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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 27, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am. theresa may vows to renew the uk's special relationship with the us, as she leaves downing street for face—to face talks with donald trump. ina in a speech last night she told us republicans that the uk and the united states had a responsibility to offer leadership to the world and protect their own interests while protecting a special relationship. we have the operable unity, indeed the responsibility, to renew the special relationship for this new age. also in the headlines. changes to hip and knee operations. head teachers in england are angry after hundreds of millions of pounds of funding promised to schools in england last year is taken back by
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the government. tesco reaches an agreement to buy the whole siler booker in a deal worth £3] billion. it says it will create the uk's leading food business. and this is a rare tropical turtle who has washed up rare tropical turtle who has washed up on rare tropical turtle who has washed upona rare tropical turtle who has washed up on a beach in wales. good morning, it is friday, january 27. theresa may is to become the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president. she told senior republicans last night of the importance of the special relationship between the two countries. it is thought the prime
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minister will meet the president in the oval office and they will spend around an hour together in a private meeting. both leaders will then give their first news conference together at around 6pm uk time. post brexit trade opportunities, security and intelligence cooperation are likely to feature, as well as the future of nato, in those talks. this report is from our washington converse correspondent. she arrived on a blustery winter's evening in a city reeling from the effects of the new occupant of the white house. theresa may will meet with president trump less
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than a week after he came to office, a week as unpredictable as any in modern american history. and as the prime minister's motorcade wound its way through the streets of the capital, she could probably be forgiven for thinking, will the new relationship be more strange than special? in philadelphia, the city of the founding fathers, mrs may earned a standing ovation for a speech that dwelt on the shared history of the two nations, a relationship which had defined the modern world. all part of a charm offensive which she hopes will pave the way for a trade deal with the us. so i am delighted that the new administration has made a trade agreement between our countries one of its earliest priorities. a new trade deal between britain and america. it must serve work for both sides and serve both of our national interests. later, she'll become the first foreign leader to meet with donald trump at the white house, the streetwise new yorker who, when it comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always put america first. the comes as president trump finds himself roiled in a row about his plan to build a wall along the border with mexico. mexico's president cancelled a visit to
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washington after trump signed an order to move the bill forward and says mexico will pay for it. mexico, says, no way. if you think about what a border tax on imports from countries like mexico does, it will provide funding. but the other positive you have to realise is that through the wall not only do we secure oui’ through the wall not only do we secure our border but i think we will save additional money that we would have had to spend on tracking down illegal in the. lesson week after he took office donald trump finds himself embroiled in controversy on finds himself embroiled in c0 ntrove i’sy 0 n a finds himself embroiled in controversy on a range of other fronts, not least his assertion that there is a pace for torture in the questioning of terrorist suspects, a statement that runs contrary to international law. but he and theresa may do have things in common and it remains to be seen whether they can find common ground just as
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they can find common ground just as the uk is preparing to negotiate its departure from the eu. david willis, bbc news, washington. speaking to fox news in his second interviews is becoming president, donald trump said he would be strong on trade deals with other countries to ensure they work for america. on trade deals with other countries to ensure they work for american the deal doesn't work out, we terminate the deal. when you get into the mosh pit with all these countries together you can't get out of the deal. you take the lowest nominator, in other words you have countries that don't treat as well, they are in there, we want to deal with the ones that treat us well and if they don't treat us well we give them a 30 day notice of termination and then they come back and they wa nt to and then they come back and they want to negotiate during that 30 days and we get a better deal. we don't get good deals any more. you almost wonder who gets these deals, how does it happen? we are going to make great trade deals, were going to bring backjobs, were going to
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have strong military, were going to drew great. let's talk to carol at westminster. theresa may set the scene last night in philadelphia. today when she meets president trump they have a lot in common probably when it comes to talks about a future trade deal. but then there are areas where there are very key points of difference as well.m are areas where there are very key points of difference as well. it was striking that last night the prime minister was talking notjust about the importance of the special relationship but also about their shared values, and i think, though the two share a common design example to share economic opportunities to woodberry working families, they want to secure a future trade deal between the us and the uk, britain cannot start formal negotiations until it leaves the eu, but the prime minister will be helping to lay the groundwork for a trade deal and donald trump has already said britain could be at the
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front of the queue. i think when it comes to a whole series of other issues, there are some real differences. donald trump said yesterday that he would be personally prepared to allow torture in order to pursue the fight against terrorism. britain takes a very strong stance that it does not condone terrorism. brass tricked rules that british intelligence agencies cannot use information which is gained through the use of torture. when i spoke to the defence secretary earlier i put it to him that this was an issue on which theresa may would need to challenge the american president. she will be making him very clear on the british position on torture and that will not change. we don't can turn it and that will not change whatever the american policy happens to be. but will she urged him not to go down that route? that would have really significant implications for future
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intelligence sharing. we work together on the basis of shared intelligence and you are right, if the american position was to change there would—be implications and she will be making that clear. the prime minister also said she wanted to see an end to what she called failed interventions, clearly signalling a change from the sort of approach that led to the us and the uk getting involved in for example militaria action in iraq and afghanistan, though she said she still did believe that both countries should engage more widely in the world in particular through nato. the chairman of the foreign affairs select omitted welcome those comments. personally i shoot she welcome it. it is a proper reality check to the unachievable ambitions of british and american policy over the last couple of decades which has led us into quite serious foreign policy mistakes with catastrophic
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consequences. policy mistakes with catastrophic consequences. so policy mistakes with catastrophic consequences. so you look at afghanistan and iraq and they undoubtedly have been severe lesson is to ask which the prime minister has recognised. now there are some shared views between the two leaders, for example, in needing to be cautious about the approach to china, but they have very different ideas about the approach to russia. above all, i think, theresa may will wa nt to above all, i think, theresa may will want to use this as an opportunity to get new the new president, to establish a personal relationship. she was asked about the fact that they are very difficult different characters. and she said sometimes opposites attract. let's see how the personal chemistry looks when they hold their first personal chemistry looks when they hold theirfirstjoint personal chemistry looks when they hold their firstjoint news conference later today. and of course she will be thinking about brexit violence back home as she meets donald trump. the labour, they
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continue to look like a incredibly divided party over this. one of the whips has said he won't follow the orders ofjeremy corbyn and vote for the triggering of article 50. diane abbott was making an interesting comment in an interview earlier. when she was asked about what would happen if labour did not get enough of its amendments through, she said labour would then review its position. tell us more about that. labour has been under a lot of pressure to clarify its position and i think it is with that in mind that jeremy corbyn decided that he would decide to impose what is called the three line whip, the strictest possible instruction to labour mps all to vote in favour of the bill. we've already had one resignation from the front bench, there are a whole series of other more junior
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shadow ministers who have said they would not be prepared to vote in favour of article 50. diane abbott said she believed that labour mps should not defy the wishes of the people and should let this bill go through. but this is what she said. there is a very big democratic issue here. mps voted for a referendum, there was an extraordinary high turnout, 72%. 70 million people voted to leave. many of the people in some of our poorest areas. how would it look if a bunch of politicians in london turned round and said we know you voted to leave but we're just going to ignore you. that would be very undermining of democracy. so the shadow home secretary, the party leader, all trying to persuade labour mps to vote in favour of that bill but we still don't know what if any disciplinary action will be taken
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against shadow ministers who defy the party whip. jeremy corbyn is someone the party whip. jeremy corbyn is someone who was the party whip. jeremy corbyn is someone who was a the party whip. jeremy corbyn is someone who was a serial rebel for decades and it still remains to be seen decades and it still remains to be seen whether he has the ruthless strea k seen whether he has the ruthless streak or believed it even to be the right course to take to punish mps who defy him. thank you. plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in worcestershire have been described as alarming by the royal college of surgeons. three groups in the territory want to cut down the number of procedures. they insist they will continue to call carry out more operations than many parts of the country. hip and knee operations can be a godsend to the people who get them and they are also expensive, up to £6,000 each. three clinical commissioning groups in worcestershire wanted to reduce their annual bill by 200 —— £2 million because they said they are spending more than other areas. it is said they considered restricting
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operations to those who are in such pain they can't sleep. in the end they didn't go that far but it is understood those criteria are used in some areas. a spokesman for the organisation for the over 50s said the bean counters shouldn't salmon their consciences. he said it was an outrage even to suggest that inability to sleep should be used in deciding eligibility for operation. the royal college of surgeons said it was worried this example of health rationing was only the tip of the iceberg. its statement went on, health spokesperson in worcestershire said many patients would benefit from physiotherapy and weight loss before considering surgery. weight loss before considering surgery. she's also said there was a clear appeals system. and with me now is our health correspondence. these three commissioning groups,
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are they clearly saying now that financial considerations will be a bigger part of their decision—making process rather than pure clinical assessment of whether someone needs operation? they are saying there aren't such financial pressure that this has to be a consideration they have to take into can separation how much pain and suffering that patients are in and how much their mobility is affected before they spend the money. they need to save money, they need to save something like £2 million, and they say by doing this they can meet their budget requirements. so, yes, in a way, not only clinical considerations but the amount of money available to spend on these operations is a fact of life. why have they gone for these procedures, targeted these types of procedures? there are reports that people have to be in considerable pain, not able to be in considerable pain, not able to sleep at night, if they are going to sleep at night, if they are going to get through the threshold for having an operation. they've gone to this because it not emergency
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medicine, it is not something that has to be carried out or that person will die. some people say they need carried out the operations promptly or the condition of the patient could get worse. but because they have to draw a line somewhere these are the people they have decided are least in need of a rapid operation. there are also making the point, and i think this is a really important sign of the times, that people who are obese, that have a bmi over 35, and i've been speaking to one this morning, he will be caught in this net. what they are saying is these people could help themselves to have a better outcome from their surgery by losing a bit of weight, going through physiotherapy, perhaps adapting their home in some ways, and that it would affect the outcome of the surgery as well. there is a push and a pull factor. it is not just financial, is it is also about improving the outcome of the
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operation. there is an excuse, if you like, to target these people. it is not purely done on the basis of funds. let's take a look at the headlines. it is 60 minutes past 11. theresa may is in washington to meet president trumpet to meet the trumps on talks. the royal college of surgeons criticises plans by hospitals in england to restrict hot hip and knee operations to save money. headteachers are angry after hundreds of million pounds of funding promised last year is taken back by the government. and in sport, two people are battling it out as to who will face roger federer in the australian open final. it is five games all in the third set. it will be a manchester united southampton league cup final,
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despite united losing 2—1 at hull last night bringing to their end their 17 match unbeaten record. and there will be a post—war record crowd of 90,000 at the anthony joshua vladimir clips go fight luck next month. the london mayor has given the go—ahead after talks with transport companies. hundreds of millions of pounds promised to schools in england have been taken back by the treasury. the money had been announced as part of a plan to turn all schools into academies, but the department fridge has revealed that when the compulsory academy plan was ditched the treasury took most of the funding back. headteachers in west sussex and other parts of the country have been warning that schools are running out of cash. but only last year the government
