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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 27, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello, it's friday, it's 9am, i'm joanna gosling. welcome to the programme. the vicar‘s daughter and the billionaire — prime minister theresa may is in washington to meet president trump for talks on trade, foreign affairs and strengthening the ties between the uk and the us. the prime minister is the first foreign leader to meet mr trump and his team, who are just one week into the presidency. speaking last night, the president again said he was determined to build a wall between mexico and the us and suggested taxing the goods to pay for it. people want protection. on the wall protects. all you have to do is ask israel. they by having a total disaster coming across, and they had a wall. it is 99.9% stoppage. and, with the nhs in crisis, doctors are increasingly struggling to provide care. we hearfrom a group of gps who had to sell off equipment to help cover the costs of closing their surgery. we will speak to a doctor who are selling the recruitment to avoid getting into debt. —— selling the
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mac equipment. a quarter of those living in the uk who survived genocides, including the holocaust, have experienced discrimination or abuse linked to their religion or ethnicity. on holocaust memorial day, we'll be talking to an auschwitz survivor about her experiences. we talk to an auschwitz survivor and a student who says he has suffered racial abuse since he was a child. hello, welcome to the programme. we're live until ”am this morning. lots coming up today on the show, and as ever, we really want to hear from you. one of the stories we are talking about is whether six—year—old girls think they are less talented than six—year—old boys. a studyjust out says they do. what do you think? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today... theresa may will become the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president. the prime minister told senior republicans last night of the importance of the special relationship between the two countries, but says they cannot return to "failed" military interventions.
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mrs may will be hoping to lay the groundwork for a trade deal after brexit. she's also been urged by labour and conservative mps to speak out against the use of torture, after mr trump said he supported its use against terror suspects. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. she arrived on a blustery winter's evening in a city reeling from the effects of the new occupant of the white house. theresa may will meet with president trump less than a week after he came to office — a week as unpredictable as any in modern american history. and as the prime minister's motorcade wound its way through the streets of the capital, she could probably be forgiven for thinking, will the new relationship be more strange than special? in philadelphia, the city of the founding fathers, mrs may earned a standing ovation for a speech that dwelt on the shared history of the two nations, a relationship which had defined the modern world.
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all part of a charm offensive which she hopes will pave the way for a trade deal with the us. so i am delighted that the new administration has made a trade agreement between our countries one of its earliest priorities. a new trade deal between britain and america. it must serve work for both sides and serve both of our national interests. later, she'll become the first foreign leader to meet with donald trump at the white house, the streetwise new yorker who, when it comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always put america first. he and theresa may do have things in common, and it remains to be seen whether they can find common ground just as the uk is preparing to negotiate its departure from the eu. david willis, bbc news, washington. let's talk to carole walker, who's in westminster. carol, he is reportedly calling her,
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my carol, he is reportedly calling her, gie. carol, he is reportedly calling her, ' we carol, he is reportedly calling her, my maggie. we have had a speech now from her already in the united states, where she has been laying out how she sees the relationship. how has that gone down? well, certainly that speech from the prime minister went down very well with the audience of senior republicans, but she was addressing. she spoke in very warm and glowing terms about the importance of the special relationship and about the shared values, although there certainly will be some concerns, notjust amongst opposition parties, but some conservative mps, about this emphasis on shared values with donald trump, who, after all, has said that he thinks the water for terror suspects might be a good idea, and is building that very controversial war with mexico. he says he wants to do so. —— wall with mexico. he is banning immigrants from certain muslim countries. when it comes to the issue with torture, there are quite serious implications
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in terms of the intelligence sharing which goes on at the moment between the us and the uk, when britain has very strong rules about not dealing with any intelligence that comes from sources when it was extracted by the use of torture. so when i spoke to the defence secretary sir michael fallon a little earlier, i asked him whether the prime minister would be raising those concerns directly when she meets president trump. schumacher very clear to him the british position on torture and that will not change. —— she will make very clear to will not change. —— she will make very clearto him. will not change. —— she will make very clear to him. we oppose torture, and that policy will not change whatever the american policy happens to be. she will make that clear. will she urged him not to go down that route because it will have severe implications for future intelligence sharing. we worked together on the basis of shared intelligence. you're right, if the american position on torture was to change, there would be implications. she will make that clear to the
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american administration. sir michael fallon, that's just one of the issues on the agenda. theresa may talked last night about a change to foreign policy. no more of what she called the failed interventions of the past. she appeared to be referring to iraq, but perhaps afghanistan as well. that might chime with the views of the new american president. above all, i think theresa may wants to take the opportunity to get to know the new president. they are very different characters, but she talked on the plane on the way over last night about sometimes opposites can attract. she wants to establish a rapport and a basis for a new economic relationship that can lead toa economic relationship that can lead to a trade deal in the future, something president trump has spoken about very warmly indeed. she will wa nt to about very warmly indeed. she will want to try to establish good, personal relations with president trump. but she will be very aware of the concerns of many mps, even some
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in her own party back in the uk. she will need to be seen to be challenging him on issues where they disagree, and not pandering so much that she prompts a backlash back at home. the importance of this visit is establishing good, personal relations. but inevitably trade will be talked about. how much are they going to be able to say because there are constraints about how much can be done in terms of any trade deals with other countries while the uk is still in the eu. that's right, the rules say we can't start formal trade negotiations while we are still members of the eu, and it will have to wait until the brexit process has been completed. but i think the prime minister feels process has been completed. but i think the prime ministerfeels it's very important to capitalise on president trump's signals, that the words he has spoken saying he wants to be putting britain at the front of the queue when it comes to a
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trade deal. president trump is somebody who doesn't like big, multilateral trade deals. he wants to work a bilateral trade basis. he has made it clear that it would be about america first, and that could bea about america first, and that could be a difficulty. the question is whether britain can drive a hard enough bargain to make sure a future trade deal doesn'tjust enough bargain to make sure a future trade deal doesn't just mean enough bargain to make sure a future trade deal doesn'tjust mean lots more american goods being imported into the uk. and there are other big differences when it comes to trade. we have very different standards when it comes to environmental regulations to some of the food and hygiene regulations. for example, some american products, cars and so on, aren't necessarily things that sell well in the uk. the defence secretary said this morning there could be a mutually beneficial trade deal. but we should be in no doubt that given president trump's background, he will drive a hard bargain. thank you very much. we
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will speak to a former economic adviser to president trump as well asa adviser to president trump as well as a former eu trade commissioner in as a former eu trade commissioner in a little while. we will also talk to the trade of the foreign affairs select committee. let us know if you have any thoughts we could bring to that conversation. annita is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. hundreds of millions of pounds promised to schools in england have been taken back by the treasury. the money had been announced last year as part of a plan to turn all schools into academies. but the department for education has revealed that when the compulsory academy plan was ditched the treasury took back most of the funding. our education correspondent sean coughlan reports. head teachers in west sussex and other parts of the country have been warning that schools are running out of cash. but only last year, the government announced an extra £500 million, for schools as part of their plan to turn every school into an academy. school leaders have been asking what ever happened to that money? but it has now emerged that when the academy plan was abandoned,
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most of the money, £384 million, was in fact taken back by the treasury. the education department said this was the right thing to do. the schools are receiving record levels of funding, according to them. head teachers are furious that so much money could appear and then disappear when schools are struggling to make ends meet. sean coughlan, bbc news. a teenager has been charged with murder after a 15—year—old boy was stabbed near his school in north—west london. quamari serunkuma—barnes was attacked in doyle gardens on monday, just as other children made their way home from school. the suspect, who is also 15 and cannot be named for legal reasons, will appear before willesden youth court later today. jeremy corbyn faces more dissent in the labour party today, as the party whip, jeff smith, says he'll defy the leader and vote against the government bill that will trigger article 50. the mp said he wasn't convinced the government had a proper plan for brexit.
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the shadow transport minister, daniel zeichner, has also said he'll oppose the legislation, while tulip siddiq has resigned from the front bench over the issue. plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in worcestershire have been described as "alarming" by the royal college of surgeons. three clinical commissioning groups in the county want to restrict who can have the operation. they hope the move can save around £2 million. but they insist they will continue to carry out more operations than many other parts of the country. three gps have told this programme they‘ re having to sell their sell their equipment to avoid going into personal debt after their surgery closed. the studley health centre in warwickshire shut permanently on the 31st of december because the partners that ran it claim they were no longer able to make a living. the doctors are trying to raise around £40,000 to cover the costs of closing. the department of health says it has invested an extra £2.4 billion into primary care. and we'll be speaking to one of the gps from that surgery, and a former patient, just after 9:30am this morning. the taxman‘s failure to get tough
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with the super—rich could undermine confidence in the whole system, according to mps. the public accounts committee says the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen by £1 billion, and there needs to be a tougher approach. hm revenue and customs has rejected any suggestion of special treatment for the wealthy. a study in the united states suggests girls start to see themselves as less talented than boys do when they are only six years old. the researchers described the results as disheartening, and said such views were likely to shape girls‘ decisions about studies and careers in the future. that's a summary of the latest bbc news, more at 9:30am. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. if you have any thoughts on theresa may's visit to the united states, we
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would love to hear them, and what about the latest report that indicates six—year—old girls do not think they are as competent as six—year—old boys. where do they get that message from? let us know your thoughts if you have young children. let's get the sport with will perry. and will, they're rolling back the years at the australian open tennis. it's a bit like an over 30s holiday camp in melbourne this year. 30—year—old rafa nadal hoping to meet 35—year—old roger federer in the final of the australian open but he needs to get past a grigor dimitrov. that semifinal is underway. it's 4—1 to nadal, a good start. he hasn't reached a final since the 2014th french open, his 14th grand slam. the spaniard has been troubled by injury in the recent yea rs. been troubled by injury in the recent years. if he beats dimitrov today then all four singles finalists will be aged over 30.
