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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 28, 2017 8:00pm-8:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm reeta chakrabarti. the headlines at 8pm: there's confusion and anger at us airports where travellers have been detained following donald trump's order to restrict entry to people from seven mainly muslim countries. on a trade visit to turkey, following her meeting with mr trump, theresa may refuses to condemn his new immigration measures. well, the united states is responsible for the united states' policy on refugees. the united kingdom is responsible for the united kingdom's policy on refugees. the president himself is holding a day of phone calls with other world leaders, including the russian leader vladimir putin. things fall apart, the centre cannot hold.
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tributes are paid to one of britain's most respected actors, sirjohn hurt, who has died at the age of 77. also in the next hour: serena williams beats sister venus at the australian open to secure a record 23rd grand slam title. and later, talking business asks what can be done to generate more jobs in some of the world's fastest growing economies. good evening and welcome to bbc news. the us president donald trump is facing a growing backlash both at home and abroad over an executive order to halt immigration from seven muslim majority countries, including iran, iraq and libya. the entire refugee admissions programme has been halted forfour months, with refugees fleeing syria banned from entering
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the us indefinitely. the order, which mr trump says is designed to protect america from "radical islamist terrorists", has caused confusion and panic among travellers with some people being turned back from us bound flights. even green card holders are not exempt. there have been protests outside new york's jfk airport, where a number of refugees have been detained in transit. rights groups have filed lawsuits demanding their release. a lawyerfor two iraqi men called the executive order "disgraceful". canada's westjet airline says it turned away a passenger from a toronto flight bound to the us. and evidence of a changing diplomatic climate. iran has described mr trump's order as an "insult to the islamic world".
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it says that in response it'll ban americans from entering the country. alex forsyth looks back on the day's developments. someone to return, others are desperate to return. now all are banned from the united states indefinitely. refugees from anywhere oi’ indefinitely. refugees from anywhere or suspended forfour indefinitely. refugees from anywhere or suspended for four months. like this woman, transgender, persecuted in iraq who fled to the root —— bearded, was on track to america. the moment i heard the news, my dreams were shattered. my parents wa nt to dreams were shattered. my parents want to kill me. -- beirut. i hope
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that would feel safe in the united states and i would be able to sleep any country where i have rates and nobody would be able to play. with a flourish of his pain, president trump made sweeping changes. to improve, she said, america's security. i'm establishing new vetting measures to keep radical islamic terrorists out of the united states of america. we don't want ‘em here. the order specifically mentioned suspending entry from seven countries with a predominantly muslim population. on social media, reports of people being stopped at airports. one said an iraqi friend who fled isis was turned back. in general, it is a state of panic.
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the extent of this order has enormous implications, not just the extent of this order has enormous implications, notjust for refugees, but from many in the middle east no longer able to travel to the us. president trump argues it will improve security, but many have condemned the message it sends to muslim communities around the world. some refugees who have been detained at airports today are being represented by civil rights groups launching legal action. the full detail of this order may not yet be clear, but already the consequences are being felt and challenged. murtadha al—tameemi is an iraqi—born facebook software engineer who has been advised by his company's lawyers to stay put in the us. he explained how the order is already impacting on his life. there's still some confusion about what it exactly means. the initial interpretation that everybody has been adopting,
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which also makes sense given the text of the order, is that people from these countries are not going to be able to receive visas or be allowed entry into the united states. so if that is indeed true and it is what the text says, the effects of this on me personally are huge. so my family is currently living in canada and i go see them on a weekly basis. i spend holidays and weekends with them. they recently settled there as refugees, so i go there every week to see them and now, all of a sudden, if i go, i may not, i will not be able to go back and that could jeopardise my work in the us, my life in the us, or i would have to make the choice of not going to see them for however long this thing lasts and, as of now, it sounds as if the ban will be for 90 days initially. initially.
