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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 28, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the veteran actor sirjohn hurt has died aged 77. he appeared in 200 films and television productions and was twice nominated for an oscar. good morning. it's saturday, 28th january. also ahead: hand in hand in the white house — donald trump and theresa may pledge their commitment to the special relationship. iama i am a people person. lam a people personli i am a people person. i think you are also, theresa. i can often tell how i will get along with somebody very early, and i believe we are going to have a fantastic relationship. after a spate of accidents, a call for lorry drivers to be banned from using satnavs designed for cars. in sport: they haven't met in a grand slam
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finalfor eight years, they haven't met in a grand slam final for eight years, but they haven't met in a grand slam finalfor eight years, but in they haven't met in a grand slam final for eight years, but in the next half—hour serena williams takes on her sister venus for the australian title and a record—breaking 23rd major crown. and chris has the weather. it is not as cold as has been over recent days, but we have got some rain to contend with today and it is still just about code rain to contend with today and it is stilljust about code and for some of that rain to fall as snow in the hills of scotland. good morning. first, our main story. the actor sirjohn hurt has died. he was 77 and had recently been ill with cancer. he starred in around 200 films including harry potter and was nominated for an oscar for his roles in the elephant man and midnight express. our correspondent nick higham reports. everything seemed to come to a head today. john hurt, as the political diarist alan clark. both my back wisdom teeth have disintegrated into blackened stumps, or stalagmites. not a nice man, but unexpectedly
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sympathetic one, the sort of complex characterjohn hurt played with such ease and subtlety. his talent was spotted early in a succession of leading stage and television roles. his first big breakthrough came in 1966. in a man for all seasons. a small part, but in a high—profile, oscar—winning film. a few years later, he was starring opposite richard attenborough intel rillington place. he played the illiterate timothy evans, wrongly hanged for a murder he didn't commit. on television, he was the mad roman emperor caligula in the bbc‘s i, claudius. mad roman emperor caligula in the bbc's i, claudius. you order does not to order any. and you took me at my word, didn't you? and then came the naked civil servant. my word, didn't you? and then came the naked civil servantlj my word, didn't you? and then came the naked civil servant. i wear roush, i wear mascara on my eyelashes, i dye my hair, i buy
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fla m boya nt clothes, eyelashes, i dye my hair, i buy flamboyant clothes, far more outre than those i am wearing out. many people said don't do that, you will never work again. but i said, it is not about homosexuality, it is about the tenderness of the individual as opposed to the cruelty of the crowd. he earned an oscar nomination for midnight express, in which he played a heroin addict in a turkish prison. and there was another oscar nomination for his performance as the hideously disfigured john merrick in the elephant man. his lined and weathered face meant he was perfect in the film 1984 as george or dwell‘s reluctant rebel winston smith. —— george orwell‘s rabble. he accepted all the television roles he was offered, although that meant stage appearances like this were rare. he played stephen ward, society schema and later victim of the profumo affairand and later victim of the profumo affair and scandal. i can do wonders with you, little baby. you're my
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future selves? late in his career, he made a guest appearance in doctor who. why are you pointing your screwdrivers like that? almost 200 screen roles alone. few actors were as reliably and engagingly watchable. john hurt, who's died aged 77. theresa may and donald trump have stressed their commitment to nato in talks at the white house. the prime minister and the president both reiterated the importance of the special relationship in the first visit of a foreign leader to washington since donald trump's inauguration. theresa may urged the united states not to lift sanctions against russia. the us president is due to speak to vladimir putin today. i'll be representing the american people very, very strongly, very, very forcefully, and if we have a great relationship with russia and other countries, and if we go after isis together, which has to be stopped, that's an evil that has to be stopped, i will consider that a good thing, not a bad thing.
