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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 30, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. donald trump defends his decision to impose travel restrictions saying he isn't targeting muslims. all chant: let them in! more protests have taken place overnight after us borders were closed to all refugees, and to citizens of seven countries with muslim majorities. good morning, it's monday the 30th of january. also this morning: six people have been killed in a gun attack on a mosque in the canadian city of quebec. the prime ministerjustin trudeau has called it a terrorist attack. so—called fake news is going to be investigated by mps amid fears that people are being swayed by propaganda and lies spread online. the future of tata steel could be
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determined today as staff vote on changes to their pensions. if the deal gets the go—ahead, it could secure the company's survival in the uk. in sport, it was a weekend full of shocks in the fa cup action. two non—league sides are into the fifth round. sutton united beat leeds yesterday. the emotional impact of the city. one man's exploration of urban britain and how it affects the way we feel. and carol has the weather. good morning. a cold and frosty start in scotland this morning, temperatures currently in the highlands —8 or —9 but here there will be some sunshine. for the rest of the uk, cloudy, damp, some hill fog around as well and we've got rain sweeping in from the south—west. i'll have more details a little earlier this morning at 6:13am. thanks for the reminder. see
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you then! good morning. first, our main story. president trump has insisted that his temporary travel ban on people from seven middle eastern and african countries is not about religion but terrorism, and protecting america. uk nationals with dual citizenship will be largely unaffected, but there's still concern about the impact that strong border controls might have on british people. here's our washington correspondent david willis. man chants: no ban, no wall — new york for all. in a country built by immigrants many find donald trump's travel ban unpalatable. they took to the streets in cities across the nation, as the crackdown sparked chaotic scenes at some airports and prompting criticism from senior members of the president's own party. this couple underwent several hours of questioning after touching down in texas from iran. over the weekend about 300 people were either prevented from travelling or detained. they asked her about her family,
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about her brothers and sisters and her parents. what they did. how long we stayed. president trump issued his controversial order without input from or giving notice to the government departments that will need to implement it, hence the concern of officials here and elsewhere, in trying to interpret it in the face of a flurry of lawsuits and the concerns of leaders around the world. the foreign office says the ban only applies to people travelling to the us from one of the seven countries on the list. travellers from the uk will not be effected and neither will uk citizens travelling from any of those seven countries to america. unless, that is, they are joint—citizens of one of the seven nations, in which case they are likely to face additional checks. for all the confusion, mr trump's aids have deemed the travel ban a success and they issued a statement seeking to dispel suggestions that it amounted to a ban on muslims:
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despite the backlash, donald trump knows that many of those who voted for him did so specifically because of his promise to combat the threat of so—called redical islamic terrorism. to them, this just represents another promise kept. david willis, bbc news, washington. let's talk to our political correspondent iain watson, and the government's facing more questions about why it took most of the weekend to get the situation for british citizens clarified? that's right. as we heard from david willis, the situation doesn't apply to uk citizens and even if you have dual nationality from one of the seven countries where the ban applies you should still be able to get into the us. that's all well and good but the political questions will focus on why didn't the prime
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minister herself distance herself further from this policy when she was asked to do so at a press conference in turkey at the weekend and why did it take at least another 24 and why did it take at least another 2a hours to get clarification from the foreign office. we understand borisjohnson was in touch with the president's son—in—law, who also advises donald trump, to get that clarification. some other european leaders were quicker to condemn, such as angela merkel in germany and francois hollande in france, so it's likely the foreign secretary will have to answer questions about this when parliament resumes this morning. it's highly likely that people will be asking about the process as well is the substance of the ban but when it comes to the band itself, the conservative mp nadia is rouhani, who was born in a rock, said he is please do get the clarification but is still against the policy and it is highly likely we will see only him protesting —— in iraq. even with the exemptions for british citizens in london today
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and around the uk. we will be talking about that later of course. at least six people have been killed during a shooting at a mosque in a suburb of quebec city in canada. police say two people have been arrested after the shooting which the canadian prime minister has described as a terrorist attack. sarah corker‘s report contains flashing images. police have closed off the area surrounding the quebec city islamic cultural center as armed officers entered the mosque. it was during evening prayer on sunday that witnesses say gunmen opened fire on a0 worshippers inside. ambulances continued to take away the dead and injured. quebec city police confirmed to suspects have been arrested but gave no further details. they have not ruled out the possibility a third suspect is still at large. the canadian prime minister justin trudeau tweeted: the quebec premier termed the act
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barbaric violence and expressed solitudarity with the victims‘ families. while the public safety minister said: the motive for this attack is unknown but incidents of islamophobia in quebec have increased in recent years. sarah corker, bbc news theresa may has said she will not shy away from tough talks on brexit when she meets representatives of the devolved governments of wales, scotland and northern ireland today. the prime minister will chair a meeting of the joint ministerial committee in cardiff to discuss how all parts of the uk can work together to support trade and investment. last week the supreme court ruled
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that devolved assemblies cannot block the triggering of article 50. a group of mps will carry out a parliamentary inquiry into so—called fake news, inaccurate or false news stories shared on social media. the phenomenon came to international attention during the recent us election campaign when there were fears voters were swayed by untruthful reports. our media editor amol rajan reports. pu rveyors of purveyors of fake news are often motivated either by the desire for a quick buck or a particular and sometimes extreme political cause. because their product tends to be salacious and remarkable, it can be more widely shared on social media platforms such as facebook and twitter, quickly reaching millions of people. now the culture committee is to investigate the growing
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prevalence of fake news and what can be done about it. we're be done about it. we' re interested be done about it. we're interested in the responsibility of companies like google and facebook to their users and to warn people and alert people to likely sources of fake news. we're also interested in the sources of fa ke we're also interested in the sources of fake news, are there particular groups and organisations or servers located in particular parts of the world where we know fake stories originate from, therefore what action can we take? ultimately the a nswer to action can we take? ultimately the answer to that question might be not much but facebook has introduced new tools in america and germany allowing users to flag material that looks suspicious. it also looks to identify fact checkers. deliberate falsehoods masquerading as news are the tiny fraction of the total media shared on social media. but with high profile cases are still reaching millions and donald trump intent on using the phrase to describe journalism he doesn't like, fa ke describe journalism he doesn't like, fake news seems to be a growing presence in our lives. amol rajan,
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bbc news. we will be speaking to the mp behind the new inquiry and a former facebook executive at around 8:10am. the french socialist party has chosen the hard—left benoit hamon as its candidate for the upcoming presidential election. he beat the former prime minister manuel valls in a ballot of party members. he'll be up against marine le pen on the far—right and francois fillon on the centre—right in april's vote. the uk need not fear electricity black—outs, even on the coldest of days when demand is at its highest, according to the former head of the national grid. steve holliday‘s comments co—incide with the opening of the government's latest auction to provide back—up power. firms will bid for subsidies to supply electricity to the grid during extreme conditions. human—like robots with cultural awareness and a good bedside manner could help solve the crisis over care for the elderly, according to academics.
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an international team is working on a £2 million project to develop versatile machines to help look after older people in care homes or sheltered accommodation. it's hoped they will be able to offer support with everyday tasks like taking tablets, as well as offering companionship. i know it's a bit early bad is a robot companionship? well, that is an excellent question —— but is. robot companionship? well, that is an excellent question -- but is. the a nswer an excellent question -- but is. the answer might be in there! black actors have dominated the screen actors guild awards in hollywood. denzel washington was named the best actor for fences and his co—star viola davis won the best supporting actress prize. the event was dominated by outspoken criticism of the trump administration. our los angeles correspondent james cook was there. ina week in a week of anger and demonstrations, this was america's most elite, most exclusive best dressed protest. hidden figures
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about three black female mathematicians that helped put americans into space was the winner of the night's top award, best ensemble. this story is about what happens when we put our differences aside and we come together as a human race. we win. the only british winner played the ultimate british figure, the queen, and she used a speech to thank co—star matt smith. you're not only a spontaneous, exciting and incredibly talented actor, but you're also my friend, matt, and thank you for making thejob a joy. as surprise best actor award for denzel washington in fences, and emma stone's success wasn't a shock — la la land was in a land of its own. the cast of stranger things took the prize for tv drama ensemble, and its star david harber gave one most blistering acceptance speech. we will shelter freaks and outcasts or those who have no homes, we will get past the lies, we will hunt monsters.
