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tv   The Papers  BBC News  January 29, 2017 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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ofthe looking at the tennis and two of the sport's all—time greats are currently locked in battle in the australian open final in melbourne. between them, the pair hold 31 grand slam titles and as you would expect, the match is heading up to expectations. roger federer has started the brighter, breaking nadal‘s ‘s serve in the seventh game of the opening set before clinching it. the spaniard is making a fightback in the second, though, and has now been broken. carl frampton has suffered the first defeat of his professional career. after 12 gruelling rounds at the mgm in las vegas, leo santa cruz is the new wba featherweight champion. this, of course, was the northern irishman's first defence of the title, which he won narrowly against santa cruz injuly, but this time round it was the mexican who edged it, winning with a majority points decision and ending frampton's unbeaten record.
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our boxing correspondent mike costello watched the fight. our boxing correspondent mike costello watched the fightli our boxing correspondent mike costello watched the fight. i had sa nta costello watched the fight. i had santa cruz winning by four rounds but many of those rounds were very tight. the key question in the build—up to the fight was, could sa nta build—up to the fight was, could santa cruz do anything different to the first contest lastjuly? carl frampton and his trainer shane mcguigan seemed convinced he wouldn't be able to do anything different. he spent most of the time on the front foot lastjuly and they doubted his ability to box on the back foot and let carl frampton come to him. but he was very adept this evening on the back foot and that made the difference, he was clean with his punching and more clinical and that made the difference. there was more vigour about his work and he seemed more determined to avenge the defeat lastjuly. he seemed more determined to avenge the defeat last july. maybe he seemed more determined to avenge the defeat lastjuly. maybe carl frampton will now have that advantage if they do get it on for a third time. there were plenty of shocks in the fourth round of the fa cup. wolves claimed the biggest scalp, knocking out liverpool,
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while non—league lincoln city will be in the last 16 for the first time since way back in 1902. and there could have been more, as patrick gearey reports. it is the salute of the underdog. a clap first performed by iceland at last summer's euros, whose upstart example wolverhampton wanderers followed gloriously. opponents liverpool had made nine changes and were just getting acquainted with each other when richard stearman headed wolves ahead. later in the half, the championship side sprung again. all it needed was for andreas weimann to stay calm, then composure could go out the window. liverpool got one back, but still went out of their second cup in a week. lincoln cathedral was once the tallest building in the world. the football club sits at a lower level, but keeps reaching new heights in the cup. brighton are on course for the premier league, but seemed to lose their bearings at sincil bank. the on—loan striker made it 2—1 to the non—league side,
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who couldn't believe their luck. but they didn't rely on fortune. as against ipswich in the last round, they mixed adrenaline with the cool head of theo robinson. lincoln city, for the first time in 115 years, are surely through now to the last 16 in the fa cup! from post—match bubbly to a pre—match cuppa at white hart lane, wycombe boss gareth ainsworth would need something medicinal by the end. his fourth tier side tore into tottenham. paul hayes has done the rounds during his career, but he will remember this goal as well as any. and the penalty that came later, 2—0 wycombe. spurs brought it back to 2—2, but wycombe weren't done. gary thompson, 3—2. only seven minutes of normal time left. ecstasy slid slowly into anxiety. but tottenham still had dele alli out there — a game changer. 89th minute, 3—3. still good enough to bring spurs back to buckinghamshire. then, though, the cruelest twist — in the final seconds of stoppage time, heung—min son cancelled the replay. spurs limp on, the wanderers left wondering. you can check out all of today's ——
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saturday's scores on the bbc sport website. there are four fa cup matches today. rangers are back up to second in the scottish premiership after beating motherwell 2—0 in a heated game at fir park. both sides had a player sent off in the first half. rangers left it late with goals from kenny miller and emerson hyndman. there were also wins for kilmarnock and stjohnstone. inverness and partick drew 0—0. justin rose is still in the hunt going into the final round of the farmers insurance open in san diego. this birdie at the fourth took him to 8—under—par, but he later dropped a shot to finish two behind leaders patrick rodgers and defending champion brandt snedeker,
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who are both on 9—under. rose is going for his eighth pga tour victory. katie archibald added a second title, winning the track race. archibald finished second in the women's keirin. great britain's james woods has claimed a gold medal in thex james woods has claimed a gold medal in the x games. his second x games medal after he took home bronze in 2013. that is all the sport. now
