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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 29, 2017 2:00pm-2:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at two: president trump's restrictions on refugees and people from seven mainly muslim countries entering the united states leads to calls for his state visit to be called off. i'm not happy with him coming here until the ban is lifted because look at what is happening with those countries, how many more is it going to be? and what will be the long—term effect of this on the rest of the world? but as a usjudge issues a temporary halt to the deportation of visa holders or refugees, demonstrators protest at airports across america. in yemen, us commandos are thought to have carreid out a raid killing at least 30 suspected al-qaeda fighters and civilians. roger federer breaks down in tears as he beats his long—standing rival rafael nadal to win the australian open. it's his 18th grand slam win and first title win for five years. good afternoon and
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welcome to bbc news. the foreign secretary, boris johnson, has condemned as "divisive and wrong" president trump's ban on refugees and citizens from seven mainly muslim countries. it comes as a judge in new york upheld a legal challenge aimed at stopping the deportation of people being detained under donald trump's new immigration policy. the american civil liberties union which filed the case estimates that hundreds of people are being detained at airports or in transit. president trump has denied that the measures are a ban on muslims and said that the plan was ‘working out nicely‘. his executive order halted the entire us refugee programme and also instituted a 90—day travel ban for nationals from iran, iraq, libya, somalia, sudan, syria and yemen. politicians here have been
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giving their reaction to president trump's immigration policy. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has said that president trump's state visit to the uk should be cancelled while the ban remains in place. i think it would be totally wrong for him to be coming here while that situation is going on. remains in place. i think he has to be challenged on this. until the ban is lifted you don't think he should come here? i'm not happy with him coming here until the ban is lifted because look at what is happening with those countries, how many more is it going to be? and what will be the long—term effect of this on the rest of the world? there is also a petition saying president trump should not be invited to the uk for a state visit which has now gained over 130,000 signatures meaning it could be considered for a debate in parliament. the figure is constantly moving, now
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at over 200,000. but the former ukip leader, nigel farage, says that donald trump has got a democratic mandate to enforce this executive order and confirms that he would like to see extreme vetting in the uk, too. trump's policy in many ways has been shaped by what mrs merkel did. he is fully entitled to do this, and as far as we're concerned, i would like to see extreme vetting. since 9/11 and including 9/11, can you name any terrorist event in the united states that has involved refugees who have been allowed into the country? no, in fact the terrorist events have been us citizens who have been radicalised whilst in america. not refugees. no. but when you have a problem already, why would you wish to add to it? of those eight people who got into paris who committed the atrocities in paris, some of them got into europe posing as refugees. the chief secretary to the treasury, david gauke, has described the ban as ‘divisive‘. he was also asked why theresa may refused three times to address
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and condemn it on a news conference yesterday, during her visit to turkey. the prime minister is not a shoot—from—the—hip politician. she wants to see evidence and see precisely what the implications are. she had been in a series of lengthy meetings with president erdogan, and she is someone who wants to see the briefing and understand it and then will respond to that. i think there are times when there is always pressure to respond within a news cycle, the important thing is, we are saying that we disagree with it and we do think it is wrong. in the last few minutes, a statement has been issued in response to donald trump's travel ban, the four time olympic champion, sirmo farah said: "i am a british citizen who has lived in america for the past six years, working hard, contributing to society, paying my taxes and bringing up ourfour children in the place they now call home. now, me and many others like me are being told that we may not be welcome.
