him the first england player to reach 1,500 runs in the shortest format of the game. they can wrap up the series with a win in the second match on sunday. i think it was a pretty complete performance. certainly as complete as we have performed on the strip. to win the toss and bowl, there is a lwa ys to win the toss and bowl, there is always more pressure on the bowlers to perform on that kind of wicket. finally, to the tennis. will there be a roger and rafa final at the australian open? federer won his semi—final in melbourne yesterday, nadal plays the in—form grigor dimitrov in the next few hours. nadal has not reached a major final since winning his 14th grand slam at the french open three years ago. if he beats dimitrov, then all four singles finalists will be aged over 30, as 35—year—old serena williams meets sister venus, who's 36, in the women's final. and it would be, if rafael nadal can
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get through, be a repeat of 2008. it would be a real throwback. when is the game? 830 our time. it will obviously go on beyond that. thank you. later today, theresa may will become the first global leader to meet president trump. the prime minster has said she hopes the two leaders can find a trade deal that will suit both countries. mrs may has also said she's not afraid of having a candid conversation. but with donald trump promising to "put america first," just how likely is an agreement? breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to liverpool to investigate. on the quayside in liverpool, row after row of british made cars bound for america. they are red bit exports for us out of the uk, as well as construction and mining
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machinery. heavy machinery. when you hear donald trump is getting america building again, this sounds encouraging for you. obviously. we wa nt encouraging for you. obviously. we want a slice of that. we can export the goods he needs to carry on that construction he is looking at. if. a slice of the economy is what theresa may wants. this is the exports out of the uk, a fifth of global exports. we sell more than we buy, with imports totalling £35 billion. the us is our biggest single nation export market. but we are america's fifth most important market. it is clear who has the upper hand. a new trade deal between britain and america must serve both sides and both of our interests. it is going to be only america first. america first. america first. does that
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alarm you at all? if they are more serious about manufacturing that creates opportunities for us. if we listen to what donald trump says, we could have great opportunity. you never know. but if there are opportunities at what cost? in liverpool's shopping districts, look up, and you might notice a golden eagle. it marks the spot of america's very first consulate, when the fledgeling republic first looked the fledgeling republic first looked the world, and it traded with britain first then. today it is a french restaurant, and everything has changed. we think we are still a big power. but the special relationship was only important from the british point of view. the assumption that everything would be fine with trade assumes donald trump's administration will behave rationally. they may not. they could
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genuinely prioritised american consumers and jobs and manufacturing to the exclusion of other trading partners. high tariffs could be put in place to tax imports. we don't know. barack obama's great, great grandfather once sailed from here in the hope of finding a better future in america. has theresa may meets his successor, she has her eye on the same thing. —— as. more coverage through the morning as we look to that face—to—face meeting between donald trump and theresa may happening later on today. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: theresa may is heading to the white house to become the first foreign leader to meet president trump. plans to restrict the number of hip and knee replacements for all but those in the most severe pain are described as alarming by the royal college of surgeons. it is time to find out what is
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happening with the weather. that is definitely a lovely optimistic picture. good morning. forsome of us, we will see pictures like this today. skies like this. not necessarily for the whole day. this isa necessarily for the whole day. this is a weather watcher picture. it was sentin is a weather watcher picture. it was sent in yesterday to morriston in the highlands where we had 13 celsius. that is a brilliant temperature. lovely skies. look further south. another cracking picture. —1, that is as warm as it got. both these temperatures, one is going up and the other is going down. you can see air coming up from the continent which is not as cold as it was yesterday. to take a look at that, if you remember in france yesterday, my chart had blues in it, indicating it was cold. mild greens and yellow is now. i use the word
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mild. it will still feel cold. dragging south—easterly is across the country. not as cold as yesterday. but to get through the day how we start to see air rotating around. the area of low pressure approaching us. this is a mild air direction approaching from the south—west. with that, a front coming our way. that will introduce afair bit coming our way. that will introduce a fair bit of rain at times. light rain and drizzle. it will very slowly move east. first thing this morning we have got variable fortunes. cloud around. also some sunshine when it gets up. a cold start. temperatures and parts of england will go as low as —5, —6. clear skies as well. northern ireland, a lot of cloud around and showers. as we move into scotland, a cold start, but a lot of sunshine. more mild towards the west. wales, you can see a bit of cloud coming in
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from the south—west this morning. sunny breaks. through the day, as the weather front goes across northern ireland, it will bring rain. eventually, it will get into western pa rt of rain. eventually, it will get into western part of scotland, england, and wales. at the same time, a system going up across the english channel bringing rain to the channel islands and into southern counties. watch out for ice first thing in kent, sussex, in the east of east anglia, where there will be rain. through the afternoon, more cloud will build to be hanging onto the sunshine in north and eastern scotla nd sunshine in north and eastern scotland and north—east england. temperatures down in the north end up temperatures down in the north end up in the south compared with yesterday. ben true this evening and overnight, well, the rain is coming from both directions. joining forces. it moves towards the east. behind that, the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. above 400 metres. we could also see snow on the tops of the pennines. the weekend. if anything,
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the tops of the pennines. the weekend. ifanything, again, it is going to be less cold. i am choosing my language carefully here. breezy. rain at times. saturday, first of all, do you remember this from the west slowly towards the east? behind that, brighter skies,. a lot of cloud initially, but the sunshine will chase that way. a plethora of showers towards the west. temperatures, coming up, between five and nine. and then on sunday, rain, from the south—west in the south moving slowly west, and the brighter skies will be across scotla nd brighter skies will be across scotland and eventually into northern england. where are you? we are listening very intently. you set at one point the sun is going to chase the clouds away, and i heard what you said. it was poetry! yes, because normally steph always listens, but charlie, i
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am very impressed! he is a pa rt—time, am very impressed! he is a part—time, we both know that. now let's have a look at this morning's papers. the guardian, first of all, lots of the papers covering the news today that theresa may will be meeting president trump, the first foreign leader to do so now that donald trump is president and lots of people analysing what is going to happen, the opposites attract headline being because theresa may said to journalists headline being because theresa may said tojournalists on headline being because theresa may said to journalists on her flight to the us that sometimes opposites do attract. and the front page of the daily telegraph, it is interesting how they have framed this one. no more wars like iraq. they haven't quoted her directly, this is a reference to know more interventions in foreign countries, and they have obviously thinks that with iraq and afghanistan. there is a story about
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hip operations on the daily mail this morning, and this is the news this morning, and this is the news this morning, and this is the news this morning that patients could be denied hip warnie replacements u nless denied hip warnie replacements unless they cannot sleep through the night due to pain —— or knee. we will be speaking to the royal couege will be speaking to the royal college of surgeons a bit later about that. we all know there is no such thing as free money, but it could soon cost you to withdraw money from tens of thousands of atms which are currently free. how much would you pay to take a tenner out of a machine? we have got used to pretty much all cash machines being free, haven't we? banks and atm operators are arguing over the fees they pay each other to cover the cost of running the machines. if you don't go to a machine that belongs to your bank, your bank has to pay a small fee, either to another bank or to the independent operator. but some of the banks want to reduce the fees. so will us customers be asked to make up the difference? ron delnevo is the executive
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director europe of the atm industry association, representing both banks and independent cash machine operators. you represent the industry. you represent the industrylj you represent the industry. i do. why has this issue come up now? it seems we have been used to not paying for our cash out of cash machines for quite awhile. it is probably a relief to some of your not hearing about brexit and donald trump, this issue is more important today now than some of those other issues. the reality is we have enjoyed fantastic free access to cash in the uk. the system which connect all of the atms here is admired around the world, and we haveit admired around the world, and we have it and therefore we have that easy a ccess have it and therefore we have that easy access to cash. it is under threat now. why now? why all of a sudden other banks saying they are not willing to pay as much as the machine operators want to charge?