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i had trips planned for yesterday and next week. i was going to go to africa for business and i had to suspend all my travel and basically just sit still and wait in boston. i wasn't planning on being in boston but i am now here and waiting to see what will happen without a clear plan for where we go next. let's get more insight into executive orders, what they mean and how they work. stephen vladeck is a professor of law at the texas school of law. he joins us via webcam from austin, texas. can we start with the status of the executive order? what sort of force does it have? the executive order is basically a command to the entire executive branch and this includes oui’ executive branch and this includes our immigration authority, our border control authority and all our other executive branch officers that this is how our new president believes these laws should be interpreted and enforced. it is
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binding on both local —— or executive branch officers are bullied into those customs and border agents at the airports, when we saw the chaos today. and what sort of status does it have? does it, for example, overrule the green card, so foreigners who have permanent resident —— residency status in the us? what sort of force does it have over a green card?m shouldn't have a lot of force. a green card is given by the executive branch but pursuant to an authority from congress, but an executive order is different. there are will be late —— litigation and have been cases filled today with regards to the green cars. even refugees who may not have much in the weird constitutional protection, but to at the very least we have the right to beef from religious discrimination. do you expect a flurry of lawsuits
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now, as you say, we know that some have been failed? i think we are already seeing one major lawsuit filed this morning in the federal district court that covers jfk airport in new york and i think we will see more next week. it seems clear that the executive order, matter what it has in the way of merit, is remarkably and destructively overbroad. i think the real question is going to be whether the administration realises that it is just asking the administration realises that it isjust asking for the administration realises that it is just asking for trouble given just how sweeping and bright and unprecedented this order is or if we see an effort to scale it back, perhaps to tighten selected from the court challenge that are —— court challenges that are already underway and are certain to follow. the use of the executive order is alwa ys to an of the executive order is alwa ys to a n exte nt of the executive order is alwa ys to an extent controversial, isn't it? yes, but it is always by degree. an executive order in many ways is just the president saying this is how i understand the authority i have understand the authority i have under both statues that congress has passed and the constitution. the real question anything you have an executive order is just how consistent the new policies are with what congress first tussle that president trump has and what the constitution allows. in this case,
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the answer to that question is very much going to depend on exactly what class of immigrants we are talking about, exactly what constitutional protections the courts ultimately conclude that they have. i think there will be a lot of trouble in there will be a lot of trouble in the courts before all is said and done. this may well be the first tussle that president trump has with courts and tussle and certainly not the last. it is worth noting that in that regard, particularly related to the first tussle and certainly not the first tussle and certainly not the last. it is worth noting that in that regard, particularly related to a huge referendum in the courts, perhaps on capitol hill and then ultimately in the executive branch, just how far the president can there have been several cases based on different degrees of war. this. i think there will be a huge referendum in the courts, perhaps on capitol hill and then ultimately in the executive branch, just how far the executive branch, just how far the president with regards to national security. the united states has been the victim of a so i think there is a long way to go for this administration to prove congress, to the courts and the american people that if there are real goal as counterterrorism the skin of an extremely nationalistic and isolationist foreign policy is the right way to go terrorist attacks since 911. none of those were committed by individuals from these seven countries, so i think there is a long way to go for this administration to prove congress, to the courts and the american people that if they are real goal as counterterrorism the skin of extremely nationalistic and
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isolationist foreign policy is the right way to speaking during a visit to turkey, theresa may has refused to condemn to condemn the united states' refugee policy, after being repeatedly pressed to give her opinion on the order. well, the united states is responsible for the united states' policy on refugees. the united kingdom is responsible for the united kingdom's policy on refugees and our policy on refugees is to have a number of voluntary schemes to bring syrian refugees into the country, particularly those who are most vulnerable, but also to provide significant financial contribution to support refugees in countries surrounding syria. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is here. we will have to leave it there. thank you forjoining there been reaction to what she said and her attitude? there was almost immediate reaction and lots of condemnation. one of the first to criticise her was the former liberal leader ed miliband who said her refusal to condemn presidentjohn was shocking and wrong and they said it flies in the face of eyes of people across britain. we have heard from many