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time for the treble hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be will be bringing us today. with me are the journalist and auther matthew green and the education editor of the sunday times, sian griffiths. the observer leads with what it calls the "global fury" in reaction to donald trump's immigration ban, preventing people from seven mainly muslim countries from entering the united states. the sunday times says that donald trump's visit to the uk could be disrupted, as the us president is engaged in a reportedly "extraordinary" diplomatic row with prince charles over his stance on climate change. the express says prince william and harry are to unveil a statue
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of princess diana in the grounds of kensington palace to mark the 20th anniversary of her death. the daily mail reports that nhs doctors have been advised in guidelines from the bma not to call pregnant women "mothers" because it might offend transgender people. and the telegraph leads with comments from the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, who tells the paper the system for investigating murders committed during the troubles is not working. so, let's begin, and we're going to start with the observer. all of the papers this morning reflecting on what donald trump has done. indeed. america is clearly on the brink of a precipice. we are seeing paranoia and fear of the kind that accompanied the internment of japanese americans in world war ii. what does it mean for britain? we've seen theresa may essentially cosying up seen theresa may essentially cosying up to trump in the hope that she might somehow provide sort of a constraining influence ——
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restraining influence, but we have seen that hope blown out of the water with what happened yesterday with these thousands of refugees and migrants. all credit is the observer, they have laid it there on the front page. trump is ignorant, prejudiced and vicious in ways that no american leader has been. i think theresa may's refusal to join other european leaders condemning what‘ trump is doing is a huge stain on her leadership. a huge criticism of her leadership. a huge criticism of her has been that she is letting america do what they want to do rather than condemning it. is she stuck between a rock and a hard place? i suppose in a way she is because she very much wants to sign trade deals with america post—brexit. she has come out today, her spokesman, and said that she does not agree with trump stance. she didn‘t do it herself. does not agree with trump stance. she didn't do it herself. she didn't. the observer is the early
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paper that has splashed on this this morning. all credit to the observer, they got quickly to this issue and they got quickly to this issue and they have seen how big it is going to be. to be fair to her, she has, through this morning, she has made this statement, she has said if there are british citizens caught up in this through dual nationality, we will be looking to represent them. she's going to have difficulty, you're absolutely right, matthew. already this morning, members of her party are saying look, this is wrong, we don't agree it. sarah wollaston has come out, ruth davidson has said quite clearly that this is wrong. we understand there is one iraqi born tory mp who may be banned from the states after this, under these new rules. we saw theresa may at the press conference in turkey ducking the question twice and then making this very weak statement about, essentially, and then making this very weak statementabout, essentially, it and then making this very weak statement about, essentially, it is america‘s business. we need a leader
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who is willing to stand up for democratic values. i‘m afraid that theresa may is failing that test. it's theresa may is failing that test. it‘s not good enough to issue a very wea kly it‘s not good enough to issue a very weakly worded statement saying we could not agree with what donald trump is doing. us newspapers are calling him a tinpot dictator. america, in the past week, has suffered its ugliest start to any republic in the history of the country. we need to bejoining other western leaders in standing up to this and not cravenly endorsing it. it isa this and not cravenly endorsing it. it is a completely new era in politics, right across the world. it is a completely new era in politics, right across the worldm is, but has theresa may grasp this? she is surrounded by these special advisers that the papers always talk about being incredibly intelligent, but maybe she should consult a psychologist, who would tell her that donald trump is suffering from narcissistic personality disorder, he is prejudiced, vengeful. it is
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totally obvious, it is not politics as usual and theresa may has to catch up with that. let's move on to the sunday times because it‘s not just the rest of the world he is fighting with, it‘s also prince charles! what has happened? this is a great story. donald trump seems to being gauged in an extraordinary diplomatic row with the prince of wales over climate change and is threatening to disrupt his forthcoming state visit to the uk". on the one hand you have prince charles, environmental campaigner. on the other hand, donald trump who isa on the other hand, donald trump who is a climate change denier. there are some amazing quotes in this story in the sunday times and i have highlighted a view of them here. apparently trump's people are saying that he is very reluctant to meet prince charles and they have warned it would be counter—productive for charles to lecture trump on green issues and he would erupt if he were pushed! on the other hand you have
