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tv   Our World  BBC News  January 28, 2017 4:30am-5:01am GMT

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he was 77. he was twice nominated for an oscar and was famous for playing a variety of roles in films including 1984, the elephant man and midnight express. he also appeared in the harry potter series. president donald trump has signed an executive order that will limit immigration and refugees from some muslim—majority countries. mr trump promised the measures, called "extreme vetting," during the election campaign. he said it was aimed at keeping radical islamist terrorists out of the united states. the british prime minister theresa may has become the first foreign leader to hold talks with the new us president at the white house. mrs may said both leaders had reaffirmed their commitment to nato during their meeting. she said they are united in their recognition of the transatlantic alliance tesco has agreed to purchase booker,
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a food wholesaler. the two firms will create the leading food business in the uk but it may need approvalfrom the business in the uk but it may need approval from the competition authority. emma simpson has more. tesco already has the lion's share of what we spend on the supermarket aisles. but what we put in our trolleys is only half of the food we consume. here is the other half. from eating out to food on the go. this fast—growing market is what tesco wants a slice of. it has struck a deal to purchase booker. this wholesaler supplies thousands of pubs, restaurants, caterers and corner shops. tesco says joining forces makes sense. the uk population is passionate about food and is changing the way that it wants to consume food — at home, on the go, it wants delivery, it wants a greater service. the combination of our two businesses allows us to serve those
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customers better than we do individually on our own. tesco is already big. with this deal, it will become an even more powerfulforce in the food industry, and that might not be to everyone's taste. booker does not own these convenience stores but does own the brands and its supplies of food for the thousands of independent retailers who run them. i think some independent retailers will be concerned about the idea of trading with some company that is ultimately their biggest competitor as well. others will say, well, look, you may get better prices out of this. cheaper prices from the newly—merged group which get passed on to the retailer and the customer. either way it is a big bold move and it will face scrutiny from the competition authorities before this deal reaches the checkout. coming up next, our world: black in trump's america. in the final week of the obama
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presidency, a louisiana high school marching band rehearses for the big day. we do not see colour, race, gender or ethnicity. we see potential. they are one of ten school bands chosen to play at the inauguration. there has been a lot of talk of how we need healing and sometimes... you just have to do it. but as it marks the transition from obama to trump, america is having two very different conversations about race. this is the live but this is the life we live so it is
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not a conversation about race it is just a conversation. and tension over the issues of police killings and the involvement of white supremacists. hail victory, and the involvement of white supremacists. hailvictory, hail and the involvement of white supremacists. hail victory, hail our president. and for some, talk of a return to the good old days signifies nothing good at all.|j think that the master has reclaimed his house. and even though he allowed the slaves to look after the house while he was on vacation, we are still in the same situation we have been in. barack obama called slavery the original sin of america. his presidency once held promise of redemption. that has not happened. is this country enters the trump era, the divisions between black and white america are felt, perhaps, more starkly than they have been in a generation. if there is anyone out there who
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still doubts that america is a place where all things are possible, tonight is your answer. that was the era of yes, we can. when black america seemed poised to claim a confident power apparently long denied. # i'm so reckless when i rocklike von she dressed # i'm so possess if # my daddy alabama, my mummy louisiana... to me it is a
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race war. you have black against white, white against black. from the swa m ps of white, white against black. from the swamps of washington to do by you of the south. beneath the surface of the south. beneath the surface of the post— racial society, fear. anger. and the deep roots of a history still unresolved. the final week of the obama presidency began with the annual commemoration for a man who gave his life for the civil rights struggle. america has come a long way since then. in new orleans they mark his memory with a show of sartorial pride. our self-esteem has grown
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from us knowing each other. black men can see each other in a greater image that has been achieved. in this respect, the obamas scandal free tenure at the white house has had huge symbolic value. so you think about a boy like... how old are you? you know who the president is? um, barack obama. do you know who the president was before him? see? all he has ever known is obama. his life, like this, it is normal. it is normalfor him to his life, like this, it is normal. it is normal for him to see a black man at the head of the country. symbol is a powerful thing. the very fa ct of symbol is a powerful thing. the very fact of his unlikely presidency has expanded the concept of what is possible for millions of americans, black and white. but when it comes
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to cold ha rd black and white. but when it comes to cold hard statistics, the tree sears that if you are black in america the odds are still stacked against you. in 2013, the median net worth of a white american household was over $140,000. the black households, that figure was $11,000. that is 13 times less. under obama the wealth gap has widened. travel up the wealth gap has widened. travel up the mississippi from new orleans and you come to baton rouge, one of the most divided cities in the united states. for some children of inner—city high schools, the education they got on the streets can see more important than what is on offer in the classroom. you can go out there tomorrow, have your pistol, shoot somebody and you end up pistol, shoot somebody and you end up in prison for the rest of your life. slim reed is a former gang
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leader turned activist whose mission now is to stop young black men following his footsteps. it is 2017 and you are still walking around looking and acting exactly like slaves. and the world is looking at you as animals. why? because you live that lifestyle. barack obama often told black americans they had to ta ke often told black americans they had to take responsibility for the problems in their own community. silky agrees, up to a point. problems in their own community. silky agrees, up to a pointlj problems in their own community. silky agrees, up to a point. i am trying to bring a message to black people that have black lives do not matter to black people than it should not matter to anybody else. that is my message. like lives have to matter to black people first before they matter to the rest of the world. black lives matter focus on police killing but i need to look at what we are doing to ourselves and try to resurrect as from the