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other politicians, including the current liberal leaderjeremy corbyn who said that she should have stood up who said that she should have stood upfor britain and our values by theresa may sidestepping the issue and doing so three times. has there been reaction to what she said and her attitude? there was almost immediate reaction and lots of condemnation. one of the first to criticise her was the former liberal leader ed miliband said her refusal to condemn presidentjohn was shocking and wrong and they said it flies in the face of eyes of people across britain. we have heard from many other politicians, including the current liberal leaderjeremy corbyn said that she should have stood up for britain and our values by condemning his actions and it should sentence —— sadden our country that she chose not to. the liberal democrat leader said not only is this shocking by our standards, it cannot be about to stand. significantly, there has been criticism from within her own country. baroness pa rsi criticism from within her own country. baroness parsi is a former conservative minister, the first muslim woman to attend cabinet, once again lost a little more moral
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authority. the hypocrisy of the debate on british values becomes worse by the day. one final one we once again lost a little more moral authority. the hypocrisy of the debate on british values becomes worse by the day. one states, we have to merge the country to rethink this policy. she added that we have to speak truth to our closest allies. there has been a lot of condemnation and very quickly. i think the significance of this is that downing street had been very pleased with the visit to washington and now in turkey they will be sitting on the foreign affairs select committee, born in iraq to kurdish parents, he said as a true friend and close friend of the united states, we have to merge the country to rethink this policy. she added that we have to speak truth to our closest allies. there has been a lot of condemnation and very quickly. i think the significance of this is that downing street had been very pleased with the visit to washington and now in turkey they will russian ship, she's actually unwilling to speak our mind. i don't think downing street arteries may will be happy as they land in the flurry of all this criticism more now on theresa may's visit to turkey today, where she's announced a defence deal worth more than £100 million to develop turkish fighterjets. the prime minister was in ankara for talks on a post—brexit trade deal. turkey's president erdogan said the visit was an opportunity to strengthen ties and deepen cooperation. from ankara, our political editor laura kuenssberg reports.
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a morning at the palace. the presidential palace. meeting a president used to doing perhaps whatever it takes to get his way. popular, feared too, after a coup that failed against him. but she wants closer ties on trade and defence, but also to make british concerns about his behaviour clear. i am proud that the uk stood with you on the 15th ofjuly last year in defence of your democracy. now it is important that turkey sustains that democracy by maintaining the rule of law and upholding its international human rights obligations, as the government has undertaken to do. no mention of that for him. translation: it gives us great pleasure and it is a privilege to host prime minister theresa may here in turkey. we have had a meeting and a working lunch and the discussions, i hope, will yield success for both of our countries.
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just as theresa may was the first leader to enter the trump white house, she was today the first western leader to come to ankara since the attempted coup against president erdogan. she showed that she was unafraid to speak her mind. having delivered the message on human rights, the ceremonials could begin. the prime minister able to enjoy the parade and appeared alongside her counterpart, to announce a deal where british firm bae will design turkish fighterjets, the start of a partnership that downing street hopes could bring in billions. but questions about her other new friend, president trump, followed her to turkey, after the american leader
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banned some muslims from entering the country. the headlines on bbc news: donald trump's restrictions on people travelling to the united states from seven mainly muslim countries cause confusion and anger at airports, with even green card holders affected. on a trade visit to ankara, theresa may refuses to join other european politicians in condemning the new us immigration measures. tributes are paid to one of britain's most—respected and versatile actors, sirjohn hurt, who has died aged 77. sport now and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. it's been a busy day of sport, but let's start with the fa cup. it's the 11th round weekend and quite a few upsets to tell you about, including more misery for liverpool at anfield. they've been knocked—out by the championship side wolves,
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who took the lead within a minute and went—on to win 2—1. inflicting liverpool's third home defeat in the space of a week. jim lumsden watched the action. i , terrorism we will be returning tonight, to meet this road. it is very serious. she boasted about the virtue of the special relationship, that it allowed her to speak candidly to her friend that it allowed her to speak candidly to herfriend on that it allowed her to speak candidly to her friend on the other side of the atlantic ocean and i think that what this shows is that perhaps it will raise about the suspicion that as the junior partner in this russian ship, she is actually unwilling to speak our mind. idon‘t actually unwilling to speak our mind. i don't think downing street arteries and me will be happy as they land in the flurry of all this january is the cruellest month and few would argue that anfield —— at anfield name changes made. those loitering at the bar would have missed the first name changes made. those loitering at the bar would have missed the first if they had dreams have dreamt something that dramatic that area the group could not have dreamt something that dramatic that run wild they struggled to find any structure. wolves threatened to run against southampton had dominated —— dominated possession. the same was plymouth, liverpool had dominated —— dominated possession. the same was true the mickey when they got the