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theresa may has travelled from washington to turkey for talks on trade and security with president erdogan. the prime minister is also facing pressure to discuss concerns about alleged human rights abuses. our turkey correspondent mark lowen is in istanbul. is she there already? give us a sense of what the discussions might include. she lands in about an hour and she will be focusing very much on trade with president erdogan and the prime minister during talks here. it is a quick visit, four or five hours in turkey. the two countries are already big trading partners, but they want to increase trade, especially when the uk leads the european union. it and take you will be on the fringes of the eu and they want to increase trade. they will also be addressing so—called islamic state. both of them are part
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of the coalition against is. they will also be talking about ongoing attem pts will also be talking about ongoing atte m pts to will also be talking about ongoing attempts to reunite —— reunify cyprus. there are also calls on theresa may to address more difficult issues here of human rights abuses and the fact that 140,000 people have now been arrested, dismissed or suspended since the failed coup last year. so she goes from one controversial president to another, and there are calls for her to raise those issues. downing street officials say she will reiterate support for the turkish government, but also stressed that turkey's response to the failed coup needs to be proportionate. thank you. a growing number of labour mps have said they will denyeremy corbyn and vote against triggering the formal process to leave the eu. yesterday, a member of his shadow cabinet resigned from the front bench over the issue. our political correspondent ellie price is in our london newsroom. if so growing dissent amongst the
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labour party? that's right. yesterday, the shadow welsh secretary resigned, saying she thought brexit would be a terrible mistake. intriguingly, two of the labour whips that they would vote against triggering article 50. in political terms, it gets complicated because it is theirjob to enforce party discipline. jeremy corbyn has tried to be conciliatory. he said he has told his mps from prop remain constituencies that he understands they are torn. but he needs to provide labour with a coherent position on brexit. he says he wants labour to respect the outcome of the eu referendum and it is important to remember that the majority of labour constituencies voted to leave the eu. so it puts him in a difficult position with his mps. number crunching suggests that 70 mps represent labour constituencies that voted to remain. not all of those will defy voted to remain. not all of those will denyeremy corbyn, but a number will. so it providesjeremy
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corbyn with some difficult navigation through these brexit times. a draft letter of application from king george iii has been made public for the first time. the unsent letter, including crossings out, read drafts, blotches and scrolls, was written during the american war of independence and is one of thousands of his private papers released by the royal archives. later this morning, we will take a more detailed look at some of those extraordinary documents. the uk's 2017 eurovision entry has been decided. former x factor contestant luciejones will represent the country in kiev in may with the song never give up on you, which was written by a former eurovision winner. lucie was chosen after winning the combined public and jury vote at the end of a live tv show in which six singers performed. all of the potential acts
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were former x factor contestants. the we wish her well, albeit it hasn't gone too well recently at eurovision. but things can change. change is a mantra at the moment. nothing is predictable. now back to one of our lead stories. it started with an oval office photo call in front of the bust of sir winston churchill, and ended with agreement on the importance of the so—called special relationship. theresa may's visit to president donald trump is the front page of most of the papers, but was it a success for the prime minister? here is a recap of some of the key moments. this is the original, folks, in many ways. it is a great honour to have winston churchill
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back. today, the united states renews oui’ back. today, the united states renews our deep bond with britain — military, financial, cultural and political. we pledge our lasting support to this most special relationship. on defence and security cooperation, we are united in our recognition of nato as the bulwark of our collective defence. today, we have reaffirmed our unsha keable today, we have reaffirmed our unshakeable commitment to this alliance. i think brexit is going to bea alliance. i think brexit is going to be a wonderful thing for your country. i have been listening to the president and the president has listened to me, that is the point of having a conversation.” listened to me, that is the point of having a conversation. i can tell how i will get along with somebody very early, and i believe we are going to have a fantastic relationship. american journalist beth gardiner joins us from our london newsroom and political commentator charlie woolfjoins us on the sofa. charlie, let's get one thing out of the way first, the handholding. it
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is on the front page of all the papers. this was after the press conference. many will have seen it already. they were just stepping out of the white house along one of the verandas, and donald trump laid his hand on theresa may's wrist to help her down the steps. but that is the shot everyone has taken. the man is a gentleman, and that is why he did it. we will make sure he knows not to do that with her majesty when he comes for the state visit, although michelle obama did that and got away with it. i think it was a win—win from both sides. the speech mrs may gave to the republican retreat, where she talked about not making the world in our image any more, and minor pointi the world in our image any more, and minor point i disagree with, but i guess if you can put 1000 mcdonald's in iraq, it is not going to turn into america. that went down pretty well. in the press conference, you could see that great britain is in prime position. this is the ally. he
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wa nts to prime position. this is the ally. he wants to roll his sleeves up. beth, what are your thoughts on it? a people are talking about how trump was very calm. we certainly saw the well— behaved trump yesterday. i think he kept his cool in a way that we certainly didn't see at his previous press conference a couple of weeks ago in new york before his inauguration, where he really lashed out at some of the questions that we re out at some of the questions that were asked. we will have to wait and see how this relationship pans out. theresa may has clearly decided to cast her lot with donald trump. as you said, that handholding photo was on the cover for the papers this morning. and i think it may become an indelible image. we will have to wait and see, as this president moves forward, whether that is a relationship she may come to regret patty implements some of the
