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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 28, 2017 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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balmoral for they are saying maybe balmoral for the golf but i don't think now what happened. great to see you. george iii — the genius of the mad king is on bbc 2 at 9pm on monday night. the headlines are coming up. hello, this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the veteran actor sirjohn hurt has died aged 77. he appeared in 200 films and television productions and was twice nominated for an oscar. good morning. it's saturday, 28th january. also ahead: hand in hand in the white house — donald trump and theresa may
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pledge their commitment to the special relationship. i am a people person. i think you are also, theresa. i can often tell how i'll get along with somebody very early, and i believe we are going to have a fantastic relationship. after a spate of accidents, a call for lorry drivers to be banned from using satnavs designed for cars. in sport: they haven't met in a grand slam finalfor eight years, but serena williams is taking on her sister venus for the australian title and a record—breaking 23rd major crown. it is now 2—2. and chris has the weather. it is not as cold as it has been over recent days, but we have got some rain to contend with today and it is stilljust about cold enough for some of that rain to fall as snow in the hills of scotland. good morning. first, our main story. the actor sirjohn hurt has died. he was 77 and had recently
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been ill with cancer. he starred in around 200 films including harry potter and was nominated for an oscar for his roles in the elephant man and midnight express. our correspondent nick higham reports. a stirring and memorable role as joseph in the elephant man. he will also be remembered for his part in the film alien, this scene often voted as one of cinema's most shocking moments. john hurt certainly demonstrated his versatility as an actor, starring in more than 200 films and television series in a career spanning six decades. his talent was recognised with four bafta awards, including for his role as quentin crisp, the fla m boya nt
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for his role as quentin crisp, the flamboyant gay writer in the naked civil servant. i wear rouge, flamboyant gay writer in the naked civil servant. iwear rouge, iwear mascara on my eyelashes, i dye my hair, iweb clubwear mascara on my eyelashes, i dye my hair, iweb clu bwear clothes, mascara on my eyelashes, i dye my hair, iweb clubwear clothes, far more outre than those i am wearing now. many people said, don't do that, you will never work again. i said, but it's not about homosexuality, is about the tenderness of the individual as opposed to the cruelty of the crowd. youngerfans opposed to the cruelty of the crowd. younger fans may remember opposed to the cruelty of the crowd. youngerfans may remember him opposed to the cruelty of the crowd. younger fans may remember him for his more recent parts as the wand maker in the harry potter films and here in the tv show doctor who. why are you pointing your screwdrivers like that? fellow stars have been paying tribute. actor in niger tweeted, saying: —— elijah wood. he became sirjohn in 2015 after
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getting a knighthood for services to drama. that same year, he revealed he had grabbed a cancer, but was determined to continue working and was later given the all—clear. asked how he felt about death after the initial diagnosis, he said, i can't say i worry about mortality, when are alljust passing time and occupy oui’ are alljust passing time and occupy ourchair are alljust passing time and occupy our chair very briefly. john hurt, who's died aged 77. theresa may and donald trump have stressed their commitment to nato in talks at the white house. the prime minister and the president both reiterated the importance of the special relationship in the first visit of a foreign leader to washington since donald trump's inauguration. theresa may urged the united states not to lift sanctions against russia. the us president is due to speak to vladimir putin today. president trump has also announced stringent controls on immigration which he said would keep what he called "radical islamic terrorists" out
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of the united states. earlier we asked david willis to give us more detail on the proposals. donald trump vowed in his inauguration address to, as he put it, eradicate islamic terrorism from the face of the earth. he has now signed an executive order banning refugees from the country, indefinitely in the case of those from syria, temporarily in the case of those from other places. mr trump believes that terrorists often pose as refugees in order to get access to the country. he wants people only allowed in who support america and who love its people. he also announced plans for a temporary ban on the issuing of visas to citizens from seven majority muslim countries, countries that have been linked to terrorism. reaction has been swift. the senate minority leader chuck schumer described it as discriminatory and unconstitutional. he said that tears would be running down the cheeks of the statue of liberty.
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america's grand tradition of welcoming immigrants, he said, had been stomped upon with these measures. theresa may has travelled from washington to turkey for talks on trade and security with president erdogan. the prime minister is also facing pressure to discuss concerns about alleged human rights abuses. employers are being offered advice about how to reduce the gender pay gap before new regulations come into force in april. ministers say progress has been made but more needs to be done. companies with at least 250 workers will be forced to reveal the pay rates for men and women. international help has been arriving in chile to help the country fight the worst wildfires in its history. so far, 11 people have died and 1,500 homes have been destroyed. 0ur correspondent greg dawson has more. beneath the rising plumes of smoke, you get a sense of the scale of what is now one of the biggest emergencies in this country's history.
