Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  January 27, 2017 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

5:00 pm
today at 5.00pm: in the last few minutes, theresa may has arrived at the white house to meet president trump. she the first foreign leader leader to meet the new president. they will discuss trade deals and renewing the special relationship. ahead of her oval office meeting, mrs may laid a wreath at the arlington national cemetery war memorial. this is the scene live at the white house, at the white house. the other main stories on bbc news at 5.00pm: two men jailed for a total of 12 years for manslaughter after a tipper—truck killed four people, including a four—year—old girl. tesco‘s share price rises sharply after the supermarket chain says it is buying the food wholesaler booker, including its chains of convenience stores. it will be a vintage affair in melbourne — rafa nadal will face federer in the australian open final. it's 5.00pm.
5:01 pm
our main story: in the past few minutes, theresa may has arrived at the white house to hold talks with donald trump. she is the first foreign leader to visit since mr trump became president. here are the pictures of the prime minister meeting mr trump. here are the pictures of the prime minister meeting mr trump. global security and a trade deal after brexit are high on the agenda. the prime minister will be holding a joint press conference with the us president in around an hour's time, at 6.00pm this evening. in a speech to us republicans yesterday, mrs may said the uk and united states could not return to "failed" military interventions to try to "remake the world." her visit comes amid the continuing controversy over president trump's support for waterboarding terror suspects and his war of words with mexico over the building of a border wall. here's our correspondent
5:02 pm
richard lister. the prime minister began her day in the chill winter sunshine of arlington national cemetery. on the quayside in liverpool, correspond with the united states and construction equipment, too. president trump has promised a building boom and britain wants a pa rt building boom and britain wants a part of that. if we can get a slice of that, we can give him the contribution he is looking at. the uk exports goods to america worth £45 billion, that is a fifth of uk global exports, and britain was maxell elsmore goodson buys, with imports totalling £35 billion. we
5:03 pm
export more to the us than any other country, but the america's fifth biggest market, we need them more than they need us. in his first because president, donald trump said repeatedly that the strategy will be to buy american, higher american. although he wants bilateral trade deals, they come with conditions attached. we want to deal with the ones that treat us well and that they don't treat us well we will give them a 30 day notice of termination. until britain gets out of the eu, only brussels can make uk trade deals. britain's chancellor is there today and he accepts that london's hands are currently tied. we will continue to abide by the rules and regulations and laws of the european union for as long as we are members. of course we want to strengthen our trade ties with the many trade partners we have around the world, but we are mindful of our
5:04 pm
obligations under the treaty and we will follow them precisely. for now, the key players in europe are wary of what mr trump is to offer. translation: let's speak frankly, there are challenges that the us administration poses to our trade laws. of course we have to talk to donald trump, but we also have to promote our interests and values as europeans. back in liverpool, this golden eagle marked the us consulate, established here in 1790, a reminder of long—standing anglo—american trade ties. today it isa anglo—american trade ties. today it is a french restaurant, that is a reminder that the relationship can't be taken for granted. the special relationship was only really important from the british point of view. we are going to prioritise american workers, american jobs, view. we are going to prioritise american workers, americanjobs, to the exclusion of other trading partners, that is what the americans
5:05 pm
seem to want. we can speak to our political correspondent tom bateman. we correspondent tom bateman. have not left the eur yet. we have not left the european union yet. while we go through that pi’ocess yet. while we go through that process of the negotiations to leave the european union, there can be no formal trade talks with other countries. this comes under that banner. we have an issue whereby these cannot be described in any way as formal talks. downing street is trying to say about this is that there are couple of key objectives. the first is to establish a close working relationship with new administration in the united states. that will be one of the key points here. theresa may said on the aeroplane on the way out that opposites attract when it comes to
5:06 pm
the rather different personalities, there are different styles of approach to things. determining that relationship, getting things off to a good start will be crucial. the second point here is to sketch out, borisjohnson second point here is to sketch out, boris johnson voted second point here is to sketch out, borisjohnson voted in terms another trip, ofa borisjohnson voted in terms another trip, of a pencil borisjohnson voted in terms another trip, ofa pencil on borisjohnson voted in terms another trip, of a pencil on the back of an envelope perhaps, what any trade deal might look like in its broad outline. expect that that will be one of the priorities for theresa may here. she has a fine line to walk. on one hand she once in early trade deal, good trade agreement with the us to show that britain is ( business outside of the european union. other hand, we have a president in his inaugural address give the tone of protectionism and has spoken of america first. i will that work with the trade deal with britain's? we have heard opposition party saying that we don't want beef
5:07 pm
injected with hormones coming over from america. all of these issues will have to be mapped out over yea rs will have to be mapped out over years to come. tom, thank you. tom, thank you. we are expecting the president and the prime minister to walk together at some point between the colonnades of the white house. we will give you those pictures live if we get them. we will give you those pictures live if we get them. with me now is anthony gardner, former us ambassador to the eu. good to see you. can we talk about trade? the same question. realistically, we have a president who has signed a lot of executive orders, he can't make laws. you have a prime minister who can negotiate. so how important is this meeting?” hope the meeting is successful, but let's be clear headed about what can be achieved. nothing can stop an eu member of having discussions that aren't legally binding commitments.