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not willing to pay as much as the machine operators want to charge ?m is not all the banks. some banks are saying they don't want to pay but the reality is that is because rightly that banks are examining their cost them trying to save money. what i would say and the uk public would say is this is not a good way of saving money. an average of 15 million adults in the uk use an atm once a week so it is a vital pa rt an atm once a week so it is a vital part of our economy and that cash keeps the economy going. millions of people use cash to lead their daily lives. there is a myth that cash is dying away but more than 50% of retail transactions are still carried out using cash. it is very important to the people of the uk and that is why it needs to be kept ona and that is why it needs to be kept on a sustainable basis for ever. some of your members are banks, are they picking the wrong fights and should they be looking to save money in other ways? this is a fight between banks and independence, because as you save many banks operate atms away from branches. we shouldn't criticise banks were
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trying to save money. they are right to be trying to save money. this is just the wrong place to be saving that money. we need good public access to cash, which is what we have at the moment. millions only use cash to lead their daily lives and we have to restore that access to cash, that is called financial inclusion. so there is a big meeting today among operators to try and sort out what will go on with these fees. if it turns out the fees have to be reduced, how many of the current cash machines that we have free to use across the country could turn into us seeing those charges like we used to? well, the working party which has been set up solves the problem. if not, to be honest, we would expect the payment regulator to intervene. do you think a third of them? it could be a third of atms. we estimate 8500 would come out, but there will also be bank atms, because of branch atms will meana
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atms, because of branch atms will mean a lot of cash access removed. one major bank leaving the network could mean the end of the network. we need that to be safeguarded, and we need to have guarantees of free access to cash, guaranteed under the link network. it makes you think how often you get cashed out. are you a cash man? i have started to use my mobile phone. and ifound out this morning what atms stood for. any idea? automatic teller machine. very good, very good. you would think i knew a bit about business, wouldn't you? it is not every day that a rare tropical turtle washes up on a beach in wales, but that is exactly what happened in november when an olive ridley turtle named menai turned up in anglesey. the species is critically endangered, and experts say it is the first time one has been seen on uk shores. our wales correspondent sian lloyd has more. an early morning start, and another
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step on a journey that could eventually lead to this tropical sea turtle being released back into the wild. she was driven all the way from anglesey, where she was found last november, to hertfordshire. six hours later, and the team at the royal veterinary college were preparing their unique patient. they have never seen a olive ridley here before. menai is the first to be spotted in british waters since records began, almost 250 years ago. getting a sea turtle into the scanning machine is no easy task, but experts need to check her lungs for damage. you can see her shell, all around, for damage. you can see her shell, allaround, and we for damage. you can see her shell,
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all around, and we can see her lungs, and we can see also that there is some gas, which is black, and that is outside her lungs. so it is free gas, and that is potentially responsible for her buoyancy problem. staff caring for her on anglesey had noticed that menai was unable to keep below the water. she may be struggling to dive, but the tea m may be struggling to dive, but the team are delighted by her appetite, which is helping her regain weight. she is starting to eat really, really well now. she is demolishing a couple of kilos of calamari a day, and she is a real personality. she likes to see us, she seems to recognise people, she knows what is going on. olive ridleys can travel vast distances but it is thought this one was carried by current thousands of miles off course. menai the total has been through a lot, and now it is time for some tlc. gel
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is being applied to prevent her skin from drying, and it will soon be time for her return to anglesey, where experts decide her future. i have learned a lot in that piece, not least that they serve calamari to captive totals. it has fine tastes, that turtle. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a 15—year—old boy has been charged with the murder of quamari barnes, who was stabbed outside his school in north—west london. quamari, who was also 15, was attacked outside the capital city academy in willesden on monday, and died later in hospital. the boy accused of his murder is due to appear at willesden youth court later today. a dutch psychotherapist who has been living and working in the uk for 40 years has told bbc london she feels rejected by this country following the brexit vote. emmy van deurzen is due
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to receive her british citizenship today, but previously had her application rejected twice. she says the vote to leave the eu has caused her a great deal of concern. it is as if that trust you have built up between yourself and the country that you have adopted, and that you think has adopted you, suddenly rejects you, and doesn't want to acknowledge that contribution anymore. that's incredibly painful. there is no woolwich ferry today, as staff have gone on strike. employees are planning to walk out every friday till mid—april over what the unite union calls a culture of bullying and sexual harassment. briggs marine contractors limited, who run the service, says it takes health, safety and welfare extremely seriously. well, let's take a look at the rest of the travel now. there is no bakerloo line between piccadilly circus to elephant & castle, and severe delays on the rest of the line. also, we have got no overg round trains between romford and upminster.
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still no south—eastern trains between sidcup and hither green, after a freight train derailed on tuesday. let's take a look at the a13 in limehouse, where we have got roadworks. it is down to one lane near island row. and in the city, on farringdon road, we have got a burst watermain. one lane is closed at ludgate circus. time for a look at the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday, away from central london, many of us stay below freezing all day. today won't be quite as bad, feeling a bit better, not so unpleasant the cold. just a touch milder, and most of us should stay dry as well. but we did have a bit of rain around first thing, and of course a widespread frost, so some of that rain is going to re—freeze onto the roads and pavements. we have got a met office warning about ice, watch out on slippery surfaces, and perhaps a few patches of freezing fog as well. but other than that, we should stay mostly dry. a rather grey day, a slight
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change in wind direction, pushing some slightly milder air our way, so temperatures will be up to between five and seven celsius. maybe a few outbreaks of rain, just towards western areas, really, as we head through the late afternoon and the first part of the evening rush—hour, where the rain will spread just about everywhere through the course of the night. just light outbreaks of it, on and off, and a milder night to come. we will start off the day above freezing, about four or five celsius. so this saturday, a rather grey and cloudy day. some outbreaks of rain around first thing, and it will probably brighten up a little bit later in the afternoon. we could hit double figures again over the course of the weekend so feeling milder, but rather unsettled. there will be some rain around on sunday morning, too. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. theresa may becomes the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president.
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the prime minister says the two leaders can "lead the world together" but they cannot return to "failed" military interventions. we have the opportunity, indeed, the responsibility, to renew the special relationship for this new age. i do not have my commerce secretary, they want to talk trade. so i'll have to handle it myself. good morning. it's friday the 27th of january. also this morning: proposals to restrict knee and hip replacements for only those in the most severe pain. the royal college of surgeons says there's no justification for the decision. the babies who die before 24 weeks and their parents who are denied a birth certificate. it isa
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it is a recognition that your child existed at all. proof that they were here. good morning. one of our biggest companies bt is having to deal with accounting scandals and tougher times ahead. i'll be looking at why this could affect our pensions and our bills. in sport, it's a happy birthday forjose mourinho. manchester united reach the league cup final, with an aggregate victory over hull, so they'll face southampton at wembley next month. and carol has the weather. a cold and frosty start to the day. patchy fog. some dense. dry and bright. cloudy rain coming in from the west and south. those will merge and slowly move east through the day. for many, though, it will be dry. i will have more details in 15 minutes. thank you. see you soon.
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good morning. first, our main story. theresa may will meet president donald trump at the white house this afternoon. she'll be hoping to prepare the ground for a smooth post—brexit trade deal. the two leaders will spend around an hour in the oval office, where they're also expected to discuss the role of nato as well as relations with russia and china. yesterday, the prime minister told senior republicans it was time for britain and america to renew their special relationship. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. she arrived on a blustery winter's evening in a city reeling from the effects of the new occupant of the white house. theresa may will meet with president trump less than a week after he came to office, a week as unpredictable as any in modern american history. and as the prime minister's motorcade wound its way through the streets of the capital, she could probably be forgiven for thinking will the new relationship be more strange than special? in philadelphia, the city of the founding fathers, mrs may earned a standing ovation for a speech that dwelt on the shared history of the two nations, a relationship which had defined the modern world, all part of a charm offensive which she hopes will pave the way for a trade deal with the us.