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this is another award ceremony where art has been overshadowed by politics, as many stars in this most liberal of cities are concerned about the direction in which their country is heading. james cook, bbc news, los angeles there you go. we shall have the weather with sally... hold on, whether with carol. oh, weather with sally... hold on, whetherwith carol. oh, dear! weather with sally... hold on, whether with carol. oh, dear! sally is here! it's monday, isn't it, one of those days! carol, we will be with you later! monday morning! it's gone! maybe he's been watching foot ball gone! maybe he's been watching football all weekend. gone! maybe he's been watching football all weekendlj gone! maybe he's been watching football all weekend. i know what's wrong, it's the fa cup, isn't it? that's all you've done, you have worked. can you get my pen back, it is all the way over there. an
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important piece of technical equipment, he needs it. always happy to help. let's pretend nothing like that ever happened. tell us all about it. have a look at that. lincoln. there were some shocks. the draw for the next round is tonight. two non—league clubs will be in tonight's draw for the fifth round of the fa cup. the lowest—ranked team in the competition, sutton united, knocked out leeds united yesterday. jamie collins was their hero with a second—half penalty. lincoln city also made it through after beating brighton. celtic have extended their unbeaten domestic run to a record 27 matches by beating hearts 4—0 in the scottish premiership. they're now 22 points clear of rangers at the top of the league. england had a great chance to wrap up the t20 series in india but a last—gasp comeback from the hosts squared the series at 1—1. two wickets in the final over from butjaspreet bumrah did the trick as india won by five runs. roger federer turned back the clock,
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winning his eighteenth grand slam title at the age of 35. he beat his old rival rafael nadal in five sets, in the final of the australian open. roger federer turned back the clock, winning his eighteenth grand slam title at the age of 35. he beat his old rival rafael nadal in five sets, in the final of the australian open. if you fancy looking at it. it is just gorgeous. it was amazing. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. we have had the driest in november since 1975. we are going to have spells of rain. some of us have seen it already. by the end of the week, it already. by the end of the week, it is going to become windy. what we have in the moment has a a lot of drizzle, rain coming the south—west. currently in the highlands, we have
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-7' currently in the highlands, we have -7, -8 currently in the highlands, we have —7, —8 and even minus nine. a cold start under the clear skies and a frosty one. there is also patchy fog around the m8, heading up towards the north. watch out for that if you are travelling. a lot of clear skies there is patchy fog at lower levels. it is mild and as we drift into the south—west. we have signs of rain coming our way. there is a 20 degrees difference interpreter between the north of scotland and the south—west of england. through the south—west of england. through the course of today, our rain starts to gather, accompanied by south—westerly winds. that is a mild direction to us. it is moving slowly north eastwards. the skies continue to brighton. we are looking at
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between seven and 11. getting onto the evening and overnight, our weather front, the first one, moves towards the east. there will be an early frost ahead of it. temperatures pick up and then receive a second weather front, introducing more rain. temperature wise, we are looking at six to the dizzy heights of 11 down towards the south—west. at a default and murky conditions associated with this. then tomorrow, it continues to advanced towards the east, eventually clear link northern ireland which will brighten up later in the day. so much of the rest of the uk, it will be wet board bank with drizzle and moisture —— —— wet 01’ with drizzle and moisture —— —— wet or dank. it went be nearly as cold as today. then on wednesday, the rain around, but as we go through the day, things will slowly improve and brighten up, particularly so
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from the west. temperatures picking up from the west. temperatures picking up and we still have the south—westerly wind. talking of the wind, this is what is coming our way towards the end of the week and the weekend. various vigorous areas of low pressure bringing in wet and windy conditions. i will update you throughout the programme. i was about to say charlie. gino what, carol, you have been called sally already today. right, concentrate. —— do you know what. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: the main picture we have is of the most thorough and his family. his so that grow can return to his family. the main story is for us keep us open to britain. that is the main
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page of the telegraph. similarly, the front page of the guardian, at picture of most thorough and federer at the top. the times have got trump in climbdown over british travellers. they are mentioning rafael nadal and roger federer. he has now won 18 grand slam finals. any people are asking —— many people are asking if he is the greatest of all time. he is amazing. the daily mirrorare all time. he is amazing. the daily mirror are talking about this visit due from donald trump. more than eight 100 thousand brits have demanded the arrest of donald trump. -- 800,000. demanded the arrest of donald trump. —— 800,000. over his ban on muslim immigration. jump defiant as protests mount over extreme rules vetting trouble van. —— extreme
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vetting trouble van. —— extreme vetting travel ban. this is looking at hull being the only city in britain that does not have the eu as its biggest training partner —— trading. derby is at least required on the eu market. it sells rolls—royce is. it is exeter, the most dependent on the eu, 70% of all that it sells that goes abroad is sold by exeter to the european union. it is an interesting breakdown. london is the big trading partner that it is just selling 43%. matt stocco bit more about roger federer. they are saying that it is one of his greatest wins ever yesterday. —— here is a bit more about roger federer. can you see how
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sad rafa is over there. they are actually properly friends. rafa is better because of roger and roger is better because of roger and roger is better because of rafa. when rafa opened his tennis academy, roger opened his tennis academy, roger opened it for him. the age of 35, winning yesterday in australia. it doesn't get better than that. considering the injury he had, he came back from not slipping over on the tennis court but slipping over while bathing his twins. that is a proper injury. easy to do, isn't it? crocodile gate last week. you can apparently swim safely with crocodiles. obviously i would never do that. have you been watching spire in the world? ijust have to show you it. to you know lulu?
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a p pa re ntly show you it. to you know lulu? apparently she doesn't shout any more. actually, she has to protect her voice. when she is on tour, she does not speak until midday. her voice. when she is on tour, she does not speak until middaylj her voice. when she is on tour, she does not speak until midday. i don't speak after midday! see you later, thanks, guys. it has been a weekend of protests, petitions and court orders against president trump's travel ban, but he has said he will stand firm on the policy. but how does his plan to close the us borders to refugees and people from seven countries work? james boys is a professor in us politics at richmond university and joins us from our london newsroom. good morning to you. so many issues being caused by this. first of all, it's very confused. are we clear yet on who this refers to, this ban?” don't think we are, quite frankly. one of the great challenges we have is that the white house issued this executive order deliberately,
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secretly. the white house has been quite openly saying that they didn't wa nt to quite openly saying that they didn't want to telegraph the decision it was going to be making because they feared it would lead to an influx of people from these seven countries if it were suddenly announced that they would be prohibited from travelling in the near future. would be prohibited from travelling in the nearfuture. the problem with that if they effectively drafted it without the necessary in —— input from the state department, the justice department or the department of homeland security. they have issued this blanket travel ban and are now having to clarify it after the fat. we are getting interpretations not only from different countries, example in london but also if a department in the united states. —— after the fa ct. the united states. —— after the fact. this has been challenged across the us in various states and cities with different results. depending on where you fly will depend on where the tumour get detained or not. it sounds very
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confusing. donald trump made a statement. he said to be clear, this is not a muslim ban. it is preposterous, isn't it? he issues a blanket ban on seven countries. these countries have inflicted no injuries on any part of the united states. it is nowhere that donald trump has business interests. if you are going to target nature is —— nations that have been affecting americans in the past, you would look at saudi arabia, afghanistan. it makes no sense to target these seven countries. it is being challenged within the us i various attorneys across the us. various judges, for example massachusetts
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and new york. there is an edict going round saying if you are looking to fly to the us, the best one is logan because of a local ruling being passed down basically prohibiting the detention of any quick immigrants coming in who might fall under this situation. he has used what is called an executive order. is that often used by presidents and is he likely to do it ain? presidents and is he likely to do it again? donald trump has hit the ground running. he made a great display of his willingness to do this and promised to do so on the campaign trail. it must be said, executive orders are quite legal. they have been used routinely by us presidents throughout us history. donald trump is well entitled to make use of this legal process. what he is doing, however, is effectively legislating without legislature. it
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would usually go through congress to pass laws. what he is doing is using the vehicle of an executive order which republicans were heavily critical of barack which republicans were heavily critical of ba rack obama which republicans were heavily critical of barack obama for using, in order to get this sweeping issue on the table very quickly in his first week or so in office. very good suspect you. thank you for that. and in the next hour we'll talk to labour's shadow attorney general, shami chakrabarti. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. islamophobic hate crimes across luton, hertfordshire and essex have risen by almost 50% in a year — to over 120 cases. yet detectives in luton believe a majority of cases still go unreported. the bbc spoke to a victim of hate crime — targeted for her faith — who hasn't reported it to police.
