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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 28, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at five. president trump signs an order banning all refugees from entering the united states — there's also a three month ban for citizens from 7 muslim—majority nations, with stringent visa restrictions in place. provo kes provokes strong condemnation from germany and human rights groups. this is more than a trade deal is as pa rt this is more than a trade deal is as part of a deep defence strategy. things fall apart. the centre cannot hold me and a key is loose upon this world. tributes to one of britain's most respected actors, sirjohn hurt, who has died at the age of 77. serena williams rewrites tennis history, beating sister venus to capture a record—breaking 23rd grand slam title in the australian open. good afternoon and
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welcome to bbc news. us president donald trump's decision to impose a temporary ban on all refugees entering the united states has provoked strong condemnation from france, germany and human rights groups. america's borders will also effectively be closed for 3 months to anyone from 7 middle eastern countries including iran, iraq and syria. in the last hour the spokeswoman at the department of homeland security has confirmed in an email that the executive order also applies to resident permit holders, also known as green cards. mrtrump said the mr trump said the measures help the country to be protected from islamic
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terrorism. protection of the nation from foreign terrorists‘ entry into the united states. with a flourish of his pen, another sweeping change, a halt on visas for people from seven mainly muslim countries, heavy restrictions for refugees wanting to enter the us, to stop, says president trump, another 9/11. i'm establishing new vetting measures to keep radical islamic terrorists out of the united states of america. we don't want ‘em here. with that announcement, confusion. on social media, reports of people being stopped at airports. one said an iraqi friend who fled isis was turned back. in doha, claims that iranians with immigrant visas were being returned to iran. in qatar, the father of a former la times employee in iraq reportedly turned back by us officials, what it means for some still unclear. but for the syrian refugees who fled war, there's no question. they are now indefinitely banned
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from entering the us, and all other refugees are suspended forfour months. like naveen, which is not her real name, a transgender woman who fled iraq, persecuted for her sexuality, now living in lebanon. she was accepted for resettlement in america. that now, it seems, is on hold. translation: the moment i heard the news, my dreams were shattered. my parents want to kill me. i'm terrified they'll find out where i am now. i hoped i'd feel safe in the us, that i'd finally be able to sleep in a country where i have rights, and no—one could hurt me. this order will not just affect tens of thousands of refugees, but many across the middle east who regularly travel to the us on visas. google has recalled its staff, saying it's worried
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about the impact it may have. for some, rather than improve security, this will only leave muslim communities more isolated. alex forsyth, bbc news, beirut. the uk and turkey have signed a defence deal worth more than £100 million to develop turkish fighterjets. the prime minister, theresa may, is in ankara for talks on a post—brexit trade deal and a closer relationship between the two countries. at a news conference, turkish president erdogan announced that turkey was aiming to boost trade with the uk from a current value of around £12 billion a year to £16 billion. mrs may also announced the creation of a joint working group to prepare the ground for a post—brexit relationship. i'm delighted that companies will be
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collaborating on a new fighter plane. this is the start of the deep defence initiative. at the same time we announce a new and unique government to government agreement between turkey and the united kingdom. it sets a new framework for cooperation and dialogue between our countries including the defence ministry and air forces. also, we have agreed to established a trade working group. these initiatives stand as concrete commitments to a strengthened relationship between owners which will help to ensure the continued security and prosperity of the turkey and the uk. theresa may speaking earlier, and cara. —— ankara. stars from around the world have been paying tribute to the actor sirjohn hurt, who has died at the age of 77.
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he had been suffering from pancreatic cancer. his career spanned over six decades and more than 120 films — including the elephant man, alien, and harry potter. nick higham, looks back at his life. john hurt, as the deranged roman emperor caligula in the bbc‘s i, claudius. but you ordered no triumphs. well, of course i ordered no triumphs. do you think i'd order triumph for myself? but you ordered us not to order any. yes, and you took me at my word, didn't you? and in the naked civil servant. i wear rouge, i wear mascara on my eyelashes, i dye my hair, i wear flamboyant clothes, far more outre than those i am wearing now. he was an unusual actor, instantly recognisable, yet never typecast. here, he played the notorious and flamboyant quentin crisp. people said it was a brave part to take on. many people said "don't do that, you'll never work again", and so on. and i said "but it's not about homosexuality, it's about the tenderness of the individual,
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as opposed to the cruelty of the crowd, really". his breakthrough had come in a man for all seasons in 1966, a small part in an oscar—winning film. what will you do with it? sell it. and buy what? a decent gown. he earned an oscar nomination himself for midnight express, in which he played a heroin addict in a turkish prison. i'm very pleased to meet you, mr merrick. and another for his performance as the hideously disfigured john merrick in the elephant man. like quentin crisp, merrick was an outsider ostracised by society. perhaps... this. late in his career, he reached new audiences in harry potter. you're my future selves? yes! and in a guest appearance in doctor who. why are you pointing your screwdrivers like that? in one of his last performances, he played a dying screenwriter, quoting lines from a famous dylan thomas poem. do not go gentle into that good night.