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spiritual depth we are really for i can woi’i’y spiritual depth we are really for i can worry about the two or 300 killings taking place by law enforcement. we are dying by the thousands and aaron hands so i am focusing on that and then i stay on that. we poverty. i have grown up in poverty and i became a gang leader because i was starving. if i am in this house and do not have anything to eat i would roll before i style. so when i am finding out that i do not have the necessities of life, i will go out and get those necessities, regardless of what the world says. i need to survive, just like anybody else. there are also inequalities that are systemic and ingrained. if you were black you are more likely to be arrested, get a longerjail more likely to be arrested, get a longer jail sentence more likely to be arrested, get a longerjail sentence and more likely to be shot dead by police. obama only engaged with this issue late in
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his presidency and then with limited results. like quarterbacks on the tea m results. like quarterbacks on the team of white supremacy does not help us. thejudge have to team of white supremacy does not help us. the judge have to abide team of white supremacy does not help us. thejudge have to abide by the law. as far as black folks on the law. as far as black folks on the whole, politically, when you do the whole, politically, when you do the research and you look at the numbers then if you and i wanted to get married, we could get married. the gays accomplished something, you see what i am saying? i can not a lwa ys see what i am saying? i can not always just pressure it because at the end of the day we did not ask for anything. we did not want to put that burden on the black man in the white house. we did not want to give him that burden. if you do not ask for anything you get nothing so you cannot be disappointment —— disappointed. so you say that the black community gave barack obama a free pass? exactly. he is one of us.
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it is over 60 years since the supreme court ruled that segregation in public education was unconstitutional. ten years later the civil rights act outlawed discrimination based on race. but today in cities across america it is all too obvious that they factored segregation is still very much in effect. —— de facto segregation. if you look at a map of bat on rouge you look at a map of bat on rouge you will see that this route here, florida street, is a stark dividing line. everything to the north is overwhelmingly black, everything to the south is mostly white. now i spent time in divided cities. places like baghdad in beirut, places where they have recently had a war. there has not been a war here since the 18605 has not been a war here since the 1860s when the north is thought the credit that is the over the issue of slavery. but last summer it felt like war was not far away. the
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killing of a black man, the latest ina killing of a black man, the latest in a string of fatal police shootings caught on camera. they are shootings caught on camera. they are shooting right now and there is an officer down. two days later at a black lives matter protest a man opened fire on police killing five. not long after that, more officers we re not long after that, more officers were shot dead in baton rouge. this isa were shot dead in baton rouge. this is a race war, to me. you have black against white, one against black. there would not be so many black people against white people, i think, if was not so the police brutality. that was pushing that situation with some of the people. nefertiti is part of a growing movement of radical black activists. during the black lives matter protests she says she too found herself on the receiving end of some heavy—handed treatment from the police. going on a protest down town to city hall and police officers approached me, they'd dislocated my
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shoulder and fractured my finger. more recently and i am recovering from that, but all was basically because i am part of a new black panther party and they assumed that the chapter out there protesting at the chapter out there protesting at the time, that i was a part of that chapter, but i was not. it is perhaps ironic that relations between the police and the black community reached their lowest point ina community reached their lowest point in a generation during the final yea rs of in a generation during the final years of the obama presidency. the killings by police and a lack of prosecutions of officers involved has entrenched a sense here of a force that does not serve and protect one that operate with impunity. everybody is an age, 0k? we are waiting on a decision from the department ofjustice. people wa nt the department ofjustice. people want justice and they the department ofjustice. people wantjustice and they want transparency. so that is the main thing that folks want. transparency and justice. recently we have
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thing that folks want. transparency andjustice. recently we have had thing that folks want. transparency and justice. recently we have had a shooting with ours and sterling about two blocks down the street. we had police killings on the highway and we had a flood. so our community is broken. we are trying to get back together. the baton rouge police department is acutely aware of the need to rebuild trust. to that end, sergeant riley harbour is dispatched of a weekend to do harbour is dispatched of a weekend todoa harbour is dispatched of a weekend to do a spot of gardening at an inner city school just to do a spot of gardening at an inner city schooljust round the corner from where he grew up. this is what passes for community outreach. the citizens here have a right to be upset with all the different things that have happened, both from the civilian side and from law enforcement. we've had losses on both, tragic all the way round, but we still have to come together because we've still got to live. baton rouge is braced for more trouble as it awaits the outcome of a federal investigation into the shooting of alton sterling. nefertiti says the tensions between
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the black community and the police have brought an old enemy out into the open. last year, about seven months ago, the klansmen, the ku klux klan aryan nation put flyers out recruiting members and this was particularly right after all than sterling was killed, they had it on the news that they were putting notes on people's doors, going through the neighbourhood. nefertiti and silky slim rang the number on a leaflet, it went through to a pre—recorded message which had clearly been updated in the past few days. hailtrump! hail our hail trump! hail our people! hailtrump! hail our people! hail out hailtrump! hail our people! hail our victory! not long after the election, a group of white nationalists gathered to discuss the new political landscape.