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so i am delighted that the new administration has made a trade agreement between our countries, one of its earliest priorities. a new trade deal with britain and america. it must serve both of our sides and interests. later, she will become the first foreign leader to meet with donald trump at the white house, the streetwise new yorker who, when it comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always put america first. he and theresa may do have things in common, and it remains to be seen whether they can find common ground, just as the uk is preparing to negotiate its departure from the eu. let's speak to our political correspondent, carole walker, who's in westminster. inevitably, there is fascination
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with the personal side to this. donald trump and theresa may, their personal sides. they wanted top business. interesting. it was interesting to hear the prime minister last night the learning no more foreign interventions the uk and us have been involved in in the past with the uk and afghanistan. —— signalling. that will chime with the views of the new president. it will be welcome to many mps back here at westminster. she also wants to make sure that both britain and the united states remain engaged in the world, through nato, a joint—venture to stand up to islamic state terrorists, and indeed, in things like the deal with iran over its nuclear programme. but the important thing for the prime minister's point of view is going to be to try to forge a personal relationship. she
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talked last night about how opposites attract. some might be surprised to hear that sort of language from theresa may. but of course there are also issues where they disagreed. many mps are not just on the opposition benches, but in her own party, were concerned to hear donald trump countenancing waterboarding as torture. it is not clear if that will go ahead. theresa may has already warned that could affect intelligence sharing. and of course, the prime minister will be aware that many mps here at westminster will be concerned about many of the things that donald trump has said and done. she will want to forge that new personal relationship to form the basis for a future trade deal without appearing to pander to the new president so much that she prompts a backlash here at home. carol, for the moment, thank you for that. in a few minutes, we'll speak to tony blair's former chief of staff and get his views on just
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how significant a first meeting this is likely to be. let us have a look at the rest of the news this morning. the labour mp and party whip, jeff smith, has said he'll defy jeremy corbyn and vote against the government bill that'll trigger article 50. the mp said he wasn't convinced the government had a proper plan for brexit. the shadow transport minister, daniel zeichner, has also said he'll oppose the legislation, while tulip siddiq has resigned from the front bench over the issue. patients in parts of worcestershire will have to be in more pain, to qualify for a hip or knee operation, under new plans by health bosses. three clinical commissioning groups want to up the threshold to get access to surgery, in a bid to save over two million. though they insist operations will continue, the royal college of surgeons are calling the plans "alarming." andy moore reports. hip and knee operations can be a godsend to do is to get them, hip and knee operations can be a godsend to the people who get them, but they can also be
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expensive, up to £6,000 each. three groups in worcestershire want to decrease those bills by £2 million because they said they were spending far more than other areas. it is important that they consider operations restricted to those who were in such pain they could not sleep. in the end they did not go that far. but it is understood those criteria are used in many areas. a spokesman for saga, an organisation for over 50s, said they should examine their consciences. they said it was an outrage even to suggest inability to sleep should be used in deciding eligibility for an operation. the royal college of surgeons said it was worried this example of health rationing was only the tip of the iceberg. the statement went on like this. a health spokeswoman in worcestershire said many patients would benefit from physiotherapy and weight loss before considering therapy. she also said there was
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a clear appeal system. andy moore, bbc news. the taxman's failure to get tough with the super—rich risks undermining confidence in the whole system, according to a group of mps. the public accounts committee says the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen by a billion pounds, and there needs to be a tougher approach. hm revenue and customs has rejected any suggestion of special treatment for the wealthy. the treasury has taken back hundreds of millions of pounds of funding for schools in england, at a time when head teachers have been protesting about a cash crisis. the money had been announced last year as part of a plan to turn all schools into academies. but the department for education has revealed that when the compulsory academy plan was ditched, the treasury took back most of the funding. our education correspondent, sean coughlan, reports. head teachers in west sussex and other parts of the country have been warning that schools are running out of cash. but only last year, the government
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announced an extra £500 million, for schools as part of their plan to turn every school into an academy. school leaders have been asking whatever happened to that money? but it has now emerged that when the academy plan was abandoned, most of the money, £384 million, was in fact taken back by the treasury. the education department said this was the right thing to do. the schools are receiving record levels of funding, according to them. head teachers are furious that so much money could appear and disappear when schools are struggling to make ends meet. sean coughlan, bbc news. business news on bt with figures just in. we heard about trouble they we re just in. we heard about trouble they were having. their profits last year we re were having. their profits last year were down by nearly 14% because of various issues they have had with the business increasing cost. we
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heard of the big italian accounting scandal going on. interestingly, the boss says the customer experience remains the top row pretty. —— priority. that is a big issue for them. if any big customers have had an issue. he is highlighting that as something. all this is quite important because bt is a massive company and many pensions are massively invested in them. anyone who is a customer of bt will have a tough time. will prices rise if they have to pay for accounting? you will talk about that later on. another story. tesco. a merger. this was a surprise. they have an appearance to merge with a food wholesaler. smaller shops... it is like a cash
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and carry kind of place. tesco is thinking of merging that part of the business. it is a far bigger business. it is a far bigger business than booker is in the uk. tesco would still be the dominant force, you would have thought. interesting to see the changes in the retail sector, especially with food. prices going up, they think that could help them. ok. both of those stories coming in the last few minutes. we will check out some of those details and come back to you. the rspb says the current cold weather appears to be bringing unusual migrant birds to britain, such as waxwings. the charity is holding its annual bird count this weekend, when more than half a million people are expected to take part in what's claimed to be the world's largest wildlife survey. does that mean they actuallyjust count all of the birds? people are asked to take pictures and they put everything together. a great idea. many people take part in it all
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across the weekend. one more story for you. relocating can be stressful at the best of times, but residents in ghent, belgium, have found an inventive way to help their local library move down the road. more than 1,200 people formed a human chain over a distance of 250 meters to move books from the old library building to the new. you could say they had the situation covered. quite a lot of effort. but i think it isa quite a lot of effort. but i think it is a great way to the books you fa ncy it is a great way to the books you fancy that you may not have read. we will have the weather and all the sport coming up for you in the next few minutes. sometimes opposites attract. those are the words of theresa may, as she becomes the first foreign leader to meet president trump. the prime minister is coming under increasing pressure to oppose some of the president's controversial views, but her team are confident the so—called "special relationship" between britain and america will endure. let's take a look at how it has evolved over the years. in his talks at the white house, mr
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mcmillan will certainly have experienced a new spirit and thinking from president kennedy. experienced a new spirit and thinking from president kennedym is not an exaggeration to say, nor is not an exaggeration to say, nor is ita is not an exaggeration to say, nor is it a reflection on our other friends and allies to say, that we enjoy a special relationship with great britain. a new look in white house welcoming ceremonies. more p°mp house welcoming ceremonies. more pomp and ceremony. mrs thatcher will get more of both as the first president to be received by president reagan. in britain you will find a ready response, an ally,
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valiant, staunch, and through. on a white house visit billed as a securing of the special relationship, john major is already having to talk down the lack of enthusiasm for the clinton's plan for airdrops on was the. george and laura bush there are two read their guests. they expect to forge a friendship based on common values. ours will be a strong and good personal relationship. and an alliance that will stand the test of time. welcome to the david and barack obama time. welcome to the david and ba rack obama showed. time. welcome to the david and barack obama showed. the united states and the united kingdom enjoy a truly special relationship. joining us now from westminster isjonathan powell, the former chief of staff to tony blair during his time as prime minister. the we were just showing the
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relationship between the prime minister and the previous prime ministers, and we were given a flavour of this special relationship. what will that mean when donald trump and theresa may meet today. unfortunately, very little. what is important as what reason can bring to the table. we can bring our alliance, and a strong military in the past. as we leave europe and run down our military we will be less relevant. the more we talk about a special relationship ourselves, the more needy we look. what will be the special message from the prime minister today? the prime minister will come back saying here is a man i can do business with but when we talk about shared values, they were shed values with previous presidents but it is difficult after last week to identify what the shared values are with someone who supports torture, who wants to old war with mexico,
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who wants to old war with mexico, who supports protectionism. they are not having a joint us conference, as it would be tricky to manage it given the different directions they are pointing in. from what you say it will be a tricky meeting. looking at the specifics, theresa may spoke the republicans last night and one of the things which came up was foreign policy, and the prime minister herself saying the days of reason and america intervening in sovereign countries in an attempt to remake the world in our own image are over. what does this mean for foreign policy? i am not quite sure, because she seemed to contradict herself in the next sentence when she said written and america must lead the world by making sure our values are upheld around the world by taking action, which sounds like intervention to me. so i wasn't quite sure that the one thing i would say is it is a mistake to encourage donald trump to be isolationist. he has a tendency to wa nt to isolationist. he has a tendency to want to isolate the united states from the world. he talks about the common world, the 1930s movement to separate america, the last thing he wa nts to separate america, the last thing he wants to do is be an isolationist.
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we should encourage him to support nato, and promised to defend the countries of nato if they are attacked. and she brought that up in her speech, highlighting that it was the united states in the uk who essentially founded nato and the un. how likely is she to convince president trump about the importance of nato. as you said, that is a big thing. the problem is, the point of having a close relationship are twinned an american president and british prime minister from the british prime minister from the british point of view is you can influence the american president to do something. influence on kosovo led to the fall of the loss of itch. it is not clear that you can influence donald trump. —— milosevic. changing his mind is going to be very difficult and i don't give mrs mac a lot of chances of being able to do that. it sounds as if you are pessimistic about what will come out of this meeting —— mrs
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may. i think talking about a trade deal is a complete waste of time because we have been negotiating a trade dealforfive years because we have been negotiating a trade deal for five years and probably longer with the united states, and goodness knows mr trump will still be there. it is much better to talk about nato. she can get him to come out publicly and say he fully supports nato and will defend any country in nato if it is attacked by russia, i think that will be an achievement. what i suspect she will do is say this is someone we can do business with, and i have my doubts about that. can i ask you, on the trade deal, we have heard trump talk about bilateral deals would obviously he likes and that sales were good news for us. there is a real danger that he likes them because it means the us can dictate the terms of the deal, and therefore we could come out in a bad day with a trade deal.|j therefore we could come out in a bad day with a trade deal. i have experience trying to negotiate with the americans on trade. they are hard—nosed the americans on trade. they are ha rd—nosed about trade the americans on trade. they are hard—nosed about trade deals and agriculture in particular. the american agriculture industry is huge and they want to have access to
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the british market. if we allow them to have the access they will demand from bilateral trade deal, british agriculture better watch out. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. good morning. hopefully more than a moment. you will notice if you are stepping outside this morning it is a cold and frosty start to the day but it isn't going to feel as cold through the day to day as it did yesterday. what is happening is yesterday we had all this blew across france. we are pulling up the air from had all this blew across france. we are pulling up the airfrom france so it is coming from the south—east, moving across our shores, and we have green and yellow indicating it won't be as cold. through the day the wind will veer to the south—westerly, milder direction and we have a weather front coming in as well. that will introduce some rain, not particularly heavy rain, and some drizzle. across southern england this morning we have bits and pieces of cloud, some breaks,
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and pieces of cloud, some breaks, and it is a cold start. some parts have dropped as low as minus six. we also have some patchy and dense fog across the east midlands and then can share and some rain moving across sussex, kent, and clipping east anglia so we could see some ice. across wales, largely dry, northern england dry and frosty. northern ireland cloud with some spots of rain and a cold start across scotland. also we are looking atafair across scotland. also we are looking at a fair bit of sunshine, especially in the northern half of the country. through the day the weather front in the west moves across northern ireland, ringing some rain the western fringes of scotland, england and wales. we have another weather front across the channel isles bringing rain in the southern england. ahead of both of these the cloud will build and there will be some sunny breaks. mostly across eastern and southern scotland and the far north—east of england. temperatures down in the north and up temperatures down in the north and up in the south compared with yesterday. both of these systems willjoin forces in a whole lot will drift eastwards. as that clears
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there is the risk of ice on untreated surfaces in the west. snow on the hills and the pennines and snow above 400m in the scottish highlands as well. tomorrow all of that rain continues to drift slowly towards the east. behind that there will be a lot of cloud around. brightest spells towards the west with some showers and temperatures again not as low as they have been. thank you very much, see you later on. losing a child is perhaps the most painful experience any parent can go though. but if a baby is born earlier than 24 weeks into a pregnancy, and doesn't manage to survive, they won't receive a birth or death certificate. that made the situation even more upsetting for sarah henderson when her daughter arrived at 23 weeks, but without a heartbeat. she has been speaking to breakfast‘s graham satchell about her loss, and why she is calling for a change in the law surrounding stillbirths. we had the opportunity to take photographs of her,
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which we will treasure forever. and handprints, and footprints, and we held her. she was very small, but she was perfectly formed. to us, she was perfect. she was our daughter. sarah gave birth to rowan, her daughter, at 23 weeks and four days. she was born without a heartbeat. i don't know how many times i told her i was sorry. as a mother, you want to protect your children. and we couldn't. we had no choice, over what happened, how it happened. sarah was told she wouldn't get a birth or death certificate for rowan. legally, the birth of a child is registered after 24 weeks, the age of viability. sarah started to petition to change the law. it now has more than 300,000 signatures. it's a recognition that your child existed at all, acknowledgement that they were here, no matter how short the time.