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got charl plus people saying he is determined to meet donald trump. this is donald trump who has tweeted about how, wouldn‘t anyone want to make money by tweeting topless photos of kate middleton... he has tweeted his desire to have slept with princess diana... why are we letting him into the country? ifind the tone of the sunday times story quite puzzling, as it prince charles, somehow his advocacy on climate change is somehow problematic and is going to disrupt this visit. let‘s face it, climate change is the threat to the future of organised life on planet earth and donald trump has gagged members of his government, scientists who are working on this and he has essentially confirmed that the republican party is now the most dangerous organisation on earth. the idea that prince charles is somehow
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at fault here i think is wrong, we should be rallying around him and saying come on, what direction are we taking and why?|j saying come on, what direction are we taking and why? i don't think the story is saying that prince charles is at fault here. it implies prince charles is somehow causing a problem to what otherwise would be a wonderful visit. i don't think that is the tone at all. i think it lays out an argument very clearly. the straightforward reporting here, there is one paragraph that says trump has repeatedly branded climate change a hoax and a moneymaking industry and was created by the chinese to damage american industry. when you have that sort of straight reporting you think, ok, you can make up your own mind. senior government officials now believe charles is one of the biggest risk factors for the visit". .. charles is one of the biggest risk factors for the visit"... donald trump is the risk factor! he might tell him... donald trump might agree
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with him just like you did with theresa may, alternative facts ain! theresa may, alternative facts again! we're going back to theresa may and president erdogan in turkey and the trade deal for that. if we just move, just tidying up the desk here, there we go... so the viewers can see this one. a double page spread there, they shake on trade deals despite fears over human rights. what do you make of this one? she has agreed a trade deal, or is preparing to agree a £100 million deal for fighterjets which could lead in fact to britain becoming turkey's main defence partner. at the same time, she has given a very clear warning on human rights. again it is this need to find close trade and diplomatic links stal side b eu
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in the wake of brexit. it is the sense that the world order has changed. we never had any morals about selling arms, look at the billions of dollars we have sent to saudi arabia which is now being used to bomb civilians and hospitals in yemen. it is great that we have human rights concerns in the headline there but it doesn‘t make any difference to british policy, let‘s not me under any illusions, we are one of the biggest arms exporters in the world. post brexit, as we walk away from the single market on our doorstep, we will be even more reliant on selling weapons to anyone who will buy them. i've never heard his words before, there we go, apparently trump has a fear of slopes and that is why he was
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holding her hand! i think bathmophobia is going to be one of the words of the year, everyone is talking about this and classed as a mark of special affection but a p pa re ntly mark of special affection but apparently it might just mark of special affection but apparently it mightjust be the case that he is quite afraid of slopes and hejust that he is quite afraid of slopes and he just gathered that he is quite afraid of slopes and hejust gathered her that he is quite afraid of slopes and he just gathered her hand to steady himself! he's also afraid of touching people because of germs!m will haunt theresa may, won't it? what a disaster. the whole thing is so what a disaster. the whole thing is so embarrassing. i don't know what the rest of the world must think of britain right now. if you don't condemn authoritarianism, you become complicit in it and she is teaching us complicit in it and she is teaching us that, unfortunately. let's move away from theresa may and donald trump and moved to the daily mail. "don‘t call pregnant patients the
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mothers", and why not? because it might offend transgender people. did they say they might be offended? no, but i think these organisations, a lot of them are producing these kind of guides for inclusive language. of course the mail on sunday disagrees with it and calls it a ludicrous politically correct objective. the argument is that you should call them pregnant people instead of pregnant mothers, because there are transitioning people who might have babies who might be offended. would they not be mothers anyway if they are having babies, no matter what your gender you are still giving birth? but mother is a sort of feminine word, isn't it? there is one transitioning person who has become pregnant. hayden is legally male, he was born a girl but he is transitioning to become a man. male, he was born a girl but he is