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i was iwas in i was in town. this man came up to me and he picked up my niqab. ijust garston. it really, through me. —— gasped. for a long time i did not go to town by myself. a number of developers building high rise properties in london are paying—off councils to get out—of including ‘affordable homes' in their plans. there are dozens of tower blocks currently under construction with hundreds more in the pipeline — and many of them include little or no affordable homes. developers are instead offering tens of millions of pounds in cash to local authorities — so they can build cheaper homes elsewhere. it's already causing anger among those who say it's going to make the current housing problem, worse. the biggest problem with developments like this is that their
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stated aim is to increase the value of property in the area. and that's not a good thing goes people already struggle to find somewhere they can afford to buy around here. it's going to make it even worse. there's more on that story on inside out london, tonight at 7.30 on bbc one. let's have a look at the travel situation now. good service this morning on the tube. on the trains, southeastern services are back to normal after the freight train derailed last week in lewisham. on the roads, the a13 into london — at limehouse is down to a single lane at island row for roadworks. and in the city, farringdon road has a lane closed at ludgate circus for water works. lets have a check on the weather now with kate. a great start the week. a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain and drizzle. —— at grey start. it is filling mild. some temperatures at
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nine or 10 celsius to start the day in london. there is not much in the way of brightness today, u nfortu nately. way of brightness today, unfortunately. looking at a maximum temperature of around nine. overnight tonight, we are hanging on to the cloud. quite a murky night, a bit of mist and outbreaks of rain. they tend to break up as they head towards us. patchy rain and drizzle and misty conditions as we had through to dawn. a mild night with a minimum temperature of around five or six. as we head through tuesday, we start to see the weather front heading towards us. the heavy, more significant rain heads for us on tuesday evening and onto wednesday. quite an unsettled week on the whole and turning breezy as we had through thursday. a week after the murder of a 15—year—old boy in willesden — vanessa feltz has got a special programme this morning focusing on the issues around knife crime. i will be back in half an hour.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: how getting your a0 winks could save the nhs money and improve your health. so should doctors be given training to help you sleep? also this morning: at a time of seemingly divisive public opinion, some news has turned out not to be fact but fiction. so could fake news be dangerous for democracy? now you can see how far you've walked, the mountain is climbed, the oceans. . . and we may be triggering brexit but this is one european party we'll still be part of. former x factor contestant luciejones has been chosen as the uk's eurovision entry. she'll bejoining us on the sofa just after 8:30am. all that still to come. maybe this is the year, maybe? do
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you think so? probably not. not because of the quality of the song, though. but now a summary of this morning's main news. president trump has insisted that his temporary travel ban on people from seven middle eastern and african countries is not about religion but terrorism, and protecting america. uk nationals with dual citizenship will be largely unaffected, but there's still concern about the impact that strong border controls might have on british people. here's our washington correspondent david willis. man chants: no ban, no wall — new york for all. in a country built by immigrants many find donald trump's travel ban unpalatable. they took to the streets in cities across the nation, as the crackdown sparked chaotic scenes at some airports and prompting criticism from senior members of the president's own party. neal behgooy and his wife underwent several hours of questioning after touching down in texas from iran.
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over the weekend about 300 people were either prevented from travelling or detained. they asked her about her family, about her brothers and sisters and her parents. what they did. how long we stayed. president trump issued his controversial order without input from or giving notice to the government departments that will need to implement it, hence the concern of officials here and elsewhere in trying to interpret it in the face of a flurry of lawsuits and the concerns of leaders around the world. the foreign office says the ban only applies to people travelling to the us from one of the seven countries on the list. travellers from the uk will not be effected and neither will uk citizens travelling from any of those seven countries to america. unless, that is, they're joint—citizens of one of the seven nations, in which case they're likely to face additional checks. for all the confusion,
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mr trump's aids have deemed the travel ban a success and they issued a statement seeking to dispel suggestions that it amounted to a ban on muslims: despite the backlash, donald trump knows that many of those who voted for him did so specifically because of his promise to combat the threat of so—called radical islamic terrorism. to them, this just represents another promise kept. david willis, bbc news, washington. at least six people have been killed during a shooting at a mosque in a suburb of quebec city in canada. the shooting began around the time of evening prayers and police say two people have been arrested. the canadian prime minister has called the shooting a terrorist attack. we will have more on that shortly. theresa may has said she will not shy away from tough talks on brexit when she meets
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representatives of the devolved governments of wales, scotland and northern ireland today. the prime minister will chair a meeting of the joint ministerial committee in cardiff to discuss how all parts of the uk can work together to support trade and investment. last week the supreme court ruled that devolved assemblies cannot block the triggering of article 50. a group of mps will carry out a parliamentary inquiry into so—called fake news. the commons, media and sport committee are going to investigate inaccurate or false news stories being shared on social media. the phenomenon came to international attention during the recent us election campaign when there were fears voters were swayed by untruthful reports. this is a growing problem, it's been a big problem that's been discussed in america. in germany there have been concerns about fake news in the lead up to their election in september this year and i believe we need to look at fake news here, look
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at what's happening in other countries and say what can we do now to address this problem before it gets too big. the french socialist party has chosen the hard—left benoit hamon as its candidate for the upcoming presidential election. he beat the former prime minister manuel valls in a ballot of party members. he'll be up against marine le pen on the far—right and francois fillon on the centre—right in april's vote. the uk need not fear electricity black—outs, even on the coldest of days when demand is at its highest, according to the former head of the national grid. steve holliday‘s comments co—incide with the opening of the government's latest auction to provide back—up power. firms will bid for subsidies to supply electricity to the grid during extreme conditions. human—like robots with cultural awareness and a good bedside manner could help solve the crisis over care for the elderly, according to academics. an international team is working on a £2 million project to develop versatile machines to help look after older people in care homes or sheltered accommodation. it's hoped they will be able
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to offer support with everyday tasks like taking tablets, as well as offering companionship. i'm not sure what i think about bad. i can't believe that robots... i'm going to get philosophical, that's where we've got two in our world, robots are offering companionship. surely a fellow human, a job for someone to say, it's all right, i'll look after you. isn't it? anyway. are you getting emotional?” look after you. isn't it? anyway. are you getting emotional? i think i need to hold your hand! a lot to be said for a bit of handholding. a robot can't do that. we're talking about the fa cup this morning, i'm interested to know what you think about big cups going into the fa cup and not playing their best team —— big clubs. it's a bit sad. does it make the competition any less
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special? ask the lincoln fans or the sudden fans. lincoln are going to be able to fix their roof so there is a flip side. two non—league clubs will be in tonight's draw for the fifth round of the fa cup. lincoln city saw off championship leaders brighton on saturday and sutton united knocked out leeds united yesterday. the lowest—ranked team in the competition caused one of the biggest upsets this season courtesy of jamie collins‘ second—half penalty. leeds had made ten changes from the side that beat nottingham forest in their last championship game. we were due to play lincoln on saturday the 18th. that got called off last night because lincoln got through. we‘ve got through the day. so we can almost guarantee that we‘re going to draw lincoln on the 18th is because we should have played them and you‘ll get a nonleague team in the quarter—final, and that will never, ever happen again. league one side millwall knocked out premier league watford. the south london club always looked the more likely to score and won the match through steve morrison‘s late strike. another premier league club fell by the wayside. hull were thrashed 4—1
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by championship side fulham. 16—year—old ryan sessegnon was among the fulham scorers. hull missed two penalties. there were no such problems for cup holders manchester united though who honoured wayne rooney before kick off against championship strugglers wigan. united‘s captain couldn‘t add to his record 250 goals, but played a part in the final strike from bastian schweinsteiger in their 4—0 win. celtic extended their unbeaten domestic run to a record 27 matches by beating hearts 4—0 in the scottish premiership. callum mcgregor opened the scoring with the pick of the game‘s goals at celtic park. scott sinclair struck twice and patrick roberts added the other. the win broke the 50—year—old record set by celtic‘s lisbon lions team. west ham have accused dimitri payet of showing a lack of commitment and respect after the france international rejoined marseille for £25 million. the hammers insist they did not need to sell payet and wanted the player to stay to make an example of him. west ham say they let him go in the interest of club unity. payet has signed a four—and—a—half
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year deal with the ligue 1 club. england had a great chance to wrap up the t20 series in india, but a last—gasp comeback from the hosts squared the series at 1—1. england needed just eight runs off the last over, but they lost the key wickets ofjoe root and jos buttler. so the tourists needed a six off the last ball, they didn‘t get it. india won by five runs, and the series will go to a decider. a bit of tennis history yesterday. roger federer turned back the clock, winning his 18th grand slam title with a five—set victory over rafael nadal, that was in the australian open final. nadal was playing his first final for two—and—a—half years and dominated the fourth set to push the match to a decider. it was federer‘s first tournament since wimbledon after taking the second half of the season off to recover from injury. the swiss hit back when it mattered, winning the last five games and clinching the match thanks to a successful challenge.