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it really would have helped with the grieving process, the fact that she was acknowledged, the fact that our grief was acknowledged, that we had lost. like millions of others, sarah has been watching harrowing scenes on coronation street. michelle connor, played by kym marsh, loses her son at 23 weeks. she also asks for a birth certificate, and is refused. what touched me so much was knowing that she had actually experienced that, in her real life. one of the reasons i felt brave enough to share my story, and to do the petition, was if kym was brave enough to do that, then i could use my voice. a meeting with zoe clark—coates, from the charity saying goodbye. what we all want as grieving parents is very much that every baby gets the recognition they deserve.
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together, we can make a real difference. registering all births before 24 weeks would mean issuing certificates in abortion cases, so charities have been working on a compromise — a new national certificate available to parents who want it. it will give parents a certificate, a formal certificate. we want to see a formal, legal document that is given to any parent who requests it, and a new register be created. sarah is hoping for more signatures for her petition, and change. not having legal recognition for her daughter has been devastating. there's no... there's no record of her anywhere. so she's not in our family tree, she'll never appear in an birth register or a death register anywhere. it's like, legally, she didn't
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exist, that she was never a person. but of course, to us she was, and will always be. that was sarah henderson, sharing her story with brea kfast‘s graham satchell. if you or someone you know is affected by this, you can find details of organisations offering support at bbc.co.uk/actionline, or you can call for free at any time to hear recorded information on 08000 566 065. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a 15—year—old boy has been charged with the murder of quamari barnes, who was stabbed outside his school in north—west london. quamari, who was also 15, was attacked outside the capital city academy in willesden on monday, and died later in hospital. the boy accused of his murder is due to appear at willesden youth court later today. a dutch psychotherapist who has been
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living and working in the uk for 40 years has told bbc london she feels rejected by this country following the brexit vote. emmy van deurzen is due to receive her british citizenship today, but previously had her application rejected twice. she says the vote to leave the eu has caused her a great deal of concern. it is as if that trust you've built up between yourself and the country that you have adopted, and that you think has adopted you, suddenly rejects you, and doesn't want to acknowledge that contribution anymore. that's incredibly painful. there is no woolwich ferry today, as staff have gone on strike. employees are planning to walk out every friday till mid—april over what the unite union calls a culture of bullying and sexual harassment. briggs marine contractors limited, who run the service, says it takes health, safety and welfare extremely seriously. well, let's take a look at the rest of the travel now.
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we have got severe delays on the bakerloo line, also minor delays on the central line between epping and leytonstone, and no overground trains between romford and upminster. still no south—eastern trains between sidcup and hither green, after a freight train derailed on tuesday. now let's take a look at the blackwall tunnel. it is even busier than usual this morning, extra traffic due to the woolwich ferry strike. and in the city, on farringdon road we have got a burst watermain. one lane is closed at ludgate circus. time for a look at the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday, away from central london, there many of us stayed below freezing all day. today won't be quite as bad, feeling a bit better, not so unpleasantly cold. just a touch milder, and most of us should stay dry as well. but we did have a bit of rain around first thing, and of course a widespread frost, so some of that rain is going to re—freeze onto the roads and pavements. we have got a met office warning about ice, watch out on slippery surfaces
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around, and perhaps a few patches of freezing fog as well. but other than that, we should stay mostly dry. a rather grey day, a slight change in wind direction, pushing some slightly milder air our way, so temperatures will be up to between five and seven celsius. maybe a few outbreaks of rain, just towards western areas, really, as we head through the late afternoon and the first part of the evening rush—hour. the rain will spread just about everywhere through the course of the night, though. just light outbreaks of it, on and off, and a milder night to come. we will start off the day above freezing, at around four or five celsius. so this saturday, a rather grey and cloudy day. some outbreaks of rain around first thing, and it will probably brighten up a little bit later in the afternoon. we could hit double figures again over the course of the weekend, so feeling milder, but rather unsettled. there will be some rain around on sunday morning, too. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello. this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. theresa may will today become the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president. she told republicans yesterday of the importance of the special relationship between the two countries, but says they cannot return to "failed" military interventions. it's expected a post—brexit trade deal will be high on the agenda at today's meeting in the oval office. donald trump's first week as president has been described by the former labour leader ed miliband, as "dizzying" and "not normal times". speaking on the bbc‘s newsnight programme, he also criticised theresa may for positioning herself so closely to the president's policies. her speech was a perfect and decent speech, if it was normal times. but to align yourself so closely with his project, which is what she did, that, i think, his project, which is what she did, that, ithink, was his project, which is what she did, that, i think, was a his project, which is what she did, that, ithink, was a mistake
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jeremy corbyn faces more dissent in the labour party today, mistake as the party whip, jeff smith, says he'll defy the leader and vote against the government bill that will trigger article 50. the mp said he wasn't convinced the government had a proper plan for brexit. the shadow transport minister, daniel zeichner, has also said he'll oppose the legislation, while tulip siddiq has resigned from the front bench over the issue. patients in parts of worcestershire will have to be in more pain, to qualify for a hip or knee operation, under new plans by health bosses. three clinical commissioning groups are outlining plans to up the threshold in a bid to save around £2 million. though, they insist surgery would continue to be carried out elsewhere, the royal college of surgeons are calling the plans "alarming." britain's biggest supermarket, tesco, has agreed to buy food wholesale business booker. the deal, worth £3.7 billion, is claimed to create the country's largest food company.
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tesco boss dave lewis has this morning told the bbc it's not about cutting costs at the business, arguing the merger will bring benefits to customers. the taxman's failure to get tough with the super—rich risks undermining confidence in the whole system, according to a group of mps. the public accounts committee says the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen by a billion pounds, and there needs to be a tougher approach. hm revenue and customs has rejected any suggestion of special treatment for the wealthy. hundreds of millions of funding promised to schools in england last year has been taken back by the treasury. the money had been announced to fund a plan to turn all schools into academies. the department for education says that it was appropriate to return funds if a project did not go ahead. the rspb says the current cold weather appears to be bringing unusual migrant birds to britain, such as waxwings. the charity is holding its annual bird count this weekend, when more than half a million people are expected to take part in what's claimed to be the world's
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largest wildlife survey. i love the idea of bird counting. are they literally counting them?|j are they literally counting them?” gathered that they are.” are they literally counting them?” gathered that they are. i saw three problems in the same few seconds visiting my bird table. it is unusual that they are coming here now that it is colder. maybe some puffins coming. first, happy birthday to jose mourinho yesterday. he celebrated with his manchester united side reaching the efl cup. interestingly, he thought that the score was 1—1. i will explain now. manchester united are into the efl cup final after beating hull city 3—2 on aggregate. 2—1 on the night. united led 2—0 from the first leg and after hull scored a penalty, paul pogba struck what would be the decisive goal.
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oumar niasse ended united's 17—match unbeaten run, but that didn't stopjose mourinho reaching his first final as united manager. and on his birthday, too, although he's not accepting their winning streak is over. have a listen. we did not lose. it was 1—1. 1-1. i only saw two goals. pogba's one. and their goal, a fantastic one. great action, and a great cross. and the guy in the far post coming... 1-1. we are still unbeatable. why did you not count the first goal? i did not see it. interesting. we could say we did not lose this morning. fake news. alternative fact. complicated.