5:08 pm
those discussions are speculative at this point because before we can advance those discussions we need to know what the uk's and relationship will be with the european union and that will take many years. how important in all this is personal chemistry? i know both american and british diplomats have said to me that the prime minister and the president are fated to get on because that is good for business for everybody. it has always been important, but there are legal issues involved. the uk, while it is a member of the european union, has to follow the treaties that they are signed up to. there is very little that the uk can do in terms of negotiating a free trade agreement, it can only start wanted is exited. chemistry is important but there are legal issues involved. from the american side, how important is the
5:09 pm
president in all this, as opposed to congress? obviously, you can tell people what he would like, he is coming in with a fair wind in his sails, but congress will decide this, would they? yes, and the trade promotion authority, as well, which has a mandate given by congress to the president to do a free trade agreement. this will not be quick or easy because tariffs are known across the atlantic. they are an average 3%. the real issues here are standards and regulations behind the border issues. i was involved in the transatlantic trade and investment partnership negotiations. it was not just a case of the german took the austrians being concerned about this. there was a lot of concern in the uk and those concerned to haven't gone away. one other point about that. the so—called nontariff barriers, so we can put a tax on things but we say we don't want your chicken because it has something in it, or you say the blades for your
5:10 pm
long—lost art too long or too short. that is a sticking point which might sound ridiculous to many people but is very important in many areas of the united states because members of congress could say, that is why my voters work. it is about those issues, the regulations and standards. we could get rid of those by having a mutual recognition agreement that those are very few and very difficult to do. firstly, they were controversial in this country and in the united states we have regulatory agencies which respond to congress, are financed by congress to protect consumers‘s rights and so forth. they have to base their decisions on evidence and facts, not as political convenience. john mccain, the republican senator, is saying that he will pursue
5:11 pm
legislation to put sanctions on russia if the trump administration does not. it goes to show that the president might be the most powerful man in the world, but he is not a dictator. absolutely, congress will play an important role. we need to be clear—headed about the differences that exist between these two lea d e rs differences that exist between these two leaders on many issues. you mentioned sanctions on russian, around, human rights. but also the european union. the prime minister was very articulate to say it was important that the european stayed as an effective force. at best, the president is indifferent of the european union, or he might think that further brexit type leavings of the eu to be a good thing. how long do you think this could take? the average time needed for the united states to reach a free—trade agreement has been 18 months. four
5:12 pm
months forjordan was the quickest. the economy of jordan months forjordan was the quickest. the economy ofjordan is not as complex as the uk economy. 18 months, perhaps, that was the case for australia and south korea. that will only start once the uk has exited the eu. then there is the implementation period, which tends to be several years. this is a long process. it would be simple or easy. so, that is over four years. we will see. anthony, thank you. let's go over to washington. barbara, could you talk us through some of the objectives of the white housein some of the objectives of the white house in this meeting. what does mr trump want out of this? the spokeswoman told me this morning that he believes this national relationship was as important to america as it was to britain, which
5:13 pm
i think is the kind of thing that the white house would say on a day like this. i think the idea would be to assure theresa may that this relationship is seen as a priority and have two old allies meeting each other personally in the first days of his presidency. his administration will be looking at this from the point of view of foreign visit. this is the first foreign leader visit. people want to be appearing presidential and statesman—like. people want things to go off without a hitch. he has had a turbulent week when he had a public spat with the mexican president who cancelled his trip here. the message they're hoping to get out today is that he will be dealing with this foreign visit in a very statesman—like way. he greeted her at the door of the west wing, which is unusual. often and intermediary will greet the leader and take them to the oval office. he
5:14 pm