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it's deeply troubling that i will have to tell my children that daddy might not be able to come home, to explain why has introduced a policy that comes from a place of ignorance daddy might not be able to come home, to explain why the president has introduced a policy that comes from a place of ignorance and prejudice." a short while ago our middle east correspondent 0rla guerin told me about the reaction in the region to president trump's executive order. we have a statement from egypt air saying they received official notification of the work to prevent visa holders from the seven muslim majority countries from boarding flights to the us. they did not have this official notification yesterday, but nonetheless at least seven passengers who were in transit through egypt from both iraq and yemen were prevented from boarding flights. that happened because there is a standard system of pre—authorisation. every passenger listed on the flight to the us has to be approved. yesterday the airline was told that certain passengers were not approved, and at least seven were taken off the flights
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or at least re—routed back to their countries of origin. we have managed to speak to one of those who was affected yesterday, an iraqi gentleman who was here in cairo with his wife and three children. the party of five were due to board a flight, a egypt air flight to the us. they had visas, and were stopped. this gentleman has worked in the past in iraq for a subcontractor used by the us aid, he has told us his life was in danger at that time, that he and his family are potential targets for terrorists, and he simply cannot understand how the us administration could take this decision. according to the information from egypt air there are exceptions. they say green card holders in the countries, sudan, yemen, iraq, iran, syria, somalia, libya, will be allowed to board their various flights, as well as diplomatic passport holders and government officials. people in those narrow
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defined categories should be able to board their flights, but the gentleman we spoke to made the point that he and his family had been through a rigorous two—year long vetting process. he said one entire year was spent on background checks of not only him, his family, his friends, everybody everybody he was in contact with. he said this suggests that donald trump does not trust his own officials, does not trust those involved in that process. he and his wife both gave up theirjobs in anticipation of beginning a new life in the united states. they sold their car, their home, although furniture. ——all theirfurniture. they shut down their lives in iraq. today they are back in iraq having to rely on the generosity of family, having had to move in and live with relatives. and they say that donald trump has ruined their lives. in yemen, us commandos have
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carried out an attack, killing around fourteen suspected al-qaeda fighters. 0ne us serviceman was also killed and three others injured. sources in central al—baida province say the attack began with an air strike on one particular house. the raid appears to mark an intensification of america's efforts to target the militants in yemen. earlier, our middle east analyst alanjohnston said the americans still hadn't confirmed they carried out the raid. sources in this mountainous area in the heart of yemen say this raid began with an air strike on one particular house, but then a wave of helicopters swept in and deposited american commanders on the ground who then engaged in a gunfight with the militants. mosques and another facility used by the militants were targeted. local people said that along with the recent deaths there were a number of civilian casualties, and now the americans are saying that one of their commandos has died and his wounds were received during the raid,
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and three other soldiers wounded. they also say an aircraft involved suffered what they call a hard landing nearby, there were more americans wounded there, and this aircraft was then destroyed so it wouldn't fall into enemy hands. we're not clear what brought about the need for that hard landing. was it shot down, did it have mechanical difficulties, we are not clear. the americans have always seen al-qaeda in yemen is particularly dangerous, the source of a number of plot against america and the west, and all through the 0bama administration there were frequent drone strikes from the air on al-qaeda militants. but they have not until now tended to go in hard on the ground in the way they did during this raid, and so this raid perhaps does mark an escalation. that is not a surprise.
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mr trump has made clear he wants to see a more robust military response to the threat posed byjihadist groups, and i think this raid we have seen today may be the sign of much more to come. life may get harder for the likes of al-qaeda. more jihadists might get killed, but there is an argument that if you killed more civilians, hatred for america in places like yemen deepens and so recruitment for organisations like al-qaeda gets easier. the northern ireland secretary, james brokenshire, says the system for re—investigating killings during the troubles isn't working. mr brokenshire has told the sunday telegraph that the process focuses disproportionately on killings by the police and the army, and he stressed that this posed a danger of re—writing the past. 0ur ireland correspondent sara girvin said this would continue to be a controversial subject. this issue of how to deal with the past of northern ireland
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has always been controversial. at the moment police are reinvestigating all deaths that took place during northern ireland's troubles. 3,500 people were killed between 1969 and 1998. 302 of those were killed by members of the british army. as a result of these police investigations two former soldiers are currently being prosecuted, and a law firm representing other former soldiers says it believes there could be more prosecutions to come. today we have heard from the northern ireland secretary of state, james brokenshire. writing in the sunday telegraph he said it was clear the investigations into all troubles deaths was not working. he added it was also clear that the current focus was disproportionately on those who worked for the state, former members of the armed forces and the royal ulster constabulary police force.