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announced an extra £500 million for schools. as part of their plan to turn every school into an academy. school leaders have been asking what happened to that money. it has now emerged that when the academy plan was abandoned most of that money, £384 million, was in tax taken back by the treasury. the education department says this was the right thing to do and the schools are written seething record levels of funding. headteachers are furious that so much money could appear and then disappear when schools are struggling. tesco, the uk's largest retailer, is buying british poznan largest cash and carry wholesaler. it means they will gain a massive ‘s share in supplying the growing restau ra nt share in supplying the growing restaurant and pub market. first, who are booker and why does tesco
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wa nt who are booker and why does tesco want them? tesco is one of the uk's biggest retailers, they are the biggest retailers, they are the biggest supermarket on the high street. it would not be going too far to say they have been somewhat in crisis for the last couple of yea rs. in crisis for the last couple of years. they've been selling off parts of the business, losing some of their market share. they had a 2014 accountancy scandal. today's announcements are significant in two ways. the bid the booker, they are also going to start paying dividends from next year. the markets have reacted positively to that and prices are up 10% on the footsie. but booker that is who you want to know about. they are the uk's largest cash—and—carry wholesaler. they supply wholesale food to 700,000 businesses across the uk. everything from restaurant chains to convenience stores. you mentioned brands like londis and budgens and
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premier. the viewers replied to tweets saying what does that mean the competition? what does that mean when i go to my local store? will they be buying wholesale from tesco? surely that won't work when it comes to competition? dave lewis said this morning it will be a problem because tesco isn't going to increase of its stores. but cashback booker owns its stores. but cashback booker owns its stores and those franchisees will now be buying their wholesale products potentially from a tesco wholesaler. that sounds like quite a complicated relationship. there are two ways to look at it. on one hand, you remember marmite gate? you could say if tesco has the 700,000 businesses behind it, 500,000 convenience stores, they are in a stronger negotiating position with suppliers ringing out products like
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marmite. but once that comes into the tesco wholesaler and tesco puts it on its shelves at a certain price, will they sell it on to the franchise holders for the same price they got? that is somewhere where competition and markets will be interesting. so the deal is still subject to approval? yes. the tesco boss said there would be no competition issues. we've had other a nalysts competition issues. we've had other analysts saying the same. the cma have said they do not comment on potential investigations. thank you. ‘s now let's look at some of today's other developing stories. police investigating historical allegations of abuse rated football have
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arrested a man in cambridge. the man, in his 70s, has been arrested on suspicion of indecency with children and indecent assault. a teenager has been charged with murder after a 15—year—old boy was stabbed school in north—west london. he was attacked in doyle gardens on monday just as other he was attacked in doyle gardens on mondayjust as other children made their way home from school. the suspect who is also 15 and cannot be named for legal reasons will appear before court today. an influential group ofappear before court today. an influential group of appear —— at mps says the tax man is inability to get tough with the super—rich could undermine public support. hm revenue and customs has rejected any cost suggestion of special treatment for the wealthy. a new study suggests that girls start to see themselves as less in 80 talented than boys when they are only six years old.
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the american researcher has described the results as disheartening and says such views are likely to shape girls decisions about studies and future careers. the rspb says the current cold weather appears to be bringing unusual migrant birds to britain such as waxwings. the charity is holding its annual bird count this weekend, when more than half a million people are expected to take pa rt million people are expected to take part in what is claimed is the world's largest wildlife survey. the tv presenters ant and deck will collect their fourth award of the week today. they've already won three prizes at the national television awards on wednesday. they are now heading to buckingham palace to collect obes. their mantelpieces will be buckling under the weight! ruffles summer of the news you can go to our website. anglican bishops
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have announced that they are teaching on marriage as the lifeline and union of one man and one woman will remain unchanged but in future all cav churchy both straight and 93v all cav churchy both straight and gay will be asked about their sexual conduct beforejoining gay will be asked about their sexual conduct before joining the priesthood. previously only gay ordinance will were asked about whether they remained celibate in line with teaching. martin, something is fundamentally remain unchanged but there are some differences. take us through those. i could barely hear the question. i can hear you now. basically, after a three—year process of what the church of england has called a shared conversation, including clergy, the house of bishops, the house of bishops have produced a
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report today which fundamentally co nse rve report today which fundamentally conserve confirms the status quo. nothing is changing. that means that marriage will still be regarded in the church of england as between a man and a woman, and that those ordinance who may express same—sex attraction will be expected to maintain celibacy throughout their service. there is no change to doctrine whatsoever. as you can imagine, many members of the lesbian and gay community are extremely angry. they feel they've entered into a conversation on intimate matters with enormous courage and sensitivity and at the end of that process they've received a report today which actually has not changed a thing. what does this mean for any future conversations? as you pointed out, this particular discussion has been going on for some three years. the subject surely is not closed, especially for clay and lesbian members of the church. no, and the
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bishop who spoke at the press conference today explained that this is in no way the end of the road. the matter is not resolved, and in fa ct the matter is not resolved, and in fact the house of bishops is going to consider working on two new documents, one on issues concerning sexuality and another on the subject generally of marriage, both of these doctrines have been described in previous publications by the house of bishops, back in 91 and 99, so they are going to embark on a process of reworking these doctrines in the formal sense of a publication. but in terms of practice, nothing is going to change. the other thing they said today was that instead of focusing purely on the sexual activities or whatever of gay clergy, they want to ensure that people who are set heterosexual are also following the guidelines of the church. what does
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that mean? it means that marriage is between a man and a woman and it is monogamous and it is lifelong. so they are going to begin to ask questions of heterosexual individuals as well as homosexual. do play gay clergy here feel that in a nyway do play gay clergy here feel that in anyway the decision that has been arrived at, the status quo, is to somehow calm concerns from the anglican church worldwide? no, i think this is very much come from the house of bishops. we asked whether it was a unanimous report today and we were told it has by and from all the dioceses and bishops in the country. it is very much a document that has been produced within the church of england is based on conversations that have taken place within members of the church of england, and there is very little reference, beyond the fact,
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obviously, that were the doctrine to change in relation to marriage that would lead to some kind of separation or split with the anglican community worldwide. but as far as this report is concerned it is very much one that has been worked on, contributed to, by members of the church of england here. it's almost half past 11. it is not everyday that a tropical turtle washes up in a beach on wales. that is what happened on november when a turtle turned up in anglesey. the species is critically endangered and experts say it is the first time one has been seen on uk shores. it is being cared for at anglesey sea zoo. an early morning start of another step on a journey that could eventually lead to this tropical sea turtle being released back into the wild. she was driven all the way from anglesey where she was found last november to hertfordshire. six hours later, the
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tea m hertfordshire. six hours later, the team at the royal veterinary college we re team at the royal veterinary college were preparing their unique patient. they have never seen an olive ridley here before. she is the first to be spotted in british waters since records began almost 270 years ago. getting a sea turtle into the scanning machine is no easy task. experts need to check her lungs for damage. we can see her shell all around and we can see her lungs. and we can see also that there is some gas which is black and that is outside her lungs. so it is free gas and that is potentially responsible for her buoyancy problem. staff caring for her anglesey had noticed she was unable to keep below the water. she may be struggling to dive but the team are delighted by her appetite, which is helping her regain weight. she is a real character. we got to know her, she
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starting to eat really well now. she's demolishing a couple of kilos of calamari a day. she is a real personality. she likes to see us. she seems to recognise people and knows what's going on. these turtles can travel vast distances but it is thought this one was carried thousands of miles off course by currents. she's been through a lot and now it is time that tlc. jealous being a pride to prevent her skin from drying and she is being kept warm ready for herjourney back to anglesey. while adding experts decide herfuture. it is half past 11. let's take a look at the weather forecast. it is still pretty cold out there across large swathes of england, some places below freezing, and a real mishmash of whether out there. some cloud, fog, and sunshine here and there. cloud to the west and
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southis and there. cloud to the west and south is interesting, particularly this front towards the west, because there will eventually move eastwards and introduce something a lot milder. this afternoon, 7—9d in the west it. further north and east, a cold day, struggling to get much above freezing. rain becomes more extensive overnight. snow over the pennines, more significantly over higher ground in scotland, but foremost, rain. nowhere nearas higher ground in scotland, but foremost, rain. nowhere near as as recently, but chilly enough in northern ireland for icy patches first thing tomorrow. a slow start of the day, particularly for the east. most rain will clear into the north sea. cloud left over on the eastern side into the afternoon, but on the west, sunshine coming through with a scattering of showers. temperatures up on most places today, 8—9. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 11.31: theresa may is in washington to hold talks with president trump,
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with a quick trade deal after brexit and security issues high on the agenda. in a speech to republicans last night, the prime minister said america and britain should end foreign interventions and stop trying to remake the world in their own image. plans to restrict hip and knee replacements in england in order to save money have been described as alarming by the royal college of surgeons. head teachers in england say they are angry that nearly £400 million of funding promised to schools last year has been taken back by the government. britain's biggest supermarket tesco is to buy the leading wholesaler booker for £3] billion. time for sport. let's cross to will, and every body is talking about tennis. yes, the only place to start is melbourne. it has been a really
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entertaining australian open semifinal so far. rafa nadal is looking to reach his first grand slam final since the french open in 2014. grigor dimitrov stands in his way, but it was nadal who took the first set after getting the early break. dimitrov has never reached a grand slam final, but he reacted well — he's broken nadal twice in the second set, though nadal has broken him twice, too, so it's back on serve, 5—4 to dimitrov. it is currently 4—3 and nadal‘s favour. the winner takes on roger federer on sunday. and congratulations to britain's gordon reid, who's completed a career grand slam. he and partnerjoachim gerard have won the wheelchair doubles title in melbourne this morning. he now has the full set. jose mourinho celebrated his 54th birthday by taking manchester united into the efl cup final. they lost 2—1 at hull in the second leg of their semi—final but went through 3—2 on aggregate, although mourinho insisted they hadn't lost. here's the goal that mourinho
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is refusing to recognise. four players tangled in the penalty area, and harry maguire went to ground, possibly after marcos rojo had pulled his shirt. tom huddlestone scored from the spot. paul pogba then struck what, turned out to be, the decisive goal. before oumar niasse, ended united's 17—match unbeaten run — but not if you listen to mourinho. we didn't lose. it was 1—1. 1—1. i only saw two goals. i saw the pogba goal, and there was a fantastic goal, and there was a fantastic goal, great action, great cross, and the guy in the far post coming. 1—1. we are still unbeaten. why don't you count the first goal? ididn't why don't you count the first goal? i didn't see. leicester will hope to halt their slide in domestic form when they travel to derby county in the first of this weekend's fa
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cup 4th round games tonight. the premier league champions are only 5 points off the relegation zone, with derby just below the championship play—off places. winning after winning is the toughest thing, and that is what leicester are proving to be given goal this season. the layer still in cup competitions, as we saw in the champions league, formidable opponents on their day. on friday, it is not their day or night. they put in the best team, the best team, because we need to go for the cup. we need to get confidence, because we lost so many matches. in the last days. sunderland have given defender patrick van aanholt permission to speak to crystal palace, after he said he no longer wanted to play for the club and submitted a transfer request. it's believed a fee rising to £14 million pounds has been agreed. has been agreed.