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35—year—old serena williams meet 36—year—old sister venus williams. serena hoping to earn a record 23rd grand slam final. it's their first final together in a grand slam since wimbledon 2009. serena won that won in straight sets. dimitrov has never reached a grand slam final. he's roger federer going for grand slam number 18 after beating fellow swiss sta n number 18 after beating fellow swiss stan wawrinka yesterday. and gordon reid has achieved the career grand slam. the wheelchair doubles at the australian open. and he's only 25, and got the whole set.
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i love the way you talk about over 30 is being old, i am sure it is in sporting terms let's talk about another guy way off his 30s, anthony joshua will be facing bad amir klitschko with a huge crowd expected to turn out. —— wladimir klitschko. yes, this is boxing history, 90,000 people can attend that fight, for the ibf title and the vacant wba super heavyweight title as well, thatis super heavyweight title as well, that is on the 29th of april at wembley, and it will match the british record set at white city backin british record set at white city back in 1939. crowds are usually cap that 80,000, because the transport networks cannot cope with it, but london mayor sadiq khan has come to an agreement with network rail and transport for london to get more services in place. eddie hearn said that sadiq khan urged me to bring the biggest fights to the city, and
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he is delighted to have the biggest fight in british boxing history at wembley. he also promoted the 2014 rematch between carl froch and george groves which said the current post—war record of 80,000, bringing in more than £20 million. when you meet someday like anthonyjoshua, if you go to its fight, you realise how lucky is by boxing fans, sports fans in general. he acknowledges the whole crowd, and that 27, to bring in 90,000 with a huge career head of him, fora in 90,000 with a huge career head of him, for a heavyweight, astonishing stuff. great, thank you very much, see you later. a new dawn is breaking — prime minister theresa may's verdict on the change in the white house as donald trump ends his first week in charge as president. today mrs may will meet him — the first foreign leader to do so. the two could not be more different. one of them is a vicar‘s daughter, the other a billionaire star of reality tv. there are frequent and regular meetings between british prime ministers and american presidents, but few will be as significant as the visit to washington today.
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the prime minister will be hoping to prepare the ground for a trade deal after brexit. speaking last night to a group of republican politicians in philadelphia, mrs may was very clear about her plans for the special relationship. a new trade deal between britain and america must work for both sides and serve both of our national interests. it must help to grow our respective economies and to prepare the high skilled, high paid jobs of the high skilled, high paid jobs of the future for working people across america and across the uk. and it must work for those who have too often felt left behind by the forces often felt left behind by the forces of globalisation. theresa may is the first foreign head of government to speak to republican congressmen. first foreign head of government to speak to republican congressmenm is my honour and privilege to stand before you today in this great city of philadelphia, to proclaim them again, tojoin hands, as we pick up
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that mantle of leadership once more, to renew our special relationship, and to recommit ourselves to the responsibility of leadership in the modern world. and it is my honour and privilege to do so at this time, as dawn breaks on a new era of american renewal. i speak to you not just as prime minister of the united kingdom, but as a fellow conservative who believes in the same principles that and up in the agenda of your party, the value of liberty, the dignity of work, the principles of nationhood, family, economic prudence, patriotism and putting power in the hands of the people. well, she was keen to stress the special relationship between the two countries. we have the opportunity, indeed the
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responsibility, to renew the special relationship for this new age. we have the opportunity to lead together again. because the world is passing through a period of change. and in response to that change, we can either be passive bystanders, or we can take the opportunity once more to lead and to lead together. on foreign policy, she said the two countries must always stand up for their respective friends and allies. the days of britain and america are intervening in sovereign countries in an attempt to remake the world in oui’ in an attempt to remake the world in our own image in an attempt to remake the world in oui’ own image are over, in an attempt to remake the world in our own image are over, but nor can we afford to stand idly by when the threat is real and when it is in our own interests to intervene. we must be strong, smart and hard—headed, and we must demonstrate the resolve necessary to stand up for our
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interests. and whether it is the security of israel in the middle east, or the baltic states in eastern europe, we must always stand up eastern europe, we must always stand upfor our eastern europe, we must always stand up for ourfriends eastern europe, we must always stand up for our friends and allies in democratic countries that find themselves in tough neighbourhoods too. applause well, the speech went down well, as you saw, the visit comes amid rows over who will pay for president trump's controversial wall along the us border with mexico. in an interview on fox news, donald trump reiterated why he was committed to the project. the wall is necessary. that's notjust politics. and yet it is good for the heart of the nation in a certain way, because people want protection. and a wall protects. all you have to do is ask israel. they were having a total disaster coming across, and they had a wall. it's 99.9% stoppage. a proper wall, not a wall that's
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this high, like they have now. they have little toy walls, i don't know why they even wasted their time... if you ever saw where they built a little ramp over the wall, i don't even know why they built a ramp. it's cheaper to knock it over. you're talking about a real wall, impenetrable? i'm talking about a real wall. i'm talking about a wall that's got to be like serious. and even that of course you'll have people violate it. but we'll have people waiting for them when they do. we can speak to dr betsy mccoy, who has been an economic advisor to donald trump, mp crispin blunt, chair of the foreign affairs select committee, and roderick abbott, who worked for the eu commission for trade for 30 years. thank you all very much forjoining us. thank you all very much forjoining us. crispin blunt first of all, how tricky is this visit for theresa may to navigate? we have already heard his speech, watched you think about the difficulties for her and how
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well she has acquitted herself so far? well, i think she gave a terrific speech to the republican caucus in philadelphia, you could see how warmly it was received. and within the trump administration, obviously you got different signals being sent out, so all this controversy about what the president said about torture, but what people have not commented on is that he said he would take his lead from his defence secretary, general james mattis, from the head of the cia, claim they are against torture on ethical and practical grounds. the indicated he will be led by the experts see as appointed to his administration, which is quite a good sign. the relationship theresa may has got to get with the president is to support british interests, and many of those interests, and many of those interests are the same as some of the senior and powerful figures that donald trump as appointed to his administration. so in the internal administrations dynamic, the prime minister of the united kingdom can bea minister of the united kingdom can be a useful voice into the white
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house, supporting the analysis of the secretary of state, the defence secretary and the head of the cia, who share britain's outlook on the world. bearing that in mind, the fa ct world. bearing that in mind, the fact that you points to others who he has said he will listen to, he can send out a strong signal and say, this is what i think, but i will listen to them, he will play those two difference dynamics. how forceful should she be when she is talking about something like that? does she need to be forceful? she is a very good listener, and she speaks calmly, and people listen to her, and she carries a quiet authority with, and i don't think she needs to change your style or her with donald trump. the president has already made clear that he sees her as his maggie, as he puts it. we need to remember the religion share between ronald reagan and margaret thatcher was not always sweetness and light. —— the relationship. on grenada, she
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felt the need to intervene in the internal administrations debates to forcefully put the british view, the dorks with the soviet union at reykjavik on nuclear disarmament we re reykjavik on nuclear disarmament were another example as to where she forcefully engaged to contradict the direction where she saw ronald reagan was taking western policy. so that was a relationship where there was mutual respect, and that is what we have got to achieve. some people might have blanched at some of your language, so apologies if you did, very sorry if any offence was called. that is my soldierly background! betsy mccoy, you are a former adviser to donald trump on the economy, crispin blunt saint theresa may is a good listener, how would you characterise him? —— saying. what i would stress is that
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she was so warmly received yesterday by the republican party, and the trump administration appears to have such deep respect for the history of this relationship with great britain, with the values of the nation, the work ethic of the people, and as you know, donald trump personally has strong ties to your country, his mother was scottish, and so she is being welcomed with open arms to a party and a leader who wants to do a trade deal, and who wants to have a strong relationship of mutual respect and affection. and when she evoked the very special relationship between ronald reagan and margaret thatcher yesterday, you could see that she was applauded so warmly, so enthusiastically by the president's
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party that i think this is going to be the beginning of a very strong relationship. obviously, we hear all of those welcoming words, the fact that he feels this great affinity to the united kingdom. when it comes down to brass tacks, though, he is a hard—nosed down to brass tacks, though, he is a ha rd—nosed businessman, and down to brass tacks, though, he is a hard—nosed businessman, and the message is that he is sending out about america first, what sort of room for manoeuvre does that mean when it comes to a trade deal in our interests ? when it comes to a trade deal in our interests? well, plenty, because as you say, your prime minister says exactly the same thing. the reason these two, i predict, will get along just fine, it is really going to be a love fest, is that both of them are committed to national sovereignty, to putting their national interest first. unlike president barack obama, who was so critical of brexit, donald trump applauded brexit from the beginning. president obama told the british
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they would have to go to, quote, the end of the queue if they voted for brexit, whereas donald trump is welcoming your prime minister with open arms to negotiate a trade deal. so there is the difference, two countries can have strong commitments to their own people and still see many mutual interests. let's bring in roderick abbott, you worked for the eu commission on trade for 30 years, obviously very appealing when the petition has gone from a president who said the uk would be at the back of the queue to a president saying the uk is right at the front of the queue, what you see has the potential for a trade deal? yes, well, good morning. i think the first thing to say is that, between a special relationship type of getting together and a trade agreement, they are two very different sorts of things, and if
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you are fine on one, because you have got all the history, you are not necessarily fine on the trade agreement. it is also true that both sides would be looking for their own national interest, that is clear. how do i see this? i don't think there's going to be anything done very, very quickly in terms of concluding anything. i think they are ina concluding anything. i think they are in a preliminary stage where they are meeting each other, and they are meeting each other, and they will be setting out a certain numberof general they will be setting out a certain number of general principles and things, and that will lead onto informal discussions over the next months. crispin blunt, how do you see the timing? obviously, there are rules that mean there cannot be any formal negotiations before the uk leaves the eu, but all the messages coming out of the united states are that there is no reason why they could not effectively sew something
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up could not effectively sew something up quickly and quietly that could come into force then. you could have the discussions, and trade experts say you could have discussions but not formal negotiations, exactly as you said, but we won't know exactly the shape of the deal that the united kingdom gets as we leave the european union, and what freedom that then gives us to negotiate our own trade deals in terms until we have signed a deal and left the european union. so these discussions will have to take place in principle between the parties, but what is different about these is the politics of this deal — you saw the warmth of the reaction that theresa may got from the republican members of congress, and of course their trade ago shaders in a united states report to congress, and usually they are report to congress, and usually they a re really report to congress, and usually they are really tough because they are looking after individual businesses.