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he said we are in danger of seeing the past rewritten. that is very much at odds to what we heard from the northern ireland director of public prosecutions just a few days ago. he said he had been left feeling mystified at claims of bias from unionists and some conservative mps. there are such differing opinions on these prosecutions and the possibility of more to come, it seems the question of how to deal with the legacy of northern ireland's troubles remains unanswered. given that the secretary of state has said this, has there been any public reaction to this? it is an emotive subject. very much so, and very controversial. yesterday we saw some former soldiers who had served in northern ireland march past parliament. they were speaking yesterday. today we have not heard a lot of political reaction, we are in an election phase here, going to the polls on the 2nd of march, and this will continue to be an issue that star is very
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strong emotions politically and publicly. living standards could be set to fall this year, according to a report by a leading think tank. the resolution foundation, said that although the uk experienced a mini—boom from 2014 to the beginning of 2016, this has now ended and they warn that household incomes are now growing at their slowest. stagnant wages and lower living standards are across the uk. reports coming in this hour twenty—five chinese nationals on board a missing malaysian boat have been found alive. malaysian naval ships and an aircraft have been searching for the vessel in a large sea area off the coast of borneo. the boat was reported to have been carrying 30 people when it sank. wildfires in chile are now known to have killed at least 11 people and left several thousand homeless. firefighters and volunteers are tackling more than a hundred separate fires, half of which are still out of control. the authorities have detained more
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than 20 people suspected of arson. bbc one viewers will be joining us in a moment for a full round—up of the days news. the local good afternoon. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has called on president trump's state visit to the uk to be cancelled amid a global outcry against his ban on refugees and citizens from several muslim countries entering america. the prime minister is facing criticism for not condemning the controversial us ban more quickly but has now said action will be taken if british nationals are affected. 0vernight — a us court ruled to stop deportations of those affected — we'll have more on that in a moment — but first our political correspondent susanna mendonca reports on growing row. protests have spread across
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america's airport ever since donald trump's travel ban came into force. at the time, theresa may was in turkey for trade talks where she failed to criticise the ban when asked about it repeatedly. the united states is a bronze bull fought united states policy on refugees. the uk is responsible for uk policy on refugees. hours after landing back in britain number ten issued a statement insisting the prime minister did not agree with this kind of approach. it added that if there is any impact on uk national then clearly we will make representations to the us government. the british olympic champion sir mo farah is worried he could be one of those affected as he was born in somalia and lives in america when trains. he described us policy coming from a place of ignorance and prejudice. 0ne policy coming from a place of ignorance and prejudice. one of theresa may buzz and very own mps born in iraq was told he was affected. how does it make you feel that donald trump doesn't want you in america now? gosh, i haven't felt
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discriminated against since little school when kids were cruel as a young boy coming from a run of kurdish origin. for the first time in my life last night i felt discriminative against, demeaning, it is sad. boris johnson has now criticised the travel ban on seven mainly muslim countries as being divisive and wrong and a petition calling for donald trump knots to be invited for a state visit to the uk has picked up pace. gaining enough signatures to be considered for a debate in parliament. i am not happy with him coming him until the ban is lifted them are quite honestly because look at what is happening with those countries. how many more is it going to take, and what will be the effect on the rest of the world ? be the effect on the rest of the world? but you can's nigel farage has defended the us president saying that mr trump agreed with democracy and was doing what the voters he backed —— who backed him wanted to do. he was elected to get tough, he