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old age should burn and rave at close of day. rage, rage against the dying of the light. today, his widow anwen called him "the most sublime of actors and the most gentlemanly of gentlemen, who touched all our lives with joy and magic". remembering sirjohn hurt who has passed away at the age of 77. still to come on bbc news. the weather and at half past five or the day's sports news. before that, view is on bbc one willjoin as bob and above today's news. good evening. theresa may has visited turkey where she's announced a defence deal worth more than £100 million to develop turkish fighterjets. the prime minister has been visiting ankara for talks
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on a post—brexit trade deal. visiting ankara for talks turkey's president erdogan said the visit was an opportunity to strengthen ties and deepen cooperation. from ankara, our political editor, laura kuenssberg, reports. a morning at the palace, the presidential palace, meeting a president used to doing, perhaps, whatever it takes to get his way. perhaps, whatever it popular, feared, too, after a coup that failed against him, but she wants closer ties on trade and defence, but also to make british concerns about his behaviour clear. i'm proud that the uk stood with you on the 15th ofjuly last year, in defence of your democracy. with you on the 15th ofjuly last now it is important that turkey sustains that democracy, by maintaining the rule of law and upholding its international human rights obligations, as the government has undertaken to do. as the government has undertaken no mention of that for him. as the government has undertaken translation: it gives us great pleasure and it's a privilege to host prime minister theresa may here in turkey.
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we've had a meeting and working lunch and the discussions i hope will yield success for both of our countries. just as theresa may was the first leader to enter the trump white house, she has today become the first western leader to come to president erdogan golden palace in ankara, high up on the hill, since the attempted coup against him. since the attempted urging the importance of human rights, though, she's shown she was unafraid to speak of mind. having delivered a message on human rights, the ceremonials could begin. the prime minister able to enjoy the parade. and appear alongside her counterpart to announce a deal where british firm bae will design turkish fighter jets, the start of a partnership that downing street hopes could bring in billions. but questions about her other new friend, president trump, followed her to turkey. new friend, president trump, after the american leader banned some muslims
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from entering the country. banned some muslims asked three times whether she agreed with president trump's ban, this was all she would say. with president trump's ban, well, the united states is responsible for the united states policy on refugees. is responsible for the united states the united kingdom is responsible for the united kingdom's policy on refugees. for the united kingdom's while marking the past, theresa may is following her own path around the world. theresa may is following her own she can't choose her fellow leaders, yet politicians, like the rest of us, are sometimesjudged by the company they keep. are sometimesjudged laura kuenssberg, bbc news, ankara. are sometimesjudged as are sometimes judged referenced as are sometimesjudged referenced in laura's report lawyers in the united states have lodged a challenge to an executive order — signed by president trump — which temporarily bans all refugees, and any traveller from seven mainly muslim countries from entering the us. the ban includes stopping those with a resident permit, known as a green card, from re—entering the country. that order has caused confusion and panic among travellers with some people being turned back from us bound flights.
