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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 27, 2017 1:30pm-2:01pm GMT

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marathon match into a decider. earlier in melbourne there had been some british success in the wheelchair doubles. he has won all four grand slams titles. after four hours of enthralling drama, a place in the final is still there is for the taking. let's ta ke let's take a look at the weather. it's been freezing for the last few days. we've had fog, cloud, temperatures around freezing even at midday. but things are about to change. it is not cold and grey everywhere. we have some sunshine around but that is going to be replaced by thick clouds coming off the ocean in next days. and that means the temperatures will rise and even this evening the temperatures
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would be quite as low as what they have been in the last day or so. the clouds out in the atlantic are ready and waiting to come our way and with this we have much milder conditions. much milder compared to what we have had, it still won't be desperately warm. as faras had, it still won't be desperately warm. as far as this afternoon is concerned, that temperatures are still in single figures. still pretty nippy across northern and central areas. some freezing fog. through this evening and overnight that process begins where we introduce that less cold air coming in of the ocean, a frost free night across many southern in of the ocean, a frost free night across many southern areas. in of the ocean, a frost free night across many southern areas. in the north just about cold enough with rain, sleet and snow mixing in. heading into saturday morning we start to see the atlantic weather winning, pushing in the oceanic air and those temperatures will not feel anywhere near as dry and bitter as
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it has done in the last few days. this is the scene around mid midday. eastern areas still pretty cloudy. transitioning into milder air. western areas or oral ready in the sunshine. but also some showers coming in. not a desperately mild stay tomorrow but better if you don't like the cold. on saturday that continues in the evening. but we will have to pay for it. we don't get the milder airfor nothing. it means weather fronts coming in, temperatures getting up to double figures in the south. as we go through monday and into next week that atlantic air is winning and it is all about double figures. that is what many of us care about is it
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will feel much less cold. and reminder of our main story. theresa may is preparing to meet donald trump, the first world leader to meet the new president. hello, i'm will perry with the latest from the sports centre. rafael nadal and recording the trough have been" for nearly five hours in their australian open semifinal. it has been an incredibly tight match, two sets going to tie—breaks. twice, nadal went ahead, and twice, dimitrov level. it is into a deciding set as we speak, going to four games all, nadal looking to reach his first grand slam final since the french open in
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2014, while dimitrov has never made a grand slam final. highlights of this night on bbc two at 5pm this evening. the winner will take on roger federer in sunday's men's finals. also in melbourne today, britain's gordon reid completed a career grand slam. he and his partner when the wheelchair doubles title, giving him the full set. sam billings replaces hails for the final odi sam billings replaces hails for the finalodi in india, sam billings replaces hails for the final odi in india, and of course, for the first t20 match as well. i have discovered to keep working ha rd i have discovered to keep working hard in all aspects of my game, and the results will come. it is not through lack of trying a lack of ha rd through lack of trying a lack of hard work, really, so it is about being able to adapt from one to seven and offering as much as i can to the side. that's what i will hopefully continue to do. sunderland defender patrick van
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ardan holders having a medical at crystal palace after the two clubs agreed a deal which could be as much as £14 million. the move would reunite him with sam allardyce. he says the player was a major saviour for them last season. palace are just ahead of sunderland, who at the bottom of the premier league. another sunderland defender has been banned forfour another sunderland defender has been banned for four matches after being found guilty. video evidence got him striking out at west brom's skipper darren fletcher on saturday. that's all the book now. back to you. you're watching bbc news. we live in the arlington national cemetery, where theresa may is laying a wreath at the site of the tomb of the unknown soldier. . let'sjoin that aside for a moment. order! right shoulder! so, a solemn start to what is a very
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busy day in theresa may's schedule, visiting the arlington national cemetery, the last resting place of a number of uk troops who lost their lives fighting alongside american forces. we can now speak to our correspondent who is at the white house. all the attention will be there later, barbara, for a hugely important day for theresa may and donald trump? yes, that is right. i asked his spokeswoman about an hour ago how important this is to mr trump, how important this is to mr trump, how important the special relationship is to america, and she insisted it was as important to the united states as it is to britain. she said he would be telling that to mrs may and assuring hair that that would continue under his presidency, but frankly, i think that is kind of obvious that britain really needs this relationship more than america does at this point, especially as it is negotiating its exit from it
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other main strategic relationship with the european union. that is something mrs may will be pursuing today, trying to get the closest possible ties with the united states. for mr trump, it possible ties with the united states. for mrtrump, it is possible ties with the united states. for mr trump, it is his first foreign visit, the first foreign leader to visit him in the white house, and we're going to have to wait and see how he handles that from the podium when they have their news c0 nfe re nce from the podium when they have their news conference later. he had a spat with the mexican leaderjust a day or $0 with the mexican leaderjust a day or so ago over the wall that he wa nts to or so ago over the wall that he wants to build on the southern border, and that president has cancelled his visit. so we will see how mrtrump cancelled his visit. so we will see how mr trump navigates his first news co nfe re nce how mr trump navigates his first news conference with the foreign leader. musi:the last post.. bugle
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order! right shoulder! so, as theresa may lays a wreath in honour of the british troops who fell alongside their american counterparts, this relationship, barbara, the special ladyship, as