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had the chance. this is unbelievable. the first half without a shot on target. it took one hour to get this far. the championship team had absorbed all that had been thrown at them. but the fee —— with a few —— uk made he will they had the chance. this is unbelievable. the first half without a shot on target. it took one hour to get this far. the championship tea m to get this far. the championship team had absorbed all that had been thrown at them. but the fee —— with a few minutes to go but there could be no more goals, as wolves pulled off one of the shocks of the season. liverpool pars miserable month goes from bad to worse, kicked out of the certain major cup competition in the space but there could be no more goals, as wolves pulled off one of the shocks of the season. liverpool pa rs the shocks of the season. liverpool pars miserable month goes from bad to worse, kicked out of the certain major cup competition in the space of four days. of 4 arguably the biggest shock was at sincil bank, where non league lincoln knocked—out champinship leaders brighton. lincoln are on a roll, leading the national league and having seen off ipswich in the last round. but they had to come from behind today to beat brighton,
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3—1 the final score, theo robinson with their 3rd goal. lincoln are now only the 8th non—league team in the past 70 years to reach the 5th round of the fa cup. there was a cracking game at white hart lane between tottenham and league two's wycombe wanderers. it looked like wycombe were going to record a famous win, with the score 3—2 until the 89th minute. but spurs came back with two late goals, their winner scored by sonne hoy—min in the 7th minute of injury time, to break wycombe's hearts and deny them a replay. 11—3 the final score. action from all the fa cup games is on our website bbc.co.uk/sport. no such trouble for arsenal. two goals from danny welbeck and a hat—trick from theo walcott helped them beat southampton five nil. serena williams has broken the record for grand slam victories, in the modern era. the australian open is her 23rd major title. it was the first final, between her and her sister venus williams for nearly a decade. her victory came in two sets, both won by 6 games to 4.
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—— in the space of four days to congratulate my sister, she is an amazing person. -- i would like to ta ke amazing person. -- i would like to take this moment to congratulate my sister, she has an amazing person. she is my inspiration and the only reason i am standing here today. the only reason that the williams sisters exist. thank you, venus. many clouds, the grand national winner in 2015, has died after winning the cotswold chase at cheltenham. he beat the favourite thistlecrack in a photo finish in the gold cup warm—up but collapsed shortly afterwards and did not recover. many clouds won the same race back in 2015 before going on to win the grand national. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. tributes have been paid to the actor sirjohn hurt, who has died at the age of 77. he'd been suffering from pancreatic cancer. his career spanned over six decades and more than 120 films, including the elephant man, alien, and harry potter. his widow said he was the "most sublime of actors" who brought "joy
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and magic to all our lives". nick higham looks back at his life. your emperor has returned! john hurt, as the deranged roman emperor caligula in the bbc‘s i, claudius. but you ordered no triumphs. well, of course i ordered no triumphs! do you think i'd order triumph for myself? but you ordered us not to order any. yes, and you took me at my word, didn't you? typical. and in the naked civil servant. i wear rouge, i wear mascara on my eyelashes, i dye my hair, i wear flamboyant clothes, far more outre than those i am wearing now. he was an unusual actor, instantly recognisable, yet never typecast. here, he played the flamboyantly gay quentin crisp. people said it was a brave part to take on. many people said, "don't do that, you'll never work again", and so on. and i said, "but it's not
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about homosexuality, it's about the tenderness of the individual, as opposed to the cruelty of the crowd, really". his breakthrough had come in a man for all seasons in 1966, a small part in an oscar—winning film. what will you do with it? sell it. and buy what? a decent gown. he earned an oscar nomination himself for midnight express, in which he played a heroin addict in a turkish prison. i'm very pleased to meet you, mr merrick. and another for his performance as the hideously disfigured john merrick in the elephant man. like quentin crisp, merrick was an outsider ostracised by society. perhaps... this. late in his career, he reached new audiences in harry potter. you're my future selves? yes! and in a guest appearance in doctor who. why are you pointing your screwdrivers like that? in one of his last performances, he played a dying screenwriter, quoting lines from a famous
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dylan thomas poem. do not go gentle into that good night. old age should burn and rave at close of day. rage, rage against the dying of the light. john hurt, who has died aged 77. the former chairman of the bbc board of governors, sir christopher bland, has died at the age of 78. he was also chairman of several other companies and organisations, including bt and the royal shakespeare company. the director—general of the bbc, tony hall, described sir christopher as "an outstanding chairman and a great communicator, who was hugely admired." let's take a look at some of the other stories making the news this hour. a second outbreak of bird flu has been confirmed in lancashire at a farm on the wyre near where the first outbreak was confirmed five days ago.