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he'll be reunited with former sunderland, boss sam allardyce, who says that van aanholt was a "major saviour" for them last season. palace arejust a palace are just a point ahead of sunderland, who are bottom of the premier league. anthonyjoshua's world anthony joshua's world heavyweight title bout against wladimir klitschko will be fought in front of a postwar record crowd, with over 80,000 tickets already having been sold for the wembley final on april 20 nine. the mayor of london, saddiq khan, has granted permission for another 10,000 tickets to go on sale after talking to rail companies to make sure fans will be able to get home after the fight. justin rose leads after the first round of the pga golf in san diego by one shot. he is seven under par. another englishman, andy sullivan, has a share of the leader of the house we stayed at the cat are masters, one of eight seven players on eight under par. sullivan has three european tour wins to his name. he has not won in over a year. and nadal has taken that set against
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dimitrov, so he leads in that australian open semifinal. we will keep you up—to—date. thank you very much, well. more now on our top story. the meeting at the white house between president trump and to reason me. the prime minister was the first world leader to meet mr trump since his inauguration, and ahead of the historic meeting, mrs meir addressed senior republican lawmakers. she was keen to stressed the special relationship between america and britain. we have the opportunity, indeed, the responsibility, to renew the special relationship for this new age. we have the opportunity to lead together again, because the world is passing through a period of change. and in response to that change, we can either be passive bystanders, or we can take the opportunity once more to lead and to lead together. and on foreign policy, mrs may
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defended the role of nato, insisting that the two countries must stand up for their allies. the days of britain and america are intervening in sovereign countries in an attempt to remake the world in our own image are over, but nor can we afford to stand idly by when the threat is real and when it is in our own interests to intervene. we must be strong, smart and hard—headed, and we must dissolve the word display the resolve necessary to stand up for display the resolve necessary to stand upfor our display the resolve necessary to stand up for our interests. whether it is the security of israel and the middle east or the baltic states in eastern europe, we must always stand up eastern europe, we must always stand upfor our eastern europe, we must always stand up for ourfriends eastern europe, we must always stand up for our friends and allies in democratic countries that find themselves in tough neighbourhoods too. applause with me now is sir david manning,
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who was uk ambassador to the us from 2003 to 2007, and he is also the foreign affairs adviser to premise to tony blair. —— was. thanks forjoining us today. rousing round of applause therefore theresa may into lead the last night, setting the scene for her conversation today with donald trump. how do you think she will approach that meeting? you're right, i think it was a very welljudged you're right, i think it was a very well judged speech you're right, i think it was a very welljudged speech and well received, and it seems to me she has laid out the issues that worry her, concern her, that she wants to explore with the new president. but on the basis of the close relationship she is hoping to build with him. i think was a good speech. it made it clear that she absolutely wa nts to it made it clear that she absolutely wants to work alongside donald trump, but she also managed to set out very clearly, as we saw in those clips just there, out very clearly, as we saw in those clipsjust there, some out very clearly, as we saw in those clips just there, some things that concern about american policy. so i
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think she's trying to get in early in his time in office to discuss some of those things. let's talk about some of the common ground, securing a future trade deal. i think there was a political desire on both sides to have something to show for this meeting on trade. whether you thing that might be? well, i think it will be a determination to conclude a quick trade deal once we have left the european union. i'm not a trade expert, but it is quite clear that president trump has been signalling that, unlike his predecessor, this is something he wants to do early, and we will be at the front if not the back of the queue. —— and not the back of the queue. —— and not the back. i think she needs to be able to show that this special relationship will deliver for her and the government in a post—brexit world. so do you think you will be an affirmation by virtue of the fact that a deal can't be done or be seen to be beginning until the uk parts company with eu? it can't be
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anything more than that? that's right, i think you can't expect some great detail. there is much discussion today about what might be in it, and it is quite clear bilateral trade deals are difficult to negotiate even if there is goodwill on both sides. the devil is goodwill on both sides. the devil is always in the detail. but i think what the prime minister will want to come home with is a clear signal from the president that he attaches great importance to this and sees it as central to the special relationship as far as he's concerned with the prime minister, and that they will build on it from there. the clip we saw a bit of on foreign interventions and the move away from that, how big a change of direction is that? i think it is very interesting to put it alongside what she also said and had in your clip. ifi put it alongside what she also said and had in your clip. if i may, i will quote this. she says, our values will endure and the need to defend and project them will be as important as ever, nor can we stand idly by when it is in our own interests to intervene. to me, you
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have to put these things alongside, because it suggests she is signalling how complicated this is the prime minister ‘s. if there is a new genocide in a country like rwanda, is it in british interest to intervene or not? we have seen intervention with boots on the ground in iraq, our intervention in libya, no intervention in syria. i think these issues are enormously difficult for prime minister ‘s, and iam sure difficult for prime minister ‘s, and i am sure she is saying, i do not wish to get into foreign conflicts if we can possibly avoid them, but she is also saying that there may be moments when we can't avoid that. and that is very different to tony blair, of course, who you were an adviser to. well, tony blair, and people have been going back to the speech in chicago in 1999. i was not working for him then. i think it is and it isn't. if you look at the intervention in the balkans, clearly, he inherited a policy that had been started byjohn major, and
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felt that they must do something about the ethnic cleansing, for example, in kosovo. he felt he had to intervene, i think, example, in kosovo. he felt he had to intervene, ithink, in example, in kosovo. he felt he had to intervene, i think, in sierra leone. i think it is a more formal policy, but in iraq, he would have said he was not interested in trying to change the regime per se, but to impose the un's will through many resolutions that had been passed. so i think it is possible to make the distinction appear more profound thanit distinction appear more profound than it really is. i go back to what isaid. prime than it really is. i go back to what i said. prime minister is find real life very difficult. what are you going to do in afghanistan, for instance, after 9/11, if there is a rogue regime that is our bring terrorists tee to take action or not? we hope mrs may will not be faced with a dilemma like this. but alongside that commitment, she herself is saying that there may be moments when very difficult decisions must be taken by our elected political leaders. and on issues like nato and the use
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of torture and so on, how willing, how open to listening do you think donald trump will be? how willing do you think you might be to adapt his views to take considerations of others' points of view? well, i don't know. i don't know him and have not met him. i do not know donald the man. but i think it is interesting mrs me has signalled cheap things are important. this is not just a special cheap things are important. this is notjust a special relationship where she's willing to go along and except necessarily the the point of view of the other side. —— access. it must be about values for us, as well as policies, and she is making perfectly clear that the government is not going to changes view —— change its view on the torture issue. i think it is interesting she issue. i think it is interesting she is so emphatic on the importance of multilateralism. the international institutions that have been built up since the second world war, and britain's roland emmerich. she has been very strong on the need for nato, an organisation donald trump
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as cass doubt on, saying it might be obsolete. she is saying the opposite. i think it is interesting brexit prime minister is bleeding because of the eu as being very important. so this is a speech in which she has room which set out the ground that is important to her personally and the government. thank you very much, sir david manning, former ambassador to the united states. and joining me now from dunstable is conservative mp alistair burt, a former foreign office minister who now sits on the select committee on accessing the european union. thank you very much for your time today. sir david manning just saying there that values as well as policies will being credibly important for theresa may in this meeting with donald trump. i'm sure you expect her to hold very firm on those values. perhaps on policies, she might have to be more flexible? i don't know whether she will need to be at all. i think this will be