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transitioning to become a manlj would like to read the original document that this mail on sunday story is based on. the mail on sunday does do some good reporting sometimes but my question is, is this a blanket order that the word mothers is now banned? ifind that ha rd to mothers is now banned? ifind that hard to believe. or is it merely offering language that could be used if you are a doctor treating a transgender patient. if you are a doctor treating a tra nsgender patient. let‘s if you are a doctor treating a transgender patient. let‘s face it, oui’ transgender patient. let‘s face it, our society is evolving. it‘s not so long ago that we locked people up their sexuality. yes it‘s a con the gated area to negotiate and it might make feel —— people feel uncomfortable but people born transgender go through incredible anguish and pain, partly because attitudes in society are so prejudiced still. so let‘s at least support doctors if they are trying to move beyond that a bit. it‘s very easy for the mail on sunday to create the outraged brigade. i've
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noticed in a love of forms and things now, you are being asked what pronoun you would like to be referred to by. i think there is a generation of young people coming up for whom the very strict gender divides are not as strict as they we re divides are not as strict as they were for our generation, they are much more fluid. headteachers of girls schools have been given guides and told not to call girls girls, instead of saying girls go to your lessons, say pupils go to your lessons. it may be rare to have a transgender child but it is only language, if we can change our language, if we can change our language and it stops offence to people, is that that —— is that such a bad thing? the secretary of state saying that soldiers and police have been failed by this inquiry into the troubles. the sunday telegraph has a
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strong military constituency amongst its leadership, knows —— so not surprising to see this as the splash. ministers saying that this inquiry into crimes that were allegedly committed up to a0 years ago in the troubles has gone off the rails. we‘ve seen this with the iraq inquiry, which has caused terrible handling of officers in the military. let‘s face it, northern ireland was an extremely dirty conflict and there is no doubt that british troops committing crimes and they should be investigated, but we should also remember that the psychological scars inflicted on tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of british troops who deployed over the years are still very alive today and we need to take that into account. that would apply to all inquiries, where you have got soldiers or police taking part in a conflict. i mean, yesterday there
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was a march on downing street by about 1000 veterans and it was addressed by dennis hutchings who is 75 and he has been charged with attempted murder over a fatal shooting in northern ireland in 197a. shooting in northern ireland in 1974. they want a statute of limitations. i think there should be a time aftera limitations. i think there should be a time after a conflict when you draw a line actually, so it doesn't go on for years and years. they want retribution. this is the problem, we fight these wars and the legacy continues. i mean, northern ireland has one of the highest rates of post—traumatic stress disorder in the world. belfast is a tiny city but the ghosts of that conflict are still very much alive. people have a right to demand the truth.|j still very much alive. people have a right to demand the truth. i grew up through that and that was my time as a teenager. the truth and reconciliation commission... yes,
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right, on that, let‘s move on. the observer on page one, "grassroots labour revolting on brexit". this is interesting, isn‘t it? jeremy corbyn himself in the past has been a major rebel and now they have got this three line whip and no one is happy. how do you think this is going to play out? this is the brexit dilemma, isn‘t it? the people likely to be hit hardest if we crash out of the single market are people on lower incomes, labour‘s constituencies. it is not surprisingly many of the mps and grassroots labour supporters are very unhappy to seejeremy corbyn falling in line behind article 50. that is i get —— adele and it is not going to be easy to resolve. what does it do forjeremy corbyn? and labour because they could be stuck in the middle with nothing through this. it isjust a continuation of
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the internal warfare going on inside the internal warfare going on inside the labour party. last night there was this open letter to jeremy corbyn circulating on facebook and now many constituents have signed it. let's raise through the rest of the list because we are beginning to run out of time. a quick look at the express , run out of time. a quick look at the express, the young princes are going to unveil a statue to their mother, diana, to mark the 20th anniversary which will be in august. it‘s a long time coming, do you think?|j which will be in august. it‘s a long time coming, do you think? i think this is a lovely gesture actually. it's going to be erected in the grounds of kensington palace where the public anger and see it. it will be their permanent tribute to her, marking the 20th anniversary of her death. yes it may have been nice to haveit death. yes it may have been nice to have it earlier but at we're having it now. let'sjump to john hurt, we lostjohn heard. it now. let'sjump to john hurt, we
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lost john heard. can we talk about prince harry‘s expression of emotion and how he is a credit to our country and should resist donald trump at the door of buckingham palace! tributes pouring in all over forjohn hurt, obviously very beloved. yes, we all remember that brilliant scene in alien when it burst out of his chest. and the elephant man as well. and if you see jackie, you can see him. he blazed the priest. astonishing. —— he plays the priest. astonishing. —— he plays the priest. astonishing. —— he plays the priest. he has completed another three films, i think, which we are yet to see. finally, the sunday times, page one, trident‘s faulty guidance. this is an embarrassing story, it has been running for a few days, apparently the trident missile test launch veered off course,