was there to say hello to her and was there to say hello to her and was being very personally engaged in the meeting. he obviously has his own style, but we also know that he doesn't seem to take criticism particularly well. theresa may has suggested she is prepared to say things that may not go down particularly well. there are all kinds of things you could say. torture, we don't support it, could be one of them. yes, those she has shown she can say things about being terribly blunt about it. yesterday she was talking about agreeing with donald trump that nato members need to pay their dues, but at the same time she talked about the importance of america not talking it's back —— turning its back on the world. she will probably try to use that nuanced approach. it may go down better with donald trump and some other approaches. the issue of torture is one that you will have to deal with i suspect more in the news
5:15 pm
conference in private conversation. she said that she will be frank in private as a friend and she would step to britain's position. i expect that she is asked about that at the news c0 nfe re nce that she is asked about that at the news conference she will articulate what the british position is, that britain is not allowed to share intelligence and operations where information is collected through torture. that is one hurdle but you will have to cross and i think she will have to cross and i think she will need to be quite clear about it and she has indicated that she would be. while the chemistry between the two of them, or the lack of it, that will be the thing the people focus on. she seemed to go down really well with republicans, and as republicans run both houses of congress, that could be very important. very much so. i expect the british government will be
5:16 pm
looking at the second level of engagement, in congress. she did go over well at the meeting yesterday. she emphasised the similar ideology and belief between the conservative party in britain and the republican party here. also, i thinkjust dealings with the different departments, the secretary of defence is somebody who i think the british people have worked with before. is same as a steady hand. he called the defence secretary one of the first calls team—mate, as well as to near to say he was behind that alliance. i think there will probably a lot of meeting of minds with the foreign secretary as well. at these different levels, the british people, the british government are hoping that the
5:17 pm
relationship will continue relatively smoothly. very interesting, barbara. we will check—in the are. this is bbc news at 5.00pm. the headlines: theresa may has arrived at the white house to meet president trump. they will discuss trade deals and renewing the special and renewing the special relationship. two men have beenjailed for a total of 12 years for manslaughter after a tipper—truck killed four people, including a four—year—old girl. tesco's share price rises sharply after the supermarket chain says it's buying the food wholesaler booker, including its chains of convenience stores. one of tennis‘s greatest rivalries is back on when rafael nadal reached his first grand slam final in three yea rs. his first grand slam final in three years. he won an epic semifinal in melbourne today to face roger federerfor melbourne today to face roger federer for the title on sunday. david weir claims he was called a disgrace to his country by the british athletics wheelchair racing coach at the olympics after he failed to win a medal last summer.
5:18 pm
he confirmed that he will never race for his country again. manor formula 1 team has faltered after administrators did not manage to find a buyer. they have been administration since the first week of january. i will have more sport for you just after half past. the royal college of surgeons says plans to cut knee and hip replacement operations in worcestershire are "alarming". three commissioning groups in the county say very obese patients and those who are in moderate pain will not qualify for surgery. they say the plan will save £2 million a year and bring them into line with other parts of the country. here's our health correspondent robert pigott. at five feet ten inches and weighing a little over 18 stone, gordon wainwright of malvern in worcestershire can no longer expect swift access to the second hip replacement he needs. the pain from his osteoarthritis wakes him up at night and his mobility is badly compromised. but new restrictions on surgery mean he would have to lose 10% of his weight before he could qualify for surgery.
5:19 pm
it's a very sharp pain, very sharp pain. it's not an ache. it's very, very sharp. i turn over in bed, and it's like... i haven't really been fully fit in terms of being able to walk properly, or gojust for a walk, pre—2013. it would dramatically change my life. the first total hip replacement was carried out in an english hospital in 1962. more than 50 years on, this revolutionary procedure is being widely rationed. the clinical commissioning groups in wyre forest, redditch, bromsgrove and south worcestershire will exclude from hip and knee replacement patients who rank as morbidly obese or those whose pain is not sufficiently severe to interfere with their daily life. the royal college of surgeons says the restrictions are not clinically justified and will often be a false economy. the patient continues to be in pain, he needs painkillers and physiotherapy, he may be unable to work.