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i don‘t think we both, either one of us i don‘t think we both, either one of us believed we would be in the finals of australia when we saw each other at your academy, you know, five months, four or five other at your academy, you know, five months, four orfive months ago and here we stand in the finals. tennis is a cut sport, there‘s no drawers but if there was going to be one i would have been very happy to have a draw tonight and share it with rafa, really. great to see them both back and playing against a well. brilliant stuff. thanks. dozens of people were gathered for evening prayers when shots were fired in a mosque in qubec city. the attack, which killed at least six people, has been described by the canadian prime minister as a terrorist attack against muslims. canadian broadcasting corporation reporter catou mckinnon is on the scene and joins us on the phone now. i know it is 1:40am this morning in quebec. thank you for talking to ask. i know you‘re still at the
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scene so can you tell us what‘s happening there now? -- talking to us. i have moved away because the premiere of the province of quebec is about to address the media. he has also called this a terrorist act. —— premier. around the scene there is a cordoned off area around there is a cordoned off area around the islamic cultural centre, which is where the mosque was. that is where that attack occurred. as you mention, six people died and the provincial police just confirmed that around half an hour ago. they‘re also calling it a terrorist act but they won‘t say why that is. there are two suspects in custody. one of them was arrested near that mosque. just to give you an idea, it‘s on commercial street, which ru ns it‘s on commercial street, which runs ina it‘s on commercial street, which runs in a residential neighbourhood. if you were to drive by it you wouldn‘t really notice that it is a spiritual or religious centre. it
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almost looks like something in a small mall. there were, as you mentioned, dozens of people there. it was the last prayer of the evening and we‘ve spoken to the president of that mosque who says that he spoke directly with people inside who were wondering what was going to happen next, they‘re now speaking to police because they are first—hand witnesses to what occurred this evening. catou, we we re occurred this evening. catou, we were hearing this particular mosque was targeted last year with a pigs head. can you tell me about tensions with the muslim community in quebec city? i've been reporting here for 12 years a slave there have been incidents in the past, there was that one, and it was somebody in ramadan —— 12 years. it was the head ofa ramadan —— 12 years. it was the head of a hog wrapped in transparent cellophane on the front doorstep of
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the mosque and with french written on it, bon appetit, i don‘t think i need to translate that for anybody. the people at the mosque at the time described it as an isolated incident and they are very careful to always say that they get along with eve ryo ne say that they get along with everyone in quebec city. they are living peacefully here. there was another incident i can remember about eight years ago, a man from afghanistan opened a restaurant after fleeing called kabul and afghanistan opened a restaurant afterfleeing called kabul and he was targeted, somebody threw a brick in his window and they drove by and said to go back to your country so he moved and changed the name of his restau ra nt. he moved and changed the name of his restaurant. i can‘t say there‘s ongoing tension here with the muslim community. it is still quite small, quebec city to give you an idea is half a million people and the muslim community has grown a little bit in
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the last ten news i would say, but they‘re mostly academics going to our universities —— ten years. catou, thank you for talking to us near the scene of the shooting in quebec overnight were at least six people have been killed. as catou had been telling us, two people have been taken into custody. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: president trump stands firm on his ban on citizens of seven mainly muslim countries entering the us but thousands of people have taken to the streets in protest. canada‘s prime minister, justin trudeau, has described the killing of six people at a quebec mosque as a "terrorist attack". two people have been arrested. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning to you guys. we‘re looking at spells of rain for some of us, mild for some of us but she
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went the thinking that in scotland. it will become windy especially to the end of the week and the weekend. if you are just a stepping out, a cold start, especially in scotland. 19 degrees difference in temperature north to south. what is happening todayis north to south. what is happening today is we have clear skies across must —— much of scotland. in the highlands, it is between —7 and minus eight. there is also frost around and patchy frog through the central lowlands. we have clear skies so called start across central england. also there is patchy fog. temperatures are up in these areas. for the rest of england and all of wales, again there is a lot of cloud around. we will see rain coming in across south—west england. temperatures are considerably higher here. as we move through the day,
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the sunshine continues in scotland. we will see more developed across england. we hang on to the cloud across the rest of england and wales. some hill fog, brightness in northern ireland but still some showers. but there is the rain. it will move very slowly north eastwards. 11 is in the plymouth. seven or eight as we push up towards scotland. the eastern scotland and eastern england, there will be an early frost. as our first weather front comes in and introduces cloud and rain, the temp which will lift and rain, the temp which will lift and then a second weather front follows in hot pursuit. ahead of it, it will be fairly murky with dank conditions. for scotland and wales, it will be cloudy tomorrow. moderate bursts of rain. for northern ireland, you will find it will brighten up. in stark contrast to the start of the day in scotland today, the temperatures to start the
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day will be much higher. as we push down towards maximum temperatures in the rest of england and wales, we go into double figures. we start the day on a cloudy and wet note on wednesday, quite breezy as well. that rain will die in situ. it is brightening up nicely towards the west. quite windy out there as well. as we head on through the latter pa rt as we head on through the latter part of this weekend into the weekend, things begin much more u nsettled. weekend, things begin much more unsettled. we have vigorous areas of low pressure coming our way, introducing not just low pressure coming our way, introducing notjust rain that windy conditions. for some of us, we could have severe gales. this is still a long way off so i will keep you posted on the finite details as we get closer to the time. thank you, carol. it‘s a big day for tata steel in the uk. staff will vote later on plans to cut their pensions, to safeguard the future of the firm. ben‘s looking at what‘s at stake. this is a compromise for the thousands of
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british steelworkers. but it comes after a tough year for the industry. back in march the indian owners announced they were making losses of £1 million a day — and putting the business up for sale. four months later the sale was halted. would—be buyers were put off by a black hole of almost half a billion pounds in the pension fund. by christmas the owners said they wouldn‘t sell, and instead invest a billion pounds in the port talbot business over the next ten years. the firm said it wouldn‘t make redundancies — but wants big changes to the staff pension scheme. that deal has been recommended by the three steel unions and it‘s now down to the workers to vote on it. jonathan aylen is a steel industry specialist at the manchester business school. good morning. this took about what they are going to be voting on
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today. you have to vote to accept cuts to your pension so ultimately they will be worse off, i assume? the current members may not be worse off. what they are voting on disclosure of the once thickish steel pensions scheme which has 130,000 members. most steelworkers are retired. we have seen a lot of retire at —— redundancies. they have been asked to vote on the closure of the financial salary scheme. new workers wait get such a good deal. to have a choice? it sounds like a choice between voting between an uncertain future and a viable job. many pension schemes, final salary pension schemes, have closed across. arryn university pension scheme has switched from final salary to benefit. —— our own. they valued a
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bribe, and icing on the cake, saying they will keep work open and they will keep the blast furnaces running up will keep the blast furnaces running up to 2021. so that safeguards the relative short—term future. let‘s talk about long—term. a lot of questions about whether it‘s really viable to do it here. actually, given all the cheap imports, we should just allow those imports to come from elsewhere. have a future here? the fortunes have turned around because the decline in the value of the pound has made british steel production much more competitive. a degree of trade protection has pushed up prices. tata steel sold off some huge works a few months ago. all the associated wea knesses we re a few months ago. all the associated weaknesses were sold for a mere pound. we know now that it has returned to profit and is making profits after seven months. the
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prospects at least in the short term, look quite bright. that will encourage further investment and innovation and renewal of existing work. visa shows how cyclical the whole industry can be. going from making huge losses just 12 whole industry can be. going from making huge lossesjust 12 months ago can now be making a profit. -- this shows. it has been a rollercoaster ride. as many of our manufacturers, it is up and down. the british car industry, we have seen, has just produced volumes of output and again, that helps the output and again, that helps the output at port talbot. there are songs in the wind saying we can maintaina songs in the wind saying we can maintain a manufacturing base. the three unions have recommended it. good to talk to you. i will have