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alex forsyth reports. from us bound flights. on from us bound flights. lebanon's streets the need clear, on lebanon's streets the need is clear, one in four is a refugee who has fled war in neighbouring syria. some wanting one day to return, others desperate to move on, now all banned from the us indefinitely. and refugees from anywhere suspended for four months. like naveed, which is not her real name, a transgender woman persecuted in iraq who fled to beirut. she was in the process of being resettled in america. that now, it seems, on hold. translation: the moment i heard the news my dreams were shattered. my parents wa nt to dreams were shattered. my parents want to kill me. i'm terrified they'll find out where i am now. i hoped i'd feel safe in the us, that
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i'd finally be able to sleep in a country where i have rights and no one could hurt me. with a flourish of his pen, president trump made sweeping changes to policies for refugees and immigrants, to improve, he said, america's security. i'm establishing new vetting measures, to keep radical islamic terrorists out of the united states of america. we don't want them here. the executive order specifically mention suspending entry from seven countries, with predominantly muslim populations. people from those areas have taken to social media in confusion. one said an iraqi friend who fled isis was turned back from a us who fled isis was turned back from a us flight. who fled isis was turned back from a us flight. and in qatar 71—year—old man heading to la was back to iraq. i think this is a case—by—case basis
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in which the family lawyers intervened. we're still waiting on getting more information on that, but in general it's a state of panic and confusion. the extent of this order has enormous implications, not just for refugees but for many from the middle east no able able to travel to the us. president trump argues it will improve security but many have condemned the message it sends to muslim communities around the world. some refugees have been detained at airports today, and are being represented by civil rights groups launching legal action. the full extent of this order may not be clear but already the consequences are being felt and challenged. alex forsyth. serena williams has beaten her older sister, venus, in the final of the australian open to win a record—breaking 23rd grand slam title. a record—breaking 23rd the 35—year—old will now reclaim her number one ranking. our sports correspondent, katherine downes, reports. in the field of sporting achievement, she now stands alone. this latest victory a defining
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chapter in the legend of serena williams. chapter in the legend the twist in the tale — only her sister could deny her and open era record 23rd grand slam. and venus had her own fairy tale to write, 36 years old, back from career threatening illness, now with the chance of another grand slam title eight years since her last. but after initial frustration, serena refound that devastating first serve. serena refound that and took the first set. serena refound that venus made her little sisterfight for her piece of history. there it is. for her piece of history. finally, number 23. for her piece of history. serena's the history maker, but together she and venus have revolutionised women's tennis. but together she and venus have she's my inspiration, she's the only reason i'm standing here today and the only reason the williams sisters exist, so thank you venus for inspiring me. the williams sisters exist, the record broken, she has nothing left to prove, but being serena, they'll be much more to come. left to prove, but being serena, katherine downes, bbc news. left to prove, but being serena, tributes have been paid
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to the actor sirjohn hurt, who has died at the age of 77. to the actor sirjohn hurt, he'd been suffering from pancreatic cancer. his career spanned over six decades and more than 120 films — including the elephant man, alien and harry potter. his widow said he was the "most sublime of actors", who brought "joy and magic to all our lives." sublime of actors", who brought "joy nick higham looks back at his life. sublime of actors", who brought "joy your sublime of actors", who brought "joy emperor has john hurt, as the deranged roman emperor caligula in the bbc‘s i, claudius. roman emperor caligula but you ordered no triumphs. roman emperor caligula well, of course i ordered no triumphs. do you think i'd order triumph for myself? but you ordered us not to order any. triumph for myself? yes, and you took me at my word, didn't you? typical. at my word, didn't you? and in the naked civil servant... at my word, didn't you? i wear rouge, i wear mascara on my eyelashes, i dye my hair, i wear flamboyant clothes, far more outre than those i'm wearing now.
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far more outre than he was an unusual actor, instantly recognisable, yet never typecast. instantly recognisable, here, he played the flamboyantly gay quentin crisp. people said tt was a brave part to take on. many people said "don't do that, you'll never work again", and so on. and i said "but it's not about homosexuality, actually, it's about the tenderness of the individual, as opposed to the cruelty of the crowd, really". his breakthrough had come in a man for all seasons in 1966, a small part in an oscar—winning film. what will you do with it? in an oscar—winning film. sell it. in an oscar—winning film. and buy what? in an oscar—winning film. a decent gown. in an oscar—winning film. he earned an oscar nomination himself for midnight express, in which he played a heroin addict in a turkish prison. i'm very pleased to meet you, mr merrick. and another for his performance as the hideously disfigured john merrick in the elephant man. as the hideously disfigured like quentin crisp, merrick was an outsider ostracised by society. merrick was an outsider perhaps... merrick was an outsider this.
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merrick was an outsider late in his career, he reached new audiences in harry potter. you're my future selves? new audiences in harry potter. yes! new audiences in harry potter. and in a guest appearance in doctor who. why are you pointing your screwdrivers like that? in one of his last performances, he played a dying screenwriter, quoting lines from a famous dylan thomas poem. do not go gentle into that good night. old age should burn and rave at close of day. rage, rage against the dying of the light. sirjohn hurt, who has died aged 77. i'll be back for the late news at 10.10pm. now on bbc one, it's time for the news where you are. goodbye. for the news where you are. hello. this is bbc news. more now on president trump's executive order, which severely restricts passport—holders from seven mostly muslim countries.