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—— trade negotiators. this is an occasion where political pressure and the need for both countries to be able to do 80, there is a slightly different dynamic compared to other deals. —— to do a deal. they will be saying to their negotiators, get the deal done. the details may be less important than securing a deal, securing the argument forfree securing a deal, securing the argument for free trade in the united states, which is very important, as well as the uk showing that the world wants to do business with us as we leave the european union. how will it be seen within the eu? donald trump's approach would look like classic divide and rule, he prefers to deal with individual countries in bilateral negotiations, rather than dealing with trade blocs. as other eu countries going to crucial election is this year, how does that dynamic play out? my first comment was that the politics which apply to the special
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relationship and the contacts with the republican party and so on, don't necessarily spillover into trading because trade people in that community are very mac and to list —— are community are very mac and to list “ are very community are very mac and to list —— are very mercantilist. i imagine what theresa may will look for is what theresa may will look for is what she said, a bold and ambitious free trade agreement. and you can start to sketch out what that would mean. you might use as a model the ttip, which is probably now in gdp freezer. it could be a good model, but i don't think you're going to get very far along the road until you see that the uk in relation to the united states is a much smaller target than the eu in relation to the united states. the dynamics in
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the united states. the dynamics in the bilateral relationship would be different to the dynamics with the eu. it means the european market i'm afraid is less attractive because it's a smaller population and you therefore have a smaller number of consumers and that kind of thing.“ itfairto consumers and that kind of thing.“ it fair to say that donald trump prefers to have deals with individual countries rather than trading blocks because it's easier, because you have more clout and therefore, is it an appealing dynamic for donald trump to be warmly welcoming the united kingdom when there are other eu countries who might be thinking, we might be all right out of the eu as well?|j think all right out of the eu as well?” think it's a lesson the entire united states has learned, that in multilateral trade negotiations, often the interests of the united states are lost on the table in
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favour of the interests of the entire group. you can see how that would typically happen. whereas in bilateral trade agreements the united states can secure its interest at the bargaining table and nobody is a better bargain than donald trump, that's why the americans elected him president, to get this nation a good deal. i believe the americans could they strongly trade relationship and strongly trade relationship and strong overall relationship with great britain is a big winner. you can see that yesterday when the republican majority in philadelphia, and they will be the ones affirming any trade agreement, gave her such a warm welcome. a quick final thoughts, crispin blunt, are we wea ker thoughts, crispin blunt, are we weaker in these negotiations by being on our own? relative to the european union in conducting these negotiations, yes, in absolute terms. but the politics of the deal are actually rather different than a
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classic united states— eu deal, which has taken decades to negotiate and has run into what looks like terminal trouble. the bilateral politics and the need for both governments to secure, going into the electoral cycle for both governments in 2020, there's big political pressure on the negotiators to get a deal done and not behave in way trade negotiators usually do, which is very dry and mercantilist, as usually do, which is very dry and merca ntilist, as is usually do, which is very dry and mercantilist, as is described. the dynamic is different around this deal. so let's hope the politicians direct the trade negotiators to be sensible and get a deal done in the mutual interest of both countries to reinforce what's going to be a deeper special relationship. thank you all very much. still to come... and with the nhs in crisis, doctors are increasingly struggling to provide care. we hear from a group of gps that had to shut down their surgery for good. they even had sell off equipment
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from their practice to help pay off their debts. and more than a quarter of survivors of the holocaust living in the uk still face anti—semitic abuse or discrimination. we'll be talking to two britishjews about their experiences. it's 9:30am. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. theresa may will today become the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president. she told republicans yesterday of the importance of the special relationship between the two countries at but says they cannot return to failed military interventions. it's expected a post brexit trade deal will be high on the agenda at today's meeting in the oval office. hundreds of millions of funding promised to schools in england last year has been taken back by the treasury. the money had been announced to fund a plan to
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turn all schools into academies. the department for education says that it was appropriate to return funds of the project did not go ahead. a teenager has been charged with murder after a 15—year—old boy was stabbed near his school in north—west london. quamari serunkuma—barnes was attacked in doyle gardens on monday, just as other children made their way home from school. the suspect, who is also 15 and cannot be named for legal reasons, will appear before willesden youth court later today. plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in worcestershire have been described as "alarming" by the royal college of surgeons. three clinical commissioning groups in the county want to restrict who can have the operation. they hope the move can save around £2 million. but they insist they will continue to carry out more operations than many other parts of the country. a study in the united states suggests girls start to see themselves as less talented than boys do when they are only six years old. the researchers described the results as disheartening, and said such views were likely to shape girls‘ decisions about studies and careers in the future.
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bring in some comments on the research on six—year—old girls. john has e—mailed to wonder about the research. he says we now know there are more young women at university in the us than young men. what happens between six and 16 that changes these apparently contradicting sets of data? another tweet, i think girls are morejudged because of social media, which is sad. an anonymous text asks, why are six—year—old girls being asked this question? thank you for your comments. keep them coming in. we will talk more about it later. now time to catch up with the sport. rafa nadal has just taken the first set against grigor dimitrov in the australian open semifinal. the spaniard has reached a majorfinal since winning his 14th grand slam at the 2014 french open. he got the break he needed to take the opening set 6—3. it's break he needed to take the opening set 6-3. it's 1-1 break he needed to take the opening set 6—3. it's1—1 in the second and the winner will face roger federer
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for the title on sunday. manchester united are through to efl court cup quarterfinal. they lost 2—1 against hull, the bringing an end to their 17 match unbeaten record. they face southampton at wembley next month. nottingham forest have asked bilton albion —— burton albion to speak to manager nigel clough. there will be a post—war record crowd of 90,000 at the anti—would joshua wladimir klitschko fight at wembley next month. three gps that gave up running a surgery in a small village say they're now having to sell their equipment in order to avoid going into personal debt. the studley health centre in warwickshire shut permanently on the 31st of december because the partners that ran it claim they were no longer able to make a living. now the doctors are trying to raise around £40,000 to cover the costs of closing.
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the surgery had around 2000 patients, and has been in the village for decades. let's talk to dr lars grimstvedt, who was one of the partners at the studley health centre, dr krishna kasaraneni from the british medical association's gp committee, and from birmingham is hazel wright, who was a patient at the studley health centre. for more than 40 years. why was it that the practice was not viable? the main issue was being a small size. we were a small village so we focused on looking after patients and offering continuity of care. they could see the same doctor every time they came in and we could offer good appointments. they didn't have to wait long to see us. talk is through the figures. where was it
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not adding up? how did outgoings compare with income? to do this we had to put in quite a lot of time as doctors. we only get a set amount of money per patient per year. is that £80? tail money per patient per year. is that £80 ? tail it's money per patient per year. is that £80? tail it's about 80 or £85. that doesn't take into account the amount of appointments we have available. we could see a patient wants or ten times. there have been contractual changes meaning the amount we get paid will be decreased every year for the next five years. there is also an increase in demand. we are having to see more patients, and also more nonclinical work we have to comply with. just cutting through, on whether a practice is viable or not, if you have 2000 patients and you get £80 per patient, but each of those patients might come once a year, it's fine, but if you have maybe an ageing
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group in that 2000, they are coming lots of times a year and it becomes an issue. was that the issue for you? it is. also the fact that costs we re you? it is. also the fact that costs were going up. wages were going up, and the income was going down. and the pressures worded so that we were spending more and more hours seeing patients, longer days, 12 hour days, and it's exhausting because you don't get on top of your workload. there is always more work coming in. you thought a merger might work. you are not the only practice in an area of 6000 people. why didn't a merger work? we explored a merger and worked really ha rd work? we explored a merger and worked really hard to see if it could be a possibility but we were told that it wouldn't be an option for us. i'm still not... i haven't been given an official reason why it wasn't and i'm still trying to find out. from the bma's gp committee,
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the department of health says it's a lwa ys the department of health says it's always been a case that some gp practices open, close and merge over time. what's important is patients get a ccess time. what's important is patients get access to the services they need in all parts of the country. in the end, ifa in all parts of the country. in the end, if a practice isn't viable, this is the only outcome, isn't it? that's a short—sighted comment from the department of health. the reason being, of the last few years we have noticed that gps up and down the country, workload has increased significantly. country, workload has increased significa ntly. part of country, workload has increased significantly. part of that is because the nhs has been a victim of its own success. people live longer with more health conditions, so they need more care in the community. unfortunately funding hasn't kept pace with that. we have been warning the government that if funding doesn't keep pace to provide a level of service nations need, gps will leave. numbers came out two days ago showing the numbers of gps from 2009
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to last year has dropped by 3500, including gps in my own practice you have moved to canada. we have now reached the point where the workload has increased so much and funding isn't enough to keep up the pace. the funding model of £80 per patient per year being a fixed amount. how would you see it working better? presumably it would be linked to the number of times somebody is visiting, and then the bill could potentially go up exponentially for the health service. the reality is that the funding isn't enough. we are asking the government to increase funding to keep up the pace with demands on the health service and general practice so we can provide the level of service patients have been used to. what would you see as a model that could work? one of the things nhs england has declared is an extra £28 billion by the end of this parliament. the problem with something like this, yes, it's an