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morphia after seven. —— more for you. what exactly do you feel walking through your home town? stressed, excited, interested ? no, it‘s a city. i love it. i look around and it‘s a beautiful place. is that good? good answer. that question inspired national geographic explorer, daniel raven—ellison‘s journey through 69 of the uk‘s cities equipped with new emotion tracking technology.he‘s trying to create what he hopes will become a mood map of urban britain. david sillitojoined him as he came to the end of his tour of urban britain. meet dan. he is an explorer of urban britain. 2.5 million steps, 69 cities, he has crossed. on every
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step, this has tracked his motions. this is an emotive e.g. wearable headset. it has a series of sensors that can detect what is going on inside my brain and can work out if iam inside my brain and can work out if i am stressed, relaxed, focused, interested. we agreed to meet in the city that registered higher on the interest of scale. so the place you brought me to it use? stoke. convince me. let‘s go for a walk. yes, this is an urban stoke. it is an old spoil heap that is now a park. as we walk, it gave us a chance to discuss the other cities that he crossed. exciting? bristol. swa nsea ? that he crossed. exciting? bristol. swansea? it is the punt -- brunt of jokes but i see gorgeous hill, wonderful city, street art. southampton? wild. surprisingly
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wild. the far north, suburbia. more birdsong than any other part of the uk. newcastle? so many children. loads of children playing out. more than any other cities in the uk. it's than any other cities in the uk. it‘s unusual to children playing outside. birmingham? greener than you would imagine. same as dudley. this is swansea. this, the six towns of stoke—on—trent where we met up with some ramblers to see if they we re with some ramblers to see if they were feeling what dan was feeling. we are starting to do more urban walks. people living in the area are tired of being here. what's brilliant about walking along here like stoke, the bricks to the flats to the trees to the street art, there is so much interest going on, so much to enjoy every step of the
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way. deal agree? yes, the diversity isa-- way. deal agree? yes, the diversity is a —— amazing. way. deal agree? yes, the diversity is a -- amazing. we are trying to create a mood map of our city. so far we have dan‘s descartes which reveals that things like this exciting and one particular thing, pulls him. —— appals. wheeler i would speak to somebody about not putting dog poo in bags. --i would talk to somebody. it‘s all over the country. we end this emotional journey across urban britain. the overwhelming feeling, confucian. as to why we were the only walkers in a place like this. he makes an interesting point about the dog bags in trees. he says it is everywhere. lots of people say we
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leave them there and go back and get them later. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. the human rights group amnesty international is urging londoners to join a protest this evening outside downing street against president trumps ban on muslims and refugees. they‘ll follow yesterdays angry protests in america against an ‘order‘ which restricts immigration from seven muslim majority countries. just over a week ago, 100,000 — mainly women — protested in trafalguar square over fears that women‘s rights will be eroded under the new us president. a number of developers building high rise properties in london are paying—off councils to get out—of including ‘affordable homes‘ in their plans. there are dozens of tower blocks currently under construction with hundreds more in the pipeline — and many of them include little
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or no affordable homes. developers are instead offering tens of millions of pounds in cash to local authorities — so they can build cheaper homes elsewhere. it‘s already causing anger among those who say it‘s going to make the current housing problem, worse. the biggest problem with developments like this is that their stated aim is to increase the value of property in the area. and that‘s not a good thing because people already struggle to find somewhere they can afford to buy round here and it‘s going to make it even worse. there‘s more on that story on inside out london, tonight at 7.30 on bbc one. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. good service this morning on the tube. on the trains, southeastern services are back to normal after the freight train derailed last week in lewisham. on the roads, the a13 into london — at limehouse is down to a single lane at island row for roadworks. and on tower bridge road — there‘s been a collision at the junction with abbey street, so the road is partially blocked. lets have a check on the
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weather now with kate. good morning. it‘s a rather grey start to the week. a lot of cloud and outbreaks of light rain and drizzle. but it is feeling mild. some temperatures around london — nine or 10 celsius to start the day. the cloud stays with us, not much in the way of brightness today, unfortunately. looking at a maximum temperature of around 9. overnight tonight, we are hanging on to the cloud. quite a murky night, a bit of mist but outbreaks of rain heading our way. they tend to break up as they head towards us. light, patchy rain and drizzle and misty conditions as we head through to dawn. a mild night tonight with a minimum temperature of around five and six. as we head through tuesday, we start to see the weather front heading towards us. may get some outbreaks of light rain and drizzle at first but the heavy, more significant rain heads for us on tuesday evening and into wednesday. quite an unsettled week on the whole and turning breezy as we head through thursday.
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exactly a week after the stabbing of 15—year—old quamari barnes — outside his school in willesden — vanessa feltz has got a special programme this morning focusing on the issues around knife crime — which is at a five year high in london. her programme starts on bbc radio london in a few minutes time. hello, this is breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. president trump defends his decision to impose travel restrictions saying he isn‘t targeting muslims. all chant: let them in! more protests have taken place overnight after us borders were closed to all refugees and to citizens of seven mainly muslim countries. a petition to prevent donald trump‘s planned state visit to the uk has reached almost a million signatures. good morning, it‘s monday
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the 30th of january. also this morning: six people have been killed in a gun attack on a mosque in the canadian city of quebec. the prime ministerjustin trudeau has called it a terrorist attack. so—called fake news is going to be investigated by mps amid fears that people are being swayed by propaganda and lies spread online. a call for doctors to get more training on the importance of sleep and what we should be doing to get more rest. more of us are eating breakfast on the go, and it means cereal sales have fallen sharply. i‘m speaking to the boss of weetabix about the big business of breakfast. two non—league sides are into the fifth round. it was a weekend of dramatic shocks. sutton united beat leeds yesterday. and carol has the weather.
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good morning. for most of us today it‘s going to be cloudy, dank, some drizzle and some rain coming into the south—west. exceptions to that, the far north of northern england and scotla nd far north of northern england and scotland where we‘ll see some sunshine after a cold and frosty start with some patchy fog. more details later on in the programme. see you shortly. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. president trump has insisted that his temporary travel ban on people from seven middle eastern and african countries is not about religion but terrorism, and protecting america. uk nationals with dual citizenship will be largely unaffected, but there‘s still concern about the impact that strong border controls might have on british people. here‘s our washington correspondent david willis. man chants: no ban, no wall — new york for all. in a country built by immigrants, many find donald trump‘s travel ban unpalatable. they took to the streets in cities across the nation, as the crackdown sparked chaotic
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scenes at some airports and prompting criticism from senior members of the president‘s own party. neal behgooy and his wife underwent several hours of questioning after touching down in texas from iran. over the weekend about 300 people were either prevented from travelling or detained. they asked her about her family, about her brothers and sisters and her parents. what they did. how long we stayed. president trump issued his controversial order without input from or giving notice to the government departments that will need to implement it, hence the concern of officials here and elsewhere in trying to interpret it in the face of a flurry of lawsuits and the concerns of leaders around the world. the foreign office says the ban only applies to people travelling to the us from one of the seven countries on the list.
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travellers from the uk will not be affected and neither will uk citizens travelling from any of those seven countries to america, unless, that is, they‘re joint—citizens of one of the seven nations, in which case they‘re likely to face additional checks. for all the confusion, mr trump‘s aides have deemed the travel ban a success and they issued a statement seeking to dispel suggestions that it amounted to a ban on muslims: despite the backlash, donald trump knows that many of those who voted for him did so specifically because of his promise to combat the threat of so—called radical islamic terrorism. to them, this just represents another promise kept. david willis, bbc news, washington. let‘s talk to our political correspondent iain watson.