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was elected to say he would do anything in his power to protect introduction by isis terrorists. there are seven countries on that list and he is entitled to do this. in america the opposition continues with families being kept apart by the travel ban. for the british government it is perhaps a sign of the challenges ahead of trying to maintaina the challenges ahead of trying to maintain a special relationship with a president who has some very different views to the uk. this morning president trump has stood by his decision on his executive order. he tweeted that america needed strong borders and extreme vetting immediately. his comments come after chaos at airports yesterday when travellers with legal visas were turned away — as richard lister reports. 0utside this new york courthouse they chanted this is what america looks like. they were waiting for these lawyers to emerge after fighting for two iraqi men held on arrival in the us despite having
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american visas. it is a challenging case for mr trump's authority. the judge in a nutshell sort through what the covenant was doing and gave us what the covenant was doing and gave us what we wanted which was to block the trump order and not allow the government to remove anybody who has come and who he has caught up in the order nationwide. they cannot remove anybody. it is only temporary, though. the ruling will be reviewed next month when there is no directive about what should happen 110w directive about what should happen now to the dozens of illegal immigrants —— legal immigrants detained across the country at airports. at chicago airport authorities released 17 migrants detained, but for them and thousands of others the freedom to come and go from the youth as freely has now ended. —— to go from the us freely. this is including talent brought in by companies from the seven countries hit by the order. google says many employees have been
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affected and it is trying to bring back people travelling abroad. donald trump is however holding firm and ina donald trump is however holding firm and in a tweet this morning he says countries needed strong borders and extreme betting, now. the. we did support from the leader of the dutch freedom party, saying it is the only way to stay safe and free. the countries included in the trump order are reeling. iran's foreign minister asked the swiss ambassador to convey that it was against human rights conventions. and in iraq and american ally there is confusion at this kurdish family was prevented from boarding a flight to the states. as someone signs effective immediately, what does this mean? it is like saddam hussein's decisions. president trump seemed very common at about the decision when signing it yesterday that the ink is barely dry and it is already causing a furious debate in america, and around the mould. that
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world. the northern ireland secretary has criticised the way inquiries are being conducted into the troubles. james brokenshire said the current re—investigations into the conflict were "disproportionately" focused on the police and the army. a number of former soldiers are facing prosecution for deaths during the 30 years of violence. jeremy corbyn has warned his shadow cabinet that it will be "impossible" for them to keep theirjobs if they vote against triggering the start of the brexit process. the labour leader has ordered his party's mps to support the bill when it reaches the commons. two of his front bench have already resigned over the issue. living standards could be set to fall this year, according to a report by a leading think tank. the resolution foundation, said that although the uk experienced a mini—boom from 2014 to the beginning of 2016, this has now ended and they warn that household incomes are now growing at their slowest. stagnant wages and lower living standards are across the uk. rising prices and stagnating wages mean a bigger squeeze on our income. our business correspondent, joe lynam reports. it may not feel like it for some of us, but we've enjoyed a mini boom
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in living standards over the past 2.5 years. that's thanks to low inflation, low interest rates and growing employment levels. but that's set to end, according to a think tank. the resolution foundation's annual living standards audit says the weaker pound will reduce our spending power, especially among low earners, and employers won't be able to increase wages as fast. while employment rates will slow down orfall this year. there are big things the government can do, but they can't deal with inflation, the government, but it can deal with trying to get even more people into work and solving some problems around productivity we might see wages growing quicker. the government said the uk under theresa may had the fastest growing economy in the g7 and it was determined to build an economy that worked for all. but the government's own official forecaster expects the economy to weaken somewhat this year and that could leave many of us a little bit poorer. joe lynam, bbc news.