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an important meeting. i listened to the end of david manning's interview and agreed with every word i heard him say. the prime minister has already been outspoken in relation to president trump has said on certain issues, and i expect there to hold to that. but the purpose of todayis to hold to that. but the purpose of today is not to deal with what we don't agree with with the united states. i think she dealt with that la st states. i think she dealt with that last night, but it is defining things which you will agree. in terms of trade and trade policy, there will be compromises, and we are yet see where they will be. thinking about the groundwork of a deal at this stage, i think it is clear there is a strong political desire on both sides to be able to come out of this meeting and say they have established a firm ground work? i think work? ithink their work? i think their areas. i think the prime minister is very conscious both of the need to be able to move the discussion on from the last few days, to say that there is something to be taking forward and trade, and
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then she should beyonce crown. the us is already our biggest trading partner. a millionjobs a day in both countries dependent businesses owned by the other. so taking apple would should be possible. she will certainly be scrutinising late into making sure no ground is being conceded on major policy differences which have already appeared, but i don't think they overshadow this meeting. it is about creating a relationship as much as making sure that the values and things that the uk have as differences from the us are well in 98. but with the government pushing forward on the article 50 bill, how important and realistic would it be for her to come out of that meeting with more than just rhetoric? the uk can create a free trade deal or anything else with the us until after the negotiations have been completed under article 50. that is a rule of the un which we already bound. so it is the nuance of being able to explore free trade. i don't
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think anyone has any doubt that it is in the best interest of both countries to pursue further opportunities for trade. the nitty—gritty will be on what terms, and the americans are very hard negotiators. they will want to use the special relationship to their advantage, and i suspect the prime minister will be well aware of that, as should be our trade negotiators. thank you very much. a committee of mps is calling for a tougher approach to taxing the richest people in the uk. the public accounts committee says the the amount of tax hm revenue and customs is raising each year from wealthy individuals has fallen by a billion pounds — but hmrc says the top 1% of earners pay more than a quarter of all income tax. joining us now via webcam is richard brooks, a journalist with private eye and a former hmrc tax inspector. thank you very much for your time today. the perception as well as the
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reality of fair play for all taxpayers, of course, is hugely important. to what extend the thing that confidence in hmrc has already been undermined? well, it was undermined quite a bit some time ago. you might remember a couple of years ago, there was a big scandal over leaks couple of years ago, there was a big scandal over lea ks of offshore accounts, and hmrc‘s inability to prosecute people who had been evading taxes then. this report now looks at the very richest taxpayers, the six and a half thousand who have wealth over £20 million. it is about the top 0.2% of taxpayers. and it suggests that, while there has been some progress, hmrc had not quite done enough to restore confidence in the idea that they are being as tough on the top people as they are with people at the bottom. yes, i seem to remember the phrase "not fit for purpose" being used if
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you yea rs "not fit for purpose" being used if you years ago to that period which you years ago to that period which you are repairing. since hmrc set up this specialist unit dealing with high net worth individuals, the amount of income tax they have paid has fallen by around £1 billion, but hmrc has not really explained why, as it? know, and i asked them this morning and they have not got back to me with an explanation. that really does demand an answer. it really may not be totally their fault. the first year, the figure for 2009—10, is really high, because as you remember, a 50p tax rate was introduced the following year. a lot of people artificially brought forward their income, so there may be so next but nations which are not about hmrc failing to collect the tax they should, but they do need to explain that to us. some of the information that is in this report suggests that they are not being quite as tough as they should be. i
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think it is telling that, in the five years that the report covers, there were 72 investigations of fraud or potentialfraud by there were 72 investigations of fraud or potential fraud by these high net worth individuals, but there was just one criminal prosecution. now, that looks very low, and it is far lower than they —— than the rate of prosecutions for people fraudulently claiming benefits or tax credits. so hmrc clearly do have a long way to go to bridging that gap between how they punish the very well off and how they punish the not very well off. richard brooks, thank you for your thoughts. richard brooks, journalist with private eye. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour, but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may is in washington to meet donald trump regarding talks on trade and strengthening ties. the royal college of surgeons criticises plans by nhs trust in
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england to restrict hip and knee operations to save money. headteachers are angry at the hundreds of millions of pounds of funding promise to schools last year is taken back by the government. hello. in the business news... tesco, the uk's biggest supermarket, has negotiated a £3] million deal to buy the uk basra to biggest food wholesaler, the booker group. they supplied grocers, pubs and restau ra nts supplied grocers, pubs and restaurants throughout the uk. it is thought the deal will attract the attention of the competition authorities. quarterly profits at bt have dived 37% after the firm reported an accounting scandal in its italian division that cost it more than £500m. it has now confirmed that corrado sciolla, head of continental europe, will step down over the affair. in the three months to the end of december profit before tax fell to £526m, although revenues were up. when is earning £4.2 billion pounds in profit
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reuters has reported german prosecutors have expanded an investigation into boxlike and's emissions cheating scandal, and said theirformer emissions cheating scandal, and said their former chief executive may have known about the manipulation sooner have known about the manipulation sooner than he has so far said publicly. prosecutors near there. the base said on friday that 28 homes and offices were searched this week in connection with the investigation. thanks forjoining me this morning. the government needs to take a tougher approach to getting tax from the very wealthy — that's the verdict of mps on the public accounts committee today. the committee found that the amount of tax paid by the very wealthy has fallen since a special unit was set up to collect tax from this group. jolyon maugham is a barrister specialising in tax law. hejoins us this morning. thank you for taking the time to speak to us.
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we have heard the public accounts committee saying hmrc is not doing enough to get this tax from the super wealthy. what do you think you macro i certainly agree with the thrust of the public accounts committee report. there is an awful lot of perception that hmrc has one rule for regular people like you and me, and another rule for the very, very wealthiest, and big, typically us multinationals. and the thing is, there is an awful lot of objective, extrinsic evidence to support their perception. some of that evidence is in the public accounts committee report today. they point to the fact that there have been only 72 criminal investigations in five yea rs into criminal investigations in five years into this class of individual thatis years into this class of individual that is very wealthy, with typically very complex tax affairs. of those 72, only two were criminal, and only one prosecution. compare that to the literally thousands of prosecutions brought every year for people who
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wrongly over claim tax credits. it is one rule for the rich, one rule for everybody else. you can also look at the sorts of deals that hmrc is doing with multinationals. we can see the us multinationals in the uk are doing deals with hmrc for much, much smaller amounts of tax than they are paying over in other europeanjurisdictions in they are paying over in other european jurisdictions in which they operate. it is possible there are explanations for that, but the extrinsic, objective evidence does not look good. you want hmrc to be recognising that there is a real public perception problem arising out of this. people are angry. they have this perception that there is a difference of treatment, really concerns me is that hmrc isn't terribly interested in addressing their perception. it has engaged in is very sophisticated politicking, but when you ask it to come up with
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the actual policy changes that would enable it to address that perception, which is driving, i think, a lot of social unease in the uk and across the western world, they are not terribly inclined to do that. i'm afraid you will have to leave it there. before we go, let's take a quick look at the markets. some interesting moves today. we mention tesco in the headline. their share price of 9%. bt fall, we know the bad news was coming. and the pound down ever so slightly against the dollar. thank you very much. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with for a look at the weather. thank you. still pretty cold out there, some part of the midlands and northern england, still below freezing. some places will struggle to get much about that will stop a real mishmash of weather out there at the moment. some patches of fog and sunshine, cloud out west is of interest. it will movies with allegedly some milder conditions.