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as correspondent iain watson. david was saying, this order as david was saying, this executive order came without consultation of those people implementing it. it‘s taken a few days for reaction from the british government as to what this means for british citizens too? yes, there‘s been a lot of confusion over the weekend and that‘s now been clarified. but both the process and the substance of the ban are equally controversial because labour mps will want the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, to will want the foreign secretary, boris johnson, to go will want the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, to go to the commons today and explain why it took so long for the clarification that british dozens are exempt, those with dual nationality are exempt, although they may face additional checks. they want to know why the prime minister didn‘t take an opportunity at the press conference over the weekend to distance herself, although downing street did later. on the substance of the ban, evenif later. on the substance of the ban, even if uk citizens are exempt, this is still controversial. we‘re likely to see demonstrations against it in london and other uk cities today and 900,000 people have signed an online
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petition calling for donald trump‘s planned state visit to britain to be put off because it might embarrass the queen. because it‘s got more than 100,000 signatures that means mps have to consider debating the issue, which could be harassing for the prime minister. labour and the lib dems have called for the state visit to be called off and even a former foreign office minister said it should be postponed. in a few minutes time we‘ll be talking to labour‘s shadow attorney general, shami chakrabarti. at least six people have been killed during a shooting at a mosque in a suburb of quebec city in canada. police say two people have been arrested after the shooting which the canadian prime minister has described as a terrorist attack. sarah corker‘s report contains flashing images. police closed off the area surrounding the quebec city islamic cultural centre as armed officers entered the mosque. it was during evening prayer on sunday that witnesses say gunmen opened fire on a0 worshippers inside.
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ambulances continued to take away the dead and injured. quebec city police confirmed to suspects have been arrested. we consider it an act of terrorism and we can confirm that we have six people, persons pronounced dead and persons is in hospital with minor or severe injuries. the canadian prime minister justin trudeau tweeted: on twitter the quebec premier said: while the public
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safety minister said: the motive for this attack is unknown but incidents of islamophobia in quebec have increased in recent years. sarah corker, bbc news. theresa may has said she will not shy away from tough talks on brexit when she meets representatives of the devolved governments of wales, scotland and northern ireland today. the prime minister will chair a meeting of the joint ministerial committee in cardiff to discuss how all parts of the uk can work together to support trade and investment. last week the supreme court ruled that devolved assemblies cannot block the triggering of article 50. a group of mps will carry out a parliamentary inquiry into so—called fake news, inaccurate or false news stories
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shared on social media. the trend came to international attention during the recent us election campaign when there were fears voters were swayed by untruthful reports. our media editor amol rajanjoins us from our london newsroom. good morning to you. the first question is, what is fake news and how big a problem is it? fake news used to have a particular meaning, around the election of donald trump there were new stories suggesting the pope backed donald trump or denzel washington backed donald trump, these were deliberately wrong, deliberately misleading bits of information which people from all over the world were spreading through social media either because they wanted to make a lot of money through the traffic off the website or because they had a particular political agenda. now fa ke particular political agenda. now fake news is a term donald trump uses to describe stuff he doesn‘t wa nt to uses to describe stuff he doesn‘t want to talk about, he described cnn or the new york times as fake news because they‘re hostile. it is worth keeping a sense of perspective, fake
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news is a tiny fraction of the total amount of stuff shared on social media. it‘s not true to say kids are looking at nothing but fake news online. now a group of mps say it serious enough that they want to look into it and make some recommendations about what tech companies can do about it. we will be talking about it later. thank you. the french socialist party has chosen the hard—left benoit hamon as its candidate for the upcoming presidential election. he beat the former prime minister manuel valls in a ballot of party members. he‘ll be up against marine le pen on the far—right and francois fillon on the centre—right in april‘s vote. black actors have dominated the screen actors guild awards in hollywood. denzel washington was named the best actor for fences and his co—star viola davis won the best supporting actress prize. the event was dominated by outspoken criticism of the trump administration. in a week of anger and
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demonstrations, this was america‘s despite a weekend of protests, petitions and court orders against it, the white house is standing firm over president trump‘s ban on immigration from seven countries. the president signed his executive order on friday, bringing to an end a hectic first week in the oval office. it halted the entire us refugee programme for four months, as well as instituting a three month travel ban for nationals from iran, iraq, libya, somalia, sudan, syria and yemen. but on saturday, as thousands gathered at airports across the country to protest, the order was challenged in the courts, with officials from 16 states describing it as unconstitutional. that led to confusion all over the world. after seeking clarification, the foreign office said yesterday that uk nationals travelling to america shouldn‘t be affected and responding to criticism of the ban, the president issued a statement last night saying he‘s not targeting
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muslims, and that visas would be reissued once new security measures had been implemented. let‘s talk now to labour‘s shadow attorney general, baroness shami chakra barti. thank you for your time this morning. i‘m sure you know that jeremy corbyn said any state visit on the back of what we‘ve seen this weekend should now be cancelled, but isn‘t that a bit premature given this is merely an order only for 90 days and it‘s not yet been officially confirmed, the state visit, anyway. i think officially confirmed, the state visit, anyway. ithink that officially confirmed, the state visit, anyway. i think that what we‘re saying is that this state visit needs to be postponed. we need to use our soft power and influence against mr trump‘s islam afobe ick policy. —— islamaphobia. it is divide and rule that is spreading hate. it‘s not even a ban on people
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from all muslim countries, countries where mr trump has business interests are where mr trump has business interests a re not where mr trump has business interests are not part of the ban. it is both discriminatory, illogical and corrupt. it will make the world and corrupt. it will make the world a less safe place. we will do everything we can to stand up to this bully in the white house. we‘re supposed to have a special relationship. that special relationship. that special relationship has to be shared, based on shared values and so fawad ahmed i‘ve seen from mr trump is this journey, racism, ill—treatment of refugees and the peddling of eight —— so fawad ahmed i‘ve seen. refugees and the peddling of eight -- so fawad ahmed i've seen. -- eight. —— so fawad ahmed i‘ve seen. —— so far what i‘ve seen. —— hate. i‘m suggesting that mrs may might
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learn a thing from mrs merkel, who hasn‘t been rude or in century to the white house. germany haven't voted to leave the eu —— in century. we can restate our values when it comes to honouring the u refugee convention, a quality to women, not being racist or islam afobe ick without being rude to mr trump. we think it is premature. it is one thing for mr may to meet mr trump, i don‘t have a problem with that, but there are some very awkward moments we saw at that press conference, which i would not like to see visited on our queen. whatever you think about the monarchy, her majesty the queen represents the queen in parliament, our democratic constitution and i wouldn‘t like to see her in paris in the way we saw mrs may sprang the squirming at
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times in recent days —— embarrassed. we‘ve heard news that downing street, the petition to prevent donald trump from visiting the country, almost at 1 donald trump from visiting the country, almost at1 million, downing street has rejected that petition. can i get a response?” would urge the prime minister to think again. it‘s not about saying that she shouldn‘t meet mr trump. in fa ct i that she shouldn‘t meet mr trump. in fact i urge her to be a little bit more forthright in restating the values on which this special relationship is based. i‘m not a shame she shouldn‘t be in constant dialogue with the president but a state visit is premature —— i‘m not saying. we shouldn‘t be rewarding human rights abuses by rolling out the red carpet in this country. theresa may has said that america is a huge and important ally and great britain need to think long—term, those are her thoughts in the last be moments. that sounds like appeasement to me. the world is in a
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precarious situation at the moment and we won‘t make the world safer or fairer by appeasing bullies like mr trump. in your role as a barrister, what do you see as the legal implications for british citizens of what‘s been happening in america over the last a8 hours? mrchubb is making mr chubb is making the world less safe. it is spilling all over the world. —— trump. safe. it is spilling all over the world. -- trump. -- america is a great democratic nation. i have many friends there including lawyers who are fighting suits against this policy. it is contrary to human rights and contrary probably to the american constitution. it makes this world less safe. it does seem that the majority of people won‘t be affected. the think part of what we have seen over the last two days has
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been a reaction because of a lack of clarity around how it will be implemented? you make a very important point. there is chaos going on here as well as the actual evils of the policy itself. clearly, there is chaos at american airports. clearly, there was a lack of clarity as to whether dual national ‘s would be affected. they can keep tweaking it and be affected. they can keep tweaking itand coming be affected. they can keep tweaking it and coming up with new exceptions for countries like britain and so on but the bottomline is that this policy is divisive and hateful and scrivener and wrong and divide and rule is the oldest trick in the book but it makes this world less fair and less safe. thank you for bringing us that.