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forests incinerated, towns destroyed and lives lost. the fire service is so overwhelmed that residents are protecting their homes with hosepipes and bottles of water. more than 100 fires are still raging, aided by high winds and dry conditions. with services so stretched, teams of firefighters have arrived from columbia, with mexico also providing reinforcements. earlier in the week, the world's biggest firefighting plane arrived on loan from the us. now russia is sending a similar aircraft. the damage has left thousands without a home, with many forced into temporary shelters like this school. others are sleeping in vehicles, clinging to what they have left. but on friday came a reminder of those who have lost much more. funerals were held for a firefighter and policeman, both killed as they tried to tackle the flames. at least ten people are now
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known to have died, but with so few of these fires under control, it is a number that is likely to keep rising in the coming days. a draft letter of abdication from king george iii has been made public for the first time. the unsent letter — which includes crossings out, redrafts, blotches and scrawls — was written during the american war of independence, and is one of thousands of his private papers released by the royal archives. the uk's 2017 eurovision entry has been decided. # the oceans crossed... former x factor contestant luciejones will represent the country in kiev in may with the song never give up on you, which was written by
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a former eurovision winner. lucie was chosen after winning the combined public and jury vote at the end of a live tv show in which six singers performed. all of the potential acts were former x factor contestants. we wish her well. we haven't got a great track record in eurovision, but who knows? anything can happen. she has got some lungs on her, my goodness. all the sport and weather are coming up in a few minutes. successive uk prime ministers have crossed the atlantic to cement the so—called special relationship, knowing a positive washington trip can be crucial back home. this time, both theresa may and the us president donald trump had a lot to gain from the uk—us summit. we will be analysing the trip from both perspectives in a moment but first, here is a recap of some of the key moments. this is the original, folks, in many ways.
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it's a great honour to have winston churchill back. today, the united states renews our deep bond with britain — military, financial, cultural and political. we pledge our lasting support to this most special relationship. 0n defence and security cooperation, we are united in our recognition of nato as the bulwark of our collective defence. today, we have reaffirmed our unshakeable commitment to this alliance. i think brexit is going to be a wonderful thing for your country. i have been listening to the president and the president has listened to me, that is the point of having a conversation. i can tell how i will get along with somebody very early, and i believe we are going to have a fantastic relationship. we are joined on the sofa by the journalist and political analyst carol gould and from our london newsroom by the independent‘s we were just seeing some of the key
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moments and lots of talk about the special relationship. how do you think it went? it went well, but theresa may needs trump, because she is in theresa may needs trump, because she isina theresa may needs trump, because she is in a lot of hot water here with the controversy over brexit, the supreme court decision, the ongoing public discourse about it. so she needs an ally. i hate to say it, but he doesn't really need her. that is what came across to me even before this meeting, that she needed to get to the states to meet him, to make this acquaintance. in my estimation, i don't think it will be like ronald reagan and margaret thatcher. the fa ct reagan and margaret thatcher. the fact that he admitted that he supports nato is a shift from his campaign rhetoric, when he said nato was a waste of time. that was an interesting moment in the press conference, because effectively, theresa may spoke for him. she said,
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i think you said you are 100% behind nato, and he didn't say that himself in the press conference. a lot of people have said he was effectively on his best behaviour. that's right, she couldn't have done that with her majesty the queen because of confidentiality, but that was a clever move. he would likely have said it to her in a private session, and then she threw it at him. she forced him to be on his best behaviour, as you said. he is going to have to have allies in the senate to have to have allies in the senate to get through some of the programmes he will have discussed with her. he is a bilateral list, not a multilateralist. that is why the first thing he did was to get rub tra ns—pacific the first thing he did was to get rub trans—pacific partnership. then he will try and dismantle nafta, the north american free trade agreement with mexico and canada. people need people like bernie sanders, who was a huge voice in the senate. he has
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beenin a huge voice in the senate. he has been in washington 20 years. people say, who cares about bernie sanders any more?. bernie sanders was for getting rid of tpp, and he was for getting rid of tpp, and he was for getting rid of nafta. let's turn to john rentoulfrom the independent. we were talking about some of the domestic policies in the us, but we had that moment when laura kuenssberg from the bbc presented it directly to the president, some of the things people might find less palatable about why he said about abortion and torture amongst other things. and that prompted an interesting reaction from him. absolutely, he really didn't like it. he sort of turned to theresa may and said, this is your question, thatis and said, this is your question, that is another relationship gone. but ina that is another relationship gone. but in a sense, that was fine,