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contentious policies he has outlined, starting this morning with the news of a clamp—down on refugees with a religious caste to it. issues immediately arise. during the press conference, we know that president trump is going to be speaking to vladimir putin by phone today. a very direct question was asked about what to do about russia. theresa may gaveit what to do about russia. theresa may gave it a straight answer — we believe sanctions should remain. donald trump has a different standpoint, and they stood together on stage saying different things. but there was a mutual respect. everyone was saying, she should tell him what to do. instead, i think she has built a relationship where i could see him picking up the phone after talking to putin or before talking to him, saying, what do you think? the sort of relationship iraq obama had with mrs merkel. that is a good position to be in —— the
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position barack obama had with mrs merkel. already, the us papers, who probably weeks ago didn't know who mrs may was, now consider her to be margaret thatcher. i think it has done well for both her and for him. the question from laura kuenssberg, from an american sense, i thought it was a bit on the edge. that said, he handled it. he gave that new york laughed and said, this is the first question you give me? it is worth reminding people of that question from laura kuenssberg from the bbc. it was the one about, maybe people find you, looking from overseas, it is hard to understand you as the leader of the free world when there are things you said that people mightfind hard are things you said that people might find hard to understand. that was a moment when he could have gone ina was a moment when he could have gone in a different direction, but he showed a sense of humour. he did try to deflect the question with a joke
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that his guest, theresa may, in an uncomfortable spot, as well as laura kuenssberg, who asked it. a more mature leader might have taken that question as an opportunity to try to reassure some of question as an opportunity to try to reassure some of the people who are, as laura said, deeply frightened and concerned by some of the things we have heard from donald trump over the past 18 months of his ascendancy. trump did not do that. what he did was reflective of what we have seen from him all along. he told usjust a week we have seen from him all along. he told us just a week ago that he was ina running told us just a week ago that he was in a running war with the media at that press conference in new york. he lashed out in a shouting match with the cnn reporter. we saw him over the course of the campaign lead arenas full of thousands of people in chants against journalists. he likes to turn the tables and use
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journalism as his whipping boy. i think laura kuenssberg, with her question, was trying to hold him to account for some of the things he said. he doesn't like that. he is going to find that as president, there are going to be hard questions. it is a two-way street. for instance, the whole dossier turned out to be fake news. so they will have to develop a mutual respect for each other. i think he handled it well and mrs may handled it well. we have to leave it there. thank you. venus and serena williams are no strangers to sibling rivalry on a grand scale. they have played each other in eight grand slam finals. but today's australian open is a special one. whoever wins will be making history. let's have a look at what's at stake for the sisters. when i am playing on the floor with
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her, i think i am playing the best competitor in the game. i never lost hope of us being able to play each other in a final. i
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couldn't write a better ending, so this is a great opportunity for us to start our new beginning. former british number onejohn lloyd who will be commentating on the match joins us now. it really is a big day. we have been talking about it over the last few days and saying it feels really retro to go back to grand slams with the williams sisters in the final. to me, it is the greatest sports story in history, the williams sisters. when they finally make a film about them, it will be just reward and i hope they do them justice because it is the most extraordinary sports story, what they have achieved. to be in the finalagain, particularly from venus‘ side, with the illness she has had and being out of the finals for so many years, it is spectacular. some people follow tennis only on these big occasions. remind us of the journey they have
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been on. there was a period of time, and it has happened to others like roger federer, and nadal, both in the final as well, where people have said, that iraq has passed. —— that era has passed. and here we are! class will always come through. as long as the people you are talking about have that love for the game and the desire. the williams sisters have handled their career so well. a lot of people said they have other things they like doing. serena liked acting and venus like designing clothes, but they got it right. they played tennis hard but they also had time off and did other things and kept themselves fresh. they are still playing now and they love the game as much as when they first set foot on wimbledon. that is the beauty of it. they have handled their careers perfectly. the whole australian open has been interesting from many perspectives, because of how well evans did to get as far as
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he did, but also, you have nadal and federer against each other in the final. and that interesting stat about the final in both the men‘s and women‘s is people over 30. about the final in both the men‘s and women's is people over 30m about the final in both the men‘s and women's is people over 30. it is fantastic. everybody i talked to wa nted fantastic. everybody i talked to wanted these finals. and no one expected it. again, it shows you that there is still life left in older players. a few years back, what you reached 30, it was time to quit. they have proven that as long as you have the attitude and these days with sports science, you have the training they have now and the nutrition and other stuff, in my day, before a match you had steak and chips. and what it down with three coca—cola ‘s! now, you have all this sports science and they keep themselves in amazing shape and they love the game. let me ask you to do the awkward thing. you are going to be commentating on today‘s game and the men‘s final tomorrow. give us a quick talk through what