5:20 pm
and he will be in severe pain for a long period of time. and also by waiting the operation may indeed become more difficult when he eventually gets it. the clinical commissioning group said they were bringing worcestershire into line with what other ccgs do. they said if a patient feels they require this surgery but do not meet the criteria, there is a clear appeal system. several other commissioning groups in england, including in harrogate, the vale of york, shropshire and the south coast of kent are imposing similar restrictions on non—emergency surgery. demand for hip and knee replacements is growing with an ageing population but the money to pay for them is increasingly scarce. the boss of a haulage firm and a mechanic have been sent to prison for the manslaughter of four people who were killed when a tipper truck with faulty brakes went out of control. matthew gordon was jailed for seven and a half years and peter wood
5:21 pm
for five years and three months. three men and a four—year—old girl died in the incident thejudge said that the judge said that having looked at photographs of the parts of the bra kes photographs of the parts of the brakes on this lorry it should've been blatantly obvious that anyone who saw them that this truck should not have been on the road. he said this vehicle was in an appallingly bad faith and, as a result, it was inevitable that there would be some kind of accident. in the end that was a terrible accident, for lives we re was a terrible accident, for lives were lost and two men and i impress and —— in prison. were lost and two men and i impress and —— in prison. they all lost their lives in a matter of seconds. four—year—old mitzi steady, chauffeur steve vaughan and businessman philip allen and robert parker, killed by a 32—ton truck, its brakes had failed while coming down a steep hill into the city of bath. just before christmas, these men were found guilty on four counts of manslaughter. on the left, matthew gordon, who ran the grittenham haulage company.
5:22 pm
on the right, peter wood, a mechanic whose job was to check the lorry. pictures of the vehicle's brakes were shown in court. the jury was told they were badly worn, rusty, and in a poor state of repair. the trial heard the company was a shambles, failing to carry out proper safety checks. today, relatives of those who were killed have told the court how their lives have been affected. the mother of mitzi steady said herfamily is bereft and she finds it a struggle to go on without mitzi's laughter and singing filling their home. mitzi's grandmother, who was also hit by the truck, needed to have both her legs amputated. she described the physical and emotional pain she's been left with, saying life has changed completely. the wife of steve vaughan told the court about the moment she went to see her husband's body. she said as she held him she played songs they had only recently played at their wedding. it's just been a horrendous time.
5:23 pm
at the end of the trial she told me about the void now in her life. we were only married for six months and especially having to spend your first wedding anniversary alone was just so far removed from the one that we had planned. it's just been absolutely horrendous. the widow of phil allen said she had been robbed of her soulmate in an horrific accident that should never have happened. she said those responsible had shown a total disregard for the rules of the road. and robert parker's widow said she had thought of nothing else since the moment he was killed by the runaway truck. she said the wreckless actions of others means her life will never be the same. having heard those descriptions of the impact on their lives, the judge
5:24 pm
sentenced those two men, matthew gordon and peter wood. let's go over to washington again, pictures from the last couple of minutes. normally there is a quick photo opportunity. i think that is the bust of william churchill behind, and above that george washington, who of course led the fight for american independence. at very important meeting. the prime minister wants to talk about trade and the future of nato and the commitment to keep america in the world. at this point they are throwing the tight pool of press photographers out. an important meeting for donald trump, because he has had a bit of a spat with mexico and one or two other countries and
5:25 pm
it will be interesting to see when we get a printout of some sort about six o'clock in the news conference high well these to get on and what substance there is to report. tesco, the uk's largest retailer, has agreed to buy britain's largest food wholesaler, booker, in a deal worth £3.7 billion. it would mean tesco gaining a massive share in supplying restaurants, pubs and convenience stores in the uk. news of the deal sent shares soaring in both companies. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. tesco already has the lion's share of the uk's grocery business. now it has its sights on serving even more customers. it has struck a deal to buy booker. you may not have heard of it but this wholesalers supplies thousands of pubs, restaurants, caterers and corner shops. this market is growing faster than selling groceries
5:26 pm
in supermarkets and tesco wants a slice of it. what we do see is... the two company bosses side—by—side for a webcast this morning to explain why the surprise £3.7 billion deal makes sense. the ability to improve the core offer of both the retail operation but also the independent and small business operation that charles currently serves is definitely going to drive growth, better choice, better range, better value, better price. what will the wider impact be? booker does not only is convenience stores but they own the brands and they supply the goods to the independent retailers who run them. tesco has 10% of the convenience food market today in our estimates, booker has a similar share, probably bigger of the convenience markets and tesco supplying both will make it a biggerforce in convenience retail. that may prompt some concerns including from the competition authorities who are likely to scrutinise this deal.