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downing street have rejected calls to prevent the state visit of donald trump to the uk. there is a source saying to scrap the visit would undo everything following mrs may‘s visit. america is a huge ally. the call to scrap the gesture looks like a —— populist. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. the period between october and december was pretty dry. the driest, actually, since 1975. january has been dry as well. as we head into this week, it will be more unsettled with spells of rain. it will be windy. this morning, a lot of cloud
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a round. some hill fog and low—level fog at across scotland, we have clear skies as we have across northern england. here, the temperatures are falling as low as minus ten. it is now minus eight. a lot of frost around and also some fog. fog across the central lowlands. clear skies and a cold and frosty start with patchy frog across the far north of england. for northern ireland and the rest of england and all of wales, it is cloudy summer berries drizzle around and also some hill fog and low—level fog but it is mild. we have the first signs of rain coming in across south—west england as well. temperatures in st mary ‘s are at 11 celsius. through the day, the fog will lift. here and there, we might see the odd spot of sunshine that it will be fairly limited. the emphasis is on will be fairly limited. the emphasis isona will be fairly limited. the emphasis is on a fairly cloudy day with this rain across parts of south—west england and into parts of wales.
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temperatures are six — 11 across the country. through the evening and overnight, where we find the band of rain continuing the edge north eastwards, it‘s not particularly heavy. they will be frost across eastern england but as the cloud moves in, the temperatures will lift. we have a second front rolling in after that and some of that rain will be heavier. not as cold night as onejust gone in will be heavier. not as cold night as one just gone in scotland. temperatures are almost on a par with what we currently have. tomorrow starts off on a cloudy, wet note for many. we have persistent rain and it is also windy. it will remain like this. it will be a damp day tomorrow across scotland, england and wales but it will brighten up in northern ireland with sunny skies coming through and some showers. temperatures again, continuing to climb. as we head on into wednesday, we start off on a wet note, particularly in eastern areas. through the day, that will
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fizzle and then with the drier conditions coming in. more rain out towards the west and is looks likely —— looks like what we have coming in from the atlantic. it is bringing wet and windy weather and some of us seeing severe gales. something to watch out for, thank you, carol. loneliness is something many people may associate with the elderly or those living alone. however the charity childline say it‘s received 3,000 calls from children, some as young as ten, seeking counselling since april last year. our reporter graham satchell spent some time with one girl who spoke about the impact loneliness has had on her life. both her name and voice have been changed to protect her identity. i first started feeling lonely probably in the beginning of teens.
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probably 13. just felt trapped and alone. i was stuck, not knowing who to talk to with all these questions i had about life. what is the purpose of life, like, why are we here? mr was lost. unable to find a nswe rs here? mr was lost. unable to find answers from friends, family, teachers. she was alone. —— emma.” didn‘t know what to do, to be honest. that‘s why i started going online because i thought maybe that had the answers. i completely believe it is as addictive as being ona drug. believe it is as addictive as being on a drug. that your reality becomes a digital world. i knew it was bad for me and i knew it was making me worse. i was crying like everyday but i had to. i do know why but i just had to. it is the most lonely
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thing you can ever do for yourself. emma kept a diary. it catalogues loneliness, self harm and worse.” just wanted to die, to be honest. just can‘t do this any more. you know, i can‘t. just can‘t do this any more. you know, ican‘t. ijust, just can‘t do this any more. you know, i can‘t. ijust, yeah, com pletely know, i can‘t. ijust, yeah, completely alone. emma called childline and spoke to somebody for more than two hours. she ended up being admitted to hospital and stayed there for five months. from there, i kind ofjust rebuilt myself. rebuild my life. it has taken myself. rebuild my life. it has ta ke n two myself. rebuild my life. it has ta ken two years now myself. rebuild my life. it has taken two years now since i was admitted into hospital. i thought i had to have it all together. i thought i had to know what to do when in reality, no one has it all together. no one knows what to do all the time. everyone has struggles. everyone has down days
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and everyone needs to talk to someone in their life. so yet, i said, go talk to someone and be yourself. i was never really myself at that time. a real insight into how one person struggles. that was graham satchell reporting. joining us now to discuss the issue further is emily cherry, head of childline young campaigners and laine esperanzate, a young campaigner. thank you so much to both of you. good to see you. laine, explained what it was like for you. my anxiety and depression were so bad it got to the point where it was taking over my entire life. it started at about 15. home was bad, school was bad so i started taking time off school to improve my mental health. it was during that period of time where i stopped speaking to my friends, i hardly spoke to my family and i just
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isolated myself. i do tighe came back to school, everyone was in the process of sitting their exams. i didn‘t know where i wanted to do so i isolated myself further. ——i decided to come back. did you feel behind? it was a lot of pressure to do with having to set my exams and go to do with having to set my exams and gotoa do with having to set my exams and go to a levels and university. only then could i find a job. go to a levels and university. only then could ifind a job. that go to a levels and university. only then could i find a job. that was go to a levels and university. only then could ifind a job. that was my mindset at the time. knowing i didn‘t have enough qualifications, it really made me feel sort of lost and alone because everyone else was moving on. there will be so many people who would be able to identify with what you are saying. emily, you have really noticed an upsurge in this, haven‘t you? it sounds
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extraordinary to say that really lonely people. really started recording loneliness in april last year. it is a problem you associate with older age and not with teenagers. you know, this globally connected generation. you have thousands of friends online. what we are hearing as we have heard from laine and emma, there is pressure from school, education, pressure to keep up with your friends online, it is affecting people vitally. laine, where did you go for help and can you explain how quickly it helped you? a "couple of my closest friends and family and i decided decided i didn‘t want to feel this way any more. ——i opened up. ifound a couege more. ——i opened up. ifound a college that taught me what to do
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when you are writing your cv, how to preach an employer, they gave me work experience. —— approach. they also gave me the motivation and confidence that i needed to go out there. i applied for an apprenticeship in digital marketing and now i am working at firm. great news. we heard the young lady talking to us earlier about social media, being online and it being like a drug. what is your advice, your immediate advice. what can they do? we have to recognise that social media is hugely important to young people. we hear it is as important as eating. let‘s recognise that. but pa rents as eating. let‘s recognise that. but parents have a huge role to play in helping their children recognise what is healthy and not healthy and looking out for the signs when children are feeling lonely, as do the schools as well. we can help children. laine has said it. talking is key and talking to a trusting
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adult. —— trusted adult. if there are parents out there, or worried about a child, call the helpline. if there are children out there, struggling with feeling. called childline. if it matters to you, it matters for childline. if you are watching this and you feel you need to talk to somebody about the issues we have been discussing, childline‘s action line is zero 8001111. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will have the headlines at 730. see them. —— ceu then. good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. the human rights group amnesty international is urging londoners to join a protest this evening outside downing street against president trumps ban on muslims and refugees. they‘ll follow yesterdays angry protests in america against an ‘order‘ which restricts immigration from seven muslim majority countries. already mr trump is causing
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challengers for the foreign secretary and the prime minister just behind me. turning up the heat later today will be a reported thousands of protesters, urging the prime minister to put pressure on president trump to cancel the travel ban or otherwise cancel his proposed state visit to london. a number of developers building high rise properties in london are paying—off councils to get out—of including ‘affordable homes‘ in their plans. there are dozens of tower blocks currently under construction with hundreds more in the pipeline — and many of them include little or no affordable homes. developers are instead offering tens of millions of pounds in cash to local authorities — so they can build cheaper homes elsewhere. it‘s already causing anger among those who say it‘s going to make the current housing problem, worse. the biggest problem with developments like this is that their stated aim is to increase the value of property in the area. and that‘s not a good thing because people already struggle to find somewhere they can afford to buy round here and it‘s going to make it even worse. let‘s have a look at
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the travel situation now. there‘s more on that story on inside out london, tonight at 7.30 on bbc one. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. minor delays meiropolitan line. on the trains, southeastern services are back to normal after the freight train derailed last week in lewisham. on the roads, the m25 has queues anticlockwise from j21 m1 to 115 ma. lets have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. it‘s a rather grey start to the week. a lot of cloud and outbreaks of light rain and drizzle. but it is feeling mild. some temperatures around london — nine or 10 celsius to start the day. the cloud stays with us, not much in the way of brightness today, unfortunately. looking at a maximum temperature of around 9. overnight tonight, we are hanging on to the cloud. quite a murky night, a bit of mist but outbreaks of rain heading our way.