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might happen and what is your instinct about who will win? the obvious one with the ladies is serena. if i was venus, and my big sis, who has won these tournaments before and i had not won 148 while, i would be saying at dinner time, give me one! but i think serena is too good and she will win. in the men‘s, it is more difficult in terms of, you don‘t know how the rafael nadal much 55 cents was one of the great matches —— the match with five sets. now he hasn‘t been in the finalfor sets. now he hasn‘t been in the final for a sets. now he hasn‘t been in the finalfor a while sets. now he hasn‘t been in the final for a while and sets. now he hasn‘t been in the finalfor a while and his body is not used to it. that will certainly help federer. having said that, i would still go for rafael nadal to win. and it is worth mentioning the wheelchair men‘s doubles, because gordon reid completed a career grand
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slam in winning that. it is amazing. we are blessed. we have got good champions in all areas of the sport, and it is fantastic. tennis is booming in britain. and you are going straight into your commentary booth now, because it is starting in the next 15 minutes. thank you for coming to see us. let‘s find out what is happening with the weather. we are finally thawing out after a freezing cold week, with some nasty fog problems. temperatures are now rising and it isa temperatures are now rising and it is a relatively mild start to the day across england and wales. that is because we have a weather system that has moved in, bringing atlantic airand quitea that has moved in, bringing atlantic air and quite a lot of rain. it is a wet start of the day for many areas of the uk. across the high ground in scotland, some of the rain is falling as snow. that means some of the higher routes like the anine and a85 are getting stoked. there is a
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risk of icy stretches here for a time. for wales and southern counties of england, it is not a bad day. quite a breezy afternoon. the winds are coming from the west, so it isa winds are coming from the west, so it is a relatively mild direction. there will be a number of showers across south—western areas. the rain is reluctant to clear in northern england. northern ireland should brighten up, and scotland stays quite grey and cloudy. overnight, there was a risk of icy stretches across northern parts as we see a frost setting in the countryside. there will be some showers falling as snow over the hills of scotland and also over the pennines. later in the night, temperatures will rise across wales and south—west england as the next system comes in. this will bring more rain for the second half of the weekend. it will turn wet quickly for wales and south—west england. then the band of rain extends north and eastwards through the rest of sunday. to the north of
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this, it stays dry in scotland, but it will stay cold. the milder areas towards the south—west, with that cloud and rain. next week, it is an u nsettled cloud and rain. next week, it is an unsettled looking weak. then we see bigger systems towards the end of the week. this means we are looking at spells of rain next week. it is going to become windy, perhaps with severe gales developing. bursts of wind are often coming from the south—west. it will be on the mild side. i don‘t think there will be a great deal of frost around. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. it‘s time now for a look at the newspapers. guardian film critic peter bradshaw is here to tell us what‘s caught his eye. we are of course talking about the death of sirjohn hurt this morning. 77 years old. the breadth of his
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work and the scale of what he did... it is amazing. it is not a shock because he had been ill for some time, but he always wanted to keep working. it was notjust his work, it was his vocation and his life. the most recent of his performances was in the moviejackie. he plays a fictional composite role of her father confessor, her priest that jackie goes to in the movie and tries to talk about her relationship with president kennedy and the question of their marriage and his fidelity and the rest of it. it is a brilliant cameo forjohn hurt. it is exactly what he always supplied, this incredible potency and power, particularly in a small part. he gave any film that texts and depth, and he was a class act. he made anything look like $1 million. such anything look like $1 million. such a wonderful actor. people of my generation remember him first of
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course as caligula in i, claudius. we remember him bringing his horse on and making his horse a consort. he had that androgynous, boyish face in the late 70s. but there was a hint of what was to come. and a couple of years later, the elephant man, john merrick. you have come to review the papers and there was only one story dominating. i know, that was always going to be the main story. i don‘t know whether it is a success or not. all the papers are full of the hand shots. unlike normal people holding hands, they are not holding hands with their arms down, they are holding hands the way when you are a little kid, your mum grabbed your hand when you we re your mum grabbed your hand when you were crossing the road. clearly, it was mr trump‘s idea to hold her hand. she obviously didn‘t think, i will hold donald‘s hand. it was his idea. so you have this extraordinary
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shot. it is absolute catnip for the papers. intimate and yet bizarre. shot. it is absolute catnip for the papers. intimate and yet bizarrem is on the steps, so it is a moment. he is guiding her down. no one else would have got away with that. i don‘t think ronald reagan would have dared hold margaret thatcher‘s hand. it is the part as well. in the papers, you don‘t see the pattern —— pat. journalists, cynically, want it to bea pat. journalists, cynically, want it to be a disaster, and yet the patriots wanted to be a success. we are sick of mr trump terrifying us all. we want him to calm down and do the decent special relationship thing. and in a way, mrs may seems to have done that. she has got him to have done that. she has got him to reaffirm his commitment. in your paper, the guardian, on the issue of trump, melania trump is on the front page of vanity fair in mexico. i didn‘t know mexico have a special
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edition, but it does. and melania trump has chosen this moment to appear on the mexican edition, posing with a string ofjewels on a plate as if it is spaghetti, and she is about to eat them with a fork. which is quite odd, especially when mexico is suffering from a malnutrition and poverty crisis. and the president has cancelled his visit. he wants to build and own enormous wall at their expense to keep them out. pick another one, other than trump related.” keep them out. pick another one, other than trump related. i am a huge fan of the movie la la land. any story about la la land warms my heart. the ft have got this profile today of the director of la la land, a remarkable young guy, damien chazelle. he‘s 31 or 32 years old, poised for a historic victory with la la land. and the guardian has former strictlyjudge arlene phillips judging former strictlyjudge arlene phillipsjudging the former strictlyjudge arlene phillips judging the dance former strictlyjudge arlene phillipsjudging the dance numbers.