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because he was saying to theresa may, my goodness, your media isjust as bad as my media, we do have something in common after all. one of the things that stood out to me was the fact that theresa may said, there is much of which we agree. carol, do you think there is? there is, but on the issue of torture, i wouldn't have thought she agrees with him. i rememberwhen wouldn't have thought she agrees with him. i remember when donald rumsfeld, the former defence secretary, used to use an expression, we visit with them, which is a euphemism for what we do to people who are extraordinarily rendered. extraordinary rendition was the practice of taking prisoners to country where torture was allowed. i don't think theresa may is going to agree with president trump on that. there will be a couple of other issues on which they will disagree. but in a broad sense, she has to handle brexit. he's getting rid of multilateral agreements, which puts him in a
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position like britain in europe. the us is out of international trade agreements and it will require a lot of work. he may even call on herfor advice. john, some huge issues on the table, but to be fair, you will notice from your newspaper experience. here is one picture that dominated this morning, and that was that moment as they were walking around the white house and donald trump took theresa may's hand. just for a couple of seconds. that is going to be an enduring image. for a couple of seconds. that is going to be an enduring imagem is. but in a way, i am not sure that will be as bad for theresa may as a journalists assume. we did a poll for the independent the other day about asking people whether theresa may should be trying to pursue a closer relationship with donald trump and there are a lot of people opposed to it, but more people thought she was right to pursue a close relationship with the president of the united states. i
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think people will take a pragmatic view of that. the holding hands was a symbolic moment to capture that relationship. i think it would be theresa may nothing but good. the whole visit for her was a triumph. all the gossip in westminster was about how terrified her inner circle we re about how terrified her inner circle were that something was going to go wrong, that donald trump was going to say something untoward in the news conference. as to say something untoward in the news conference. as carol said, he was as meek as a lamb. one of the other relationships that will come under scrutiny is with russia, and that was mentioned by theresa may and president trump yesterday, with theresa may being clear about the sanctions against russia. but president trump was not being very committal about it. we know he will talk to vladimir putin later, so how significant is that? he is going to talk to vladimir putin tomorrow. you have to remember that he still has to consult. there is a concept of
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consent in the senate and congress, and there are republicans who don't agree with president trump. so he is going to talk to putin, but we don't know what his colleagues will say. he has to consult the cabinet, the joint chiefs of staff. he thinks he's going to be an emperor and just do what he wants, executive order after executive order, like he has done this week. but at some point, the idea of consulting congress is going to be important. and don't underestimate the power of the doye ns underestimate the power of the d oye ns of underestimate the power of the doyens of congress, john mccain and bernie sanders, who are highly respected. he can't toss them aside. and dick cheney, the former vice president, came out yesterday and said unequivocally, republicans and conservatives cannot have a ban on people coming here from muslim
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countries. we have to leave it there. thank you both. chris is here with the weather. good morning. we are finally coming out from the deep freeze. we had lots of frost and fog in the last week, but temperatures are rising. for many of us, it is a mild start of the day. the reason for the changes that we have an area of low pressure that is bringing some rain. still some cold air with this bringing some rain. still some cold airwith this in bringing some rain. still some cold air with this in scotland. so we have seen some of the rainfall as smoke over the higher ground, most of which has been over 300 metres in elevation. nevertheless, some of the a routes could be affected by snow. there could be slippery conditions
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here for a time. the rain will be slow to clear away from northern parts. further south, the rain will clear, followed by sunshine and showers this afternoon. the showers will not last because there will be brisk winds bringing relatively mild air. it will stay quite cold in northern england. brighter skies in northern ireland. in scotland, the rain and hill snow will be reluctant to clear away. 0vernight, the rain does ease off, followed by some showers. they will fall as snow over the higher ground in scotland and over the pennines as well. it touch of frost in rural parts. towards wales and south—west england, it will turn milder later in the night as the next atlantic system begins to move in. for the second half of the weekend, more rain on the way. after a bright start to the day, more rain will move in and that band of wet weather will continue to push northwards and eastwards. but it is not reaching scotland. here, it is a
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decent day, but quite cold. milder in the south—west. in the week ahead, it will be unsettled. slow—moving weather fronts are crossing the uk initially. later in the week, we will see more oomph from these weather systems moving in of the atlantic. spells of rain, certainly. but by and large, frost will become quite rare, certainly towards the end of next week. it's time now for a look at the newspapers. guardian film critic peter bradshaw is here to tell us what's caught his eye. a lot of people are waking up to the news that sirjohn hurt has died at 77 years old. a lot of reflections ona 77 years old. a lot of reflections on a remarkable career. a remarkable
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career. i have been thinking about the wonderful roles he has played. the generation of children have grown up the generation of children have grown up with him as mr 0llivander as the proprietor of the magic wand shopin as the proprietor of the magic wand shop in the harry potter movies. i remember him in so many roles. 0bviously, john merrick in the elephant man, his extraordinary performance that he had to selljust with his incredible voice. that delicate, quavering, but courageous voice of a survivor. but for me, his absolute masterpiece is the movie scandal, about the profumo affair, where he played the osteopath doctor stephen ward and ian mckellen played profumo. and joanne whalley played christine keeler. and john hurt nailed it. he embodied everything he wa nted nailed it. he embodied everything he wanted to embody. he nailed british snobbery and fear of sex and everything about that made such a great satire, a great anatomy of the