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theresa may described it again last night, i'm wondering how that speech went down? she had private talks with paul ryan and mitch mcconnell. what has been made of that?” with paul ryan and mitch mcconnell. what has been made of that? i think she was quite well received by the republicans. as you remember, she appealed to the common principles of the conservative party here and the conservative party in britain, and she got quite a good reception as she got quite a good reception as she stressed those kinds of things. i think she was also seen as having handled quite well that balance between mr trump's sort of protectionist, isolationist stance and her view that international as is important. so on the one hand, she said she agreed that global institutions needed to be reformed, that people needed to pay their bills, at nato, for example, but on the other hand, she stressed the importance of america and britain together shouldering global responsibilities, otherwise the west
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will be marginalised. and i think that new ones went down fairly well with the republican congress people there. and it is important to britain to establish that relationship with congress, because, although the relationship between the leaders is key, i think especially british government and diplomats are hoping that the relationship that they have known it will continue fairly smoothly at the congressional level, at the level of cabinet ministers and departments here, which they do have close working relationships with, because mrtrump is working relationships with, because mr trump is really an unknown and has been known to be quite unpredictable and erratic. although he has been effusive about mrs napac macro visit, i'm not entirely clear how he will proceed in emphasising the importance of that relationship in the way britain would like it to be. so i think it was quite important, this message she had to the republicans, and the meetings with the congressional leaders. you andi with the congressional leaders. you and i both know that the obsession
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as those to meet later will be on the body language, what is and isn't said, and on the plane over, theresa may yesterday said, you never know, opposites attract. interesting, given that there are two more different people who are meeting today. and if you think about previous american and british leaders, not all of them have been completely on the same page. but it is hard to give any other two that are more different. on the one hand, you have donald trump, this sort of brash, bombastic york billionaire, unpredictable, he tweets out every morning what he feels need to be said and is quite happy to shake things up as much as possible. and mrs may, she is conservative, reserved, the daughter of a small—town vicar, she is prudent, she is cautious, she is very well briefed. she is very careful and nuanced, so yes, personally, they are very nuanced, so yes, personally, they are very different. i think she will
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be stressing the commonalities between whatever, now these exist between whatever, now these exist between the american and british positions, during the press conference, but almost certainly, journalists will ask air about where they differ, and particularly, the latest comments of mr trump in which he said that torture works, which is that quite a lot of backlash in england, as you know. she has said she is going to be quite clear that britain is against torture, and i suspect she will be given an opportunity to say that at the news conference. barbara, we will all be watching, and they will talk you again later. for now, thank you very much. three gps who gave up running a surgery in a small village say they're now having to sell their equipment in order to avoid going into personal debt. the studley health centre in warwickshire shut permanently on the 31st of december because the partners that ran it claim they were no longer able to make a living. now the doctors are trying to raise around £40,000 to cover the costs of closing. we only get a certain amount of
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money per patient per year. and is that £80? about 80 or £85. and that doesn't take into account how many appointments we have available. so ifa appointments we have available. so if a patient comes in once, we get the same money if we see them ten times. and there have been some contractual changes which have meant that the amount we will get paid is decreasing every day for the next five years. there is also an increasing demand, and more nonclinical work that we have to comply with. so, just to cut through, then commenters of whether a practice is viable or not, if you have 2000 patients and you are getting £80 per patient, but each patient comes once a year or whatever, that is fine, but if you maybe have an ageing group in those 2000, they come lots of times year and that is where it becomes an issue? yes, and also the fact that our
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costs were going up, wages were going up, and our income was going down. the pressures werejust going up, and our income was going down. the pressures were just so that we were spending more and more hours spending patients, 12 hour days. and it isjust hours spending patients, 12 hour days. and it is just exhausting, because you don't get on top of your workload. the result was more work running in. so you thought a merger might work? you are not the only practice in that area. it is a community of 6000 people. why did that not work you macro we explored a merger, and we worked really ha rd macro we explored a merger, and we worked really hard to see that would bea worked really hard to see that would be a possibility. but we were told that that would not be an option for us. i'm still... i haven't been given an official reason as to why it wasn't, and i'm still trying to find out. you are from the pm a's gp committee. the department of health
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has said that it has a list in the case of gp practices open, close and merger with time, but what is important is that patients continue to get access to the services they needin to get access to the services they need in different parts of the country. in the end, if a practice is unviable, this is the only sort of outcome, isn't it? well, that's a very short—sighted comment from the department of health. the reason is that over the la st two health. the reason is that over the last two years, we have up and down the country's workload has been increasing significantly, partly due to the fact that the nhs in a way has been a victim of its own success, because has been a victim of its own success, because people now live a lot longer with more health conditions, meaning they need a lot more care in the community. unfortunately, funding hasn't kept pace with that, and we have want the government that it does not keep pace to provide the level of service of the patient's' need, gps will leave. a number has dropped by 2500 since 2009, including some from my