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iran has condemned the ban as an "open affront against the muslim world and the iranian nation" and vowed to reciprocate. meanwhile, google has recalled its travelling staff members back to the us. let's discuss more on this with murtadha al—tameemi. he is an iraqi—born facebook software engineer who has been advised by his company's lawyers to stay put in the us. he joins me live from boston, massachusetts. have i got those details right? you have been advised to stay in the united states and not to travel. yes, that is right ever since the news surfaced about the executive order, the advice i have received from immigration lawyers is to not
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leave the country. i was already outside the united states when the first news came out on tuesday and i got a call from my lawyer saying "come back, right now. it is possible as of tomorrow morning you may not be to enter the country." how are you feeling? i feel a mix of things. hearing that this country is now putting a ban on people like myself and others is discouraging and disappointing, so many words that i could use to describe it. it doesn't feel right. at the same time, the amount of support that people are showing and the solidarity that people are exuding from people not affected by it but simply outraged is amazing. it is something that has surprised me and iam something that has surprised me and i am optimistic that something like this will not last that people will
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fight against it and stand up all it. i understand you have a work visa. you are born in around. iraq. iraq, sorry. you have a work wiese. do you understand how this executive order affects you? —— you have a work visa. there is still some confusion about what it means. the initial interpretation, which makes sense given the text of the order, is that people from these countries are not going to be able to receive theseis are not going to be able to receive these is be allowed entry into the united states. so, if that is indeed true, if that is what the text says then the effect of this on me personally are huge. my family live in canada and i see them on a weekly basis, i spend in canada and i see them on a weekly basis, ispend holidays in canada and i see them on a weekly basis, i spend holidays and weekends with them, they settled there is refugees, so i go there every week to see them and now all of a sudden
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ifi to see them and now all of a sudden if i go, to see them and now all of a sudden ifigo, i to see them and now all of a sudden if i go, i may not, i will not be able to go back and that could jeopardise my life and work in the us. ori jeopardise my life and work in the us. or i could not go and see them for however long this things last ulster as of now it sounds like it will be 90 days, i had trips plan yesterday and next week. i was going to go to africa but business but i had to suspend my trouble and sit still and that is why i'm in boston. i wasn't planning to be here but i'm here and waiting to see what will happen without really applying plan for where to go next. are you getting any legal advice from your attorney? what support ie receiving from facebook? the attorneys that have been supporting me are keeping a close watch on the news and trying to understand the impact and seeing
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what we can do with it. because this thing was assigned yesterday, they are still trying to understand the full impact of it and how we can work around it and what we can do with it. they are working hard on it, in fact the call i got the my attorney on tuesday night she volunteered that, she didn't have to do it. she remembered that i1 of her client and i travel back and forth and she suspected i might be out of the country and you called me to warn me. i know that they have my back and i am counting on them to give the best advice they can to help me navigate this situation. i1 of the fortunate people that have this access to attorneys do my work. ——iam this access to attorneys do my work. —— i am one of the fortunate people. people that don't will have a much harder time as they have do suspend their plans to visit their family all stuck on the outside of the border if they are overturning from travel. people coming back from
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holidays will stop in fact, i know somebody who was getting married and now she can't come back. so, it is terrible. what does this do, how are your feelings about living and working in the united states, are you happy to stay in the country? or are your feelings changing? you happy to stay in the country? or are your feelings changing ?l you happy to stay in the country? or are your feelings changing? a good question. when i first heard about this and i was coming back into the country i asked the border officer and said had you heard of this and they said they didn't know about it that had been confirmed. that was on tuesday. he said, you know what, you would want to be here anyway when stuff like this is happening. i thought about that and i don't know what he meant and i was thinking maybe he is right, maybe i don't wa nt to maybe he is right, maybe i don't want to be here, why would i want to be in want to be here, why would i want to beina want to be here, why would i want to be in a country that is taking this sta nce be in a country that is taking this stance and rejecting me and rejecting people like on the my country and other countries? i was
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saddened by this reality and i started thinking along these lines and thinking, is this representative of how people feel about me? very quickly, i made a facebook post about this and that is how i ended up about this and that is how i ended up talking to you guys, is do a post i made that was immediately spread. people started messaging me and commenting. people i have never met expressed their frustration on how sorry they are that this is happening and how they disagreed with it. that was a very quick turnaround and reminded to me that this country does not, the people of this country does not, the people of this country do not believe in these policies, that the american people i knew when i first came here ten yea rs knew when i first came here ten years ago that welcomed me with open heart and arms and expressed so much generosity and kindness, they are still there and they are fighting the me and people like myself. that
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was very professional in and until now as i'm talking to you i'm getting messages about people sharing their support. that is touching. it reminds me that this is not a country that will give up on me or that i want to give up on. i wa nt to me or that i want to give up on. i want to stay here, i want to continue to fight the people like myself and others that came here in pursuit of their dreams and are working hard and contributing to society. people who are creating new lives for themselves, their family and others. even though this is discouraging, and it is easy to get cynical and though the towel in and say "to heck with it, i'm out.", i think that support and solidarity that people are sharing is amazing. thank you for sharing your thoughts. thank you for sharing your thoughts. thank you. thank you so much. we are going to find out how the
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weather is looking. it certainly hasn't turned mild everywhere across the uk, tomorrow, a mixed bag. the south of the uk, the southern half of the country will be tried it with cloud. this weather front with some rain. northern areas will be getting some sunshine. let's see what happens through the course of this evening. in advance it will be quite chilly particularly across the north, with some showers around, chance for some ice, quite frosty. towns and cities probablyjust above freezing, but in rowell spots, a prostitute is, maybe the north midlands, down south it looks as though temperatures are four and five. it marches into the south—western areas, wales and eventually northern ireland, and the me get into the middle of the afternoon. mild and damp and wet.