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there is some sunshine to be had. this is a picture from suffolk not so long ago. the best of sunshine into the eastern side of scotland. rain moves eastwards, another area creeping in from the south—west. into the afternoon, spells of sunshine to be had on the east of scotland. further west, more sunshine to be had on the east of scotland. furtherwest, more cloud and outbreaks of rain. nothing too heavy or widespread. it should dry up heavy or widespread. it should dry up in the northern isles. some parts of northern ireland will struggle to get above freezing, and still some mist and fog. that fog springs up across the south—west, with outbreaks of rain, and our main front pushes into cornwall and pembrokeshire. through the evening, rain becomes much more widespread across england, and wales, and it will turn to snow over the pennines. more significant snow over the scottish highlands. not as cold as it has been in recent nights, but we
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may well see a view icy patches in northern ireland. looking ahead to the weekend, it will be noticeably a lot less cold, but quite breezy, and some rain in the forecast as well. we will start the weekend with a bit ofa we will start the weekend with a bit of a wet note, but then things will improve. the main area of rain moving eastwards into the north sea, leaving behind a fair bit of cloud for the afternoon across the east. but the wes thomas sunshine comes out, but also showers, some of which could be quite heavy. the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures better than recent days, 5—9. through the evening, showers drift away a bit further eastwards on the breeze. still some wintry weather over high ground in scotland. by the weekend, there are question marks about how far north of rain goes, but it looks like england and wales will be quite wet. double digits in the south, the decent day in scotland after a frosty start. much more unsettled next week, but much milder. theresa may is in washington to hold
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talk with president trump — a quick trade deal and security issues are high on the agenda. in a speech to republicans last night, the prime minister said america and britain should not return to failed military interventions and called for a renewal of the special relationship. we must be strong, smart and hard—headed. and we must demonstrate the results necessary to stand up for our interests. also this hour, changes to hip and knee operations. the royal college of surgeons criticises plans by hospitals in england to restrict hip and knee replacement operations to save money. tesco reaches an agreement to buy the wholesaler booker. head teachers in england are angry after hundreds of millions of pounds of funding — promised to schools last year — is taken back by the government. and meet menai — a rare tropical
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turtle who's washed up on a beach in wales. good morning. it's friday the 27th of january. welcome to bbc newsroom live. theresa may is to become the first world leader to meet donald trump since he became us president. she told senior republicans last night of the importance of the special relationship between the two countries. it's thought the prime minister will meet the president in the oval office, where they will spend around an hour together in a private meeting. both leaders will then give their first news conference together at around 6pm uk time. post—brexit trade opportunities, security and intelligence co—operation, and the future of nato are likely to feature
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prominently in the talks. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. she arrived on a blustery winter's evening in a city reeling from the effects of the new occupant of the white house. theresa may will meet with president trump less than a week after he came to office, a week as unpredictable as any in modern american history. and as the prime minister's motorcade wound its way through the streets of the capital, she could probably be forgiven for thinking, will the new relationship be more strange than special? in philadelphia, the city of the founding fathers, mrs may earned a standing ovation for a speech that dwelt on the shared history of the two nations, a relationship which had defined the modern world. all part of a charm offensive which she hopes will pave the way for a trade deal with the us. so i am delighted that the new administration has made a trade
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agreement between our countries one of its earliest priorities. a new trade deal between britain and america. it must serve work for both sides and serve both of our national interests. later, she'll become the first foreign leader to meet with donald trump at the white house, the streetwise new yorker who, when it comes to trade deals, has vowed he will always put america first. the visit comes as the president finds himself embroiled in a political row over his long stated plan to build a wall along the us border with mexico. mexico prospect precedent cancelled a visit to washington after trump signed an order to move the plan forward and repeated the claim that mexico would be made to pay for it. no way, says mexico. it ended nation is heightened by a suggestion that the
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administration might tax mexican imports to raise the cash. if you'd think about what a border tax on imports from things in mexico, that could provide funding. but the other positive is that through the wall not only do we secure our border but i think we will save additional money we would have had to spend on tracking down illegal immigrants. less tha n tracking down illegal immigrants. less than a week after he took office donald trump finds himself embroiled in controversy on range of other fronts, not least his assertion that there is a place for torture in the questioning of terrorist suspects, a sentiment that contrary to international law. he and theresa may do have things in common, and it remains to be seen whether they can find common ground just as the uk is preparing to negotiate its departure from the eu. david willis, bbc news, washington. speaking with fox news in his second interview since becoming president, donald trump said he would be strong on trade deals with other countries to ensure they worked for america.
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if it doesn't work out we terminate the deal. when you get into the mosh pit, as i call it, where you have all these countries together, you can't get out of the deal. and you take the lowest nominator, in other words, you have countries that don't treat us well, they are in there. we want a deal with the ones that treat us well. and if they don't treat us well we terminate or we give them a 30 day notice of termination, and then they come back and they want to renegotiate during that 30 days and we get a better deal. we don't make good deals any more. you almost wonder, who does these deals, how does it happen? so, just to sum up, we're going to make great trade deals, we're going to bring backjobs, we're going to have a strong military, we're going to do great. let's get more honest with our political correspondence in westminster. the two leaders are looking for a mutually beneficial agreement on a future trade deal that one has to wonder to what
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extent donald trump will listen to theresa may when she is talking about things like nato, the issue of torture, areas where there is clearly points of difference. theresa may clearly wants to use this first meeting with the american president to forge a strong partnership, lay the foundations for a future trade deal, that is something where i think there is scope for a lot of agreement. though of course president ron's trade deal may not be the same as theresa may's. but there are of course some much more contentious issues than that. donald trump said he personally would be prepared to consider using torture in the fight against terror, though some of his seniorfigures around against terror, though some of his senior figures around him against terror, though some of his seniorfigures around him do not agree. that is something which could create quite a significant problem in terms of intelligence sharing. british intelligence services have strict rules about not using, not condoning torture and not using
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information gained through torture. i put it through to the defence secretary that this was an issue which the prime minister would need to challenge the new president. the she will be making very clear to him the british position on torture and that's not going to change. we oppose the use of torture, we won't condone it and that policy is not going to change whatever the american policy happens to be. she'll be making that clear. but will she urge him not to go down that route because that would have really significant implications for future intelligence sharing? well, we work together, obviously, on the basis of shared intelligence. and you're right, if the american position on torture was to change then there would be implications and she will be making that clear to the american administration. she was also talking about how she wa nted she was also talking about how she wanted no more of what she called failed interventions. she appeared to be signalling the us, uk involvement in iraq and perhaps in afghanistan. that is something that
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may well chime with what the new american president wants to do. but it is quite a significant shift. at the same time she was stressing the importance of both but written and america continuing, for example, to confront iis and the involvement in action there. and the engagement with iran over its nuclear programme, somewhere with iran over its nuclear programme, somewhere where the us president has a very different approach to that of britain. the chair of the foreign affairs select committee of the house of commons welcomes that approach and theresa may's promised to have no more of the sort of interventions we saw in iraq. personally, i hugely welcome it. it's a proper reality check to unachievable ambitions of british and american policy over the last couple of decades, which has 5 into quite serious foreign policy mistakes with catastrophic consequences for the areas in which we sought to intervene without putting the very sources in behind that intervention to deliver the stability and the values that we promised. so you look at afghanistan and iraq
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and they undoubtedly have been severe lessons to us, which the prime minister is recognising. nonetheless i think theresa may will also want to talk to the new american president about nato. we know donald trump has severe reservations about that. he thinks other countries should be putting in more money and more resources. theresa may will want to make sure that the americans remain engaged in nato. remain part of that key defence strategy. the two do not agree for example in the approach to russia and i think the tightrope she will be treading is to try to yes, confront the president over issues where they disagree, but above all to forge a new relationship and try to forge a new relationship and try to get to some personal rapport with someone to get to some personal rapport with someone who has a very different approach on a lot of different issues. meanwhile labour continues to be in
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a tangle over brexit. diane abbott was talking about it this morning saying that if the party does not get all its amendments they may want to consider their position. what was she getting at? i think it is difficult indeed for the labour party, which has some mps representing constituents who voted strongly to stay in the eu, some who voted strongly to leave. i think there is a recognition in the team around jeremy corbyn of that. nonetheless, he sought to try to clarify his party's position on brexit by saying he was going to impose a three line whip. that is simply the strongest possible disciplinary instruction if you like to labour mps to vote in favour of the bill to trigger article 50, to start formal brexit the go asians, when it comes before the house. diane abbott, shadow home secretary,
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somebody very close to the leader, said she understood some mps might wa nt to said she understood some mps might want to look at the final shape of the bill after labour has put down amendments, but above all she urged mps to back the legislation. there's a very big democratic issue here. mps voted for a referendum, there was an extraordinarily high turnout, 72%, 17 million people voted to leave, many of them are people in some of our poorest areas. how would it look if a bunch of politicians and commentators in london turned round and said, "we know you voted to leave but we're just going to ignore you"? that would be very undermining of democracy. so diane abbott, jeremy corbyn, both urging labourmps to so diane abbott, jeremy corbyn, both urging labour mps to unite and vote to allow the article 50 bill to go through. as already we have had one
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junior shadow minister resigning and a number of other junior shadow ministers have said they would not be prepared to vote for article 50. those include two of the party whips. these other people who are supposed to be imposing discipline! so ifjeremy corbyn was trying to clarify the party line on brexit, it does not appear to be going quite to plan. plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in worcestershire have been described as "alarming" by the royal college of surgeons. three commissioning groups in the county want to cut down the amount of procedures. but they insist they will continue to carry out more operations than many other parts of the country. andy moore reports. hip and knee operations can be a godsend to the people who get them but they are also expensive, up to £6,000 each. three clinical commissioning groups in worcestershire wanted to use their annual bill by £2 million because
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they said they were spending far more than other areas. it is reported they considered restricting operations to those who were in such pain they could not see. in the end they did not go that far. but it is understood those criteria are used in some areas. a spokesman for saga, the organisation for the over 50s, said the bean counters should examine their consciences. he said it was an outrage even to suggest that inability to sleep should be used in deciding eligibility for an operation. the royal college of surgeons said it was worried this example of health rationing was only the tip of the iceberg. its statement went on... a health spokeswoman in worcestershire said many patients would benefit from physiotherapy and weight loss before considering surgery. weight loss before considering surgery. she also said there was a clear appeals system. two men are being sentenced the