5:27 pm
if approved it is a big bold deal by tesco extending its already formidable reach. emma simpson, bbc news. just a quick recap. we saw pictures ofa just a quick recap. we saw pictures of a few moments ago of the president and the prime minister the oval office. they are supposed to have talks for 30 minutes or so, then sometime around six o'clock we are expecting a news conference, but you can never predict these things. if they get on particularly well, it made the one for longer. we will see. we'll hope and provide news conference at six o'clock. let's have a look at the weather. a day of change today, or at least a start of change to that has been so
5:28 pm
dry and cold for so long. the next few days will be much milder, celeste frost by night, more cloud and more rain. you can see the cloud has been gathering. it is still common across the area of high pressure towards the east which is blocking its progress. there will be some rain through the night. it still could be icy in the northern half of the uk, particularly northern ireland, later in the night. so, still not especially mild tomorrow, but we are on the road to something much milder. there will be something much milder. there will be some brightness coming through in the south and the west, it will take much of the date of the things to brighten up in the east. there is a question over the rain and high far north paul gadd. scuttled scotland could be in the clear and dry. it will be wetter weather than we have had for some time. this is bbc news at five.
5:29 pm
the headlines: theresa may has arrived at the white house to meet president trump. they're expected to discuss trade deals and renewing the special relationship. ahead of the meeting, the prime minster laid a wreath at the tomb of the unknown soldier at arlington cemetery in virginia. a haulage boss and a mechanic have been jailed for a total of 12 years after a tipper—truck crash that killed four people — including a 11—year—old girl. britain's biggest supermarket, tesco, is to buy the leading wholesaler booker, £3.7 billion pounds. now let's catch up with the sports news, including the tennis. good evening. there's a dream line—up for nostalgic tennis fans in the australian open men's final. rafael nadal will play his old rival roger federer in melbourne on sunday after nadal fought—off grigor dmitrov in an epic semi today to reach his first grand slam final in nearly three years. drew savage reports.
5:30 pm
14 1a grand slam titles to his name, nothing since the french open back in 2014. if roger federer was waiting in the final, rafa nadal and his many fans were hoping that he could also turn back the clock. no problems in the first set, he won that 6-3. but problems in the first set, he won that 6—3. but the bulgarian, aiming to reach his first grand slam final at the age of 25, was only getting going, winning eight marathon second set to square things up. this was turning into a classic. he could hardly separate the two players. nadal showed why he has only lost three semifinals, hitting the third ona three semifinals, hitting the third on a tie—break. the scene was set for him to triumph. one problem, dmitrov was not giving up, squaring the match at 2—2. this one was going all the way. they took nearly an hourfor
5:31 pm
all the way. they took nearly an hour for cena rafa nadal to all the way. they took nearly an hourfor cena rafa nadal to make the breakthrough in the decider. after five hours of top quality tennis, finally a chance to rest. nadal, unbelievable, and real. we have the chance to be again in the final, the first of the year. i think we both worked hard to be where we are. it is great that, again, we are in a moment like this and have the chance to enjoy the game. leicester city will hope to halt their slide in domestic form when they travel to derby county in the first of this weekend's fa cup 4th round games tonight. it's live on bbc1 and bbc radio 5 live. the premier league champions leicester are only 5 points off the relegation zone, with derby pushing for promotion just outside the championship play—off places.