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british ruling classes then, as now. it was encapsulated byjohn hurt‘s brilliant performance. it is worth downloading it right now. on that recommendation, i am sure a lot of people will be revisiting his films. you have been looking at the papers. where are you starting? the daily mirror. a good old—fashioned social interest story on homelessness in britain. homelessness has doubled in the last two years. there is a stunning statistic in this report. there are around 4000 people on the streets. it was under 2000 two years ago. there are a number of different determinant factor is for this. mental health cuts and so on, problems with housing, people who are vulnerably housed and the rest of it. but we have all seen homeless
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people that we walked past, particularly in cities. and now with the weather so terrible, minus two degrees, this is a terrific story. it isa degrees, this is a terrific story. it is a classic mirror story, good old—fashioned socialjustice. it is a classic mirror story, good old-fashioned socialjustice. let's look at a story from the daily express. this is about everyone's utter dependence, our hypnosis when it comes to sat—nav. wendy sat—nav is switched on, we become mesmerised by the voice saying go 300 yards forward and then turn right. and this voice tells us what to do and we abandon our common. what is happening is that truckers get told what to do by sat—navs which are designed for tiny little country lanes. the express has a funny gallery of pictures of trucks which literally jammed into these gallery of pictures of trucks which literallyjammed into these winding little byways. and it is true. we
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are all mesmerised by sat—navs. we think they know. so the idea is that they should have their own special sat—navs. they should have their own special sat-navs. but also, use your common sense. if the lane in front of you is flooded and you as an experienced driver think, i can't drive into that without getting into trouble, then don't be overridden by this voice telling you to drive on. the local government association once legislation on this now, for lorries to have specific sat—navs for them. it is horrible, but they are funny pictures in the express of huge trucks getting jammed in tiny country lanes. to the world of photography now and trends with cameras. i never thought i would live to see the day. i am as the addicted to everyone else to taking pictures on my smartphone because of all the filters you can use which can surely approximate everything that an old —fashioned can surely approximate everything that an old—fashioned roll camera can take? no. kodak have reported that people are crying out for old—fashioned roll films. that people are crying out for old —fashioned roll films. and that people are crying out for old—fashioned roll films. and in the
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world of film too, people still want celluloid. they think it has a warmth and a richness and a colour tone which digital can't match. do we liken it to people wanting to buy vinyl? partly that, yes. whether or not it is rational, people still wa nt not it is rational, people still want vinyl. kodak are hard—headed business people. they wouldn't do it if they didn't think it wasn't profitable. they are going to bring back rolls of film. i am a bad photographer, but one of the things that having film in economic is that it makes you think about what pictures you are taking. if you take as many as you like, you don't think. i remember when you only had 34 exposures, and you would save it and come back from your holiday and go to the chemist. is all of that going to make a comeback? maybe it
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is. and the fish and chip revolution. yes, the ft is reporting from the national fish and revolution. yes, the ft is reporting from the nationalfish and chip championships, which i never knew existed. the revolution is that more and more people are eating fish and chips. it is up 4% in the last year. you would think that with burgers and vietnamese food and sushi, no one would be interested in fish and chips. no. people are really into fish and chips! is it comfort food, something to do with brexit? there isa something to do with brexit? there is a new phenomenon known as dining down, and! is a new phenomenon known as dining down, and i are going back to fish and chips. i haven't had old—fashioned fish and chips. i haven't had old —fashioned fish and and chips. i haven't had old—fashioned fish and chips for a while. i used to love them with too much salt and vinegar, and it getting too cold and three quarters of the way through, and continuing to eat it. you would power through. i love it. and the best chips from
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whitby, without a doubt lovely to see you. this is breakfast. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when angela hartnett takes over in the saturday kitchen. with all that talk about food, i bet there was not fish and chips on the menu there? no fish and chips this morning. we have a few other delights for you. our special guest todayis delights for you. our special guest today is a fabulous food writer and critic, tom parker bowles. feeling very good this morning. bright and early. not as early as me. what is your food heaven? broth, consomme, the essence of the animal. delicious soup. and your food hell? goats cheese. we have some amazing chefs as well, ken hom, to celebrate chinese new year. how are you? ready to go. what are you going to cook?
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session one dumplings, as i know tom likes spicy food. and steamed salmon with black bean sauce. and adam, your first with black bean sauce. and adam, yourfirst time on with black bean sauce. and adam, your first time on saturday kitchen. feeling good? i am excited. nervous, but looking forward to it. you are going to be fine. you have to do some delicious beef for us. we have already had beef, salmon and dumplings. tune in and see you at ten o'clock. we will do. coming up in the next half hour... #do # do you still love me? heartbreak, separation and living in the present. singer—songwriter ryan adams will be here to tell us about his new album just before 10. stay with us — headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. coming up before ten we'll have an update on the weather with chris.