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the department for environment, food and rural affairs says the two farms have business links and this outbreak affects around one thousand birds. defra says a two—mile protection zone and a six—mile surveillance zone have been put in place around both infected premises. employers are being offered advice about how to reduce the gender pay gap before new regulations come into force in april. companies with at least 250 workers will be forced to reveal the pay rates for men and women. ministers say progress has been made but more needs to be done. a draft letter of abdication from king george the third has been made public for the first time. the unsent letter, which includes crossings out, redrafts, blotches and scrawls, was written during the american war of independence, and is one of thousands of his private papers released by the royal archives. lorry drivers should be banned from using sat navs designed for cars, according to council chiefs.
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the calls to change navigation systems come after a number of lorries have got stuck in narrow roads or under low bridges. the local government association, wants legislation brought in, to make it compulsory for all lorry drivers in england and wales to use sat—navs specifically designed for their vehicle. keith doyle reports. when a large lorry tried to cross this bridge over the thames in buckinghamshire last year it caused hundreds of thousands of pounds of damage. it was ten times heavier than the bridge's weight limit but its sat—nav did not know that. sat—navs are leading large vehicles into unsuitable roads across the country. it causes damage and disruption. the local government association, which represents local authorities across england and wales, says truck drivers using sat—navs and phones meant for cars are causing mayhem. they want to lorry drivers to be forced to use the right kind of sat—navs for large vehicles. we are seeing a growing problem, i have more and more complaints
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from local residents who see country lanes blocked by vehicles who should not be going down them, and they see local high streets blocked by hgv vehicles and local economies are hit when you just see big lorries going over bridges that they just cannot take the weight for. most truck drivers use the right kind of sat—navs but they say they are no substitute for common sense. sat—navs are ok but you cannot rely on them. we have a particularly special one for hgvs and even they go wrong. it isjust watching road signs and being careful, that is not to say you don't come unstuck and you have to turn around sometimes. the bridge has now reopened after two months of repairs but locals say they live in fear of a similar accident closing it at any time, and that is why the local government association says something needs to be done to stop drivers of larger vehicles using the wrong kind of sat—nav that is leading them into nothing but trouble. tributes have been paid tojohn
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hart. looking back on his life and career, it has as talent and the many roles he played that impresses, isn't it? absolutely, just looking at his catalogue of successes, do something like 120 from pig in total and it is a six decade career. when you think of those great character roles from the 1960s and early 1970s, then to have this fresh hollywood career, taking on one of the great science—fiction roles and a rather
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memorable stomach churning scene, every single person i have spoken to today has a separate favourite role that the claim for themselves. as you say, a character actor rather than a leading man. she was always the first to say, she didn't have the first to say, she didn't have the looks for is leading man, but that was as opposed to —— the makings of a character actor. these sings lend themselves to be more versatile career. as well as that, he had this wonderful, distinctive, unique, into —— instantly recognisable voice. indeed. she managed to reach a wide variety of audiences as well, didn't he? partly because of the lead his career and then because of the variety of that
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he played. later on, as he said, she went to hollywood but ever since the 19705 went to hollywood but ever since the 1970s and he's been bouncing big screen roles with also great work on the london stage. she replete quentin crisp. he made a return to that rule and then there were these fish, youthful audiences. —— fresh. even for doctor who fans, the most demanding audience of all, arguably, they didn't complain when he turned up they didn't complain when he turned up in the 50th anniversary episode. he has a singular appeal. what is your favourite? i fear that you would ask me that. they have been so many. i would have this in my personal favourite was when he played bob champion in the early
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19805. played bob champion in the early 1980s. somehow, he managed to touch the humanity and the epic nature of that real—life role. that is my particular favourite. i realise that everybody has their own. many thanks.

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