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investment and a welcome opportunity for the government to invest in general practice, but if a patient rings for an ambulance with chest pain,, that money will not make a difference, the ambulance is needed now. unfortunately parliament continues to interfere with the health service too much political cycles rather than need. we need investment urgently available to gp practices now to maintain and improve services for patients. number of gps have been leaving the service. are you aware of how many practices are closing? the numbers are difficult to pin down, but we know eight out of ten gps are reporting that the level of service they are providing for patients has deteriorated in the last year and we know that one in three gp practices in the country have permanent vacancies where they cannot fill gp places. depending on the situation, some will be looking to close practices and patients who are used to access in their local gp for a
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period of time will no longer be able to see their gp. hazel, i mentioned you had been a patient at that surgery for more than 40 years, how do you feel about and closing? quite angry, and so do and closing? quite angry, and so do a lot of residents, and it is an anger that really escalated, because studley seems to be losing all these services. we have lost the fire service, the library, which is now manned by volunteers. we have at the banks close, you name it, we have lost it. and really, this was really angry, it made people really angry that this was happening now, that the doctors were going, especially those doctors, because they are well regarded, highly respected, because they knew, or as a patient you knew that you could rely on them, not only as a doctor, but somebody who cared about you. so what are the options now? what will you do? well,
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in fact, there is another surgery in the village. i have registered with them. in all fairness, they are doctors of good quality, and i feel that i am confident with them. you have got to wonder, are they going to be able to cope if 2000 patients from this practice turn up at their door? at a public meeting arranged by the ccg, they made a pledge that they would accommodate as many patients as wanted to go to their surgery, because patients as wanted to go to their surgery, because when we had a letter telling us that we would have to find a new doctor, we were provided with a list of doctors that are in redditch, so people were givena are in redditch, so people were given a choice. but as far as i am aware, most people have chosen to go to the other surgery. you are out of that environment now, working as a
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salaried gp somewhere else. how has this left you feeling? presumably you went into medicine because you wa nted you went into medicine because you wanted to care for people, you got into a position where you were effectively a businessman. that is typical, really, isee myself effectively a businessman. that is typical, really, i see myself as a an accidental businessperson, i wa nted an accidental businessperson, i wanted to look after people, and i am not very good with the financial side of things. it has been quite a stressful six months, six months two—year, really, when we have been looking at how to resolve this. i have,in looking at how to resolve this. i have, in recent times, my take—home pay has been less than a junior doctor's from the surgery, and therefore... and i knew! doctor's from the surgery, and therefore... and i knew i wanted the kind of work i wanted to do was in a small village surgery, and that comes at a price, but at some stage you have got to weigh up whether you are able to put bread on the table and pay the mortgage versus going to work. and there is work at there
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that pays a reasonable amount more with less responsibility, and it wasn't just that i with less responsibility, and it wasn'tjust that i couldn't with less responsibility, and it wasn't just that i couldn't see with less responsibility, and it wasn'tjust that i couldn't see a way forward to carry this through, and that is why we had to make this really ha rd and that is why we had to make this really hard decision to say, well, we cannot carry this on much longer. how do you feel about patients who have been coming to the practice all this time? it has been overwhelming, the positive response that we have had, people saying how well they thought of us as a surgery. we haven't had anything but positive comment and sadness from patients and people we have been working with, that they have lost this surgery. with, that they have lost this surgery. and it is... it is almost heartbreaking to see, really, the effect that these decisions have made. but at the end of the day, we have got to think about what is best, and if we could not carry on much longer, we would have got into some kind of difficulty, and i wouldn't want to risk clinical
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safety or making a mistake or cutting services down to a level where i thought it was unsafe, which are the kind of choices i would have had to make if i carried on. thank you all very much, thank you. a spokesman for the department of health says it has invested an extra £2.4 billion into primary care and there will be an extra 5000 gps by 2020. a spokesperson for nhs south warwickshire clinical commissioning group says it felt merging the studely health centre with another practice was not viable and it was making sure patients still had an excellent gp service. coming up, the vicar‘s daughter theresa may meets the billionaire president trump for talks in washington today. we're looking at what the special relationship between the us and the uk means and whether it has a future. one in four survivors of genocide have experienced discrimination or abuse in the uk because of their religion or ethnicity. the disturbing figures are released to mark holocaust memorial day, which is dedicated to all those
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who were killed during the holocaust, and in genocides since world war ii. the research shows that most survivors can't talk about their experiences for at least 20 years. that is a brick that was thrown into the home of a london family last weekend. police are investigating. and this is a poster for the film denial, about a holocaust denier, which was defaced after it was displayed at a london underground station. last summer, figures revealed that the number of anti—semitic incidents in britain increased by 11% between january and june. we have two guests in the studio with us. holocaust survivor susan pollack mbe, who was saved by the british army. and binyomin gilbert, who's a student and the president of thejewish society at goldsmiths university, who's been subjected to abuse. thank you both very much for coming
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in. susan, what do you think when you see the break, the reaction that there was to that poster, and also there was to that poster, and also the statistics about anti—semitic abuse? well, it is very disturbing. it is frightening that after so many yea rs, it is frightening that after so many years, and many of us have devoted time and effort to remember, to try to inform people what that sort of hate propaganda, anti—semitic various ways of talking, can lead to. and it is frightening, it is frightening. but we're hoping that, eventually, there's going to be some very strict laws. and notjust talking but actually preventing that sort of thing. have you experienced
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anything in your later years like anti—semitic abuse? anything in your later years like anti-semitic abuse? no, actuallyi haven't. indirectly, yes, indirectly. remember, talking about for instance the olderjewish woman down the road, forgetting that i have got a name, forgetting that i am part of the wider community. so that sort of discriminatory identification, i think, that sort of discriminatory identification, ithink, all these small streams of the others has got a certain danger attached to it. you we re a certain danger attached to it. you were taken to auschwitz at the age of 14. i was only 13 years old at the time. and some 435,000 of the jewish people, and others, we must never forget the others, have been murdered. at the time. and it was
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the most horrific experience that i could think of, that could be orientated against innocent people. how could it happen?” orientated against innocent people. how could it happen? i think your mother disappeared almost immediately. almost immediately, selection was taking place, and my mother was selected to be with older people and was gassed right on arrival. ireland about this when i was in auschwitz. —— i learned.” said that for many holocaust survivors, it took 20 years to be able to talk about it. how did you sort of come through it? well, the difficulty was, of course, how can
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life go on after? we were left on our own, the majority of us, we had no language, we were dehumanised, no skills and no education. the path to extermination had started long before auschwitz, of course, so i lost my education very early. and i had to find some means of how to support myself. so that was one of the reasons why we couldn't speak about it. also, the difficulty of finding an audience who were listening. at that time. how do you view discrimination after everything that you've experienced and been through? i am vigilant and cautious.
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i think that it needs constant education and very strong legislation. the two things that one needs in order to re—educate people and accept myself, thejews, i am very involved in various other things as well. i mean, i became a samaritan, just to rebuild my self—esteem and help others. the physical recovery wasn't all that difficult, though it took a couple of years. but the emotional, mental recovery took a lifetime, i'm still working on it. of course. binyomin, you are 22, obviously at the other end of the spectrum, but you have experienced anti—semitic abuse, tell us about it. i have experienced a few physical incidents and a consta nt few physical incidents and a constant stream of small, everyday
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comments, online anti—semitism and other forms the worst experiences i have had involved physical assault. a few months ago in coventry, i was assaulted by a... i think he was a neo—nazi, it was difficult to tell, but he attacked me, hit me across the head. when i was younger... were you literally just the head. when i was younger... were you literallyjust walking along? walking along with a friend, up a side street in the middle of cove ntry, side street in the middle of coventry, and someone just came up to me, he saw that i was wearing a kippah, came up to me, said, you are jewish, and told me to go back where lam from. jewish, and told me to go back where i am from. what impact does that have on you? it is concerning. thankfully, i am tough enough to ta ke thankfully, i am tough enough to take care of myself, but it does concern me that this is increasing, and it isn't something that i face of my own, it is something that my
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peers face, that we are seeing increased across britain and europe. and it makes me worried about the future. you say that you are tough enough to deal with it, has that been built over time? yes. i think when i was nine years old and someone when i was nine years old and someone threw a bottle at me out of a car window when i was walking with my grandmother in the street, psychologically that god to me a lot more than recent incidents. did you know when you were nine why that was done? i couldn't understand it. it took me years to understand, and it has been, over the last few years, i have come to terms with what anti—semitism is, understood how it has developed since the war into a new form of anti—semitism, new ways to attack people. and it has driven me to volunteer to fight against anti—semitism. i started working for anti—semitism. i started working for a campaign against anti—semitism. and i feel like i am fighting back.
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susan, i mean, how frustrating is it for you to hear that those sort of things are happening? well, it is frightening. it is absolutely frightening. it is absolutely frightening. the holocaust should a lwa ys frightening. the holocaust should always be a beacon of warning of what can take place, notjust perhaps, yes, first of all against the jews, but perhaps, yes, first of all against thejews, but many others as well. we all need to stand up against that, and here strong voices. it is not good, because if we remain silent, if we made voiceless, who do we help? the perpetrators. that is one of the lessons we learned. neither of you demonstrate any angen neither of you demonstrate any anger, do you feel anger?