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and the sport with mike. but first at 9.30am, a summary of this morning's main news: the actor sirjohn hurt has died. he was 77. he starred in around 200 films including harry potter and was nominated for an oscar for his roles in the elephant man and midnight express. sirjohn continued working despite being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2015. tributes have been pouring in online. let's have a look at the other news this morning. theresa may and donald trump have stressed their commitment to nato in talks at the white house. the prime minister and the president both reiterated the importance of the special relationship in the first visit of a foreign leader to washington since donald trump's inauguration. theresa may urged the united states not to lift sanctions against russia. the us president is due to speak to vladimir putin today. i will be representing the american people very, very strongly, very forcefully, and if we have a great relationship with russia and other countries, and if we go after isis together,
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which has to be stopped, that's an evil that has to be stopped, i will consider that a good thing, not a bad thing. following her trip to washington, theresa may is now on her way to turkey for talks with president erdogan. the talks are expected to focus on trade and security but she's facing pressure to discuss concerns about alleged human rights abuses in turkey. lorry drivers should be banned from using sat—navs designed for cars. that's what councils are calling for after a spate of incidents caused by heavy goods vehicles using bridges where they're too big or too heavy. the local government association wants legislation brought in to make it compulsory for all lorry drivers to use sat—navs specifically designed for their vehicle a draft letter of abdication from king george the third has been made public for the first time. the unsent letter — which includes crossings out, redrafts, blotches and scrawls — was written during the american war of independence, and is one of thousands of his private papers released by the royal archives.
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those are the main stories this morning. mike is here. did you just spritz some aftershave? that is just my natural aroma! you smell lovely. i've been watching the tennis. we are not in an episode of doctor who, it's not 2009, its 2017 and the williams sisters are in another grand slam final. as you would expect, serena is on top, chasing that record, the 23rd grand slam title that would take her beyond steffi g raf‘s total. title that would take her beyond steffi graf‘s total. serena went into this game against venus, for the first time in eight years, as firm favourites, as she tries to win a record breaking 23rd grand slam title. serena hasn't lost a set so far at this australian open, and she broke her sister's serve
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early on to seize the early advantage. however, if anyone is able to tame the serena serve, it is venus, and she broke back. but serena, who has won more of their matches to date, was able to seize the initiative with her greater power and took the first set 6—4, in 41 minutes. that shows how close it was, that it took that time to get the first set. lets get the latest from melbourne and speak to our tennis correspondent, david law. as someone who watches the game all the time, put it in context for ask how surprising is we are witnessing this throwback final mark ——? how surprising is we are witnessing this throwback final mark --? very surprising. if you did a survey of eve ryo ne surprising. if you did a survey of everyone who works in tennis i don't think anyone would have picked this to be the final on the last day of the tournament. venus williams hasn't been in a grand slam final for eight years. they haven't played each other for that long at this sort of stage. venus williams, aged 36, not young for a tennis player
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and she has had real health difficulties, a fatiguing illness for many years now. she hasn't really looks like getting to this stage of a tournament for a long, long time. but she is here on merit. she's having a fantastic run. serena williams, this is much more familiar for her. as you say, going for history today. if she can win this match, she moves ahead of steffi graf. it would be a monumental achievement from her and she has the first set on the board, 6—4. it is more competitive in the second set. 2-1. a more competitive in the second set. 2—1. a strange atmosphere, two sisters who love each other trying to beat each other. that's amazing on its own, then you add the fact tomorrow we have this retro men's final between rafael nadal and roger federer. absolutely. 36, nadal, he beat grigor dimitrov in five hours last night, amazing match. roger federer, aged 35. this is a grand slam final that we always remember.
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think of 2008, that's the only time the venus and serena williams final and federer and nadal both happened at the same tournament. that was the greatest men's match i think we'd ever seen. greatest men's match i think we'd ever seen. we probably thought we would never seek nadal and federer ina grand would never seek nadal and federer in a grand slam final again, i certainly didn't expect to see it again. this is an extraordinary grand slam tournament, the australian open, and one to cherish. what is it down to, that we've seen these two finals, the odds against which were 5001 at the start. is it others of all like murray and djokovic or have they got there by their incredible stamina and able to —— ability to fight back? i think it's a combination. if you asked the majority of people in tennis virtually everyone thought it would be djokovic and murray in the final. i certainly thought that would be the case, given the last two or three years. but they lost early. they were fatigued, not really mentally fresh compared to
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federer, who has had six months out because of injury. what it did it it refreshed him. he was so excited to be back on the circuit. but even he didn't think he would reach the final. he said, i might win a few matches but i've had six months off, how can i go all the way? nadal has incrementally worked his way back and we have one for the ages tomorrow. david, thank you for the updates. we will keep you updated on that williams final. the fourth round of the fa cup got of to a flying start last night, with championship side derby going so close to upsetting their neighbours, the premier league champions leicester city. it began with a bizarre own goal, darren bent giving leicester the lead with an awful slice into his own net. a striker ‘s defence! he did make amends, levelling for derby, who then went ahead before half time and held on untilfour minutes from the end, when wes morgan forced a replay. a strong header. the biggest giant killers from the last round, non league, lincoln city, are hoping home advantage, will help them cause another big upset. their manager danny cowley, says beating ipswich of the championship,