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i think she gives them nine. i would give them ten! i am going to be controversial. i didn‘t love it! go what?! this is what i call the la la land backlash. it happens every year. all of us critics are usually pretty unanimous. we write our reviews and about this time of year, there is the pundit backlash, where other people are nagged beyond endurance to see these films that the critics have beenjabbering about. and they go and see it, and it is ourfault about. and they go and see it, and it is our fault for overselling them. if only you could have seen it without having to listen to a jabbering chorus of people like me ordering you to see it! you don‘t wa nt to ordering you to see it! you don‘t want to be told what to do. even if it is good. you will be back in the next hour. headlines coming up in just a moment. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. coming up before 9, we‘ll have an update on the weather with chris. but first at 8.31am, a summary
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of this morning‘s main news: the actor sirjohn hurt has died. he was 77. he starred in around 200 films, including harry potter and was nominated for an oscar for his roles in ‘the elephant man‘ and ‘midnight express‘. sirjohn continued working despite being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2015. many tributes have been pouring in online. let‘s look at the other news this morning. theresa may and donald trump have stressed their commitment to nato in talks at the white house. the prime minister and the president both reiterated the importance of the special relationship in the first visit of a foreign leader to washington since donald trump‘s inauguration. theresa may urged the united states not to lift sanctions against russia. the us president is due to speak to vladimir putin today. i will be representing the american people very, very strongly, very forcefully, and if we have
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a great relationship with russia and other countries, and if we go after isis together, which has to be stopped, that‘s an evil that has to be stopped, i will consider that a good thing, not a bad thing. following the trip to washington, theresa may is now on her way to turkey for talks with president erdogan. the talks are expected to focus on trade and security but she‘s facing pressure to discuss concerns about alleged human rights abuses in turkey. lorry drivers should be banned from using sat navs designed for cars. that‘s what councils are calling for after a spate of incidents caused by heavy goods vehicles using bridges where they‘re too big or too heavy. the local government association wants legislation brought in to make it compulsory for all lorry drivers to use sat—navs specifically designed for their vehicle. a draft letter of abdication from king george ii! has been made public for the first time. the unsent letter — you can see here, which includes crossings out,
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redrafts, blotches and scrawls — was written during the american war of independence, and is one of thousands of his private papers released by the royal archives. those are the main stories this morning. 0f of course, a big day for sport. you know what i‘m talking about, the grand slam final. the greatest sporting story ever, the story of the williams sisters. the odds before the australian open started of the williams sisters meeting in the women‘s final and nadal playing federer were very long. it so mesmerising, the contest, it‘s not just the sporting battle but the mental battle, two sisters who have competed against each other so long. and serena with that record so close, who can mess it up... her sister! given that serena is 35 and venus a year older, it‘s remarkable that they are contesting a grand slam trophy again,
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for the first time, since 2009. then it was on the grass of wimbledon, on a day that serena won. venus has since had to battle a illness that affects her immune system, and serena has had her injury problems but if she can now win, it would be her 23rd grand slam title, taking her past steffi graff‘s record. there‘s a retro feel to the australian open tennis. you have to go back to 2008 to find these four players, in the same grand slam finals. this morning, serena williams takes on her sister venus, and tomorrow‘s men‘s decider will be between roger federer and rafael nadal. another throwback. how weird is this? that‘s after nadal, spent almost five hours on court yesterday, against grigor dimitrov, before eventually winning in five sets. nadal hasn‘t won a major title for three years — federerforfive. we never thought that we had the chance again to be in a final, and especially in the first of the year. so... i think both of us, we worked very hard to be where we are, so it‘s great.
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it‘s great that, again, we‘re in a moment like this, and we‘re going to have the chance to enjoy again a moment like this. and one more line from melbourne — britain‘s andy lapthorne lost to australia‘s paralympic champion dylan alcott in the quad wheelchair singles final. let me keep an eye on the women‘s williams final, if you like. we will keep you updated. highlights later at1:15pm. the fourth round of the fa cup got of to a flying start last night, with derby going so close to upsetting their neighbours, the premier league champions leicester city. derby of the championship, made it hard for themselves, as darren bent showed why he‘s a striker... a striker trying to defend, not particularly well. he did make amends, levelling for derby, went ahead before half—time and hung on until quad minute —— four minutes
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from the end when wes morgan. replay. what a cup tie, what a great game, great atmosphere. as i said, proud of the players, coming against the champions, to perform like that and give them a real good game. i just said, another game against them, look forward to it. it‘s a great tie for us. there‘s no dan walker on the sofa today — because he‘s on the road with football focus, at non—league lincoln city, giant—killers in the last round, hoping to knock out championship leaders brighton today. five premier league sides, are facing lower league opposition this afternoon — including liverpool, at home to wolves in the 12:30 kick off. liverpool‘s only win in any competition in 2017 so far, came when they beat plymouth argyle, in a third round replay. but wolves have already knocked out premier league stoke city. i don‘t like the results, but i see that we‘re really fighting, still fighting for each point, for each little victory, for each big success, all that stuff. that‘s what we‘re doing, and it‘s the job we have to do. i‘m absolutely more than ok,
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and looking forward to the next opportunity tomorrow. niall mcginn, scored two goals and set up another, as aberdeen beat dundee 3—0 in the scottish premiership. mcginn‘s volley on the stroke of half time was an absolute cracker. the win moved abderdeen above rangers into second place in the table — but they‘re still 21 points behind celtic. the welsh boxer lee selby, was almost in tears, after his ibf featherweight, world title defence, against, jonathan victor barros was called off, just a little over 24 hours before it was due to take place. the decision was announced on stage, just before the weigh—in in las vegas — american media have reported that barros had tested positive for hepatitis. saracens have gone top of their pool, in rugby union‘s anglo welsh cup, thanks to a 32—17 away to scarlets. elsewhere, sale beat cardiff 41—3.