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the final speaker was richard spencer who coined the term albright, a movement associated with donald trump's former campaign ceo steve bannon, who wasn't present but who is now one of the most powerful men in the white house. america was until this past generation a white country designed for ourselves and oui’ country designed for ourselves and our posterity. this then is the context in which donald trump has taken office. america's new president has disavowed support from over racists but still in baton rouge the tranquil surroundings of university leg near the college campus belies a sense of unease. tina lange and meet lewis morris are here for a photo shoot. they're expecting their first child in march. they want to remember this special time. but they fear their unborn daughter's future may not necessarily be brighter than
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their own. we don't know how it will be for african—americans now to four yea rs be for african—americans now to four years down the line, six years down the line. even when obama was in office you seen officers were killing young black males and really weren't getting penalised for it. now that it's trump, you never know. it'll be hard for us to get those opportunities and have that freedom to get the best education and to get the bestjobs, you know what i'm saying? just because of our race and the perspective that others have on us. the perspective that others have on us. that's what i'm afraid of for my child. here in the south the shadow of the plantations, the memory ofjim crow, of america's original sin still loom large. it takes more than eight
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yea rs large. it takes more than eight years to dismantle a social system that's been in place before the country was even established, before the country talked about creating some people equal and allowing some to have the pursuit of life and liberty and happiness, they had individuals that were even considered human, they were treated as chattel. the situation you're talking about is normative for america so to see something other than that is to see something radically different from actually what america is and how it came into being, which is deeply, deeply antiblack. barack being, which is deeply, deeply antiblack. ba rack obama's being, which is deeply, deeply antiblack. barack obama's legacy is antiblack. barack obama's legacy is a subject of fierce disagreement but radically different is not an assessment often applied to his record in office. for some the election of donald trump looks less like a sudden change of direction than a resumption of the status quo. i look at it like master has reclaimed his house, i'm at master's place, i know my place, i'm in the field, i don't try to get up to the
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house, know what i'm saying? you're talking about slavery here. of course. that's the dynamic you're talking about. it's the oppression. you're saying it never really went away? know, even though master allows the slaves to look after the house when he was on vacation we are still in the same fight that we've beenin still in the same fight that we've been in for the last 245 years. in all seriousness, there is a huge legacy of slavery but you can't say things haven't changed since the 18605, things haven't changed since the 1860s, since the nineteen sixties? definitely. there's no forced free labour here with the slaves, right? and what america has been successful in doing is creating these slums and ghettos, putting you in these areas and then making the police still oversee you like we're still on the plantation. so what goes on in the
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white community don't happen in the black community, so when the police come here they say get up against the car, i've got rights, shut the hell up, it's a different treatment. it's still like the overseers overseeing the plantation, wejust don't have to go to work. next up, from louisiana, it's the high school marching band. inauguration. after the speech in the oath of office there's a moment in the spotlight for the high school marching band louisiana. then the parade moves on. and so america begins a new chapter in its long book on race, weaving in the history of slavery, on segregation with that of slavery, on segregation with that of martin luther king and of the obama era. from my experience, i think the american dream is still alive for
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anyone who wants to reach for it. there are african—americans in all areas of life that are quite, quite successful. i think that the road may be a little narrower and a little more stoney at times, but i think the american dream is still achievable for everyone if you work ha rd achievable for everyone if you work hard and live right and play by the rolls then success happens. jailer, 11 years old, has known no other president but obama. for her and her friend, president trump was at first a frightening prospect. we was all thinking about, like, what if he sends us back to africa? that was your first thought, that you might not be allowed to be an american any more? yes. that sounds like a scary thought? yeah. at first we were all, like, we went through withdrawal and we we re like, we went through withdrawal and we were saying it's going to happen,
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but we talked about it one day at school and we was, like, it can happen unless everybody says yes to it. jaylen is ambitious. after harvard law school she wants to become america's first black female present, but... i think become america's first black female present, but... ithink he is become america's first black female present, but... i think he is going to try and make everything harder for blacks to get in, everything harderfor hispanics for blacks to get in, everything harder for hispanics to get in, everything harderfor harder for hispanics to get in, everything harder for anybody of colour to try to do all be something. jaylen has one of those teachers you remember for the something. jaylen has one of those teachers you rememberfor the rest of your life, someone who helps you make sense of a bewildered ring world. i think that people were sick of talking about race. white people 01’ of talking about race. white people or black people or everyone?” of talking about race. white people or black people or everyone? i would say from my experience mostly white people. it's overwhelming, i can understand that from the perspective where you've never had to deal with it, you don't understand why we keep