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in round 3, was like climbing a mountain, and so thinks today's match against the leaders of the championship, brighton, is like trying to get to the moon. niall mcginn, scored two goals and set up another, as aberdeen beat dundee 3—0 in the scottish premiership. mcginn's volley on the stroke of half time was an absolute peach. look at the control and finish. the win moved abderdeen above rangers into second place in the table — but they're still 21 points behind celtic. now 8 miles of fire, freezing water, huge obstacles, muddy trenches and electric shocks... it's why thousands are flocking to the west midlands this weekend, from all over the world. after 30 years, it's the final ever tough guy race this weekend, and it has led to hundreds of other extreme races being established. there's now even a movie out, to explore why so many want to do this... i've been on the course near wolverhampton ahead of this final weekend. it's the end of an era, on a farm in
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the west midlands, where for decades people from around the world have come together. why? to share the ultimate pain and fear. pushing their bodies over eight miles to the extreme, but after this weekend, there will be no more tough guy. it's been a huge part of my life, for sure, it's changed my life. it's a huge part of my life that will cease to be. hundreds of thousands of people have attempted this tough guy challenge in the last 30 years. but for this doing it this time, it will be the last ever. behind it all, the man known as mr mouse, a former soldier who 30 years ago wanted to add more of a challenge to fun runs and so reinvented the obstacle course. keep
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going! this is mild compared to the electric shocks and fire. i decided to put people through something they hadn't seen in the past, fear, pain, claustrophobia, all the things you fear come and lived here. then they come through and say, thank you. i cried, i was so unhappy... and you get this medal put around your neck. there's nothing else like it. i'm terrified, what can i say? but as mr mouse brings the curtain down on this world—famous event he is the subject of a movie that look at why people of today willingly paid to experience such pain and suffering. if you can come with a fight club —esque scar on monday morning and a story about what you did... running through fire... it sounds awesome. mr mouse's cultural
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impact is massive. all these things have exploded because of tough guy. not many people know about it. i thought it was a really compelling story. to mark the final tough guy, competitors will be joined on the course by the star of the warhorse film. to remember the suffering that was for real in the trenches 100 yea rs was for real in the trenches 100 years ago. and thanks to what started here, obstacle racing is now one of the fastest growing sports in the world. time to call it a day, so many other events around like tough mother. he will keep the equivalent for people that want to train for the sort of events. these super fests, that want to train for the sort of events. these superfests, you can download from the usual sites. how are you? just about warmed up again. it was
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about —1 in the air, imagine how cold the water was! laughter thank you, mike. it is 9:41am. back to our lead story. back to our lead story. tributes have been pouring in for the actor sirjohn hurt who's died at 77. the 0scar nominated star continued working despite being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2015. the actor clare higgins worked with sirjohn on doctor who. she joins us on the phone. thank you forjoining us. very, very sad news to wake up to today. tell us sad news to wake up to today. tell usa sad news to wake up to today. tell us a bit about your thoughts on him. good morning. it's appallingly sad news. john hurt was the perfect actor, as far as i'm concerned. he was a complete actor. he made so many ground—breaking performances, and all of us looked up to him. i was thinking this morning that whenever actors get together and start arguing about who's the greatest actor and who they admire
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the most, there are often a lot of disagreements. john hurt was acknowledged by all. there were never any arguments aboutjohn. he was simply the most brilliant, com plete was simply the most brilliant, complete actor. which is not surprising when you consider how many roles he did. 200 films he was in. it's not he was typecast in any of them because they we re typecast in any of them because they were so extreme, weren't they? i think that was part of his essence. he was a chameleon. he gave himself to his roles, and in doing so, john had this wonderful quality that so rare, he had a real tenderness and gentleness, which is rare ina tenderness and gentleness, which is rare in a male actor. he also crossed not only emotional boundaries in his work, but i'm remembering now the seminal quentin crisp in 1975, when he crossed gender boundaries. to such an extent it was a ground—breaking
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performance, not just as it was a ground—breaking performance, notjust as an actor, but also in a societal way. he opened a lot of doors for gay people with that performance. a beautiful man. 0na man. on a personal note, i know you spent some time with him at doctor who conventions. what was he like when he was meeting people, being more private? this is what sealed my deep affection for him. i spent three days with him last year, i think it was one of his last public performances at doctor who convention in los angeles. i watched him interact with fans who were overwhelmed to meet him. what was touching and lovely aboutjohn, this was not an actor talking to fans, this was a person talking to a person. it was very moving and lovely to watch. a beautiful gentleman. thank you so much for sharing your memories with us much for sharing your memories with us this morning. clare higgins, who worked with him on doctor who. 0ur entertainment colin paterson joins us now. good morning. hearing that, so many
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tributes coming in for him. the big ones coming in ajk rowling, because he was the magic wand seller in the original harry potter films. said so sad to hear the immensely talented and deeply beloved john hurt has died. mel brooks, one of the producers of the elephant man, where he got an 0scar the elephant man, where he got an oscar nomination for playing john merrick, mel brooks said no one could have played the elephant man more memorably, he carries that film into cinematic memory. and a tribute paid by axl rose from guns and roses. slightly misquote him but has treated" archibald, you speak, one must never underestimate the healing power of hatred". if you can get axl rose to be your fan, that shows his breadth of acting. youngerfans breadth of acting. younger fans will know him from films more recently but he is a link toa films more recently but he is a link to a different generation. his first role was in a man for all