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polls have opened in france where the socialist party is choosing its candidate for april's presidential election. manuel valls, a former prime minister, is leading in the polls. his opponent is benoit hamon. the party faces a tough battle from france's right wing. at 35 years old — and five years after his last grand slam victory — roger federer has triumphed at the australian open tennis championships. he was up against his old adversary — rafa nadal. it's the swiss player's 18th major trophy — but as tim hague reports, it didn't come without a battle. roger federer and rafa nadal, a matchup made in heaven and a final no one predicted yet everyone wanted to see. with 31 majors between them it lived up to expectations back and forth like to prized fighters, federer striking the first blow, but nadal, like his opponent, like a man
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winding back the clock he did not disappear. a relentless and ruthless in equal measure and this match was level but not for long, with the 17 time grand slam champion reducing scintillating stuff in the third set, taking on the door and beating him easily, 6—1. he didn't distract the spaniard, in the bullring, and taking the set by the horns. you can only applaud play like that. it meant inevitably going to fifth deciders, so many break points, three of them executed, two in favour of federer. an 18th grand slam title for a 35—year—old many think is the greatest. after this, it would be hard to disagree. you can see more on all of today's stories on the bbc news channel. the next news on bbc one is at five minutes past six —— bye for now. in recent weeks we have looked at
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the concerned rather than the atla ntic the concerned rather than the atlantic for weather influences. that is all about to change and there is plenty of weather coming our way there is plenty of weather coming ourway in there is plenty of weather coming our way in the atlantic but the first signs of that changes is only there to be had across a good part of wales and central and southern parts of england. the last of the cold, crisp stuff is still to be had across the vast north—east of england, and across scotland, too. through the late afternoon and long into the evening will stop that rain quite heavy across the mountains of south wales got across the moors of the south—west and increasingly moderate to heavy bursts of rain going into the south midlands, so lots of surface water around if you are moving back on your weekend away, perhaps. further north, northern england and northern ireland with bits and pieces of rain never amounting to much and skies
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rain resolutely clear across scotland, where the surfaces have been dampens you will be looking at quite significant ice problems if not treated, and somewhere across northern britain particularly eastern is governed scotland, —10 tonight. what a contrast, further south. proud and rain keeping temperatures up. even though the rainfor temperatures up. even though the rain for the most part moves away we will keep lots of cloud and that is just the first signs of this change ofa just the first signs of this change of a week where we will cease bales of a week where we will cease bales of rain, becoming windy but noticeably milder. great, leaden skies to reach much of england wales and northern ireland, and for scotla nd and northern ireland, and for scotland bits and pieces of stone —— ‘s clear skies, some lingering around for the good part of the day, so watch about. mild with all of that air flooding so watch about. mild with all of that airflooding in so watch about. mild with all of that air flooding in from the atla ntic that air flooding in from the atlantic and just the last of that cold air still trapped their across scotland. it will be elbowed aside as we get on into tuesday, atlantic fronts moving out and eventually
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pushing the last of the cold air to the east, eight, 12, 13 or so across the east, eight, 12, 13 or so across the east. as i say it is a matter of looking to the atlantic to see where and when these funds will arrive across the aisles, because this front wiggles around. its exact time of clea ra nce front wiggles around. its exact time of clearance off to the continent is open to some doubt, a little bit of a lull, and the next weather front already approaching on the atlantic. wherever you are, take care. goodbye. hello. welcome if you've justjoined welcome if you'vejustjoined us. this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines at 2:30: president trump's ban on refugees, and people from seven countries which have mainly muslim populations, entering the united states is condemned by the british government and by labour. i'm not happy with him coming here until this ban is lifted, honestly, because look at what is happening with those countries. how many more is it going to be? and what's going to be the long—term effect on the rest of the world?
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as an american judge issues a temporary halt to the deportation of visa holders and refugees, president trump receives support from nigel farage. trump's policy in many ways has been shaped by what mrs merkel did. he is fully entitled to do this and as far as we're concerned in this country, yes i would like to see extreme vetting. in yemen, us commandos kill at least 30 suspected al-qaeda fighters, as well as civilians. a statue of princess diana will be built in kensington palace by her sons prince harry and the duke of cambridge. the princes said 20 years after her death, the time was right to recognise their mother's positive impact around the world. those are the headlines, i will have more at 3pm. now on bbc news, it's the week in parliament.
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