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manslaughter today over the deaths of four people. they were convicted last month. the victims included a four—year—old girl who was crossing the road when she was hit by the runaway truck. let's go to bristol crown court now. you can bring is up—to—date, john. crown court now. you can bring is up-to-date, john. the actual sentencing by thejudge up-to-date, john. the actual sentencing by the judge will be a little bit later but before he passes sentences, the families of the four people who died are each getting a chance to tell the judge and the court and the public about the impact this terrible incident had on their lives. first we heard from the mother of the four—year—old
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girl who was crossing the road with her grandmother that afternoon in past two years ago when she was killed instantly by the tipper truck. she said the family is bereft, it is a struggle to go on without her laughter and singing filling the house. we then heard a statement from the girl's grandmother who was holding her hand that day when the tipper truck crashed into them. she survived but has had to have two legs amputated. she described the physical and emotional pain of that, losing her legs but also losing her granddaughter. she said life has changed for all of us completely. we are hearing at the moment from a woman who married her husband six months before he was killed in the crash. he was a driver, he had a limousine company. he was driving a couple of businessmen that afternoon when a truck crashed into them. she
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has been in tears, telling the court how she went to see her husband's body in the mortuary, held his hand and played, at the time, songs they had had at their wedding, that they had had at their wedding, that they had danced to just a few months earlier. she said losing him had created a void in her life and she never expected when she married him that she would be widowed within just a few months at the age of 33. we are also hearing from two other widows of the two other men who were killed, businessmen from south wales. one said she is heartbroken, has been robbed of her soul mate, and those responsible have shown a total disregard for rules of the road. this was echoed by the other whose husband was killed. she said it was a poisonous waste of life, the reckless actions of others mean my life and my families's lives will never be the same again. the judge
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heard those very powerful testimonies and after he has heard those and some legal representations from the lawyers representing the defendants he will decide on the sentences. i should say, after they we re sentences. i should say, after they were found guilty just sentences. i should say, after they were found guiltyjust before christmas, they were already remanded in custody. they have been in prison ever since because the judge—made it clear they should begin custodial sentences and might as well start before christmas. we don't expect them to walk free today. their families are also here today. their families are also here to support them. now the headlines. theresa may is in washington to meet president trump the talks on trade, foreign affairs and strengthening ties between the uk and the us. the royal college of surgeons criticises plans by hospitals in england to restrict hip and knee replacement operations to save money. headteachers are angry
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after hundreds of millions of pounds of funding promised to schools last year is taken back by the government. let's catch up with the latest sport now. it has been a brilliant australian open semifinals so far with rafa nadal currently leading by two sets to one in melbourne. he is looking to reach is first grand slam final since the french open in 2014. the spaniard looked back to his best form in this. he took the first set, 6—3. dimmer trove has never reached a grand slam final. he reacted well after edging out the second. that theme continued into the third set which nadal one on a tie—break. currently four games all in the fourth set. the winner will take on roger federer on sunday. also in
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melbourne, gordon reed querrey completed the grand slam. he and his partner won the wheelchair doubles title. leicester hope to halt their slide in domestic form tonight when they travel to derby county tonight. the premier league champions are only five points above relegation with derby just outside only five points above relegation with derbyjust outside the championship play—off places. winning after winning is the toughest thing. that is what leicester has proven to be difficult this season. they still in cup competitions as we saw in the champions league, full medical opponents on the day. we just hope on friday it is not their day or night. they put on the best team. the best team because we need to go to the cup, we need to get confidence, because we lost so many matches. sunderland defender is
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having a medical at crystal palace after the two clubs agreed a deal which could be worth as much as £40 million. it would reunite him with his former boss sam allardyce. he was a major saverfor them last season. sunderland are bottom of the premier league. anthonyjoshua's fight against vladimir cech go will be fought against a post—war size crowd. the maher of london has granted permission for another 10,000 tickets to go on sale after talking to rail companies to make sure fans will be able to get home after. that's all the sport now. we'll have more in the next hour. how more on our top story now — the meeting today at the white house
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between president trump and theresa may. obviously theresa may was setting the steam in her speech last night to republicans. how much of that will have filtered through to donald trump? that is a good question. she was addressing the republican party and congress, making this appeal that the conservative values she represented where the same as the ones they did and they should rather work together. she will have been sending that message to mr trump to but she will be repeating that again today at the white house because although there are similarities with the republicans there are also differences, so she has stressed some of the similarities, she said she agreed with mr trump, it was not up she agreed with mr trump, it was not up to the west to try to intervene in other countries, to try to reshape the world in their image, but at the same time she said the message that he could not afford to
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turn his back on the world, that they had a go global responsibility to make sure the west was not eclipsed. so she has a fine line between wanting to have a special relationship with the us continue under relationship with the us continue undeertrump but relationship with the us continue under mr trump but also she doesn't share his protectionist and hard nationalist views. so she is trying to look at commonalities that she can to look at commonalities that she ca n stress to look at commonalities that she can stress but also to urge him, encourage him to not turn his back on the world. if america first means doing that it is a mistake. it will be interesting to read the body language at that later. briefly, much has been made of trying to assess what donald trump is like now in office. do you think he is a man who is open to listening to other points abuse, adapting his thinking to other points of view? based on this week it seems he does listen to other points of view but he has
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quite a short attention span so you need to take the opportunity as it exists and try to influence him and encourage him as much as you can because he often comes out of meetings and says, that was very encouraging, interesting, iwas interested. but he then seems to be one quite quickly. i think britain seize this opportunity as quickly as it could to get theresa may through the door to make her case. mps are calling for a tougher approach to taxing the richest people in the uk. the public accounts committee says the the amount of tax hm revenue and customs is raising each year from wealthy individuals has fallen by a billion pounds — but hmrc says the top one per cent of earners pay more than a quarter of all income tax. joining us from westminster is the chair of the public accounts committee, meg hillier. thank you forjoining us. you
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haven't really gotten to the bottom of the question of why the income tax paid by these high net worth individuals has fallen by £1 billion, have you? no. we asked hmr see to explain it and they hadn't gotan see to explain it and they hadn't got an answer either. in 2009 they set of the unit to deal with the wealthiest individuals will stop thatis wealthiest individuals will stop that is currently about 6/2 thousand people worth £20 million in total wealth. the tax paid has gone down since then. the fact that hmr see did not know concerned us because they need to be on top of tax avoidance schemes to make sure eve ryo ne avoidance schemes to make sure everyone whether they are wealthy or not but particularly those in this brat get are not making use of tax avoidance schemes. do you think the sense of fair play has already been badly dented? i think they've had a rocky period with poor telephone service. they tell us that is getting better. and this weekend a
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lot of people will be filing their tax returns. if they have attacked problem they don't have a personal relationship manager the same way the wealthiest to—do and it is about perceptions of fairness and making sure the whole system is fair for everybody and everybody is encouraged and supported to pay theirfair encouraged and supported to pay their fair share. you've raised concerns about a number of areas. you worried about the customer relationship managers that each of these high net worth individuals has. you've talked about football and concerns about the use of image rights to reduce tax liability. looking at the totality, what you think revenue and customs needs to do by way of reform? they need to look closely at customer relationship managers make sure there is no hint of a cosy relationship. they need to be clearer about which the lines those people cannot cross in terms of giving advice. they were clear they don't give advice but we were not so
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clear when we questioned them. in terms of the football issue, image rights is an example of how well the loophole has been found and codified asa loophole has been found and codified as a way of avoiding tax. we think it needs to be looked at again and we've asked them to come back with recommendations. as 11 paper -- labourmp, iwant recommendations. as 11 paper -- labour mp, i want to ask you, you are ata labour mp, i want to ask you, you are at a constituency meeting in hackney last night and you said there was palpable anger from your constituents who voted to remain about the way jeremy constituents who voted to remain about the wayjeremy corbyn is handling the situation. people shared my view that we need a longer debate in parliament to discuss what parliament's view is about how the government should enter the negotiations. we cannot just government should enter the negotiations. we cannotjust give the government a blank cheque to negotiate out of europe because it is theresa may that set the 31st of march as a deadline and once she set
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that and it is triggered there will be 27 countries deciding our future without without us at the table. the more parliament can get certain views on the table and showed the prime minister and she can then so europe what we can see the better. at the moment we have very little certainty of any real change. the bill is very narrow and we are concerned that that view was shared by the people at the meeting who we re by the people at the meeting who were dismayed that we had not pushed labour from the labour side for a longer discussion about these vital it issues. given the views of your constituents, i want to ask if you will disregard that order from jeremy corbyn to vote in favour of triggering article 50? jeremy corbyn to vote in favour of triggering article 50 ?|j jeremy corbyn to vote in favour of triggering article 50? i am going to be voting for more time and i hope my front bench will be doing that. i'm also pushing for a different motion at second reading. things are moving very fast. we don't know exactly what options we will get to vote on. so you might vote against
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it? i will be voting with my constituents and for what i believe. it is not about going against the referendum outcome. my position lost, i recognise that. but it would mean disregarding jeremy corbyn's order. i will be voting the way my constituents voted. a formerjudge and his assistant have been sentenced for fraud. tell us more about the background. it's been a very strange morning. one george facing another sentencing in the dock. he was told he'd brought shame on the legal profession, a former deputy districtjudge and
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lawyer and he was told he and his assistant had used the law firm and their clients's money as their personal piggy bank. they had firstly started using the funds to keep the business afloat but then had started spending money on things like holmes, mortgage payments, holidays to barbados, days out, a hot tub, a range rover. thejudge laying down the six—year sentence for them said they had been drawn to access and extravagance and their offending was a breach of a high degree of trust over a sustained period. he said it was difficult to imaginea period. he said it was difficult to imagine a more significant breach of trust. £85, 000 imagine a more significant breach of trust. £85,000 have been taken from the will of an elderly lady and they said this simply abused the trust of the clients who has kept money with that firm. they have both been sentenced to 60 is in prison and court was told that simon kenny has been held on remand awaiting sentence and word has got round the
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prison about what his previous profession was and he had had to be put in special protection for own safety. it is time now for the weather forecast. let's catch up with how things are looking as we head into the weekend with thomas chavanel hello. it has been freezing for the last few days, so bitterly cold, and that wind—chill, but things are now about to change. milder weather heading our way. it will be a bit of a gradual process, taking a couple of days for things to warm up a little bit. still today, pretty cold in some areas, with some thick fog, even freezing fog, in some spots. all of this atlantic cloud is ready to come our way, much milder air sitting out there, and the process sta rts sitting out there, and the process starts today. across western areas, clouds thicken, there will be outbreaks of rain, but some eastern areas still cold, cloudy and foggy. through the night, some temperatures