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seasons in 1966, starring with 0rson welles. roles like i, claudius. you could sit here all day listing his great parts. alien, we heard earlier about one of the great cinematic deaths of all time. indiana jones he was in as well. you forget about them all. 1984 was another really memorable role for him. clare was talking about his role as clinton crisp, he twice visited that, the naked civil servant and an inclusion in new york. he started as an artist, he asked for volunteers who he could paint naked and one of the people was quentin crisp. and years later he would play him. finally, in the cinema right now, and jackie, with natalie portman. he turns up three quarters of the way in. whenever you saw
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three quarters of the way in. whenever you sanohn three quarters of the way in. whenever you saw john hurt three quarters of the way in. whenever you sanohn hurt in a film you thought, quality has arrived. thank you so much. it is 9:46am. let's look at the weather. good morning, we are falling out after a cold week with widespread frost. that is behind us now. the weather turning a lot more mild. the milderair weather turning a lot more mild. the milder air brought in by an area of low pressure, also bringing some wet weather northwards. as this begins there is some cold air in scotland and it will fall us know. a lot of the snow high up in the hills but nonetheless we have had some in perth. thank you to that weather watcher for that picture. the a9 have had some icy patches reported. further south and west there will be an improvement in the weather. sunny spells this afternoon, some blustery
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showers working in. milder, temperatures nine or possibly ten in london. northwards into north england, quite a cold morning. northern ireland a bit brighter, a few showers in the west, six in belfast. in scotland quite a lot of cloud, rain and hillsnow belfast. in scotland quite a lot of cloud, rain and hill snow lingering this afternoon, highs of four degrees at best. 0vernight the rain clears away followed by some showers. temperatures will fall away across northern parts. a touch of frost in the countryside. a risk of icy stretches developing. there will be some snow in those showers for the hills of scotland and the hills of the pennines. later in the night, the next weather system comes in. sunday morning that will bring some wet weather across wales, south—west england, the rain arriving in northern ireland. after a bright star in northern england, tending to cloud over with some rain later. in north—east england and scotland, you should hold onto some decent sunshine. it will still be quite cold and the mildest weather in the south—west, where temperatures reached double
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figures in plymouth. the week ahead looking pretty turbulent. slow—moving weather fronts bringing rain initially and then the atlantic wa kes rain initially and then the atlantic wakes up late in the week with some strong areas of low pressure. all in all this means it will be an u nsettled all this means it will be an unsettled week, spells of rain, quite windy at times but also on the mild side. thank you, have a lovely day. many of us may have found ourselves in unexpectedly narrow roads because we've blindly followed our sat nav. in a car there's often no harm done. but in a lorry it can be a different matter. the local government association is blaming a reliance on sat navs for a spate of heavy good vehicles getting stuck under low bridges. they want legislation brought in to make it compulsory for all lorry drivers to only use devices specifically designed for their trucks. we're joined byjoanna morris joins who's been a lorry driverfor over 16 years. 16,17 16, 17 years. 16,17 years. in 16, 17 years. in the time you've been driving, sat—navs have arrived.
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painta been driving, sat—navs have arrived. paint a picture of you in your truck with a sat—nav. does it take you to places you shouldn't be? it does. i have a truck sat—nav and i can put something in but it has tried taking me down certain roads, mainly on country lanes and stuff. but obviously using common sense you'd say, my truck isn't going to get down there so you either get a normal map out or phone the transport office and see if they can re—route you anywhere. you wouldn't go down, you are five foot long... it must be tricky when you don't know if something like a bridge is going to come up? if you're only relying on your sat—nav, you're not looking at road signs. as a professional driver driving a truck you should be looking at road signs as well, not just you should be looking at road signs as well, notjust relying on the red line. i love my sat—nav. when i first started i didn't have a sat—nav so i had to do map—reading.
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but having a sat—nav has come in handy, but i wouldn't rely on it totally, you can't rely on it totally, you can't rely on it totally because you have to use common sense. is there such a thing asa common sense. is there such a thing as a sat—nav that is geared towards driving a truck? you can put into the system what you're driving and it can find appropriate routes? mine does. you can put width and length. does it work? not always. it does get you out of some situations, it will sort of beep a warning that there is a bridge but it's sensible to look at the road signs. if you don't look at the road signs... a roadside will point, when you come toa roadside will point, when you come to a bridge, a bridge makes my heart flutter, i've never gone near one, thankfully, but they make my heart flutter. what i do is look at the road signs, and it points to which way the bridge is. if you don't look at that road signs, you don't know
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if it's to your left or to your right or straight on. you have to read the road signs as well as using your sat—nav. read the road signs as well as using your sat-nav. that sounds obvious but still you get those pictures where you see the lorry stuck and the local government association are so worried about it they want the laws to change. what do lorry drivers tell you about what they rely on? some don't. some are ready good navigators and don't use a sat—nav at all. that's good, they are not lazy and know the way. but something like that... you would know, you can tell. if you're a professional driver, that's what we are, you should be able to know, evenif are, you should be able to know, even if you don't come from this country, if you're going round a bend and you're going to come towards houses, you can't risk it.|j know you are back in the truck today. i am. drive know you are back in the truck today. iam. drive safely. thank you. thank you, joanna. it is 9:52am.