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the heaviest of the rainfall will fall across southern and central parts of wales. the south of northern ireland will get a fair bit of rain. the north—east of england, central scotland northern scotland's great day, some sunshine and still chilly. temperatures around only 4 degrees. we have the remnants of the cold air sitting. this weather fronts never makes it to the north, it turns frosty, whereas in the south it stays damp if not wet. the week ahead will be a mixed bag, we will get rain and clear blue skies as well. however monday, cars look grey and gloomy. look at all of that rain across the uk and dampness and bits and pieces of rain certainly goes downhill. eventually that milderair goes downhill. eventually that milder air marches into scotland. eight in glasgow, 12 to plymouth. come tuesday, it could be heavy rain across some of these western areas
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of the uk and it should be just about dry most of the day, double figures even as far north as northern parts of the uk. and then wednesday morning could be some rain in the east but wednesday, at least from lunchtime onwards, probably the best day of the week across the uk, with some sunny spells on the way. hello this is bbc news, the headlines at 533. dresden tram's decision to order a temporary ban on all refugees entering the united states has been met by strong opposition from iran as well as france, germany and human rights groups. whitton has signed a deal with turkey to develop fighter jets worth more than £100 million. as talks continue towards a closer relationships post brexit. this is
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more than a trade deal, it is part they a deep defence budget that will contribute tools are overall security. stars from around the world have been paying tribute to the actor sirjohn hurt who has died at the age of 77. and serena williams beats her sister venus to ca ptu re a williams beats her sister venus to capture a record—breaking 23rd grand slam title in the australian open. the last film john hurt worked on was "that good night" — which also stars charles dance. in it he plays a dying screenwriter, quoting lines from the famous dylan thomas poem from which the film gets its name... things fall apart, the centre cannot hold. mere anarchy is loosed upon this world. what is anarchy? guillem
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act it is either insurrection or pandemonium. 0r act it is either insurrection or pandemonium. or it is the absolute freedom of the individual to do precisely what he wants. earlier i spoke to charles savage, the producer of that film. i asked him for his reaction to sirjohn's death. sadness and a big, big loss, john had many more films on him so it was a lost quite what was it like working with him because the cancer had come back. what was he like to work with? wonderful, the bravest of all men and the most creative and actually the most energetic of all of the actors, just extraordinary. ina way, of the actors, just extraordinary. in a way, summed up, one tried to give him the best dressing room and he said no, he wanted the one nearest the action and the set. he was just part of the team. nearest the action and the set. he wasjust part of the team. was this
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film offered to him knowing he had a history of cancer? was this something that he really wanted to do? guillem act he wanted to do one big film and i know that, this was an extraordinary part, it opened up an extraordinary part, it opened up a whole lot of his soul that is revealed in the film. he did know that he had cancer, he was in remission but he wanted to do the film. he brought incredible qualities to it. how will you remember him? an amazing sense of humour, constant twinkle and the ability to know every single person's name who was involved, and to ask them how they were. he never really wa nted to ask them how they were. he never really wanted to talk about how he was. because i am a writer as well it was a very, very interesting experience. was the rate close collaboration between the two of you, you said writing? yes what is interesting, is that as a writer you
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hold onto your words and john doesn't need very many words, it was wonderful getting rid of text. there was a whole level of drama thatjust froze up and up, a man with huge depth as an actor and wonderful to work with. what you think of his career highlight because you must have followed his career? it is impossible, i think for me elephant man isjust impossible, i think for me elephant man is just a impossible, i think for me elephant man isjust a remarkable piece of work. i think everything he did, the just brought an extra level to it. he dug right in, extraordinary to watch. did you know that it would be his last film, is that something he ever expressed? no his last film, is that something he ever expressed ? no but his last film, is that something he ever expressed? no but i sort of had an instinct that it might be. so often, on screen, at the most sensitive parts you could feel him
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going into a different level and it was very moving and all of the cast we re was very moving and all of the cast were completely entranced with him and the crew. and the work that he does with charlie dances just wonderful as well. that was the film director remembering him. we have got a busy day sport, starting with the fa cup. it is the fourth round, and we will have the shocks and the upsets. but let us start at anfield because the championships wolves have knocked out liverpool. january is the coolest man thank you would argue in anfield, the opening win, second attempt against plymouth and a semifinal defeat against southampton so nine changes made and those loitering in the bar would have missed those goals.“