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heading towards the american mainland before it was detonated in midairand is one mainland before it was detonated in midair and is one assumes it was not equipped with a warhead, but it raises huge questions over the whole purpose of trident, doesn't it? this enormously expensive deterrent and a problem with it is that the technology is evolving so fast, we are soon going to be having underwater drones that can follow the submarine right out of the... and render it completely obsolete. it said it did what it was supposed to do when something goes wrong, it fears off and explodes. not on america! but i was reading yesterday 01’ america! but i was reading yesterday or this morning that part of it washed up on a beach... we broke this story last week in the sunday times and we have a follow—up story today and i think what our follow—up shows that actually this deterrent was blighted with problems with its navigation control for years before this particular malfunction. inside
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the paper there is this particular malfunction. inside the paperthere is a this particular malfunction. inside the paper there is a really interesting suggestion that maybe the whole system was hacked. and so the whole system was hacked. and so the reason it malfunctioned... can we not just mothballed the reason it malfunctioned... can we notjust mothballed this thing, 01’ we notjust mothballed this thing, orare we notjust mothballed this thing, 01’ are we we notjust mothballed this thing, or are wejust have we notjust mothballed this thing, or are we just have it, just have it with no warheads. no one will ever know and it is still a deterrent! if we ever have to press that button, it‘s all over anyway. we ever have to press that button, it's all over anyway. thank you very much, both of you. it‘s been great to talk to you. just a reminder we take a look at tomorrows front pages every evening at 10.a0pm here on bbc news. goodbye for now. hello there. last night we had quite a storm working through cumbria. it did this to whitehaven, a hailstorm bringing around a centimetre or two of heol. whitehaven was turned white for a moment. that storm worked its way through from the irish sea and
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you can see a number of showers draped close to our coasts with a morgue persistent area of rain going into south—west england too. it has not been a wet start everywhere, we had a beautiful sunrise in fraser brown aberdeenshire. thank you to our weather watcher for sending us that this morning. we started off on a sunny note and the early—morning ice continues to melt away and there will be some rain arriving, edging north and east throughout the day. they‘re in mind there is a bit of uncertainty about the exact position of this rain, so it might be that across the east midlands and east anglia and the south—east, we don‘t see much in the way of rain until after dark. it will probably rain for a time after dark. it will probably rain fora time in after dark. it will probably rain for a time in northern ireland but for a time in northern ireland but for the far north of england and scotla nd for the far north of england and scotland it is more straightforward and there will be some showers around coastal areas. those will be brought in by a strong wind in
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scotland. we could see icy patches across northern england and scotland, and elsewhere a lot of clout and missed and hill fog patches. mild towards the south—west, the cold air with as in northern england and scotland. looking at the weather for the week ahead, quite a change in fortunes compared to recent weeks, it is u nsettled, compared to recent weeks, it is unsettled, spells of rain and it will become windy with the potential for some severe gales later in the week and perhaps towards next weekend. before we get there, for monday we have got a lot of clout is coming our way for most parts of the uk, bringing some damp and drizzly conditions for northern ireland, wales and south—west england. temperatures up to 12 degrees in plymouth and some sunshine for a time across northern england and scotla nd time across northern england and scotland but it will still be relatively cool here. by tuesday, those southerly winds will have pushed right into scotland, so we will see rising temperatures and some parts of scotland into double figures but there will be some rain
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around as well. that is your forecast. editor of the sunday times, sian griffiths. this is bbc news. i‘m maxine mawhinney. the headlines at 10. ajudge in the us issues a temporary halt to the deportation of visa holders or refugees stranded at airports following president trump‘s executive order. downing street say theresa may does not agree with president trump‘s temporary refugee ban after she was criticised for not condemning it during her trip to turkey. what it was wrong to do was go over there and effectively roll over in there and effectively roll over in the face of a ban affecting people from predominantly muslim countries. the northern ireland secretaryjames brokenshire says inquiries into killings during the troubles are concentrating too much on the police and the army. a statue of diana princess of wales is to be built in kensington palace by her sons prince harry and the duke of cambridge. also in the next hour: two of
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