5:32 pm
i put out the best team, because we need to go through the cup. we need to get confidence, because we lost so to get confidence, because we lost so many matches in the last days. manchester city have accepted a football association anti—doping charge in relation to their third violation of the club whereabouts rules in the space of 12 months. teams are required to provide accurate details of training sessions and player whereabouts for drug testing at all times. it's understood the information wasn't updated following a change to training routines. a date will now be set for a hearing to decide their punishment which is expected to be a fine. wayne rooney says he still plans to go into management when he retires. the 31—year—old manchester united and england forward told the bbc‘s football focus programme that he has no intentions of slowing down after breaking the all—time scoring records for both club and country. when you get a bit older, you start
5:33 pm
to think about the game. it is something i would love to do. my whole life has been around football. you know, the minute i finish playing, i would like to try and stay in the game and, hopefully, get the opportunity to manage. players playing in this generation, they have enough money to not have to go into management. the ones that want to do it will be successful. the manor racing formula one team has folded after failing to find a new buyer. the oxfordshire—based team has been in administration since the beginning of the month. it employs more than 200 staff. there is a chance part of the company could still be bought but as it stands, manor's collapse leaves 10 teams — 20 cars — on the grid for the start of the new season in march. there's a record breaking tie for the lead at the qatar masters golf. welshman bradley dredge and england's andy sullivan are two of nine players tied on 8 under par — a record going into the third round of a tour event. dredge made level par after his second round but sullivan was one of the day's big movers. he was part of the european ryder cup team last year and made four
5:34 pm
under par to give him a share of the lead at eight under. that's all sport for now. more on our main story and theresa may has arrived at the white house to hold talks with donald trump. she's the first foreign leader to meet mr trump since he became president. the prime minister will be holding a joint press conference with the us president in around an half an hour's time, at 6 o'clock this evening. that, at least, is the schedule. her visit comes amid the controversy over president trump's support for waterboarding terror suspects and his war of words with mexico over the building of a border wall. much of the focus of the visit has been talking about the so—called special relationship between the us and the uk and the history of the previous counterparts. nile gardiner is a former aide to margaret thatcher and is now the director of the margaret thatcher center for freedom in washington. we can speak to him now from their studio there.
5:35 pm
ijust wonder what your i just wonder what your expectations are for this meeting? what would be are for this meeting? what would be a good outcome for america and britain? well, i think that for great britain there are a couple of chief priorities. firstly, reinforcing and re—energising the anglo—american special relationship after a period of several years with president obama, who was rather lu kewa rm president obama, who was rather lukewarm towards britain. i think theresa may spoke yesterday in his speech in philadelphia about basically regenerating the special relationship as a great force for good on the world stage. that was a very powerful message, very well received by her republican congressional hosts. the other big priority is moving forward with the us uk free trade agreement, that would be limited as soon as britain leaves the european union in 2019. i think there are going to be early discussions on such an agreement today. already, there is tremendous momentum on capitol hill for such an agreement. there are five pieces of congressional legislation, urging a
5:36 pm
us-uk congressional legislation, urging a us — uk trade deal. there was a lot of support for moving forward in terms of a common free trade agenda for both sides of the atlantic. in terms of the personal chemistry, i know we go around in circles, we know we go around in circles, we know about maggie and ronnie, that was a good relationship, but bill clinton did not have a particularly good relationship withjohn major, and yet the us — uk relationship was still very strong. do we kind of overbloated bit about how these two are going to get on? —— over low it are going to get on? —— over low it a bit. the special relationship is more thanjust a bit. the special relationship is more than just one prime minister or president. here you have two figures that clearly believe in the importance of the special relationship. i think donald trump's instincts are very pro edition. i think there will be a meeting of minds. there will always be
5:37 pm
differences between british prime ministers and us presidents, but the big picture is two leaders that are determined to work together and the anglo—american special relationship will still be a powerful force. anglo—american special relationship will still be a powerful forcem seems like what theresa may said yesterday went down well with republicans. they control both houses of congress. we have also seen a very houses of congress. we have also seen a very busy week for president trump. he has been signing executive orders. how much power do you think he has to shift things on? barack obama signed an order to close guantanamo bay 80 years ago, it is still there. how much freedom does the president how to push policy?” do think president trump has a lot more freedom to manoeuvre, not least because the republicans control both parts of congress. i think that you are going to see the president moving forward with his executive orders, many of them with the
5:38 pm
support of congress. he is in a far stronger position than president obama, who became, in effect, a lame duckin obama, who became, in effect, a lame duck in his final years. with donald trump, you have a leader who is somebody who believes in implementing his campaign promises. you are saying that already with a flurry of executive orders being issued this week. he is sending a message, very loud and clear, that he is going to implement what he promised on the campaign trail. he does have a congress that is, on the whole, very sympathetic to most of his proposals. i think you're going to see a little synergy between the white house and capitol hill in the coming years. there might be some disagreements in certain areas. coming years. there might be some disagreements in certain areasm you read his book, the art of a deal, i wonder if britain is in a tricky position? coming out of the european union, we really do need a trade deal with the united states.