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i feel disappointment. ifeel disappointment. i i feel disappointment. i do ifeel disappointment. i do feel... anger perhaps not in that sense, sort of angry. we never retaliated, for instance, after the holocaust, we just went about and tried to rebuild our lives. but disappointment that we don't have any stronger kind of protection. you said that it has taken a lifetime to deal with the emotional scars of what you went through, you are still dealing with them. absolutely, absolutely. we are still dealing with it. i mean, it is not something i shall everforget, with it. i mean, it is not something i shall ever forget, and with it. i mean, it is not something ishall everforget, and i have with it. i mean, it is not something i shall everforget, and i have come to a cce pt i shall everforget, and i have come to accept it. but i have managed to build on it, and i have done quite a few things to do that. i have become a volunteer, as i mentioned, i became a samaritan, which was helpful. can i help you? and ireland
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a lot about human conditions and various other things. i have been speaking to schools for almost 30 yea rs. speaking to schools for almost 30 years. —— and i learned. and yet such deep embedded eight, with some, i wouldn't say everyone, is still in existence. —— hate. i wouldn't say everyone, is still in existence. -- hate. binyomin, how do you feel about the people who demonstrate its towards you? there is frustration, i wouldn't call it anger, but frustration for sure, that after all these examples, pogroms, it still has not been eradicated, and it makes me feel that it may be intrinsic and there may not be a way to completely re move may not be a way to completely remove it. but the only chance that we have is to educate, and that is
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one of the things that i do now in my life, i try and educate people about anti—semitism. i have dedicated time to learning about anti—semitism, and now i try to pass that information to on, going to other universities, going to speak to is duden is and explain what it is that anti—semitism is and why it is that anti—semitism is and why it is baseless and what it makes people feel like. —— speakto is baseless and what it makes people feel like. —— speak to students. thank you both very much for talking to us. we are a little bit late for the weather but we'll catch up with it right now. still very cold outside. we have low pressure coming from the west with this weather fronts bringing pressure coming from the west with this weatherfronts bringing rain. not particularly heavy rain. and also some drizzle. we still have fog across parts of the east midlands and lincolnshire that will slowly lift, pretty dense through the morning. we have a 2—pronged attack, rain coming from the west and from
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the channel islands into southern areas and a lot of cloud building ahead of it across england and wales and western fringes of scotland and northern ireland. a cold day in prospect. not as cold as yesterday. the rain tonight moves north and comes in from the west. the lot of it meets and travels east. snow above 100 metres in scotland and in the pennines. behind the cloud we have some icy conditions, bear that in mind first thing. the band of rain pushing over towards the east in the morning, cloud behind it, but it will brighten up with sunshine. we will have showers out towards the west and highs between five and nine. hello, it's friday, 27th january, it's 10am, i'm joanna gosling. the eyes of the world are on theresa may and donald trump, who have their first face—to—face meeting since the billionaire businessman because president. some tricky issues are on the agenda, but how will the two leaders get along? the reason these two i predict will
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get along just fine, it's going to bea get along just fine, it's going to be a lovefest, is that both of them are committed to national sovereignty, putting their national interests first. girls start to see themselves as less talented than boys from the age ofjust six. before then, both sexes think their own gender is "brilliant" — according to experts in the us. we're looking at gender stereotypes, and where children are picking up these influences from at such a young age. let us know your thoughts. it's democracy in action tonight, as the uk decides which act will represent the uk at this year's eurovision song contest. we'll be asking last year's entry, joe and jake, if they think the 2017 contender can hope to beat their 24th place. here's annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. theresa may will today become the first world leader to meet
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donald trump since he became us president. she told senior republicans last night of the importance of the special relationship between the two countries, but says they cannot return to failed military interventions. it's expected a post—brexit trade deal will be high on the agenda at today's meeting in the oval office. the conservative mp crispin blunt, who is chair of the foreign affairs select committee, says a good relationship between the two leaders is key. and that theresa may's reception from republicans bodes well for a trade agreement. the reaction theresa may got from republican mems of congress, and trade negotiators in the states report to congress. they are normally really tough because the congressmen look after businesses in their individual district. this is a situation where political pressure and the need for both countries to doa and the need for both countries to do a deal, a slightly different dynamic in this trade deal than others. in both countries the politicians will say to the trade
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negotiators, get the deal done. hundreds of millions of funding promised to schools in england last year has been taken back by the treasury. the money had been announced to fund a plan to turn all schools into academies. the department for education says that it was appropriate to return funds if a project did not go ahead. a teenager has been charged with murder after a 15—year—old boy was stabbed near his school in north—west london. quamari serunkuma—barnes was attacked in doyle gardens on mondayjust as other children made their way home from school. the suspect, who is also 15 and cannot be named for legal reasons, will appear before willesden youth court later today. jeremy corbyn faces more dissent in the labour party today as the party whip, jeff smith, says he'll defy the leader and vote against the government bill that will trigger article 50. the mp said he wasn't convinced the government had a proper plan for brexit. the shadow transport minister, daniel zeichner, has also said he'll oppose the legislation, while tulip siddiq has resigned from the front bench over the issue. plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in part of england have been described as alarming by the royal college of surgeons.
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three clinical commissioning groups in worcestershire hope the move would save around £2 million, though they insist surgery would continue to be carried out elsewhere. a study in the united states suggests girls start to see themselves as less innately talented than boys do when they are only six years old. the researchers described the results as disheartening and said such views were likely to shape girls‘ decisions about studies and careers in the future. that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10:30am. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag #victorialive. why might it be that six—year—old girls don‘t think they are as good as boys according to new research? a couple of comments on the conversation we just had about the holocaust. and anti—semitism today.
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it's holocaust. and anti—semitism today. it‘s holocaust memorial day. stephen e—mailed to say he is horrified by continuing reports and he‘s interested to know which members of our communities are carrying out such offences. kathleen has texted to say, watching your item on anti—semitism with disgust. how can anybody treat another human this way? if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. here‘s some sport now with hugh. we‘ve got a match on our hands in the australian open semi—final. rafa nadal is looking to reach his first grand slam final since the french open in 2014. grigor dimitrov stands in his way but it was nadal who took the first set after getting the early break. dimitrov has never reached a grand slam final, but he reacted well, breaking nadal in the second. buttons al has broken him twice. ——
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but nadal has broken him twice. currently 5—4 to dimitrov. roger federer will play the winner for the title on sunday after tomorrow‘s all williams women‘s final. and congratulations to britain‘s gordon reid, who‘s completed a career grand slam — he and partnerjoachim gerard have won the wheelchair doubles title in melbounre this morning. jose mourinho celebrated his 54th birthday by taking manchester united into the efl cup final. they lost 2—1 at hull in the second leg of their semi—final but went through 3—2 on aggregate — although mourinho insisted they hadn‘t lost. here‘s the goal that mourinho is refusing to recognise. four players tangled in the penalty area, and harry maguire went to ground, possibly after marcos rojo had pulled his shirt. tom huddlestone scored from the spot. paul pogba then struck what turned out to be the decisive goal. before oumar niasse ended united‘s 17—match unbeaten run — but not if you listen to mourinho. we didn‘t lose. it was 1—1. 1—1. i
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only saw two goals. i saw the pogba goal, and their goal, fantastic goal. great action, great cross. and the guy at the far post coming. 1—1. why don't you count the first goal bastion yellow i didn't see. deadly serious. --? oh i didn't see. could there be another clough in charge of nottingham forest? they‘ve made an approach to burton albion, to speak with nigel clough about their vacant manager‘s job. his father brian clough was forest‘s most famous manager, leading them to numerous victories, including two european cups in a row. nigel has already followed in his father‘s footsteps once, in managing derby county. and anthonyjoshua‘s world heavyweight title bout against wladimir klitshcko will be fought in front of a post—war record crowd. over 80,000 tickets have already been sold for the wembley bout on april the 29th — and the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has granted permission for another 10,000 to go on sale,
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after talking to rail companies to make sure fans could get home afterwards. we will have the headlines for you at10:30am. we will have the headlines for you at 10:30am. lots of you getting in touch on our conversation on anti—semitism on world holocaust day. a tweak to say, disgusted there are still people in 2017 who abuse people of different races, religions and creeds. —— eight—week to say. —— at tweet. prime minister theresa may is in washington today. she is the first foreign leader to be meeting with president donald trump. the meeting comes as may has suggested that britain could withdraw from some if its intelligence sharing with the united states if trump presses ahead with his announced plans to reintroduce torture techniques like water—boarding during the interrogation of terror suspects. he has said it does work but he will
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bow to the wisdom of the cia in anything on something like that. in an interview with abc news yesterday, trump said he believed that water—boarding works, but downing street says the uk‘s opposition to torture remains "unequivocal". that‘s not the only issue overshadowing the president‘s first few days in charge, though. the mexican president has now cancelled his trip to the united states because of the row over the building of a border wall between the two countries. it‘s a meeting everyone would love to be a fly—on—the—wall for, but what exactly does the special relationship between the uk and the united states actually mean? let‘s talk now to laura schwartz, a political commentator who worked for the clinton administration for eight years. talking to us from washington is republican commentator anneke green, who was a speechwriter for george w bush. thank you both forjoining us. donald trump is supposedly calling theresa may, my maggie. she says she
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won‘t be afraid to talk tough with him. how do you see the dynamic? she‘s already been fairly savvy in setting up a meeting with the republican congress. the republicans have been on retreat in philadelphia and she stopped by to talk to them ahead of her meeting with president trump. she‘s been pretty savvy in communicating that she will work with congressional leaders as well as the president ahead of meeting him. laura, how do you see things? i completely agree. i thought her speech yesterday was forceful. she mentioned a lot of the alliances and information from the donald trump campaign of which she's concerned about, and ways to make that the iran to clear deal doesn't go away. commitments to nato. some of the allied agreements might be flawed but they can't be done away with that must be built upon. everything from the world bank and international monetary fund. she
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brought up some heady issues. issues that are the same issues that many world leaders are concerned about within a donaldj trump administration. i think it's very savvy to go to the republican retreat. it gave her a day ahead of her meeting with donald trump to make that statement and i think that's what will make today's meeting with donald, the press co nfe re nce meeting with donald, the press conference following, and the working lunch following that, productive, even perhaps more so behind the scenes with president trump than we will see in front of the scenes. we have been able to build upa the scenes. we have been able to build up a pretty good picture quickly. he has hit the ground running in terms of actions, as well as just words. the running in terms of actions, as well asjust words. the key running in terms of actions, as well as just words. the key phrase from him, america first, we have heard him, america first, we have heard him say torture works. he introduced a potential clamp—down on visitors from seven countries with muslim majorities. making steps to see the border wall with mexico come into