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lifting, actually rising through the night. there will be some rain around, the only some sleet and snow across northern areas where it is still pretty cold, but generally a frost free night. maybe a turgid iciness and northern ireland first thing after a nippy morning. western areas later get a bit of sunshine and showers, but eastern parts still in the transition zone, a bit of cloud, and feeling a little on the cold side. but it is all change from about now onwards. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines at 12.30: the headlines at 12.31: theresa may is in washington to hold talks with president trump, with a quick trade deal after brexit and security issues high on the agenda. in a speech to republicans last night, the prime minister said america and britain should end foreign interventions and stop trying to remake the world in their own image. plans to restrict hip and knee replacements in england in order to save money have been described as "alarming" by the royal
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college of surgeons. head teachers in england say they're angry that nearly £400 million of funding promised to schools last year has been taken back by the government. britain's biggest supermarket tesco is to buy the leading wholesaler booker, for £3] billion. more now on our top story, the meeting between president trump and theresa may. mrs me is the first world leader to meet the president after his inauguration, and head of the meeting, she addressed senior republican lawmakers last night in philadelphia. she was keen to stress the special relationship between america and britain. we have the opportunity, indeed, the responsibility to renew the special
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relationship for this new age. we have the opportunity to lead together again. because the world is passing through a period of change, and in response to that change, we can either be passive i stand as, or we can take the opportunity once mortally. —— passive bystanders. we can take the opportunity once mortally. -- passive bystanders. and to lead together. on foreign policy, mrs me defended the role of nato, insisting the two countries must stand up for their allies. the days of britain and america intervening in sarin countries in attempt to remake the world and our own image over. -- sovereign countries. but nor can we stand idly by when the threat is real and when it is in our interests to intervene. we must be strong, smart and hard—headed. and we must and straighter resolve necessary to stand up for straighter resolve necessary to stand upfor our straighter resolve necessary to stand up for our interests. —— we must display the resolve necessary. and whether it is the security of
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israel and the middle east, or the baltic states in eastern europe, we must always stand up for our friends and allies in democratic countries that wind themselves in tough neighbourhoods too. applause earlier, i spoke to sir david manning, who was uk ambassador to the united states from 2003 to 2007. he was also a foreign affairs adviser to prime minister tony blair. he told me mrs me byes speech showed she was not willing to compromise on some issues. i think it was a very welljudged speech, and very well received, but it seems to me she has laid out the issues that worry her, concern her, that she wants to explore, with the new president, but on the basis of the close relationship she is hoping to build them. i think it was a good speech. it made it clear that she absolutely
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wants to work alongside donald trump, but also managed to set every clearly, as we saw in those clips, some of the things that concern about american policy, and sol think she's trying to get in early in his term of office to try and discuss those things. let's talk about some of the common ground, securing a future trade deal. i think there is a political desire on both sides, isn't there, to have something to show for this meeting and trade? what do you think that might be? i think they will reaffirm their determination to conclude a quick trade deal once we have left the eu. i'm nota quick trade deal once we have left the eu. i'm not a trade expo, but it is clear that president trump has been signalling that unlike his predecessor, he sees this as something he wants to do early on and quickly, that, if you like, we will be at the front of the cute, not the back of the queue, and i think she needs to come home and be able to show that the special relationship will deliver for her and for the government in a post—brexit world. and for the government in a post-brexit world. so you think it
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will be an affirmation by the fact that obviously, a deal can't be done, or can't be seen to be beginning until the uk parts company with the eu. it can't be anything more than that. i think that's right. you can't expect great detail, and there is a lot of discussion in the media today about what might be in it. it is quite clear bilateral trade deals are difficult to negotiate, even if there is goodwill on both sides. the devil is all was in the detail. i think the to want to come home with isa think the to want to come home with is a clear signal from the think the to want to come home with is a clear signalfrom the president that he attaches great importance to this, sees it as central to the special laois and ship as far as he is concerned with the prime minister, and then they will build on it from there. —— the special relationship. this that clip we had a little love on foreign interventions on the mood away from that will stop our big a change of direction is that? i think it is very interesting to put it alongside what she also said which she was having your clip. if i may, i will quote this. she says,
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"our values will endure, and the need to defend and project them will be as important as ever, nor can we stand idly by when it is in our own interests to intervene". to me, i think you have to put these things alongside, because she's signalling how complicated it is for prime minister is. if there is a new genocide in a country like rwanda, is it in the british interest to intervene or not? we have seen intervention with boots on the ground in iraq and half intervention in libya, and none in syria. i think theseissues in libya, and none in syria. i think these issues are enormously difficult for prime ministers, and i'm sure she is saying we do not wish to get into foreign conflicts if we can possibly avoid them, but she is also saying that there may be moments when we can't avoid them. sir david manning, talking to me a little earlier. relations are getting increasingly ugly between the us and mexico over president trump's insistence that the southern neighbour will pay for his planned border wall. the mexican president cancelled a meeting with mr trump in washington, which was scheduled for next week. the white house has bitten back, saying they may impose a 20% tax on imports from mexico
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to foot the bill. joining me now from mexico city is our correspondent will grant. will, i think that has already been a bit of rolling back and that 20% idea in favour of what has been called a bus they have ideas? that's right. the 20% border tax on what is one of your key trading partners responsible for 300 alien dollars worth of products in your country every year —— $300 billion, would be a radical step, and have a huge impact, not just would be a radical step, and have a huge impact, notjust an act together, which is obvious, scores of thousands of families, hundreds of thousands of families, hundreds of thousands of families, hundreds of thousands of families all affected by such a step. but also in the united states itself, that is what the mexican foreign minister pointed out during a press conference in washington, that in fa ct, conference in washington, that in fact, this would rise the prices of all others products brought into the
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united states from mexico, and in fa ct, united states from mexico, and in fact, it would be the american taxpayer who end up paying for the wall and not mexico. and is there quite widespread approval of mr pena nieta's decision to cancel the meeting next week tee yes and no. they certainly approve of cancelling the meeting, but there is not much approval of president pena nieta more generally here, or his handling of donald trump. people did want him to abandon the meeting. they felt that mexico was being almost humiliated by donald trump, so they wa nted humiliated by donald trump, so they wanted the meeting to be cancelled by and large, but i think they feel that mr pena nieta got himself into the situation in the first place by inviting donald trump down to mexico city while he was still a candidate, courting him, only to find that he went back to the united states and continued with this rhetoric that not only would there be a border wall, but that mexico would pay for
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it, so there is not much sympathy in mexico for mr pena nieta right now. although, as you say, people buy and large to want to see this meeting brought to an end. is there a feeling that the two men will venture we have to meet for some sort of discussions? right, i some sort of discussions? right, i think they can't put it off forever. there are so many important and pressing issues between the two neighbours at the moment, notjust the border wall, although that is the border wall, although that is the biggest and most obvious symbol of the conflict between them. but on cross—border immigration, on border trade, and the future of the nafta, the north american free trade agreement, the drugs war, security issues. of course, mexico wants to make it clear that it has a problem with the united states too, the guns and the money that fund the drug war here come from the united states, and it wants the united states to do more to stop the flow of those from north to south. so this is a two—way
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street, and i think the diplomats here on either side probably need to get to a point so that the two presidents can finally sit down and meet. it does not like it will happen next week. thank you very much, will grant in mexico city. more now on plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in worcestershire have been described as "alarming" by the royal college of surgeons. three commissioning groups in the county want to cut down the amount of procedures. but they insist they will continue to carry out more operations than many other parts of the country. with me is liam o'toole, ceo of arthritis research uk. thank you very much forjoining us today. i'm sure you appreciate the financial pressures that commissioning groups are under, of course. do you think that when it comes to hip and knee surgery, these area comes to hip and knee surgery, these are a relatively easy target when it comes to cost cutting? well, we are concerned about this,
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and we are concerned in general that society and the nhs doesn't really the stand the enormous impact of conditions like osteoarthritis, and so, ithink conditions like osteoarthritis, and so, i think the important thing is to put the person at the centre of this. the people we are talking to in this situation have been in pain and suffering for a long time, not just a couple of weeks, notjust and suffering for a long time, not just a couple of weeks, not just a couple of months, but for many yea rs. couple of months, but for many years. and the impact of that on every aspect of their life is enormous. and what we are hearing from the perspective of the need to save money is that sometimes in the case of people having hip and knee surgery, of people having hip and knee surgery, there is more that those individuals can do to either prepare themselves for surgery or potentially avoid it altogether. is that a fair point? i think we recognise the nhs is under pressure and that ccgs have
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got difficult decisions to me, but i think the key thing here is that this has 2p a clinical decision made ina this has 2p a clinical decision made in a conversation between a surgeon and the patient about what they can do to prepare and when the time is right for the operation, not a decision made by the clinical commissioning group itself. the people that you represent, the members of arthritis research uk, do they fear that this will become a postcode lottery, almost? yes, and! postcode lottery, almost? yes, and i think we need to keep a close eye on this, because the population is ageing, there are more and more people with osteoarthritis, so there will be more and more people in this situation. and we have to make sure that the decisions being made are right for the person at the time. do you see the need to get the balance between the clinical needs
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of patients, then, and the financial pressures of the nhs? once again, it comes back to the conversation with a surgeon and the patient about what they can do to prepare and what the right time yes. —— right time is. thank you very much, liam o'toole. hundreds of millions of pounds promise to schools in england have been taken back by the treasury. the money had been announced as part ofa the money had been announced as part of a plan to turn all schools are academies, but when the department for education ditched its plan to do this, the treasury to back most of the funding. here is our education correspondent. headteachers in west sussex and other parts of the country have been warning that schools are running out of cash. only last year, the government announced an extra £500 million for schools as part of their plan to turn every school into an academy. school leavers have been asking, what ever happened to that money? but it has now emerged that when the academy plan was abandoned,
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most of that money, £384 million, was in fact taken back by the treasury. the education department said this was the right thing to do, and the schools are receiving record levels of funding. but headteachers are furious that so much money can appearand are furious that so much money can appear and then disappear when schools are struggling to make ends meet. to talk about this is kevin cooney, general secretary of the national union of teachers, who joins us now. thank you for your time today. —— kevin courtney. £348 million originally intended for academy conversions, as we explained, and when that plan was ditched, this money was taken back. is there real anger that this money has now been taken away? absolutely. you just heard in that report, headteachers are furious. i am absolutely livid about this decision. it is absolutely inexplicable. context really matters. the national audit office
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says that schools are facing nearly 996 says that schools are facing nearly 9% extra cost by 2020. hardly any of thatis 9% extra cost by 2020. hardly any of that is inflation. almost all of it is decisions made by governments to increase costs and then not funding them in schools. that is £3 billion, and that means increased class sizes for our children, it means reduced numbers of subjects on offer, less individual attention, every parent should be furious as well as every headteacher, and i think every pa rent headteacher, and i think every parent should be e—mailing their mp today to complain about this. so you know the money is there, but you can't get your hands on it, basically? sorry, would you repeat that? yes, you are saying fundamentally, you know money is there, but you can't access it? well, this 384 million has gone directly back to the treasury, so it is about 10% of the total real terms cut that they are going to implement across the term of this government.