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anyway. arsenal manager, arsene wenger, will attend a personal hearing for his misconduct charge later today. wenger says he'll accept the charge for verbally abusing and pushing an official during his side's win over burnley last weekend, but he wants clarity on the rules for when a manager is sent to the stands. when i was sent off, i was surprised. i was in the tunnel. i thought i had the right to be in the tunnel. in 2009 i had to go into the stands in old trafford. i did not know where to go. nobody tells you what you have to do when you are sent off. arsene wenger needs to know where to go. could there be another clough in charge of nottingham forest?
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they've made an approach to burton albion, to speak with nigel clough about their vacant manager's job. his father brian clough was forest's most famous manager, leading them to numerous victories, including two european cups in a row. nigel has already followed in his father's footsteps once, in managing derby county. anthonyjoshua's world heavyweight title bout against wladimir klitshcko will be fought in front of a post—war record crowd. over 80,000 tickets have already been sold for the wembley bout on april the 29th, and the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has granted permission, for another 10,000 to go on sale, after talking to rail companies, to make sure fans could get home afterwards. england cruised to a seven—wicket victory in their first twenty20 international against india in kanpur. captain eoin morgan led by example, top scoring in the match. his half century made him the first england player to reach 1,500 runs in the shortest format of the game. they can wrap up the series with a win in the second match on sunday. i think it was a pretty complete performance. certainly, as complete as we have performed on this trip. to win the toss and bowl, there is always more pressure
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on the bowlers to produce what is needed on that kind of wicket. especially with a guy like virat up first. so, will there be a roger and rafa final at the australian open? federer won his semi—final in melbourne yesterday, nadal plays the in—form grigor dimitrov in the next few hours. nadal has not reached a majorfinal since, winning his 14th grand slam at the french open three years ago. if he beats dimitrov, then all four singles finalists will be aged over 30, as 35—year—old serena williams meets sister venus, who's 36, in the women's final. i love a bit of retro tennis. throwback. i remember sitting with you. tennis experts... welcome back, by the way. laughter. they were
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saying the old order had changed. they thought that themselves. there is an interview with roger federer in the papers. three months ago he was only able to play mini—tennis with rafael nadal at a charity do. rafael nadal had a wrist injury so he was playing one—armed. roger federer had an injured leg. they said they could only dream about playing each other properly again. they thought they might have to have a charity match. now, dimitrov willing, they are facing each other for the first time since 2011. now for the first time since 2011. now for the first time since 2011. now for the front pages. many of the papers are using these images. theresa may arrived in philadelphia. she spoke at a republican meeting. there were some moments when the people got up off their feet. she was described as barnstorming. now she is having a face—to—face meeting with donald trump. she said she will
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handle the uk and she will do it by herself. he talks fondly of the uk. all you have heard from donald trump is america first when it comes to trade deals. we are going there talking about expanding the special relationship. how can we do it better than america in the coming years, i better than america in the coming years, lam better than america in the coming years, i am not too sure we're not supposed to negotiate with anyone until we leave the eu. donald trump things he can do what he wants when it comes to trade talks, probably. shall be look at other papers? one being in allthe shall be look at other papers? one being in all the papers, shall be look at other papers? one being in allthe papers, the shall be look at other papers? one being in all the papers, the economy grew by 0.6% in the last few months of la st grew by 0.6% in the last few months of last year. that was better than expected. it was boosted by consumer spending. so it is ours going to bars and shops and restaurants. people forget how much the economy is boosted by going to shops. and we
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are talking about manufacturing, but lots of it comes down to that. did anyone mention puffins? he is excited. explain the story, please. escape the rat race, says the daily mail. look after puffins on this island instead. this is near fine islands near northumberland. —— farnham islands. you could do many things. you could count puffins or cute seal pups. is that an actual job? you get £70,000, free accommodation, and two motorboats to get around. really? do you have to climb upa get around. really? do you have to climb up a cliff and look at their nests ? climb up a cliff and look at their nests? that will be your first question at the interview. they are saying that being good at powerpoint. is not necessary.” saying that being good at powerpoint. is not necessary. i do not think you would need powerpoint. . how do you know so much about
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puffins? they are very fascinating. they love to talk when they are in their nests, but when they fly, they are completely quiet. i will struggle to bring us back to the front pages now. the front page of the times. looking at the speech with theresa may. let us stand together. looking at the words. everyone is fascinated. together was one of them. special relationship was also used over and over again as she talked to republicans. many people will analyse the language. they will look at the speech between donald trump and theresa may to see if it feels as good as it sounds. the front page of the telegraph. no more wars like iraq. that was not actually a quote. she talked about no more intervention, failed intervention. but people have read that to me in iraq and afghanistan. before we go, can i... where am i
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going? laughter. i before we go, can i... where am i going? laughter. lam off before we go, can i... where am i going? laughter. i am off with the puffins. look at this. how great is this picture? a bear in the air. he they say that? look at that. all right, lads. is that a puffin in a bear costume? you have got one. no, i have a moose costume. it is a nice bear. but i think we should finish talking about it. thank you very much. we will see it in a few minutes because he will bring us up—to—date with more stories. bt and tesco. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning. theresa may is heading to the white house to become the first foreign leader to meet president trump. plans to restrict the number of hip
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and knee replacements for all but those in the most severe pain are described as alarming by the royal college of surgeons. i think we should find out what is happening with the weather. what do you think about going to an island to look at puffins? it sounds idyllic. i have never seen a real one. that would be a double bonus. the weather. today, a cold start. you may be glad of this if you are a puffin. frost on the leaves. that is how we will wake up. that will turn slowly less cold through the day. not warm. it will not feel as cold as yesterday. what what is happening, we are importing less cold air. yesterday, if you remember, across france, blue, that means temperatures were sub—0. now, mild greens and yellows. mild is not the right word. it will still feel cold. south—easterly winds. later,
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south—westerly, a milder direction. coming from the atlantic accompanied by the weather front, that will bring rain. that is knocking on the door of northern ireland at the moment. starting off this morning with some frost around. temperatures and parts of england, —6, scotland, -5. and parts of england, —6, scotland, —5. dense pockets of fog in east midlands and lincolnshire in particular. through the day, as the weather front approaches, rainy northern ireland and also across western parts of scotland as well. -- rain in. western parts of scotland as well. —— rain in. eastand western parts of scotland as well. —— rain in. east and western part of scotla nd —— rain in. east and western part of scotland will hang on to the sunshine in the afternoon and also north england. south of that, the cloud will build through the day. that is because we have a weather front not too far away. even so, some sunny breaks here and there. kent will see some. a weather front in the channel islands bringing rain. that will come in through southern counties of england. at the same time, a weather front from the west. that will bring rain through cornwall and west wales. a lot of
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dry weather and there cloud with the odd sunny break. western ireland, a weather front across the irish sea. it will brighten up with some sunshine. some showers. through the evening and overnight, the weather front goes north and the other weather front coming from the west moves east. they will meet in slowly continue theirjourney, going towards the east. they will deposit snow in the pennines and also go up to 400 metres in scotland. behind that, cold and damp enough on the surface for the risk of ice. through the weekend, we continue with a less cold, not mild, theme. breezy with some rain. on saturday, that tra nslates some rain. on saturday, that translates into the rain continuing to edge towards the east of the country. breezy around yet. in the west, sunshine developing behind the cloud. there will be showers towards the west. some of us will see quite a few with the odd heavy one. temperatures, 5—9. a quick look at
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sunday. rain coming from the south—west. it is moving north. the north of the country, especially scotland, seeing the driest and brightest of the weather. the positioning, the final resting place, will change. it will turn mild in the south by sunday. back to you. charlie and steph, not lou! that is shocking. never mind. we didn't notice when you nearly dropped to the floor in shock! in the last hour one of our biggest businesses, bt, has announced a steep fall in profits towards the end of last year. earlier this week, shares in telecoms giant lost £8 billion in value due to a scandal in their italian business. sean has more. they have had a lot of problems within the business. it has been a rough week for bt. this morning the business has confirmed pre—tax profits at the end of last year fell more than a third, and earlier this week the company's share price dropped 20%,
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losing £8 billion in a day, when they revealed details about an accounting scandal in italy. it is worth remembering the firm once known as british telecom is a huge global player, offering phone and internet services in over 180 countries. and, because it was privatised here, it still has an estimated one million small shareholders as a result, so those share price plunges matter. if you have a private or company pension, it is almost certain that your pension fund will hold its shares, too. dave millett is the boss of the telecoms consultancy equinox, and he worked for bt for more than decade. how much of a different business is it now than the bt you used to work for? well, it was still part of the civil service when i joined for? well, it was still part of the civil service when ijoined and privatisation has led to the million shareholders but it means it has a
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lot more competition, it didn't in the tv when i worked there. it has become a more complex business. and we have seen profits down whichever way you look at them. when you talk about the 1 million shareholders, bt is quite an important company for our own incomes, especially in retirement. absolutely, because it is on the ftse100, people will see their share holdings fall. white that it has been a rough week. is bt struggling or not? well, you have to bearin struggling or not? well, you have to bear in mind they are making £100 of profit every second. but the problem is their debts are mounting. they are about nine billion pounds as a result of recent purchases, the pension review fund will be another £9 billion and they lost £500 million this week so they have to