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and gloucester fought back in the last few minutes to earn a 17—17 draw at bath. ben vellacott‘s late try and james hook‘s conversion rounded off a great contest at the rec. olympic team pursuit champion katie archibald eased to victory in the individual pursuit at the british national track championships in manchester. archibald, wearing blue here, fought off the challenge of emily nelson for her second victory in the event. excuse me if i make a quick exit, i‘m going to watch the williams grand slam final, something i never thought i would say a few years ago! nearly a quarter of a million people who care for someone with a disability are losing out on pension credits which could leave them poorer later in life. this is because many aren‘t claiming this extra benefit. paul lewis from radio 4‘s money box is in our london studio and has been
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looking at the figures. good morning. tell us a bit about what this is about and who can get help? these contributions toward your state pension, if you had to buy them date cost you several hundred pounds a year, so they are free in that sense and each year will boost your state pension by about 200 odd pounds a year. but out ofa about 200 odd pounds a year. but out of a quarter of million people who could get them, only about 11,000 actually have, the others have just not applied or they don‘t know about them or they find the whole process too daunting. but they really are missing out on important help, because if they don‘t get it, there could be gaps in their national insurance record and get reduced payments when they get to pension age. the people we are talking about our carers who will be very busy and as you say, trying to claim that this might seem very daunting than they might not have time to do it. how can you claim? it can be daunting. i was wondering why they had claimed and then i looked at the
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forms online on the government website. i must say, they are long. i think it might put people off. really am trying to encourage people, as i often do an breakfast, don‘t be put off, it is your right and you should do it. it‘s a long form but you just have to figure out with details and sometimes get a statement from a health professional you really a re statement from a health professional you really are caring for at least 20 hours a week, for someone who gets disability benefits and you don‘t get other benefits yourself and you can get this help. but you have to claim it. i don‘t know why, the government know who they are or should do, they could give it automatically stoplight interesting, thank you for that. you can hear more on money box on radio 4, at midday. it is 8:41am. tributes have been pouring in for the actor sirjohn hurt who‘s died at 77. the oscar nominated star continued working, despite being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2015. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson is here. good morning. 200 films he‘s been
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m, good morning. 200 films he‘s been in, it‘s such a varied career he‘s had. varied is the word. i was trying to think what madejohn hurt so special and it‘s when he took on a role he gave a sense of gravity as and a sense of fun at the same time. 1978, he took two role that year, the voice of haze the rabbit in water ship down. and nominated for an award for playing a heroin addict in midnight express. then he played the elephant man, oscar nominated again. for a whole generation he‘s known for harry potter for selling magic wands. he even has his doctor who action figure. what variety. he was one of those actors who had a stamp of quality. when you knew he was ina stamp of quality. when you knew he was in a film it was almost like you thought, this film is going to be something special, interesting or
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good. like a brand of quality. sense of relief if you knew he was in it. he‘s in cinemas at the moment, jackie, the film that could get natalie portman best actresses here. towards the end of the film up p°p5 here. towards the end of the film up poszohn hurt here. towards the end of the film up pops john hurt is here. towards the end of the film up poszohn hurt is appreciate 57. you think everything is all right now he‘s on—screen. think everything is all right now he's on-screen. fashion some were very popularfilms. he's on-screen. fashion some were very popular films. the alien was voted, that moment in the film many people remember, where the alien burst out of the chest is voted by many people as their favourite moment in the cinema. we‘ve spoken to sedona weaver, an interview done two years ago, where she talked about that moment in the scene and the actors preparing themselves for what was about to happen. it was in the script and when we got down to the set everyone was wearing
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ponchos, which made us think something is going to happen that‘s not usual. but i don‘t think anything could have prepared us first of all forjohn‘s performance. such brilliant acting. i didn‘t realise he was acting. you thought something had gone wrong. all i thought was, john is dying. then the next take, this was with a couple of quys next take, this was with a couple of guys underneath the table, no cgi, no anything, no green screen, with a couple of little tubes and bulbs, and they made this little, honestly, they did a quick change, then this thing came out ofjohn hurt‘s fake chest, sat on the table, looked around and ran off the table, all in one shot. there is a master where all five of us are... and we‘re not acting, because we just went... what just happened? you know, it happened so seamlessly that it seemed so
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real. wonderful to hear. one of the most famous deaths in cinema history. but three orfour famous deaths in cinema history. but three or four years famous deaths in cinema history. but three orfour years ago famous deaths in cinema history. but three or four years ago he famous deaths in cinema history. but three orfour years ago he had been playing quentin crisp in the naked civil servant. and before that he played caligula. he was never typecast. that‘s why so many tributes have been coming in for him because he meant so much to many people. mel brooks was the producer of the elephant man, he paid tribute saying no one could have played the elephant man better. jk have played the elephant man better. j k rolling because of the harry potter films. and the final tribute, to show the breadth of fan basejohn hurt had, axl rose from guns and