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own practice have moved to canada. we're now at a point in surgeries where workload has increased so much funding simply isn't enough to keep up funding simply isn't enough to keep up to speed. and now, some tennis news. in the last few moments, we know who will meet roger federer in the final of the australian open, and it is rafael nadal. he hasjust the australian open, and it is rafael nadal. he has just won a five set thriller against grigor dimitrov, and i will give you the score. it was 6—3, six sevenths, 5-6, 6-7, 6-4. nahda score. it was 6—3, six sevenths, 5—6, 6—7, 6—4. nahda will now play roger federer in sunday's final, his first majorfinal since roger federer in sunday's final, his first major final since 2014. that game ended a moment ago after four hours and 56 minutes. the latest there from the australian open. in a minute, the summary of the business news. now, the headlines. to reza mayers in washington to meet president trump for talks on trade
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and strengthening the ties between the uk and us. —— theresa may. the royal college of surgeons criticises plans by doctors in the uk to reduce hip and knee operations to save money. hundreds millions of pounds of funding is taken back by the treasury. and ina the treasury. and in a minute, the turtle washed up and in a minute, the turtle washed up on and in a minute, the turtle washed upona and in a minute, the turtle washed up on a beach in wales. in the business news... tesco, the uk's biggest supermarket has negotiated a £3.7 billion pound deal to buy booker group, the uk‘s biggest food wholesaler. the uk's biggest food wholesaler. they supply everything from baked beans to teabags to 700,000 convenience stores, grocers, pubs and restaurants throughout the uk. more on this injust a moment. german prosecutors have said they believe the former volkswagen chief executive, martin winterkorn, knew of emissions cheating software earlier than he claims. prosecutors near vw‘s wolfsburg base said 28 homes and offices were also searched this week in connection with an investigation
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into the carmakers. quarterly profits at bt have dived 37% after the firm reported an accounting scandal in its italian division that cost it more than £500m. it has now confirmed that their, head of continental europe, it has now confirmed that their head of continental europe will step down over the affair. now, more on that tesco deal. the supermarket is buying grocery supplier booker in a deal worth £3.7bn. it caught everyone by surprise this morning, including retail analyst bruno monteyne, who used to work for tesco. he told us why it was such a big deal. for sure, it is a surprise. nobody saw this coming. consolidation in the uk market is something that many people have talked about. it is normally very hard to do. i combining a wholesaler like booker winner retailer like tesco, it is an unexpected and bury efficient way of making uk food retailing very
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efficient. what's in it for tesco is that booker is very big in the convenience, on the go food market stop rocket is good and fast growing, as well as relatively small in the overall market for food. so it will make booker a much more efficient, fast—growing and better for consumers ultimately. it changes the uk landscape to a material degree, so competition authorities will look at it, but given that you are will look at it, but given that you a re really will look at it, but given that you are really combining a retailer with are really combining a retailer with a wholesaler, i can see how many objections there will be. there might bea objections there will be. there might be a few stores, but it is like saying unilever supplies every supermarket in the uk. should we break of unilever? no, it is cynthia supplier to the uk. —— simply a supplier to the uk. —— simply a supplier to the uk. in other business news... toshiba has said it will split off its part of the business that makes memory chips for smartphones and computers. its going to sell a stake in that part of the business. its in desperate need of a cash injection after revealing a heavy
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one—off loss at its us nuclear power business. some analysts are estimating it could be around £5bn. jim farley, the boss of ford europe, has warned the fall in the value of the pound since the brexit vote would be a significant challenge for the carmaker this year. he told the bbc that the drop could cost the firm as much as £480m. the pound has fallen about 16% against the dollar since the referendum injune. ant financial, the digital payments arm of e—commerce giant alibaba, is buying us—based moneygram for £700m. moneygram has about 350,000 outlets in nearly 200 countries. ant financial has more than 630 million users. the takeover by the chinese group will need regulatory approval from the us committee on foreign investment. and a quick look at the markets before we go. those tesco shares are up about 9% on news of that deal, and they also announced they would restore dividend, which has boosted the share price even further. that is it for business but this hour. plenty
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more to come through this afternoon. thank you. let's get more now on plans to restrict some hip and knee operations in worcestershire. they have been described as alarming. three counties want to cut down the number of procedures, but they insist they will continue to carry out more operations than other parts of the country. earlier, we heard from liam o'toole, ceo of arthritis research uk, who told is the impact on patients would be significant. we are concerned about this, we are concerned in general that society and the nhs doesn't really understand the enormous impact of conditions like osteoarthritis, and so, ithink conditions like osteoarthritis, and so, i think the important thing here to put the person at the centre of this, the people we are talking to an this situation have been in pain and suffering for a long time, not just a couple of weeks or a couple of months, but for many years. the impact on every aspect of their life
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is enormous. it's not every day that a rare tropical turtle washes up on a beach in wales. but that's exactly what happened in november when an olive ridley turtle, named menai, turned up in anglesey. the species is critically endangered and experts say it's the first time one has been seen on uk shores. now it's being cared for at anglesey sea zoo, as sian lloyd reports. an early morning start, and another step on a journey that could eventually lead to this tropical sea turtle being released back into the wild. she was driven all the way from anglesey, where she was found last november, to hertfordshire. six hours later, and the team at the royal veterinary college were preparing their unique patient. they have never seen an olive ridley here before. menai is the first to be spotted in british waters since records began almost 270 years ago. getting a sea turtle into the scanning machine is no easy task, but experts need to check her lungs were damaged. her lungs for damage.