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force. at this stage, how do you assess him in terms of the rhetoric on the campaign trail, which some thought might be tempered once he came into office, with what we are seeing. he has not found down the way many anticipated. myself included. —— he has not toned down. we did not think you‘d be picking fights with the president of mexico ahead of a meeting, which led to the meeting being cancelled. i think the debate around torture is a big distraction. like you mentioned, leading the programme, he said he thinks it works but will rely on the cia. the cia has not used that enhanced interrogation techniques since 2003. they have no plans to begin doing so again. originally it was only used on three high—value terrorism suspects. i don‘t think there is an appetite for that at this point among the american people, or interest in the cia on resuming that. laura, what should we
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make of that? ultimately, we mustn‘t forget that he‘s a deal maker and plays hardball. forget that he‘s a deal maker and plays hard ball. he forget that he‘s a deal maker and plays hardball. he is sending out very ha rd core plays hardball. he is sending out very hard core messages, but if the caveat is always, i will listen to the people around me, and the people around him don‘t necessarily agree directly with what he says, he gets to play to the people who want to hear those messages but maybe it will not happen in practice. it isa it is a very good plan for donald trump, great for carrying forward the messages of the campaign, yet in this new governing mode that he is in today. he has said, i will let the caa decide, and mike pompeo has said that torture is illegal. we heard yesterday from the leader of the house and the senate, both said that torture is illegal, and they don‘t plan to overturn that any time soon, they don‘t plan to change
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that, because it has not been reliable. so he is able to talk to his base while still being able to give himself, joanna, really and have to say, hey, i brought it up, i did it, i chose these great leaders to put around me, did it, i chose these great leaders to putaround me, and we did it, i chose these great leaders to put around me, and we are going to put around me, and we are going to try it their way first. on the wall, a key part of the campaign, he is now talking about it actually happening and a 20% import duty to pay for it, what do you think about the messaging on that one? that is going to hit people at home, isn‘t it? prices willjust go up. that has been the criticism of those plans. i don't know what i planned to do to counteract that, but the point that wasjust made by laura still stands, which is that something needs discussing, is that what they are
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going to go with? we don't know at this point. i do wonder if there is a kind of good friend, bad friend scenario being set up with mexico being debated as a bad friend, cancelling their meeting, and great britain being depicted as the good friend, the first one visiting, and they are the nation that the trump administration has said they want to fast—track a trade deal with, do everything they can to make it work, evenif everything they can to make it work, even if the terms are not all favourable to the united states. so there is wiggle room there as an example internationally. this is what happens when you support us, this is what happens when you don't support as. he has gone into the white house with record low approval ratings, i mean, from what we see and hear about ratings, i mean, from what we see and hearabout him, things ratings, i mean, from what we see and hear about him, things like the number of people that turned out to the inauguration really mattered to him. it is quite interesting, isn‘t it, i suppose, him. it is quite interesting, isn‘t it, isuppose, whether
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him. it is quite interesting, isn‘t it, i suppose, whether he cares about those low approval ratings and what that says? it is something that he cared about all throughout the campaign,joanna, he cared about all throughout the campaign, joanna, where oftentimes he would come out with a sheet of paper, and on that paper were the names of polls and where he stood among them with relation to the republican rivals. i think that is how he is driven, and you can see his fight turn more feisty or more cavalier depending on what those numbers are. i think he sees that these are very important numbers, some of the lowest ever, and he needs to make massive inroads to cou ntera ct needs to make massive inroads to counteract that. having theresa may there today is outstanding, because there today is outstanding, because the united states of america, the same people who are being polled on his approval rating, they have a very high regard for the uk, so we see a working relationship both among trade and among advisement. very interesting, before barack
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obama left office, he spoke to a few leaders around the country that had been confirmed by their administration officials, as well as british officials in this case, with theresa may. he asked theresa may to stay in close contact with donald trump, because he felt the centre—right cleaning was much better than nigel farage‘s influence. so i really believe that your prime minister is taking up that baton, i really look forward to seeing the press conference this evening. yeah, we will all be looking forward to that one! thank you very much indeed for your time. let‘s get the thoughts of a few other people. should the uk re—evaluate its special relationship, or should it be business as usual? we can talk now to four british expats living in the united states. john turner is a brit living in vermont. he thinks our relationship means more to britain than it does to the usa. talking to us from massachusetts is samantha mcgarry. says she‘s proud the first foreign leader to meet
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president trump will be a woman. michaela and matt wilkinson in florida are split on their opinions of trump, but both think theresa may will hold her own in the negotiations. thank you all very much forjoining us, john, why do you think the special relationship matters more to us than to the united states?” don‘t think that donaldj trump really needs the uk that much. i think we have turned our back on europe from a trade perspective, so we need to look west again. so i think, for that reason if nothing else, you know, she is looking to solidify her sort of authority there, move forward with the brexit negotiations, and i think she sees an opportunity, and i agree it is a savvy an opportunity, and i agree it is a savvy m ove an opportunity, and i agree it is a savvy move for her to be the first one to come over and do business with them. but i think he has a pretty long track record of using
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people, and i would be very circumspect with any sort of negotiations with him. samantha, you are proud that theresa may is the first foreign leader to be walking through the door of the white house with donald trump inside. absolutely! you know, i can't imagine this relationship being anywhere near the thatcher— reagan love fest, but my hope is that trump takes theresa may seriously as a woman in power, and that she holds her own, woman in power, and that she holds herown, and woman in power, and that she holds her own, and that she doesn't kowtow to him, and that she does what she thinks is right for the uk. nick taylor and matt, i said you are split on your opinions of donald trump, but you think she will hold her own, tell us more about why you ask let them what is going on? well, we‘re not having rows, but matt and iare we‘re not having rows, but matt and i are agreed on many issues, like
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women‘s rights, climate change, and ifind women‘s rights, climate change, and i find that terrifying. i hope that theresa may is strong in her opinions on that and holds firm on her values and can broach that with a diplomatic air. i think matthew is more. . . a diplomatic air. i think matthew is more... he can see the business opportunities with trump and those advantages. but i find him deplorable as a person! he has been elected, and we have to deal with him, he has got notoriously thin skin, and she would not be wise to go public with her opinions, whatever they might be, but she should aim to become a confidant and a good friend to him perhaps, talk straight in private, but don't humiliate him in public, because we know how he will react to that, and it will not be any good... how do you feel, as brits living in a united states? are you sort of conscious of their being a special
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relationship between the us and the uk, as is obviously talked about? do you sense add affinity? absolutely, yes, we have had a lot of history together, it suffered in the last administration, i think, together, it suffered in the last administration, ithink, i do together, it suffered in the last administration, i think, i do not think obama at the same feelings that previous presidents might have had towards the uk, but hopefully that can change now, churchill's bust is back in his office, and may is seeing him before anyone else, so it isa is seeing him before anyone else, so it is a good start. both countries wa nt it is a good start. both countries want to start trading and hopefully can work out a deal. hopefully it is the dawn of a new era and it will be a good thing for both of us. yeah, i personally think she probably would not want to have a special relationship with him! because of the kind of man he is. but it is something that she has to do, and i just hope that she can, you know, steer him in the right they reckon,
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telling do maybe count to ten before he speaks. i am hoping that she can maybe be more of a calming influence on him, because we have to have a relationship with america, because they are incredibly important to britain. so ijust hope that she can bea britain. so ijust hope that she can be a good influence on him. samantha, sorry, samantha as a brit living in the us, how do you see the special relationship? obviously, it has had ups and downs, and the mood music now is that it could be potentially on and up. well, you know, i don't envy theresa may's role right now, she is like the piggy in the middle, or the monkey in the middle, as they say over here, she has got to do what is right for the uk, here, she has got to do what is right forthe uk, but here, she has got to do what is right for the uk, but she is stuck between the us and the eu as well, somewhere in the middle she has got to figure out what is right. i mean, these bestial relationship is important to us —— the special
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relationship. i cannot imagine it is as bestial to donald trump, he has got a big agenda, and working out a trade deal with the uk is maybe not his top priority. —— it is as special to donald trump. i think this meeting is bob abi morgan for setting a tone and showing that he is the boss —— is probably more. i hope she does what is right. he has certainly spoken very warmly about his feelings towards the uk, particularly his links with scotland, and i think that theresa may is taking him something that is called a quaich, an old ceremonial whisky cup, but he is a teetotaller, he will only use it as a decorative thing. john, is the special relationship something that you are aware of, living in the united states ? aware of, living in the united states? do you feel there is an affinity between the countries that tra nslates affinity between the countries that translates all the way through to,
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you know, ordinary people as well? absolutely, i mean, i have lived in the us over 25 years, and there is a fondness, i think, for british people and british culture over here, people have always been very warm and friendly, wanting to open up warm and friendly, wanting to open up and talk to us or talk to me, so there is definitely an affinity there. they love downton abbey, some of them think everyone drives around ina of them think everyone drives around in a rolls—royce with a top hat still! but i think it only goes so far, in my opinion, and i think that she needs to be very candid with him and stay very strong with him and hold his feet to the fire, especially with things around, you know, torture and nato. and i think being that sort of confidant, maybe from the western world, that he seems to be able to lean on and rely
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on, that is a very important role that she can play, but i don‘t think she... she must not kowtow to him, i think he has shown himself, over the last 15 months, in the tortuous electoral campaign that we endure every four years, that he can say things and then changes mind, you know, the next day or a week later. soi know, the next day or a week later. so i would have liked to have seen a stick to her guns and not... represent britain‘s values and place in the world, and potentially open up in the world, and potentially open up some new areas of development for both countries. within trade and so on and so forth. thank you all. but do it carefully, i mean, i think he isa man do it carefully, i mean, i think he is a man where you have to earn his trust, and he is definitely very thin—skinned, so tread very
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carefully. yeah, right, thank you very much for your time, i know it is horribly early, we appreciate you speaking to us, thank you. just some news in that just speaking to us, thank you. just some news in thatjust hearing about a conversation between blood in the pudding and donald trump. —— between lad amir putin. they will have a telephone conversation on saturday evening moscow time. the aim of the conversation was for putin to congratulate president trump and facilitate an exchange of opinions on the main aspects of bilateral relations, so they will be talking on the phone on saturday. here‘s a tale to restore your faith in humanity. it starts with a letter taped to an empty bike rack in the centre of reading. the letter was addressed to the thief who‘d stolen a brand new bike, belonging to someone who‘d saved—up for a year to buy it. a passer—by saw the note, and decided to do something about it. sobbing. bike horn honks. cheering. it can be really, really lovely.