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those loitering in the bar would have missed those goals. if they had dreams last night they could not have dreamt of something quite so dramatic that early. clocks change, men struggled to find anything further. costa came close. against southampton and plymouth liverpool had dominated and the same was true against wolves again to little avail. all of it left the london side to make a woman they got the chance which they proceeded to do. —— to make hay when they got the chance. the first half without a shot on target. q coutinho. the championship team had absorbed all that had been thrown at them. and within a few minutes to go. they have got one back. but there was to be no more goals as wolves pulled off one of the shocks of the season. liverpool's miserable month goes from bad to worse, kicked out of a
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second major cup competition in the space of four days. i have been dreaming all week about winning, iam i have been dreaming all week about winning, i am a massive liverpool fan, so to go and do what we did was a real heat. playing top—class players. fantastic result for everyone. your manager was saying after the game that you left absolutely everything on the pitch? we knew what we had to do here. whoever we would play. we had a game plan, and we went into it. it was one of those games, wet it didn't come on top. you can imagine we think a lot during a game and when you don't see the start, have the ball, give it away, make a foul, free kick. so it is an open situation and a set piece. but of course we could have defended
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better. i could look for excuses, but i don't want actually. maybe we should use this time to be disappointed and frustrated and angry. to make it better next time. because that is obviously the target. if that is the shock, arguably, the big shock was lincoln knocking out brighton. leading the national league and having seen off ipswich but they had to come from behind to lead brighton 3—1. theo robinson with the third goal. only the eighth non—league team in the past 70 years to reach the fifth round of the fa cup. meanwhile newcastle also flying just behind the leaders brighton and they were also beaten by lower league opposition, oxford united from league 1, with the third in a 3—0 win. it was a cracking game at white
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hart lane between tottenham and wycombe wanderers. it looks like wickham was going to record a famous winter the 89th minute but spurs came back with two late goals. the winner scored in the seventh minute of injury time and in my them a replay. 4—3. premier league leaders chelsea safely through to the last 16 beating brentford 4—0, branislav ivanovic got the pic of the goals. he is linked with a move away from chelsea before the transfer window shuts on tuesday. manchester city's match also went with form, it was 3-0 to match also went with form, it was 3—0 to knock restored palace out. blackburn beat blackpool. our today'sjump
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our today's jump racing at cheltenham was called a mini version, but the day ended in tragedy, and many cloud who surprised everyone byjust beating the favourite this will crack but then he collapsed and died, many clouds one in 2015. powell horse correspondentjoins me live. tell me —— power course correspondent. what is the reaction? stunned, and similar among those following afar.
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many clouds, trained by oliver sherwood, run by thejockey leighton as hwell, sherwood, run by thejockey leighton ashwell, was one of racing's biggest players. he finished last season ‘s grand national, he has won or taken pa rt grand national, he has won or taken part in some of the biggest prizes around. oliver sherwood pay tribute to the horse of a lifetime "i always said he died for you and he did, he wa nted said he died for you and he did, he wanted to win that race, by god he wa nted wanted to win that race, by god he wanted to win that race, by god he wanted to win that race". and he beat thislecrack in a photo finish. thislecrack having won so much in the george. ijust want thislecrack having won so much in the george. i just want to ask you, it is important, as horse racing fans, that the horse wasn't being flogged. he wasjust fans, that the horse wasn't being flogged. he was just trying to win the race and do what he loved? the vets are saying it is too early to say what the cause of death is, we will have to look at the postmortem tests, probably a suspected heart
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attack or some kind of haemorrhage is the reason. this horse when he won the grand national did undergo an examination afterwards, he had to be given oxygen but he recovered quickly. he has been a winner since then and let's say that as far as they were concerned he was in prime condition. and to end up in that closely fought battle through the very closing stages and too narrowly beat thislecrack, we await the results of the postmortem. we are again to move on to tennis because serena williams, beat her sister venus williams, her 23rd title, her first final between her and her sisterfor first final between her and her sister for nearly a decade. first final between her and her sisterfor nearly a decade. tim hague report. venus williams and serena williams, bringing to cash as true meaning to the sibling rivalry.