5:39 pm
the united states would like one with us, but it is not quite the same thing? you know, i think it is in both britain's and the united states's interests to have a free—trade deal. i think there is a lot goodwill in washington towards great britain at this time. it is important that president trump has strongly backed brexit, unlike president obama. his administration has talked about britain being at the front of the queue for a free—trade deal. i think it is a very different mindset, the white house is very pro—british, it is not in favour of the european project, it isa in favour of the european project, it is a more eurosceptic white house. in many respects, the situation, the outlook, it looks good for great britain. a final point, in terms of nato, we know the
5:40 pm
prime minister's views are very clear. we also know what candidate trump said about nato, that it is obsolete, which could mean a number of things. where do you think we are on that? is nato secure in this president's hands? i think nato is secure in this president's hands. you will see, over the next few yea rs, you will see, over the next few years, growing calls from both washington and london for european partners in particular in the nato alliance to invest more in differences, to step up to the plate in terms of the alliance. i think that will be the main focus in terms of us messaging in relation to nato. without a shadow of a doubt, nato is hugely important to british and american interests and it is going to remain at the very heart of the transatlantic alliance. thanks for taking time to talk to us. many survivors of genocide are still facing discrimination
5:41 pm
because of their religion or ethnicity, according to research to mark holocaust memorial day. across the world, there've been ceremonies to remember the millions of people who died in the second world war, and in other genocides since. our correspondent holly hamilton went to meet one survivor and to hear his story. the door opened, three german soldiers came in. he took out his revolver and put it to my head. and people ask me, what does it feel like when you've got a gun at your head? what did you do? this wasn't the first time gabor lacko came face—to—face with death. and it wouldn't be the last. this was all around us, all the time. nothing was new. nothing was surprising, we were prepared for everything. it's made from bits and pieces of material because... his first yellow star, worn to identify him as a jew, was made by his mother. a piece of history he
5:42 pm
has kept to this day. i'll never forget it. the first day i was wearing it, i had a medical appointment. at the top of the road, a lady who saw me trying to hide it with a newspaper under my arm said, "little boy, don't cover it. there's nothing to be ashamed of." the yellow armband my father wore. like many survivors gabor waited for more than 20 years before talking about his experiences, motivated by a desire to help people understand what happened. i don't think young people appreciate how lucky they are. they worry about their mobile telephone, and their game consoles. they don't know what problems are, they don't know what it is when bombs fall from the sky and you
5:43 pm
don't know if you'll survive it and an occupying army can take you away. it wasn't until 1956 that gabor decided to move to england. in those days people looked at refugees with different eyes, and they tried to make us welcome. i started a new life and i got on with it. with friends who went through the same. whatever is the conversation, after a while, it always turns to the past. we all have memories. you've got to live with them. let's have a look at the main news
5:44 pm
headlines. theresa may is meeting president trump at the white house. they are expected to discuss trade deals and renewing the special relationship. two men have beenjailed for a total of 12 years for manslaughter after a tipper—truck killed four people, including a 4—year—old girl. tesco's share price rises sharply after the supermarket chain says it's buying the food wholesaler booker, including its chains of convenience stores. an update on the market numbers for you. for viewers expecting the film review with mark kermode, it'll be on at 9:45 on bbc news channel this evening because we're waiting for this joint press conference between prime minister theresa may and president trump.
5:45 pm

29 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on