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over the last couple of years, our next guest has toured the world, picked up two grammy nominations and has even covered an album by the popstar, taylor swift — much to her delight. ryan adams now has a brand new record out, which includes some of his most raw and reflective material to date. it is his 19th album. we'll speak to him in a moment, but first lets have a listen. #do # do you still love me, babe # do you still love me, babe #do # do you still love me, babe # do you still love me, babe # do you still love me, babe # do you still love me, babe # do you still love me, babe #do # do you still love me, babe # do you still love me, babe # do you still love me, babe # do you still love me... # do you still love me... # another gear will pass # another gear will pass # i will count the days
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# i will count the days # another sun goes down # another sun goes down # and will never see the rays #is my rays # is my heart blind #. ryan adams joins us now. i hear you caused chaos in manchester last night. you performed a gig randomly, tulisa happened?” got here in the afternoon and went for some food. i was just sitting there with one of my managers and i thought to myself, how can i make thisjob harder today. i thought, thought to myself, how can i make thisjob harder today. ithought, i should go my tour and say, where shall i play? i did it thinking nothing would happen, but like an hour later we had a place to play. so this is an arranged, nothing planned, nothing arranged before you
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turn up. where did you go, a cafe? i was going to go to the southward lads club because that place is awesome. and it sounds nice in there and they've been really kind to me. it was last—minute and they were having boxing. then this place, the soup kitchen offered. i waited to tell people this is what it's going to be. as soon as i posted this anti—war hole soup can i think people caught on. your fans will know this, i'm sure, but it shows how much you love to play. simple as that, playing music. you turn up at a place, find somewhere to play, get a guitar and you're off. yes, i was going to be like read my bookin yes, i was going to be like read my book in no time get bored or go and play and try to create some pleasant chaos. i opted for the second. this is your 19th album, isn't it?
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tell us about this, what's different and what's new in it? i probably have way more silver has! i'm not seeing them anywhere. —— silver hairs. this one is different, maybe, the second or third in a row i have produced myself. i've kind of gone from playing almost all acoustic shows to playing with the band. i've spent time thinking about how i want staff to sound on record, how is it exciting to me? and then i end up challenging myself more, which is really cool. trying new things, trying to leave things more sparse, it's nice, reverse editing. some artists are happy to kind of play out their private lives, talk about what's happening in their lives in their music. that's something you do as well. are there decisions about how much you offer up of yourself in your music? is that tricky sometimes
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question that this is quite a personal album, isn't it? yes, but! don't think anyone would accuse me of making an impersonal record or a record about ufos or something, not that i won't or i'm not interested... but they always deal with that kind of subject matter. i grew up listening to a band from here, the smiths. when i was listening to this record, i thought, they are making things that matter in day—to—day life, things that might get overlooked or things that impact us that we forget about. they illuminated them so much. i think i found a way to tap into that and sort of try... it sounds strange, but there's so many records and bands where it's just about partying, and just doing that stuff, which is great, because i'm a goofball in my life... i haven't
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heard anyone say that for so long! it's true, but i think it's nice to be on the side of trying to illuminate the more complicated stuff. it's good, it makes me feel like i'm leaving a map for people if they're in a hard place. you have an eclectic taste in terms of your inspiration. the smiths on one hand and taylor swift on the other hand. you did a cover of her album. taylor smith! a mash up. it is eclectic customer i guess so, i tend to play music when i'm not playing music. it's still something i enjoy doing. i live in california. some of my friends we like to get together and play. that is what we did that week. will you be doing live stuff in the uk? yes, there is a tour, it's not announced yet but i'm very excited. it's going to be awesome. lovely to see you here this morning.
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not everybody‘s cup of tea, early morning on the sofa! ryan's album prisoner is released on february 17th. that is it from us this morning. have a great weekend from everyone here, bye—bye. have a lovely day. this is bbc news. i'm maxine mawhinney. the headlines at ten: tributes to the bafta—winning actor sirjohn hurt, who has died aged 77. i dye my hair, i wearflamboyant clothes, far more outre than those i am wearing now. he starred as quentin crisp in the naked civil servant, as well as films including alien and the elephant man in a career spanning six decades. president trump bans the entry of syrian refugees to the us until further notice. fresh from her historic visit to the white house, theresa may travels to turkey, where she's set to discuss a post—brexit trade deal. also in the next hour...
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back to the future, as the williams sisters battle it out in a major final. they've played each other 27 times in their long careers — but this one is going all serena's way — she's taken the first set
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