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roses has tweeted. he says, "archibald, you speak, one must never underestimate the healing power of hatred". we all now know axl rose‘s favourite john hurt power of hatred". we all now know axl rose‘s favouritejohn hurt roll. thank you. it is 8:45am. time to find out what‘s happening with the weather. good morning, chris. good morning, we are changing the weather, things turning much milder. you can see the green on the map and even tinges of yellow as those temperatures rise through the weekend. it is all change and the changes brought about by area of low pressure, also bringing some wet weather. a wet start to the day for many of us. this rain still working into the cold air is still with us in scotland, bringing some snowfall. most the snow above 300 metres elevation. but the a9 could be icy for a time to be some slow to clear
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rain from northern areas but different further south, where we get rid of the rain and replace it with sunshine and showers. there will be a brisk westerly breeze and that will bring in the mild temperatures, up to 9 degrees in london. staying on the cool side in northern ireland. and in scotland, staying quite cloudy and damp with the rain, four degrees as good as it gets the many areas. overnight tonight, as the skies clear, a touch of frost developing in rural areas. the risk of some icy stretches there will still be some snow showers across the of scotland and also over the pennines as well. further south and west, milder air will be working in as the next atlantic system pushes and in time for sunday. here is sunday‘s weather. outbreaks of rainfor is sunday‘s weather. outbreaks of rain for wales in south—west england, swinging northwards and eastwards a cross england, swinging northwards and eastwards across northern ireland. holding onto some sunshine in the north—east of england. still quite
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cold, temperatures 4—6. in the south—west we will be into double figures with cries of ten in plymouth. looking for the weather for the week ahead, and unsettled week. outbreaks of rain. one of the system is quite slow moving across the uk, but then it will get barged out of the way by more active weather systems. spells of rain next week, going to become quite windy. we may have some severe gales towards the end of the week. the wind often coming in from the south—west, so it will be quite a mild week compared with what we have seen. i think frost will be fairly rare, particularly late in the week. that‘s how the weather is shaping up. thank you, unsettled but mild. it is 8:48am. the veteran british actor sirjohn hurt has died at the age of 77, after battling pancreatic cancer. after yesterday‘s meeting with theresa may, donald trump is due to
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speak to theresa may, donald trump is due to speakto vladimir theresa may, donald trump is due to speak to vladimir putin later. for the first time in about 40 years, the government is planning a scheme to recruit specialist maths and physics teachers from abroad. it is willing to pay up to £300,000 to attract people from czech republic, germany, poland and the us in the hope it will help schools to fill vacant posts. so why is a scheme like this needed? joining us now is malcolm trobe, acting general secretary of the association of school and college leaders, a union which represents head teachers. and we are hoping to speak to patsy kane, with a secondary school in greater manchester. explain to us the problem they are trying to address. the problem basically is we have a national shortage of teachers around the country. in some subjects, maths and science, maths and physics particularly, the shortage is acute. but it is a national problem. in
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some parts of the country they are saying recruitment is that crisis level. why? quite simply we don‘t have enough teachers in the system. we‘re not training enough teachers, the retention rate is not as high as it should be, and so we are finding we have a significant shortage, as i say, particularly in maths, science and modern languages. surely we must have seen this coming? yes, there's a lwa ys have seen this coming? yes, there's always a time lag when you have to deal with the sort of difficulties because you have to get people through the degree system and through the degree system and through the degree system and through the training system, in terms of preparation. so we‘ve not been recruiting teachers over the last four or five years, so the problem has simply got to severe level. does it make sense, then, to look elsewhere and recruit from overseas? yes, we have traditionally always brought in teachers, often australia, new zealand and canada,
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we have a good reputation in terms of bringing teachers from over there. and we do recruit from ec countries at the moment. so it is good the government is actually taking action here, to recruit. but it‘s not actually an aspirational target. to recruit 50 teachers when we have over 3000 secondary schools, it‘s going to have an impact on less than 2% of the schools. as we say, the problem is really severe. it needs action. we as a profession wa nts needs action. we as a profession wants with the government come out with an overarching strategy to deal with an overarching strategy to deal with this problem. it's an interesting time to be talking about bringing in people from other countries to do jobs here, bringing in people from other countries to dojobs here, given everything that‘s happening with brexit? we don't know what the impact of brexit would be. rules that are set up yet to be determined. at the we do use teachers from it easy. when vote leaves ca m e teachers from it easy. when vote leaves came through it created a bit
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of uncertainty with ec teachers who are currently working in the system. we‘ve yet to see what the impact will be and what the rules will be, but we certainly at the moment need those teachers helping to build up their teaching community that we‘ve got in the country. do you have any concerns about the quality of the teaching? the impression is your slightly desperate, thinking, where is there a maths teacher? anyone, come in and teach maths here. is there a worry about standards? yes, you have to ensure you are getting high—quality teachers coming in. what we would do is have a programme of adjustment, teaching about the english system, to ensure there are aware of what the teaching methodologies that are used in this country, and how they work within the english system. there needs to bea the english system. there needs to be a conversion programme, a conversion course, as part of their induction. surely that there's more we could be doing here as well?