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we can see her shell all around, and we can see her lungs, and we can see also that there is some gas, which is black, and that is outside her lungs, so it and is free gas, and that is potentially responsible for the buoyancy problem. staff caring for her anglesey had noticed that menai was unable to keep the lower the water. she be struggling to dive, but the team are delighted by her appetite, which is helping to regain weight. she is a real character. we have got to know her. she has started to eat really, really well now. she's demolishing a couple of kilos of calamari a day, and she is a real personality. she likes to see us, she seems to recognise people and knows what is going on. olive ridleys can travel vast distances, but it is thought that this one was carried by currents and thousands of miles off—course.
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menai the turtle has been through a lot, and now it is time for some tlc. gel is being applied to stop her skin from drying, and she's being kept warm ready for herjourney back to anglesey while experts decide her future. on, but now, let's catch up on the weather forecast. you have clouds on your tie! sorry? clouds! 0h, sorry? clouds! oh, yes! they are very nice, and they? cumulus clouds, in fact. oh, yes! they are very nice, and they? cumulus clouds, infact. i will show you later. pretty chilly in some areas, but we are infora pretty chilly in some areas, but we are in for a change. blue skies we have right now i'm part of the country will be replaced by cloud, and much milder air coming country will be replaced by cloud, and much milderair coming in off the ocean. it is pretty evident from the ocean. it is pretty evident from the satellite picture. you can see that streaming in here. sort of stuck by the time they get to the
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uk, but eventually, all of this is going to win, so the milder air here out in the ocean will eventually move in our direction and will wash away those shivering troubles a bit further towards the east. it will not warm up quickly, it will take time. it will be a process. if anything, it will still be cold across northern areas, and even the chance of a bit of sleep or snow. with this slightly less cold air, where the front comes, and that brings outbreaks of rain. you can see that across the country during the night. so saturday morning for the night. so saturday morning for the early birds will be pretty grey and rainy and some areas. but eventually, the sunshine should break through the clouds across some of these western areas here. so, talking about 7 degrees around lunchtime in cardiff, but the weather is still marching through across eastern areas. we will be stuck underneath the car, and here,
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i think these northern areas will still remain pretty raw, so four degrees in newcastle, thick cloud, a bit of drizzle and a breeze, still pretty chilly for that part of the world. eventually, the weatherfront pushes through, and this is the boundary between the cold air here and the less cold air coming in will stop but then, it is night—time, saturday night, and temperatures will drop away anyway. in the north at least, sunday morning, a bit of a frosty, chilly start, but then another front comes out of the south—west, bringing milderair. double figures, but rain as well, so not especially exciting, particularly across the south sunday. you will need your brollies. monday into tuesday, it looks as though those weather fronts will keep on coming in and that basically means a lots of cloud, some outbreaks of rain, and those double—figure temperatures. that is it for me. this is bbc news. the headlines at 2pm: theresa may is to become the first foreign leader to meet donald trump, hoping to open the way to a trade
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deal after brexit. ahead of their meeting, theresa may laid a wreath at the tomb of the unknown soldier at arlington cemetery, virginia. i'm at the white house were donald trump will be hosting to may and doing a press conference with her. tesco's share price rises sharply after the supermarket chain says it is buying the food wholesaler, booker. in the next hour, plans to ration hip surgery in worcestershire. surgeons express alarm at the money saving plans. church of england bishops say its teaching on marriage shouldn't change, and that gay clergy should remain celibate.
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