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find a lot of money. is one of the ways they might find that money to push prices up more than they have? yes, because they have announced they will raise dividends, with people possibly asking who they are building up the most. there are price rises due in april which give consumers and small businesses the option to leave. you have a right to live within 30 days of being told the price. is that because they need more money to cover these costs, or do they want more money to reinvest in the business for things like football rights? well, football rights have been expensive but the number of new tv connections has dropped, growing at half the rate it was last year. that is potentially a problem. certainly the investment, if you look at the various reports, uk infrastructure is lagging most in europe, which is why businesses can't get fibre broadband and a lot of money is needed there. they have to cut it from somewhere or raise prices. and open reach has been a
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big issue for bt as well. how will changes in the way that is run affect the business going forward? will they have less money? well, the money will still come from bt. in theory, open reach will decide more where it is invested. historically it has favoured residential areas, which is where bt makes most of its money. and finally, with all of these costs, do you think bt will be a stronger company over the coming year or will it have turbulent times? i think the leadership has a very heavy in tray but i think it is still profitable. so tough week for bt but they are doing all right overall. it was horror on a scale never seen before, the mass—murder of six million dues by the nazis. decades on, worrying research suggests a quarter of genocide survivors now living in the uk still face discrimination because of their religion or ethnicity. to mark holocaust memorial day, our reporter holly hamilton has been to meet one survivor
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and hear his story. the door opened. three german soldiers came in. took out his revolver and put it to my head. people asked me what does it feel like when you have a gun to your head? what did you do? this wasn't the first time gabor came face to face with death, and it wouldn't be the last. that's the certificate the germans gave me on arrival to the concentration camp. just 12 years old when the germans invaded, he describes himself as one of the lucky ones. death was all around us, all the time. nothing was new, nothing was surprising. we were prepared for everything. and as you
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see, it is made from bits and pieces of material, because... his first yellow star, warned to identify him asa yellow star, warned to identify him as ajew, yellow star, warned to identify him as a jew, was made yellow star, warned to identify him as ajew, was made by his mother, a piece of history he has kept to this day. i will never forget it. the first day i was wearing it, i had a medical appointment on the top of the road. a lady whose only trying to hide it with a newspaper under my arm, said little boy, don't cover it. there is nothing to be ashamed of. but they discovered it —— but i covered it. like many survivors, gabor waited for more than 20 years
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before talking about his experiences, motivated by a desire to help people understand what happened. i don't think young people appreciate how lucky they are. they buy their mobile telephones and game consoles. they do zero problems are, they do know what it is. bombs fall from the sky and you don't know if you survive it, and an occupying army can take you away. you don't know what happens tomorrow. and you learn to live with it. that is my pa rents. learn to live with it. that is my parents. my mother was —— with a young granddaughter. he moved to
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england, where he has lived for over 60 years. well, in those days people looked at refugees with different eyes, and they tried to make us welcome. i started a new life, and i got on with it, with friends who went through the same. whatever is the conversation, after a while it a lwa ys the conversation, after a while it always turns to the past. we all have memories. we've got to live with them. holly hamilton there, speaking to gabor lacko. and thank you to gabor for taking part. really interesting to hear his reflections about younger people, and the lives they lead, as compared with the life he and others had to leave. after 8:30pm, we will be joined
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on the sofa by a woman whose extended family was destroyed by the holocaust. she is now working to help young people better understand what happened. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: it is the old adage, men are from mars, women from venus, and it seems when it comes to confidence, the difference between boys and girls can become worlds apart from just six years old. we will find out why after 8:00am. were you are confident kid? do you know, i can't remember. i wasn't worried, and if you are anxious about things that can make a difference. let us know if you have been affected by that over the yea rs. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm sonja jessup. a 15—year—old boy has been charged
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with the murder of quamari barnes, who was stabbed outside his school in north—west london. quamari, who was also 15, was attacked outside the capital city academy in willesden on monday, and died later in hospital. the boy accused of his murder is due to appear at willesden youth court later today. a dutch psychotherapist who has been living and working in the uk for 40 years has told bbc london she feels rejected by this country following the brexit vote. emmy van deurzen is due to receive her british citizenship today, but previously had her application rejected twice. she says the vote to leave the eu has caused her a great deal of concern. it is as if that trust you've built up between yourself and the country that you have adopted, and that you think has adopted you, suddenly rejects you, and doesn't want to acknowledge that contribution anymore. that's incredibly painful. there is no woolwich ferry today, as staff have gone on strike.
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employees are planning to walk out every friday till mid—april, over what the unite union calls a culture of bullying and sexual harassment. briggs marine contractors limited, who run the service, says it takes health, safety and welfare extremely seriously. well, let's take a look at the rest of the travel now. we have got severe delays on the bakerloo line also minor delays on the central line. and no overground trains between romford and upminster. still no southeastern trains between sidcup and hither green, after a freight train derailed on tuesday. let's look at the a13. those queues stretch eight miles into town, from rainham to newham, some drivers saying they have been stuck for an hour. and at the blackwall tunnel, traffic is even busier than usual, because of the woolwich ferry strike. time for a look at the weather now, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. yesterday, away from central london, there many of us stayed below freezing all day. today won't be quite as bad, feeling a bit better, not so unpleasantly cold.
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just a touch milder, and most of us should stay dry as well. but we do have a bit of rain around first thing, and of course a widespread frost, so some of that rain is going to re—freeze onto the roads and the pavements. we have got a met office warning about ice. watch out for some slippery surfaces around, and perhaps a few patches of freezing fog as well. but other than that, we should stay mostly dry. a rather grey day, a slight change in wind direction, pushing some slightly milder air our way, so temperatures will be up to between five and seven celsius. maybe a few outbreaks of rain, just towards western areas, really, as we head through the late afternoon and the first part of the evening rush—hour. the rain will spread just about everywhere through the course of the night, though. just light outbreaks of it, on and off, and a milder night to come. we will start off the day above freezing, at around four or five celsius. so this saturday, a rather grey and cloudy day. some outbreaks of rain around first thing, and it will probably brighten up a little bit later on through the afternoon. we could hit double figures again over the course of the weekend, so feeling milder,
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but rather unsettled. there will be some rain around on sunday morning, too. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. theresa may will become the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president. the prime minister says they can "lead the world together" but can't return to "failed" military interventions. we have the opportunity, indeed, the responsibility, to renew the special relationship for this new age. i don't have my commerce secretary, and they want to talk trade, sol have to handle it myself. laughter. good morning, it's friday the 27th of january. also this morning... proposals to restrict knee and hip replacements for only those
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in the most severe pain — but the royal college of surgeons says there's no justification for the decision. the babies who die before 24 weeks, and their parents who are denied a birth certificate. we'll hear about their experience. it's a recognition that your child existed at all. acknowledgement that they were here. tesco has been shopping this morning — buying food wholesale business booker in a deal worth £3.7 billion. this morning i'm looking at what this could mean for our supermarket industry. in sport — it's a happy birthday forjose mourinho. manchester united reach the league cup final, with an aggregate victory over hull, so they'll face southampton at wembley next month. hello, hello, hello, children. neil patrick harris as you've never seen him before. the hollywood actor will be here with his two young co—stars to tell us about his new series. and we have the weather with carol.
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it's a cold enough and frosty start to the day. cloud building through the day for most of us but it will remain dry and for most of us, sonny. good morning. first our main story. theresa may will today become the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president. the prime minister told republicans yesterday of the importance of the special relationship between the two countries, but says they cannot return to "failed" military interventions. mrs may will be hoping to lay the groundwork for a trade deal after brexit. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. she arrived on a blustery winter's evening in a city reeling from the effects of the new occupant of the white house. theresa may will meet with president trump less than a week after he came to office, a week as unpredictable as any in modern american history.
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and as the prime minister's motorcade wound its way through the streets of the capital, she could probably be forgiven for thinking, will the new relationship be more strange than special? in philadelphia, the city of the founding fathers, mrs may earned a standing ovation for a speech that dwelt on the shared history of the two nations, a relationship which had defined the modern world. all part of a charm offensive which she hopes will pave the way for a trade deal with the us. so i am delighted that the new administration has made a trade agreement between our countries one of its earliest priorities. a new trade deal between britain and america. it must serve work for both sides and serve both of our national interests. later, she'll become the first foreign leader to meet with donald trump at the white house, the streetwise new yorker who, when it comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always put america first.