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absolutely. that‘s why we say we wa nt absolutely. that‘s why we say we wantan absolutely. that‘s why we say we want an overarching strategy, we wa nt to want an overarching strategy, we want to work the government to do this. we need to simplify the routes into training at the moment. we need to promote teaching more as a profession. we‘ve seen some advertising campaigns, but we need to build up better links with universities and schools, in order to get undergraduate and to enthuse about teaching. they‘ve all been taught and inspired at some stage in their life by teachers. what about people who aren‘t young and newly qualified but taking people move perhaps had other careers. that‘s what schools lack, where people have used maths or science in theirjobs? we don‘tjust used maths or science in theirjobs? we don‘t just want to recruit at 22. in fact, the average age coming into teaching is now, i think it‘sjust under 30. so we are recruiting people with significant experience,
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that have not just people with significant experience, that have notjust come straight through the pipeline of university, training course and straight into teaching. it‘s important to bring that industrial, business knowledge and experience into teaching. thank you very much, malcolm. he is best known as the monarch that went mad but has history misjudged king george iii? thousands of documents are being made available for the first time with a view to learning more about britain‘s longest—reigning king. the project is also the subject of a new documentary and we will be speaking to daily mailjournalist and historian robert hardman in a moment. first, here is a look at one of the most important discoveries. george, at the end of the line, try to work out what you do with this inability to form a government which he can have conference in. he wants to be the person who ends party, brings together the most able, to work in the national interest. what this speech is basically saying is, "i‘ve failed". what we see here, he‘s really troubled here, isn‘t he? yes.
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there‘s a lot of free drafting and crossing out going on. —— re—drafting. this is written in a state of high agitation, i think. you do get a sense of the troubled mind, the blotches on the scrawling and the scratchings out and we begin to come to the end of the line, and this is the key message. "i am therefore resolved to resign my crown and all the dominions appertaining to it to the prince of wales, my eldest son and lawful successor, and to retire to the care of my electoral dominions." daily mailjournalist and historian robert hardman joins us now. what a delight, to even see those things. set the scene for us. the cameras have been allowed into this place. this is windsor castle, a vault. the royal archive, where they put all the royal treasures. if you look at windsor castle, the big tower at the top, at the top of that
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is the royal archives, where they put all the papers and documents of every monarch, including our current queen. we were allowed in there, the first time camera crews have been allowed in properly, ever, to look at these extraordinary papers of george iii. they will be available to the public as of next week. they are going on a new website. we were allowed in to watch that process happening and it is extraordinary. this is inside the royal archives academics who always dreams of being able to look at these papers. they are finally being allowed in for their first rummage in these historic documents. hundreds of thousands of documents. the results, it will take many years before they are all put online and digitised but we were able to see it get under way. it was extraordinary to see papers like abdication documents, private letters, to hold them in your hand, and that‘s what‘s going on here. why do you think you we re going on here. why do you think you were allowed, what‘s changed? going on here. why do you think you were allowed, what's changed? these are papers that have basically sat
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in boxes for over 200 years. a few yea rs in boxes for over 200 years. a few years ago the queen decided to allow queen victoria‘s journals to be digitalised. that was a great success. so they thought, let‘s let george iii, let‘s open him up. history has been very unkind to george iii. they the only thing people know about him is he went mad and lost america. is the queen looking around some of her great great great great grandfather‘s papers. those letters, we saw the one right at the beginning. what clues that they give us to what george iii, what was really going on in his head? what did you learn?” think we learned stress of kingship in this period. this was a period when the whole world was in turmoil. he‘s just lost the war of independence in america, he‘sjust lost a child, all his politicians squabbling scream scheming, he thinks everyone is corrupt and out to get him so he writes this extraordinary letter of application.
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you drew attention to the scrawls, the bits crossed out, is musing and writing as he goes. he had no secretary, he sat down... we find this time and time again in the documents, the amount of detail and anguish that goes into these letters on these documents. it‘s quite extraordinary. we think of the abdication of henry viii, but this isa abdication of henry viii, but this is a king that twice drafted an abdication, never got round to it and went on to be the longest reigning king we ever had. he saw the application there but he reigned for another 30 years. and had 15 children. one of the big fines is the lock of hair. very early on we we re the lock of hair. very early on we were going through some of the papers from queen charlotte, his wife. out of nowhere pops this letter with a little envelope in it. we open it up and it is a lock of hairof we open it up and it is a lock of hair of prince alfred, child number 14, he died very young. we can have a look at that moment now. it's a short note from queen charlotte to lady charlotte finch, the governess. with a little paper
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included. just labelled, prince alfred's hair, cut during his... illness. 1782, at the lower lodge, windsor. and then a lock of prince alfred, little prince alfred who died, a little golden lock of his hair. for herto died, a little golden lock of his hair. for her to remember him by an thanking him for looking after him. that is amazing to see. i must ask you whilst you are here, president trump met theresa may yesterday and theresa may announced president trump will be coming here to meet the queen. that is going to be a big moment, isn‘t it? a very big moment. the queen has met all the great world leaders since pretty much the second world war. it was i suppose inevitable a new
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president would come, but that he is coming so soon is very interesting. the question is, where will he be hosted? the question is, where will he be hosted ? buckingham palace, the question is, where will he be hosted? buckingham palace, windsor castle ? there could be some breaks the protocol. they are saying maybe balmoral for the golf but i don‘t think now what happened. great to see you. george iii — the genius of the mad king is on bbc 2 at 9pm on monday night. the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the veteran actor sirjohn hurt has died aged 77. he appeared in 200 films and television productions and was twice nominated for an oscar. good morning.
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it‘s saturday, 28th january. also ahead: hand in hand in the white house —
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