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it is absolutely disgraceful. they put this money aside to academise every school. they had to retreat on that. but it is still their policy direction. that is expensive. that money is there and should still be used to make a class sizes don't go up used to make a class sizes don't go up as much as we are predicting. but our prediction is that 98% of schools are facing real terms cut in funding, and that means higher class sizes for our children, less subject access for our children. i would urge people to look at our website, see the figure for their school, e—mail their see the figure for their school, e—mailtheirmp to see the figure for their school, e—mail their mp to complain about it. schools were of course told that that money was contingent on converting to academies. have you been told that the money will be used for something else still within the field of education? that is not my understanding. it has gone back to the treasury, and most of the cost pressures on schools, like i say, i due to government
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decisions. they have introduced national insurance contributions that governors must have. but they aren't putting any money in full schools to pay that. so the cuts that schools are facing directly come from government actually. at least three and nicky 4 million would have been a small contribution to offsetting that, but it is absolutely in its the kabul that the treasury has chosen to take at from our children's education. ie planning to make any direct representations to the education secretary to ask others moneyback? absolutely. we are approaching every mp about the school cuts situation in general, and we will be in communication with the secretary of state education about this money in particular. it is vital for our country. sometimes people say education is expensive, but i think ignorance is even more expensive than education. our country and our children need proper funding than education. our country and our children need properfunding in their education system. the
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government is trying to soft soap everybody, telling us that they are talking about a fair funding situation, but actually, 98% of schools will have less money in real terms by the end of this government than they do at the beginning. that isa than they do at the beginning. that is a huge cut across the country. pa rents is a huge cut across the country. parents should be angry about it. we are angry about the nhs cuts, and we should be, but the cuts to higher education also need to be considered by everybody looking at the future of our country. kevin courtney, from the national union of teachers, thank you very much. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: theresa may is in washington to meet president trump for talks on trade, foreign affairs and strengthening the ties between the uk and the us. the royal college of surgeons criticises plans by hospitals in england to restrict hip and knee replacement operations to save money. head teachers are angry after hundreds of millions of pounds of funding promised to schools last year is taken back by the government. in a moment... anglican bishops have announced that their teaching on marriage
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as "the lifelong union of one man and one woman" will remain unchanged. but in future, all church of england clergy — both straight and gay — will be asked about their sexual conduct beforejoining the priesthood. previously only gay ordinands were questioned about whether they remained celibate, in line with church teaching. earlier i asked our religious affairs correspondent, martin bashir, about the announcement. after a three—year process of what the church of england has called a shared conversation, including clergy, members of the laity and the house of bishops, the house of bishops have produced a report today which fundamentally confirms the status quo. nothing is changing. that means that marriage will still be regarded in the church of england as between a man and a woman, and that those ordinands who may express
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same—sex attraction will be expected to maintain celibacy throughout their service. so there is no change to doctrine whatsoever, and as you can imagine, many members of the lesbian and gay community are extremely angry. they feel that they have entered into a conversation on intimate matters with enormous courage and sensitivity, and at the end of that process, they have received a report today which actually hasn't changed a thing. and what does this mean for any future conversations? as you pointed out, this particular discussion has been going on for some three years. the subject surely is in close, especially for gay and lesbian members of the church? —— the subject surely hasn't closed? know, and the bishop who spoke at a press co nfe re nce know, and the bishop who spoke at a press conference today explained it is not nearly the end of the row, the matter is nowhere near as, and
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in fact, the house of bishops are considering working on two new documents, one concerning issues of sexuality, and another on the subject generally of marriage. both of these doctrines have been described in previous publications by the house of bishops, back in 1991 and 1999, so they are going to embark upona 1991 and 1999, so they are going to embark upon a process of reworking these doctrines in the formal sense ofa these doctrines in the formal sense of a publication. but in terms of practice, nothing is going to change. the other thing they did say today, however, was that instead of focusing purely on the sexual activities or whatever of gay clergy, they want to ensure that people who are heterosexual are also following the guidelines of the church, and what does that mean? that means that marriage is between a man and a woman and it is monogamous and lifelong. so they are going to begin to ask questions of heterosexual individuals as well as homosexual.
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just a final point, martin. do gay clergy here feel that in any way the decision that has been arrived at, the status quo, as you say, is to somehow calm concerns from the anglican church worldwide? no, ithink anglican church worldwide? no, i think this has very much come from the house of bishops. we asked whether this was a unanimous report today, and we were told that it has the buying of all dioceses is an bishops in this country. so this is a document which has been produced within the church of england, based on conversations between members of the church of england, and israel at all reference, we and the fact obviously that if the doctrine change in relation to marriage, that would lead to some kind of separation or potential split with the anglican communion worldwide. now, it is not everyday that arrive tropical turtle washes up on a beach
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in wales, but that is exactly what happened in november when an olive ridley turtle named mea turned up in anglesey. the chris —— the species is critically endangered, and it was thought to be the first time one had appeared on british shores. now it is being cared for at anglesey sea zoo. an early morning start, and another step on a journey that could eventually lead to this tropical sea turtle being released back into the wild. she was driven all the way from anglesey, where she was found last november, to hertfordshire. six hours later, and the team at the royal that generic college were preparing their unique patient. they have never seen preparing their unique patient. they have never seen an preparing their unique patient. they have never seen an olive ridley here before. menai is the first to be spotted in british waters since records began almost 270 years ago. getting a sea turtle into the scanning machine is no easy task, but experts need to check her lungs we re but experts need to check her lungs were damaged. we can see her shell
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all around, were damaged. we can see her shell allaround, and we were damaged. we can see her shell all around, and we can see her lungs, and we can see also that there is some gas, which is black, and that is outside her lungs, so it is free gas, and that is potentially responsible for the buoyancy problem. wing staff caring for her anglesey had noticed that menai was unable to keep the lower the water. she be struggling to dive, but the tea m she be struggling to dive, but the team are delighted by her appetite, which is helping to regain weight. she is a real character. we have got nowhere. she has started to eat really, really well now. she's demolishing a couple of kilos of calamari a day, and she is a real personality. she likes to see us, she seems to recognise people and knows what is going on. olive ridleys can travel vast distances, but it is thought that this one was carried by currents and thousands of miles off—course. menai the turtle has been through a lot, and now it is time for us and tlc. gel is being
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applied to stop her skin from drying, and she's being kept warm ready for her journey drying, and she's being kept warm ready for herjourney back drying, and she's being kept warm ready for her journey back to anglesey while experts decide their future. a couple of kilos of calamari! nice alliteration, and menai may thinks it is tasty as well. in a moment, the news that one, but first, the weather. for some of us, still a pretty cold day, with some frost around, but there is sunshine around as well. not all bad, nice picture there from suffolk. a change in the way in the coming days. we have been shivering for days now in this cold weather, but that will be out of the picture, out of the way, and milder atlantic airwill out of the way, and milder atlantic air will start to set in. we will have to pay for that, because there will be a lot of bad out there in the atlantic heading our way, bringing some rain too. so vigilant and milder winds will win and that cold air will be pushed towards the east. so this is the transition day.
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milder already coming into western parts of the uk. a little at a light rain, still the goal their sitting across eastern areas. through the evening and night, that weather front pushes to the uk, and there is the risk of some snow across the pennines, parts of scotland, and maybe a bit of iciness around first thing across scotland, but the general theme is for things to become less cold. it will be a gradual process. through saturday, many eastern areas of the uk still stuck underneath that transition between the milder and the colder air. so fresh conditions with some sunshine and showers across western areas on saturday, whereas the east is shrouded with cloud. it still feels pretty cold, but not as cold as it has been. we are talking about temperatures of 5—6d rather than freezing like we have had in the daytime recently. this is lunchtime.
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through the course of the day, a little too late for eastern areas, but eventually, the dry, clearer weather will come through. by saturday night, we are in that clearer air with sunshine and showers. come sunday, another weather front coming through, this time from more southern areas. look how far north that rain is going to get. it is open to question, trying to figure that out. temperatures of 10 degrees, so the thinking is it will stop somewhere across the central uk. monday into tuesday, more weather fronts lining up central uk. monday into tuesday, more weatherfronts lining up in central uk. monday into tuesday, more weather fronts lining up in the atlantic, trying to push that milder air in ourdirection, atlantic, trying to push that milder air in our direction, and the milder air in our direction, and the milder airwins. air in our direction, and the milder air wins. look at these figures, double figures across most of the uk on monday and tuesday. theresa may is to become the first foreign leader to meet donald trump in the white house this afternoon. hoping to wade to a trade deal after x brexit. but will, in mrs may's words, "opposites attract" after president trump's controversial support for waterboarding? we'll be live in washington
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and in westminster, asking what each side hopes to achieve in this crucial first meeting. also this lunchtime: plans to ration knee and hip surgery in worcestershire to save money to save money are described as ‘alarming' by surgeons. tesco's share price has risen sharply after the supermarket chain said it was buying the food wholesaler, booker. six years injailfor the six years in jail for the former judge and his assistant who defrauded their own law firm art out of hundreds of thousands of pounds. and could rafa nadal be the latest comeback kid — as he fights for a place in the men's grand slam
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