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he and theresa may do have things in common, and it remains to be seen whether they can find common ground, just as the uk is preparing to negotiate its departure from the eu. david willis, bbc news, washington. let's speak to our political correspondent carole walker, who's in westminster. there's a lot of talk about renewing the special relationship between the president and prime minister. there will be a lot of pressure on theresa may today. absolutely. fascinating day with the prime minister yesterday who said she believed there should be no more of the sorts of foreign interventions that the us and uk have engaged in in the past, like iraq and afghanistan. i think that will chime with the views of the new american president. jonathan powell, who used to be tony blair's chief of staff, was pretty critical of those comments when he spoke to
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this programme earlier.” of those comments when he spoke to this programme earlier. i think it's a mistake to encourage donald trump to be isolationist. he already has a tendency to want to isolate the us from the world. it's all about america first, which was the 19305 movement to 5epa rate america first, which was the 19305 movement to separate america from the rest of the world. the last thing we should encourage him to be is an isolationist. we should encourage him to support nato, and say he will defend all the countries of nato if attacked. if she can achieve that in her visit, it will be worth bringing home. is one of theissues be worth bringing home. is one of the issues on the agenda. for theresa may, the important thing is to establish a personal relationship, a rapport with the new american president. they are very different characters. she said last night that sometimes opposites attract. she wants to try to lay the groundwork for a future trade deal, but she will be conscious that many mps, including some in her own party are very concerned mps, including some in her own party are very concerned about some of president tromp's remarks, including
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those on torture and wanting to build a wall with mexico. she will walk a tightrope to try to establish a new special relationship, but without appearing to pander to the president so much that she provokes a backlash back home. it will be interesting. i'm pleased to see you've got a double coat on! it must be freezing this morning. jeremy corbyn faces more dissent in the labour party today, as the party whip, jeff smith, says he'll defy the leader and vote against the government bill that will trigger article 50. the mp said he wasn't convinced the government had a proper plan for brexit. two labour frontbenchers have already said they will oppose the bill. patients in parts of worcestershire will have to be in more pain, to qualify for a hip or knee operation, under new plans by health bosses. three clinical commissioning groups want to up the threshold to get access to surgery, in a bid to save over £2 million. though they insist operations will continue, the royal college of surgeons are calling the plans "alarming". andy moore reports.
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hip and knee operations can be a godsend to the people who get them, but they can also be expensive, up to £6,000 each. three clinical commissioning groups in worcestershire want to decrease those bills by £2 million because they said they were spending far more than other areas. it is important that they consider operations restricted to those who were in such pain they could not sleep. in the end they didn't go that far. but it is understood those criteria are used in many areas. a spokesman for saga, the organisation for over 505, said the bean—counters should examine their consciences. they said it was an outrage even to suggest inability to sleep should be used in deciding eligibility for an operation. the royal college of surgeons said it was worried this example of health rationing was only the tip of the iceberg. the statement went on like this. a health spokeswoman
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in worcestershire said many patients would benefit from physiotherapy and weight loss before considering surgery. she also said there was a clear appeal system. andy moore, bbc news. the taxman's failure to get tough with the super—rich risks undermining confidence in the whole system, according to a group of mps. the public accounts committee says the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen by a billion pounds, and there needs to be a tougher approach. her majesty's revenue and customs has rejected any suggestion of special treatment for the wealthy. the treasury has taken back hundreds of millions of pounds of funding for schools in england. the money had been announced last year as part of a plan to turn all schools into academies. but the department for education has revealed that when the compulsory academy plan was ditched, the treasury took back
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most of the funding. britain's biggest supermarket, tesco, has agreed to buy food wholesale business booker in a deal worth £3.7 billion. sean is here — what's behind this move? we were both shocked about this one. it wasn't on the cards and it's a big deal. we haven't heard many people talk about it but its £3.7 billion. the biggest supermarket and booker are the biggest food wholesaler. it's a big deal. looking at why tesco want to do it. they call it a merger but tesco is five times bigger than booker. it gives an opportunity to talk about the supply chain. tesco talked about suppliers when we had the whole marmite— gate when there was the rising cost of food. tesco save rising cost of food. tesco save rising prices is and why they have done this deal, but imagine they are doing deals with suppliers, and now they are selling food to britain's biggest supermarket and we have the biggest supermarket and we have the biggest wholesaler there as well, it will change things. you have to dig
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down into the report and tesco says it recognises that to achieve the benefits it wants from the merger, there might be restructuring between there might be restructuring between the two companies. whether that meansjobs going the two companies. whether that means jobs going or the two companies. whether that meansjobs going or moving the two companies. whether that means jobs going or moving from different places, because booker, they are a big food wholesaler, but they are a big food wholesaler, but they also own londis, budgens. competition for the small tesco expresses. dave lewis says he doesn't expect there to be issues, but there will be questions about whether it's good for customers, tesco buying such a big company as booker. the rspb says the current cold weather appears to be bringing unusual migrant birds to britain, such as waxwings. the charity is holding its annual bird count this weekend, when more than half a million people are expected to take part in what's claimed to be the world's largest wildlife survey. relocating can be stressful at the best of times, but residents in ghent, belgium,
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have found an inventive way to help their local library move down the road. more than 1,200 people formed a human chain over a distance of 250 metres to move the books. you could say they had the situation book—covered. that's terrible, isn't it! sorry! i know you hate a pun. they are ok when they work, but when they don't... sport when they work, but when they don't. .. sport and when they work, but when they don't... sport and weather coming up later. in a few hours, theresa may will become the first foreign leader to meet president trump at the white house. the mood music is positive from both sides. but behind the scenes, what's the real balance of power and should
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she be attempting to align herself so closely with the us editor? —— the us president? joining us from westminster is the consultant editor of the daily mail, andrew pierce, and also steven erlanger, who's from the new york times. stephen, donald trump right now appears to be a man who pretty much gets whatever he wants. what does he wa nt gets whatever he wants. what does he want from this meeting with theresa may? he wants good atmospherics. he really does like britain and he favours brexit. he wants to have a good relationship. he has scottish ancestry. he's always been a bit of ancestry. he's always been a bit of an anglophile. he has a soft spot for the queen. for him it's all about atmospherics, but he's the new quy: about atmospherics, but he's the new guy, and she's the supplicants who has made the effort to see him first, so he will be very magnanimous, certainly in public. he will make good noises, and she will
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try to speak truth to him as she seesit try to speak truth to him as she sees it about nato and why she is leaving. but it is crucial because she has blown up the eu pillar of and british foreign policy, meaning she needs the american pillar. andrew, be a fly on the wall looking ahead to the meeting. looking at the contrasting characters, she is a flickr's daughter, grammar school educated. he's a buccaneering, brash businessman. —— she is a vicar's daughter. she said coquettishly on the plane on the way over that opposites can attract. maybe theresa may will flatter her eyelashes. i don't think it will work too well on donald trump, but she will be firm and clear. what she doesn't want this to be seen as is the new margaret thatcher and ronald reagan show. she gets rather cross when people compare her to mrs thatcher, but she will be hoping for a constructive meeting with donald
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trump because she needs an important trade deal with the united states, because as stephen said, we are leaving the eu. it's interesting, and you mentioned the thatcher and reagan relationship. she mentioned that relationship many times in her speech to republicans last night. it was one of the touchstones, together, special relationship, a bit of churchill, and then it was thatcher and reagan. it's something trump has mentioned as well. the thing about thatcher and reagan, though, is that they were a team, i remember it well. they had big problems to solve. i don't think trump isa problems to solve. i don't think trump is a team player as much. he's happy to have her as a sort of wing lady, but i think we have gone a long way. and reagan and thatcher actually got on. i'm not sure these two will get on very well. this is the stiff headmistress against the great salesman. trump is very nice
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face to face, but you never know what he will do or to eat later. andrew, that's an interesting element to this. -- do or tweet later. it will be interesting what people at home make of her and the way she praises him. inevitably, when she comes on, people will say, did you tell him that being sexist is wrong. did you tell him torture is wrong. did you tell him torture is wrong? they will ask her if she was upfront with him. there is no understating the fact that this is aided and coup, she is the first leader to cede donald trump bya the first leader to cede donald trump by a long chalk, so it is game on for her, she likes that. she will be quite clear, privately, and i think she will be able to tell us that in public that if torture cropped up, and i'm sure she will make sure that it does, but an absolutely deprecates the idea of reintroducing torture, and she wants nato to be supported, and while
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donald trump may wish the eu to wither on the vine, she does not. we are leaving, but we want to continue to have a relationship with the eu, so to have a relationship with the eu, so she will be aware, of course, a lot a lot of british people have misgivings, to put it mildly, about the new president, and i'm sure she will reflect that in a public utterances. just a couple of thoughts on the business elements, i notice he said in his press conference to republicans, he will handle the uk himself, and that is because he literally has no—one in—house to deal with the trade talks. he is a deal maker, is he going to say something that we are not expecting today, just because you can? he always seems to. britain isa you can? he always seems to. britain is a real estate guy, and britain has just sold its is a real estate guy, and britain hasjust sold its house, it needs is a real estate guy, and britain has just sold its house, it needs a new house, so we will see what kind of deal gets struck. it is not going to happen right away, i expect there will be nice talk about a trade frame or, talks and so on, but as we know, britain, under treaty
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obligation, cannot stop negotiating a deal until it leaves the european union, which is at least two away. atmospherics is good. the only other point i would make is that theresa may did good work for the republicans in congress, by the way, because his speech to them was well accepted, and she is much more like accepted, and she is much more like a mainstream american republican than donald trump, who is a republican by convenience, and some of the things she said about nato and western leadership will go over very well with the republicans, who are trying to make this point to donald trump themselves. she did mention they does several times in a speech to republicans, that clearly it is on the agenda, she wants to get some reassurance from donald trump about his view of the world — is that the thing? i think that is right, but she will accept donald trump's point too that it is time for the rest of the world to pay their share of the nato bill, because britain and the united states and a handful of others are
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paying most of the money. she will wa nt paying most of the money. she will want an assurance that nato continues to be the important bulwark that it is in defence policy for the west. we will leave at there, thank you very much for your time, we wait with interest to see how that emerges, that meeting happening later today. there will be a lot of analysis of that. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: theresa may is heading to the white house to become the first foreign leader to meet president trump. plans to restrict the number of hip and knee replacements for all but those in the most severe pain are described as alarming by the royal college of surgeons. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. the other carol, carole walker, our political correspondent, was doubled up political correspondent, was doubled up with two coats on, looking pretty cold, particularly in london.