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bringing it up over and over again. and i think that especially with the heightened sense of awareness of police shootings and police brutality and the injustices being so brutality and the injustices being so blatantly put in your face because of social media, white people started to have a backlash and they started to think that no one is representing me, everyone is talking about black people and not talking about black people and not talking about black people and not talking about me, so how can i make it somewhat about me? and so the age of donald trump began as all presidencies usually do with as all presidencies usually do with a promise of concealer retreat. to rebuild our country and restore its promise for all of our people. but donald trump's opponents fear quite the opposite. there are those who fear that the new president is a man with a vindictive streak who may
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use the power of his office to lash out at those who opposed him. i'd like to punch him in the face, i'll tell you. many liberals... especially white liberals see trump as an extra ten shall threat. to the founding principles of america. —— existential threat to the founding principles of america. but from the black perspective things look a lift little different. it doesn't scare me, i don't have an issue with trump 01’ me, i don't have an issue with trump or whatever he does because everyone gets in there and does the same things. when black america contemplates the prospect of a hostile perhaps even oppressive state it shrugs and asks, what else is new? well, while some of us
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were shivering on thursday, for others, for example across the north of scotland, it was remarkably mild. a day of contrasts. we're kind of getting back to normal. most of us will turn less cold. a bit of a breeze, some sunshine, but there will be some rain around as well. we are losing the continental feed, which brought most of us a very cold day on thursday. starting to drag the cold air in from the atlantic, hence the rising temperatures for the majority. but we start the day with a hard frost, one or two freezing fog patches, and the odd shower as well, which could cause some icy stretches. should be a dry start across wales. that fog up over the high ground, but that will be lifted, and the temperatures will be on the rise. above freezing for northern ireland, rain knocking on the door of the west of the province. a frosty start for most of scotland, and here i think it is set to be a largely dry day, with some sunshine.
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heading our way down across the borders into northern england, cold with a hard frost. some freezing fog patches, for sure, in the morning, so watch out for those. i mentioned the odd showerjust building in the eastern counties, for a time, in the morning. so the risk of one or two icy stretches, but temperatures slowly rising above freezing down across southern england and into the south—west. we should be above zero. a dry start, but some showery rain lies in wait out west, and this band of showery rain will start to push its way slowly eastwards across northern ireland and into the far south—west of england, perhaps the far south—west of wales. another little area of showers pushes up across southern england through the afternoon as well. further the north and east it stays dry, but that chilly air holding on for one more day. just two degrees in newcastle, milder, though, across many southern and western areas. as we head through the evening and overnight, so it gets a bit messy. there will be areas of rain pushing their way northwards and eastwards, some quite heavy, actually, some quite wet, actually.
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a period of snow across high ground in particular. the temperatures could dip, late, close to freezing. but for most of us, actually, it will be a frost—free start to the weekend. saturday, then, starts with cloud, with some patchy rain continuing to move northwards and eastwards. behind that it turns brighter, but also with some showers, and one or two of those showers could be wintry up over high ground. it might not be as cold as it has been for most of us, double figures in a few southern areas. that milder theme continues into sunday. we could see an area of rain pushing into southern areas, however, how far north that gets is open to question. the best of the brightness on sunday will be further north across the uk. milder than recently. welcome to bbc news, broadcasting at home and around the globe. i'm tom donkin. our top stories: the legendary british actor sirjohn hurt, who was twice nominated for an oscar, has died at the age of 77. president trump fulfils another campaign promise and signs an executive order authorising tough new vetting procedures of immigrants to the us.
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britain's prime minister theresa may becomes the first world leader to visit the new us president and reaffirms their backing of the nato alliance. today we've reaffirmed our unshakeable commitment to this alliance. mr president, i think you confirmed that you're 100% behind nato. and the drive to fill a rather unusual vacancy in austria — one that offers a frugal lifestyle with no financial reward.
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