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coming up... girls start to see themselves as less talented than boys do when they are only six years old, according to a group of us researchers. we‘ll be asking education experts why. tonight the country decides who will represent the uk at this year‘s eurovision song contest. we‘ll be looking forward to that with last year‘s entryjoe and jake and a eurovision superfan. and i would love to hearfrom and i would love to hear from you if you are a eurovision super fan as well. here‘s annita in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today‘s news. theresa may will today become the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president. she told senior republicans last night of the importance of the special relationship between the two countries, but says they cannot return to failed military interventions. it‘s expected a post—brexit trade deal will be high on the agenda at today‘s meeting in the oval office. hundreds of millions of funding promised to schools in england last year has been taken back
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by the treasury. the money had been announced to fund a plan to turn all schools into academies. the department for education says that it was appropriate to return funds if a project did not go ahead. a teenager has been charged with murder after a 15—year—old boy was stabbed near his school in north—west london. quamari serunkuma—barnes was attacked in doyle gardens on mondayjust as other children made their way home from school. the suspect, who is also 15 and cannot be named for legal reasons, will appear before willesden youth court later today. plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in part of england have been described as alarming by the royal college of surgeons. three clinical commissioning groups in worcestershire hope the move would save around £2 million, though they insist surgery would continue to be carried out elsewhere. the taxman‘s failure to get tough with the super—rich could undermine confidence in the whole system, according to mps. the public accounts committee says the amount raised each year from wealthy individuals has fallen by £1 billion, and there needs to be a tougher approach.
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hm revenue and customs has rejected any suggestion of special treatment for the wealthy. that‘s a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11 o‘clock. here‘s some sport now with hugh. grigor dimitrov hasjust grigor dimitrov has just levelled his australian open semifinal against rafa nadal at 1—1. his australian open semifinal against rafa nadalat1—1. in his australian open semifinal against rafa nadal at 1—1. in the last few minutes. rafa nadal took the first set 6—3, but dimitrov took the first set 6—3, but dimitrov took the second 7—5. the winner will face roger federerfor the the second 7—5. the winner will face roger federer for the title on sunday. jose mourinho celebrated his 54th birthday by taking manchester united into the efl cup final. they lost 2—1 at hull in the second leg of their semi—final but went through 3—2 on aggregate — although mourinho insisted could there be another clough in charge of nottingham forest? they‘ve made an approach to burton albion, to speak with nigel clough about their vacant manager‘s job. his father brian clough was forest‘s most famous manager,
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and anthonyjoshua‘s world heavyweight title bout against wladimir klitshcko will be fought in front of a post—war record crowd. over 80,000 tickets have already been sold for the wembley bout on april the 29th — and the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has granted permission for another 10,000 to go on sale, after talking to rail companies to make sure fans could get home afterwards. gender stereotypes start kicking in when children are as young as six. it appears from that age girls start to see themselves as less innately talented than boys. before then both sexes think their own gender is brilliant according to us researchers. where are they picking up these influences from at such a young age? i don‘t get any make—up in my hair. this was about a week ago. what do you think about me? that is the coolest thing. while the rest of the
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girls powder their noses, alice has found something else to play with. these dinosaurs. do you know a tyrannosaurus rex, its teeth is as big as a banana. a clip from the channel 4 observational series, the secret life of four, five and six—year—olds. let‘s discuss this more with professor gemma moss, director of the ucl institute of education‘s international literacy centre, and professor paul howard —jones, an education neuroscientist from bristol university who was part of the channel 4 observational documentary series the secret life of 4, 5 and 6—year—olds, who joins me on webcam from bristol. professorjones, you were part of those documentaries and you have seen those documentaries and you have seen kids close—up. what do you think of this latest research that indicates that six—year—old girls don‘t think they are as good as
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six—year—old boys? don‘t think they are as good as six-year-old boys? untili don‘t think they are as good as six-year-old boys? until i was involved in the documentary series, i think involved in the documentary series, ithinki involved in the documentary series, i think i would have been quite surprised about this. but we have actually been filming this, children, looking at this specific issue. you will see on the screening of the special gender issue that‘s coming out on thursday at 8pm, that in fact this is very common, even among younger children. even four and five—year—olds seem to pick up these stereotypes. in a way it‘s really shocking. there are definite biological differences between boys and girls, but it‘s kind of ridiculous. at that age, the differences are almost all favouring the girls. even at four and five yea rs old the girls. even at four and five years old you was seeing children, where the girls are very... they have fine motor skills, better motor skills, better social skills and
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theory of mind. they outperform the boysin theory of mind. they outperform the boys in so many respects, but at the same time you see gender stereotypes arising where the girls say, boys have bigger brains, boys are better. you wonder where it comes from. part of it comes from the adult world, and part of it comes from the cultured the children make themselves. you see that recurring when you watch these children. gemma, where do you think it comes from? i'm not sure where it comes from? i'm not sure where it comes from is really the key question. the study shows that children develop stereotyped views quite early on. it's very careful and precise in those respects. what it doesn't show is how that impacts on educational attainment and it doesn't show whether that has a longer lasting influence. why do you think it's not to work out where coming from? it‘s not innate, is it? i think it's because of the fact that if children have a stereotypic view, what does
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it do to their performance in schools? the same study shows that girls aged six and seven think girls are more likely to succeed in school than boys that's not been run in a way the report has been headlined, but it is in the report. there is something paradoxical here. they believe boys are more likely to be brilliant, but they think girls are more likely to succeed in school. ultimately you are saying if it doesn‘t make difference in the long term in terms of attainment, it doesn‘t matter they are thinking these things. it raises another question. does thinking that boys are brilliant help or hinder boys? does thinking that girls have to try hard, help or hinder girls? that's a different set of questions that the report doesn't address. what do you think about that, paul? it's a very interesting point. i‘m not sure it is very good necessarily for boys to think they are brilliant. that‘s almost a defence. when you watched children in this age, and you‘ll see
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this on thursday, the boys are really struggling in so many different areas and are surrounded by these super beings, which are the girls. when the girls enter you get overwhelmed by the sense of flourishing ability among them, which is common at this age, the gender difference. ifeel which is common at this age, the gender difference. i feel like the boys feel like they have to fight back, and this is a way of boiling themselves up, if you like, feeling more assured and confident by promoting this idea that somehow the girls are inferior. —— boying themselves up. an e-mail from mary, her two—year—old granddaughter loves looking at spiders in the garden. when she bought some spiderman wellington boots for her a couple of months ago, the shopkeeper said, initiate tom boyd? i think the most -- is initiate tom boyd? i think the most —— is she a tom voip? —— tom boy.