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and other cold and frosty start to the day, and it is a foggy one for some, the weather watchers doing us proud, beautiful picture, freezing fog in leicestershire. as we push that bit further north, clearer skies, this is perth and kinross, you are likely to hang onto this through the course of the day, but having said that it is cold. these are the current temperatures, in fife, minus six, edinburgh minus five, burton on trent minus five, london around freezing. st mary's sticking out like a sore thumb, 10 celsius already, and that is because we have a weather front not too far away which is producing some cloud and also some rain. as we go through the course of the day, my graphics arejust the course of the day, my graphics are just frozen, the course of the day, my graphics arejust frozen, no, there the course of the day, my graphics are just frozen, no, there they go! through the course of the day, the weather front towards the west will introduce some rain and some drizzle, and it will also come in from the south as well, but it will
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remain dry for most of us, not as cold as yesterday. through the evening and overnight, two areas of rain will meet in the middle, and they are going to push eastwards. ahead of them, snow on the mountains of scotla nd ahead of them, snow on the mountains of scotland and the pennines. behind them, the risk of ice on untreated surfaces. let's hope the graphics are working now! as we head into the weekend, it is going to be less cold, and i'm choosing my words wisely — it is not going to be mild, it will be less cold. on saturday and self, this rain continues its slow progress, eventually getting over to the east. behind it, quite a veil of cloud, and behind all of that, some sunshine and showers. but look how the cloud is eroded by sunshine through the course of the day. temperatures down in the north compared to what we have been used to, up in the south competitor what we have been used to. and then as we
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head through the rest of the day, my graphics are doing very funny things, sorry about this! into sunday, we have got a weather front coming in from the south—west and the south of england, and it is going to bring in some rain. how far north that gets is open to question, but we think it will cross wales into the midlands, east anglia, the far north of north lingle and, and also scotland should remain largely dry with sunshine. —— the far north of northern england. i can only apologise for my graphics, no idea what went on there! and you still styled it out, you know so much about the weather, you don't even need and! we are talking about confidence among girls, you are super sassy, what will you like when you were a kid? no, not untili what will you like when you were a kid? no, not until i was about 25, only a couple of years ago! can we talk rates for an agent, please? you
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would make a brilliant agent for me! everybody wants you, carol! we are talking about confidence amongst girls, because there is some research out about it, how young girls compare two young boys in terms of growing up. researchers in the us have found that byjust six years old, girls already see themselves as less intelligent and talented than boys do. the researchers describe the results as disheartening, and say it is likely to shape decisions about studies and careers in the future. so how can gender stereotypes be overcome? let's speak to counsellor and parenting educator suzi hayman, as well as anousa parkin — who's a girlguiding, young leader. so you are 17 now? when you hear the survey about girls lacking in confidence, being less confident, when they are younger, what do you make of that? i do find it quite shocking, because i think back to when i was six or seven, and i don't
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demand the feeling that at all. when i was six, i felt i was invincible, you know. so the fact that they are feeling like this so young, yeah, it is quite shocking. so you were feeling pretty confident, but what about your peers? could any of them identify with that? to be honest, i don't know whether i can remember what the blood drinking when i was that young, i think that is part of the thing. —— what people were thinking when i was that young. i don't think they were thinking about it explicitly, it is subconscious, so it is hard to realise, i think. that is a really good point, how does it manifests? how can you tell girls are not as confident? it is about aspirations, how they might describe themselves, what choices they make, or what they see themselves as. you may find a girl, six or seven, would not see herself becoming a doctor — a knows maybe,
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but not a doctor. and it is about the descriptions they have of themselves. —— a nurse. and colours, blue for a boy, themselves. —— a nurse. and colours, blue fora boy, pink themselves. —— a nurse. and colours, blue for a boy, pink for a girl, already we are saying there is a divide, you are different. look at the slogans on t—shirts, for boys, primary schoolboys, you could find scientist or dinosaur or something like that. with girls, it is all form fitting, and it is little princess or kittens or something. right from the beginning, in a sense, right from the beginning, in a sense , we right from the beginning, in a sense, we are telling children that they are different, and that one of them is supposed to be pretty and nice, and the other is supposed to be thrusting and able and all those things. it is not that we tell them specifically, it is the atmosphere, and is exactly you said, it is the subconscious messages you are taking that put you in your place. anousa, where do you think your confidence has come from? clearly you are doing really well, brilliantly leading
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yourgirlguiding group, really well, brilliantly leading your girlguiding group, where has it come from? i think a lot of it has been from people supporting the really well, whether that is at school or at home, or within the guides, i have always had a support network to really encourage me to be a good leader, and to build up my confidence like that, which i think isa confidence like that, which i think is a really big thing. and i have had good role models and good mentoring, which has really helped build my confidence. role models are important, because you talk about your mother doing research into child health, was it? but there is a model for you in your family, child health, was it? but there is a modelforyou in yourfamily, of child health, was it? but there is a model for you in your family, of a woman who is actually doing something, who has a level, and this is the point. many schools are very good at trying to break through these gender stereotypes, but we need more models, we need people to say, it doesn't matter what your politics are, having a female prime minister is absolutely fabulous.”
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am wary of going to gender stereotypes, but do you think boys worry less about what others think of them? and that breeds a kind of confidence? that if you don't worry so much about what people think of you, you may be emboldened?” so much about what people think of you, you may be emboldened? i think anousa will back me up on this, it is not so much that you feel what other people think of you, but there isa other people think of you, but there is a barrier that is about the ceiling above you, how high you can go, what your aspirations may be, what you expect of yourself, what people expect of you. you may feel a very confident young person in your own little field, and boys tend to feel very confident, much more so, they inhabit the space. girls stand around the outside of the playground, the boys are in the middle, that is a very common thing. they have a superficial confidence, but aspirations, they may also feel there is a ceiling. going back to role models, i think that is
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absolutely crucial, and when you look at six—year—old, who are their role models? there are not really role models? there are not really role models? there are not really role models for boys at six, are they? sports stars. who are the stars? for the women, it is pop stars, in other words looking good and doing something that shows yourself off, rather than doing something. it is men have skills, so you can see a very skilled footballer, you know, he trumps someone else. thank you very much, good luck with everything, anousa. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. it's a cold and frosty start for central and eastern parts
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of the uk with patches of freezing fog and in east anglia and the south—east of england there is the risk of some icy patches on untreated surfaces from this area of cloud that is producing a bit of rain, sleet and snow. signs of a change out west. this weather front will move its way slowly eastwards, bringing some rain with it, yes, but also less cold air. 6—7 degrees mid—morning across the south—west of england. still pretty cold further east, temperatures creeping up to two or three degrees. patches of freezing fog lingering in a few places, but generally, it's lifting. notice in northern england, some places still at or below freezing. six or 7 degrees in northern ireland with cloud and some rain. some sunshine to start the day in scotland. it won't do much for the temperatures, though. many places hovering a little bit above freezing mid—morning. but some sunshine lingering on in central and eastern parts of scotland. elsewhere, a fair bit of cloud. some rain creeping its way in from the west and another area of rain coming in from the south. by the afternoon, 7 degrees or so in belfast, nine in plymouth, but really quite cold
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towards the north—east of england. this evening, rain becomes much more extensive across england, wales and up into scotland too. there will be some snow on the high ground in scotland as well. by dawn tomorrow, most places should be just about frost free, although still pretty cold in the north—east of england. generally speaking, it's the weekend, so a lot less cold, a bit of breeze around and some rain. in fact, we start the weekend on quite a wet note. earlier on saturday there's a fair bit of rain around but it is moving its way out of the north sea. behind it, something a lot drier and brighter moves in. some good spells of sunshine but also some showers and some could be quite heavy with the odd rumble of thunder. by this date we have temperatures in the range of five up to eight or 9 degrees. saturday is definitely the better of the two days of the weekend. sunday looks quite wet across much of the uk. although it looks i scotland should
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enjoy a pretty decent day with some spells of sunshine. this is business live from bbc news with aaron heslehurst and rachel horne. trading with trump, britain's prime minister becomes the first foreign leader to meet the new us president, but can she strike a bargain with the world's biggest economy? live from london, that's our top story on friday the 26th of january. story on friday the 27th of january. as britian leaves the
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european union, we'll ask which side of the special relationship has more to gain from a boost to transatlantic trade. and when is a $5.3 billion profit in three months just not enough? we'll tell you why investors are not happy with google and also find out if its parent company alphabet‘s other bets will pay off?
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