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they knew each other inside out and thatis they knew each other inside out and that is clearly the case in the first set. and while venus williams for herfirst first set. and while venus williams for her first grand slam final was a lwa ys for her first grand slam final was always chasing her little sister, she gave as good as she got, her problem was that serena williams despite the odd mishap, found that bit extra. the fifth of those firebreaks going her way. one set ahead. and the second was equally close, venus williams her head on serve only force —— only for serena williams to. what a winner that was, it will allow serena williams to serve for the match which she achieved. the area it is an error record, she moves on to 23 plan slam singles titles —— 23
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grand slam. i would like to congratulate venus williams, an amazing person. there is no way that i would be a 23 without her, there is no way that i would be one without her, she's my parade in and she's the only reason i'm standing here today and the only reason that the williams sisters exist today so thank you venus for inspiring me. sibling rivalry definitely, sibling love even more so. in netball , england have got their quad series tournament off to a winning start in durban, narrowly beating south africa 60—55 in extra time. after a slow start, england impressed in the second quarter to lead by 10 points at half—time. but south africa fought back to levels the scores to 48—118 at full time. it went to extra—time, and england's red roses thwarted the south africa attack, and pulled away. they next play world cup runners up new zealand on thursday. that is all the sport for now, you
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can keep up to date with those stories and many more including an update on the southampton against arsenal game. arsenal have taken the lead around nine minutes the match, they are leading 1—0. we will have much more. now it is time for meet the author. chris cleave knows how to spin a story. his novels incendiary and gold were huge bestsellers, gripping thrillers that were also psychological studies. his new novel, everyone brave is forgiven, takes us back to the early years of the second world war, to the london of the blitz, at a time when no one quite knew who was going to win in the end. it is the story of unlikely, enduring love, a picture of society pulled apart by the threat of destruction, and an account of the human cost of war and human resilience. welcome. chris, many people have written
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novels set in the second world war. it's a very familiar scene. what made you want to do it one more time? i'm always writing about the time that we are living in now. i became really interested in the idea of unity, and the idea of the country coming together and putting aside its differences to face down an existential threat. and the last time that we did that really was the second world war. and so i thought if i could go back into that period, and research it with fresh eyes, trying to understand how it had felt at the time, at the outbreak of war, when people weren't sure whether it was the right course of action to take, when the country was still,
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at the beginning, disunited about whether we should appease hitler or whether we should fight, that difficult time at the beginning of the war is a period that i think is really unexamined. those of us who were born after the war like you and me tend to forget how uncertain that time was. most people felt strongly about the threat, and strongly about people who had been caught up and decided to go and fight, but there was uncertainty in the air? uncertainty and a lot of fear. we now look at the war movies and the war novels and they tend to show these very stoical figures, square—jawed and brave. they always win! they take these insane risks and it always pays off for them. but in real life, these people were frightened and they were very young. you tell the story through the interlocking stories of i suppose four people really, so it's through them that you see the war.
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it's through an individual that you get a picture of london? because i wanted to immerse the reader in their experience of becoming part of that fighting machine. it's the becoming that i found more interesting than the being. they weren't brave to begin with. i think that a muscle is the best model for courage. something that develops through use. at the beginning they were nervous, they were frightened and they had very different agendas. and of course, bravery, your title everyone brave is forgiven is a beautifully ambiguous and sort of penetrating title in the sense it makes you wonder, what is this book really about? but you reveal how bravery comes in all shapes and sizes. it means different things to different people. to stand up in peace time against a policy of one's own government might be construed
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as a brave action but in wartime that is cowardice, that is treachery, that is betrayal. that transitional period between peace and war is interesting. notjust people's ability to be brave changes, but the notion of what bravery means changes and it changes with each individual at different speeds and i like that. one of the ways you get into that is to cross social boundaries in a very deliberate way. the woman we meet at the very beginning of the book comes from a particular segment of society. finishing school but didn't finish it, i think you put it somewhere. and you meet people in different walks of life and you've got a very acute sense of where those boundaries were and however, one knew where the line was drawn. i like the fact that the boundaries haven't changed either. all those fault lines... they are recognisable to us? absolutely, don't you think? you could be living in 1939 and know exactly where the fault lines in society were between the haves and the have—nots, where the racial divides in society were.