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they need to learn about all the different ranges of gender that exist. that‘s only going to really, about through having mixed groups. that‘s the most important thing. the is always going to be girls and girls groups who have interests that might ina girls groups who have interests that might in a stereotyped way be seen as more boyish. some of them have biological causes. for example, it is possible to predict, based on the hormones a child has at one or two—month—old afterbirth, the sort of play behaviour they might show. so girls with high testosterone levels at one or two months old are more likely to pick of a truck or train set. there are biological issues here but there are massive social ones as well. the important
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thing is for boys and girls to have experience of each other so they can develop broad perceptions of what gender means. you are laughing at this. cultural norms change over time was up expectations for women now are quite different for expectations for woman at the start of my lifetime. only 12% of girls we nt of my lifetime. only 12% of girls went to university in the 1970s now more girls than boys get into university. i think the key thing is not to gender stereotype ourselves. that doesn't help. the second thing is to keep on keeping our attention on the differences between boys and girls. thinking that all boys are brilliant might disfavour boys who are actually struggling in the early stages of learning to read. it may be more difficult then to own up to the problems you've got and seek help. that could be crucial, equally, if girls think... is that evidence, our boys less likely to
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ask for help? i've just completed a study for save the children looking at literacy and language development in the early years. one of the things we do see is that those boys and girls who start off school with the lowest attainment in relation to language and literacy, it has particularly strong impact on how boys interact with school so they are less likely to feel self—confident. one of the other important differences between the groups is that low attaining girls at age seven are much groups is that low attaining girls at age seven are much more groups is that low attaining girls at age seven are much more likely to feel positive about reading despite the fact they attain at a low level. but boys are more likely to be disengaged. we have to challenge our stereotypes of boys and girls and get more specific about which girls and which boys and what are the issues. in a way it's an argument for individual attention from teachers to the range there is in their class and thinking about how they can do best by them. i'm not sure how to think now. it felt like
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it was all quite clear—cut. and jerry is standard tarry —— and gender stereotyping was alive as well. maybe it‘s not that clear cut, and it depends on the prism you look through. it's a very complex issue. there is biology involved and strong social and cultural issues as well. i agree with everything gemma has said. these differences in terms of boys reaching out and asking for help, it carries on into adulthood where we see men less able to ask for help with mental health issues. within a group of boys you are a lwa ys within a group of boys you are always going to have a greater range of differences than between boys on average and girls on average. you can never really leap to conclusions about how somebody is going to behave or what they need in order to succeed based on the fact that they area succeed based on the fact that they are a boy or girl. a good message
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for pa rents of are a boy or girl. a good message for parents of both genders, it‘s a lwa ys for parents of both genders, it‘s always good to ask for help if you need it. absolutely, a key message to take away. thank you both very much. interesting to talk to you both. we are going to stay with this, sort of. are gender—stereotyped toys putting off girls from choosing careers in engineering and technology? before christmas, the institution of engineering and technology warned parents against buying pink presents for their daughters. but women who work in these industries got in touch with the bbc to say they disagree. one of them, jade leonard, is a welding engineer at sellafield nuclear power plant. i‘m a welding engineer, and i grew up playing with barbies and dolls. what‘s the big deal? i don‘t believe pink girly toys
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put off girls from doing science or engineering careers. growing up, i played with barbie dolls, just like the ones i‘ve got here, and it didn‘t affect my choices. i think working here doesn‘t suppress my female side at all. i can be who i want to be, and actually being female helps with my success and how i interact with people, whether i‘ve got this on or i‘m dressed in these clothes, it doesn‘t change who i am, and i enjoy thisjob and i‘m proud of being a female in this environment. i believe what does discourage girls from going into these careers is when they get to secondary school, they lose self—confidence, a bit of self—doubt, not sure what careers are actually available to them.
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my advice to girls getting into engineering, just do what you love. even if you play with dolls, if you like being girly, getting your nails done, your eyelashes done, you can be who you want to be as long as you work for it and work hard. i will encourage my children to play with whatever they want to play with, be it pink, blue, rainbow—coloured, it‘s up to them. jade got in touch to share her views on the bbc‘s family and education news facebook page. if you‘re interested in the development and learning of children and young people, you canjoin in the conversation there. just search @bbcfamilynews. breaking news, police investigating historical allegations of abuse in cambridge have arrested a man. detectives arrested the man in cambridge this morning. the man is in his 70s and from cambridge. he has been arrested on suspicion of indecency with children and indecent
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assault, and he is currently in custody. officers are working closely with partners including the football association, the local children‘s safeguarding board for cambridge and peterborough, cambridge and peterborough, cambridge and peter brake united, the clinical commissioning group and peterborough city council. they would encourage anyone with concerns about the allegations to call police on 101 or the nspcc. so newsjust threw that a man in his 70s and from cambridge has been arrested on suspicion of indecency with children and indecent assault. elisa been investigating historical allegations of abuse relating to football in cambridge. —— police have been. from the x factor to the eurovision song contest, tonight six hopefuls will be asking for your vote as they bid to represent the uk in kiev this may. as you‘re "making your mind up" during the show, which is live on bbc two, so will a jury
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of music professionals — including sophie ellis—bextor and strictly come dancing judge bruno tonioli. all the contestants have previously appeared on the x factor, and they want the chance to improve a rather dismal run of eurovision results for uk entries. last year we put forward joe and jake, who finished 24th out of 26. we‘ll speak to them injust a minute. but first, let‘s have a listen to tonight‘s shortlisted songs. # we build these walls. # we watch them fall. # we‘re drowning in our secrets. # the lies we keep between us... what do you think? any of those grab you? let‘s speak now to british duo joe woolford and jake shakeshaft, who represented the uk in the eurovision song contest in stockholm last year. nicki french, who represented the uk in eurovision 2000. simon bennett is a superfan and head of the international eurovision fan club group. he has been to every eurovision since 1999. thank you all very much forjoining
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us, i feel dreadful to have thank you all very much forjoining us, ifeel dreadful to have said that you came 24th out of 26 — it is a fact, though. we have dealt with it now! good, before you speak, let‘s have a look at that performance. # heartbeat. # when you‘re not around, it‘s fading, slow. # and it‘s something that i‘ve never known. # oh, oh. # i‘ll be, i‘ll be the answer you‘ve been waiting for. # i‘ll be the truth that you‘ve been looking for. # oh, oh. i think it was great, you should have done better than 24th, you were robbed! thank you very much. what
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has lifelike been since taking part? it's has lifelike been since taking part? it‘s been good, we‘ve been busy, we just released our latest song, we are in the studio recording lots of stuff. definitely, it has been good, positive. as we look tonight to all of the hopefuls, when you were in that position, how did you feel? how big a deal is it when you are hoping to represent the country at eurovision? we were so nervous about it, we thought, you know, if we make it, we thought, you know, if we make it to your vision, we know it will be amazing, but if we don‘t make it through tonight, we thought, no, we are going to miss out in front of everybody. we put so much work and before, singing that song, we really grateful we won that show. what is that? that is not mine, sadly! it is simon's. because you have taken part
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in eurovision as well, you have been actively involved ever since as well. tonight it is being done slightly differently from how it was done last year, in that the public at the final say. they won‘t get the final say tonight. oh, i didn't know that! 50-50, the television vote will be half of it, and the professionaljury will be the other half. they don't trust the public, you see? why has it changed? ijust wa nt you see? why has it changed? ijust want to say they did us proud lest you, they deserve so much higher than 24th, and they were great ambassadors for the uk, all year. and i was so proud to introduce them at the london party that we do every year, they were great. and they have been great ever since, and tha n kfu lly been great ever since, and thankfully they are another one of the artists who does not want to hide it from their cv, they are proud. very much so. you have every
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reason to be proud, representing the country. do you feel the ambassadorial part is as important as everything else? definitely. as important as it is to put on a great performance, it is important for eve ryo ne performance, it is important for everyone to feel proud of you, because one thing we have learned is that the community really wants to love you, so it is not hard to just hold yourself in a good manner for that. and the venue there was amazing, it was the first time it was held in the same venue where i did mine, in stockholm. so i mean, it really is an amazing place to be form. so yeah, tonight, the artists will be getting ready, and it is such an exciting day, and then to be chosen as the uk‘s representative, it is like no other feeling. you love eurovision, don‘t you? why you love it so much? oh god people
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a lwa ys you love it so much? oh god people always ask me, i have loved it since i was always ask me, i have loved it since iwasa always ask me, i have loved it since i was a kid, and always ask me, i have loved it since iwas a kid, and in always ask me, i have loved it since i was a kid, and in the uk it has tried my patients are little bit. you know, it is a fun fest, it is a week—long festival of fun, and it is a bit like some people are passionate about sports, other people are passionate about eurovision! you know, there is a whole community are people who go to the live shows, and we have a wonderful time. why do you think we don‘t do better? british music does brilliantly internationally, doesn‘t it? there is a whole load of reasons, there is politics in it, and certainly last year there was more politics than ever before. speu more politics than ever before. spell it out! last year, there is a jury spell it out! last year, there is a jury and there is the public, and it was the jury is that seemed to swing the vote is lasted, and there was a stop russia movement, they probably had one of the strongest songs in the competition. ukraine, russia, a bit of a situation there, and there
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was clearly some element of that political tension playing out in some of the votes of the jury is. did you feel that? it is tough, isn't it? we tried not to focus much on that, because all we saw was our name is slowly going down and down. it started really well! we are doing well! no, we are not. in recent years, we said that you could literally send one direction and adele, and we would still get the same result. it is difficult, really, we were hoping to turn it around for the really, we were hoping to turn it around forthe uk, but really, we were hoping to turn it around for the uk, but unfortunately it didn't go the way we wanted. the thing is, it is a national thing that people love. it is still one of the bbc‘s biggest shows every year, still one of the most watched bbc shows. last year, around the world, 204 million people. so there is
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something going right with it. you know, particularly in this country, people love to ridicule it, but actually, if you get on board with it and supported and enjoy it for what it is, it is an amazing experience, an amazing show to watch. and as i say, 204 million cannot be wrong, quite a few million in the uk cannot be wrong. so we are supporting a good thing here! a bit of enjoyment for the audiences nowadays, when everything else in the world that is going on.” nowadays, when everything else in the world that is going on. i am afraid we are out of time, enjoy its tonight, it has been fabulous to meet you all, thank you for your company. bbc newsroom live is next, i will see you soon, bye—bye. good morning! still pretty cold and frosty for large parts of the
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country, quite a mishmash of conditions, a few patches of fog, their bit of cloud, but in the west and south it is of most interest, rain into northern ireland, a breeze as well, and other area of rain moving up from the south. a lot of dry weather, still quite cold in the north—east of england, but generally speaking temperatures are back on the rise, coming in from the west. this evening and overnight, the rain becomes more extensive across large swathes of the uk, turning to star over higher ground in scotland. with a southerly breeze, nowhere near as cold as last night. through tomorrow morning, it starts quite wet, the rain is on the move, getting into the north sea fairly quickly. behind it, brightening up quite nicely, sunshine coming through, a scattering of showers, some on the heavy side, 5—8 degrees. this is bbc news, and these are
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the top stories developing at 11am. theresa may vows to renew the uk‘s special relationship with the us, as she leaves downing street for face—to face talks with donald trump. ina in a speech last night she told us republicans that the uk and the united states had a responsibility to offer leadership to the world and protect their own interests while protecting a special relationship. we have the operable unity, indeed the responsibility, to renew the special relationship for this new age. also in the headlines. changes
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to hip and knee operations. head
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