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they are still with us. that society is very recognisable, and as a writer, something i have often done is to look at things, where are those fault lines in our society and how can i voice people on both sides of those, and try to show the enormity of the fractures in our society. they don't heal, they haven't healed. and yet it's not a book that is driven, it seems to me anyway as a reader, by anger or bitterness or envy from one side of society to the other. it's a very generous book in that sense. i mean, you're quite inside yourself i think, almost sentimental? i like people! i really do. i wouldn't write about people unless i really liked them. what i like is survivors. i like people who have reinvented themselves, who have been hurt. i think everybody has been hurt by the time they are grown up.
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i liked the fact that people don't just stay on the mat. they do get up and they do help each other and they do help each other across those fragmentation lines in society. i write about people because i do think there's an enormous amount to hope for still. you're talking, in telling the story of these people, about enormous resilience. that seems to be the characteristic you find most inspiring by what happened during the war? i think it was amazing the way people dug in. we know now, we can watch a war movie or we can think back to the second world war and think, they only had to tough it out until 1945, and some people as long as 1916. they didn't know that! they didn't know what they were embarking on. they didn't know how long their suffering would continue. i liked that about them. i liked the sense of humour that was starting to develop.
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really, it was a funny book. i wanted to show that the sense of humour that my grandparents had, i remember talking to my grandfather about his first parachute jump. he was very scared. he said in the back of the plane the sergeant major would cheer us up and he said, never mind lads, if your parachutes don't open, you can just take them back to the packing shed! theyjoked their way through the war because they were terrified and that's what i liked about that generation, and that's what i liked and still like actually about british people. the more frightened we are, the funnier we get. that for me is a very civilised response to fear. i don't want to talk about the plot in any detail because it will spoil it for people, because it is a story which i think needs to keep its secrets until the end, but we are talking in a way, you are talking in the book about emotions that are released, really, because of the threat, because of the darkness, because of the uncertainty.
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somehow, emotions are. people behave differently in war. and like the fact that people's choices had to made in a split second, and they were made, often from the gut. i think that's what life does to you. it tests you when you are least expecting it and the answers that you come up with, that you reveal about your character are not always pleasant, are not always expected, but are the inevitable result of all the little habits you have built up during your life. what would you most like people to take away from this story? most of all i would like them to be immersed in that experience of what we call the golden generation, and to come away with a fresh appreciation of what they did and what we could still do. chris cleave, thank you very much. thank you. it certainly hasn't told milder
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everywhere a cross it certainly hasn't told milder everywhere across the uk, tomorrow a mixed bag. the south of the uk all southern half of the country shrouded with cloud. this weather front with some rain, northern areas will be getting some sunshine. let's see what happened through the course of this evening. in advance of this weather front it would be quite chilly particularly across the north, showers around and the chance for a bit of ice in northern ireland, northern england, scotland, quite frosty. towns and cities just above freezing but in rural spots for sure, rusty as far south as the north midlands but down south it looks as though temperatures would be around for five. this is the weather front, marching be around for five. this is the weatherfront, marching into south—western areas, wales and eventually northern ireland and by the time you get to the middle of the time you get to the middle of
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the afternoon this is what it looks like. mild and damp and wet, i think the heaviest of the rainfall will be across southern and central parts of wales. and also the south of northern ireland will get a fair bit of rain. but then the north—east of england, central scotland, north of scotland. great day. still chilly, temperatures only around 4 degrees. we still have remnants of that cold air. and this weather fronts never makes it to the north, it turns frosty again tomorrow night whereas in the south it stays damp if not wet. and the week ahead will be mixed bag, rain and clear blue skies. certainly not looking that bad. however monday does look grey and gloomy. look at all of that greyness. and dampness and bits and pieces of rain and drizzle goes downhill across the north but eventually that milder air marches into scotland, eight in glasgow and 12 in plymouth by the time we get to
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monday afternoon. come tuesday could be heavy rain across some of these western areas of the uk. should be just about right, double figures, as far north, stornaway 11 degrees, glasgow around ten. but wednesday morning it could be some rain in the east but wednesday at least from lunchtime onwards, probably the best day of the week across the uk with some sunny day of the week across the uk with some sunny spells on the way. this is bbc news. the headlines: president trump's decision to restrict entry to travellers from seven muslim—majority countries is met with condemnation from a number of nations, including iran, which says it'll ban americans in retaliation. the president's restrictions are challenged by lawyers in the united states after passengers arriving at american airports are refused entry.
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the prime minister says the uk will enhance trade relations with turkey, as a £100 million deal to develop fighterjets is signed in ankara. this is more than a trade deal. it is the start of a deep defence partnership that will contribute to our overall security. things fall
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