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they tend to break up as they head towards us. light, patchy rain and drizzle and misty conditions as we head through to dawn. a mild night tonight with a minimum temperature of around five and six. as we head through tuesday, we start to see the weather front heading towards us. may get some outbreaks of light rain and drizzle at first but the heavy, more significant rain heads for us on tuesday evening and into wednesday. quite an unsettled week on the whole and turning breezy as we head through thursday. vanessa feltz has got a special programme this morning focusing on the issues around knife crime — which is at a five year high in london. her programme is on bbc radio london. i will be back in half an hour with our next update. of the president at
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the white house last week. earlier shami chakrabarti said she thought mr trump was a bully who had been appeased by the government.” would urge the prime minister to think again. this is not about saying that she shouldn‘t meet mr trump. in fact i urge her to be a little bit more forthright in restating the values on which this special relationship is based. i‘m not saying she shouldn‘t be in co nsta nt not saying she shouldn‘t be in constant dialogue with the president but a state visit is premature, we should not be awarding human rights
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abuses by rolling out the red carpet in this country. president trump has insisted that his temporary travel ban on people from seven middle eastern and african countries is not about religion but terrorism, and protecting america. the restrictions close us borders to all refugees for four months, and to citizens of seven mainly muslim countries for three months. uk nationals with dual citizenship will be largely unaffected. at least six people have been killed during a shooting at a mosque in a suburb of quebec city in canada. the shooting began around the time of evening prayers and police say two people have been arrested. the canadian prime minister has called the shooting a terrorist attack. we consider the event like an act of terrorism and we can confirm that we have six persons pronounced dead and persons is in hospital with minor or severe injuries. theresa may has said she will not
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shy away from tough talks on brexit when she meets representatives of the devolved governments of wales, scotland and northern ireland today. the prime minister will chair a meeting of the joint ministerial committee in cardiff to discuss how all parts of the uk can work together to support trade and investment. last week, the supreme court ruled that devolved assemblies cannot block the triggering of article 50. a group of mps will carry out a parliamentary inquiry into so—called fake news. the commons, media and sport committee are going to investigate inaccurate or false news stories being shared on social media. the phenomenon came to international attention during the recent us election campaign when there were fears voters were swayed by untruthful reports. the uk need not fear electricity black—outs, even on the coldest of days when demand is at its highest, according to the former head of the national grid. steve holliday‘s comments co—incide with the opening
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of the government‘s latest auction to provide back—up power. firms will bid for subsidies to supply electricity to the grid during extreme conditions. black actors have dominated the screen actors guild awards in hollywood. denzel washington was named the best actor for fences. his co—star viola davis won the best supporting actress prize. but the event was marred by outspoken criticism of donald trump‘s immigration policy. the actor ashton kutcher opened proceedings by welcoming "everyone in airports", saying they belonged in america. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather for you. it could be windy later in the week. right now sally is here with a look at the sport and reflecting on an interesting weekend in the fa cup. we love a giantkilling in the fa cup, it makes it more exciting when you see a small team beating someone meant to be stacks better than them
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but at what point does it become too much and at what point do you want the bigger clubs to field their best sides? a lot of criticism over night after we found out 13 premier league clu bs after we found out 13 premier league clubs in the fourth round made 98 changes to their lineups for this competition, that‘s a lot. changes to their lineups for this competition, that's a lot. not good. a bit too much perhaps. two non—league clubs will be in tonight‘s draw for the fifth round of the fa cup. lincoln city saw off championship leaders brighton on saturday and sutton united knocked out leeds united yesterday. the lowest—ranked team in the competition caused one of the biggest upsets this season courtesy of jamie collins‘ second—half penalty. leeds had made ten changes from the side that beat nottingham forest in their last championship game. we were due to play lincoln on saturday the 18th. that got called off last night because lincoln got through. we‘ve got through today. so we can almost guarantee that we‘re going to draw lincoln on the 18th as we should have played them and you‘ll get a nonleague team in the quarter—final.
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now that will never, ever happen again. league one side millwall knocked out premier league watford. the south london club always looked the more likely to score and won the match through steve morrison‘s late strike. another premier league club fell by the wayside. hull were thrashed a—1 by championship side fulham. 16—year—old ryan sessegnon was among the fulham scorers. hull missed two penalties. there were no such problems for cup holders manchester united though who honoured wayne rooney before kick off against championship strugglers wigan. united‘s captain couldn‘t add to his record 250 goals, but played a part in the final strike from bastian schweinsteiger in their a—0 win. celtic extended their unbeaten domestic run to a record 27 matches by beating hearts a—0 in the scottish premiership. callum mcgregor opened the scoring with the pick of the game‘s goals at celtic park. scott sinclair struck twice and patrick roberts added the other. the win broke the 50—year—old record set by celtic‘s lisbon lions team. west ham have accused dimitri payet of showing a lack of commitment and respect after the france international rejoined marseille for £25 million. the hammers insist they did
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not need to sell payet and wanted the player to stay to make an example of him. west ham say they let him go in the interest of club unity. payet has signed a four—and—a—half year deal with the ligue 1 club. england had a great chance to wrap up the t20 series in india, but a last—gasp comeback from the hosts squared the series at 1—1. england needed just eight runs off the last over, but they lost the key wickets ofjoe root and jos buttler. so the tourists needed a six off the last ball, they didn‘t get it. india won by five runs, and the series will go to a decider. roger federer says he has no intention of giving up, he‘s not going to retire. keep going, we want him winning and 30 sex in instead of 35 that 36. -- 36.
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roger federer turned back the clock, winning his 18th grand slam title with a five—set victory over rafael nadal, that was in the australian open final. nadal was playing his first final for two—and—a—half years and dominated the fourth set to push the match to a decider. it was federer‘s first tournament since wimbledon after taking the second half of the season off to recover from injury. the swiss hit back when it mattered, winning the last five games and clinching the match thanks to a successful challenge. when i heard in switzerland people we re when i heard in switzerland people were following me and i saw people being generally really happy for me that i won a slam again, particularly this one, it‘s a bit of a fairytale, you know? after the comeback, to come back this way. the goal is absolutely to be playing, that‘s why i took the six months on to hopefully be playing four more yea rs. it's it‘s great, isn‘t it. we talk about it all the time on this programme. how did you sleep last night?”
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slept brilliantly last night, terrible the night before, really well last night. you know what the a nswer well last night. you know what the answer is? reading a book. she may have solved everything. steph advised me to try this lavender spray on the pillow. i had the worst night's sleep i had had in ages. we spend a third of our lives sleeping. margaret thatcher famously got by on four hours a night and thomas edison claimed it was a waste of time. now the royal college of gps say sleep is so important to our health doctors should have more training to help patients get their a0 winks. but a sleep study by radio 5 live found the most common cause of sleeplessness is anxiety about work, family or money. we went to the bed section of a department store to ask people whether they slumber soundly. i don‘t sleep well at all. i have to ta ke i don‘t sleep well at all. i have to take sleeping tablets and then even
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with sleeping tablets i still wake up. i get off quite easily but i do wake—upa few up. i get off quite easily but i do wake—up a few times in the night. i'm gone, yeah, straightaway, even before i hit my head on the couch. he‘s snores, if he sleeps on the side he doesn‘t snore, that helps me. if someone is snoring in the room i can‘t sleep. me. if someone is snoring in the room i can't sleep. temperature makes a difference, i prefer it when it's quite cold when you get into bed and that's easier to get to sleep. i would hate to be someone who tosses and turns and wakes up in the night, i‘m lucky i can sleep, i don‘t move in the bed and ifeel well rested when i get up.” don‘t move in the bed and ifeel well rested when i get up. i toss and turn, i wake up often during the night. i wake up, and turn, i wake up often during the night. iwake up, my and turn, i wake up often during the night. i wake up, my bed covers are twisted around me and my sheet is often ripped off so i don't sleep harry well at all. sleep and body clock expert professor david ray from the university of manhcesterjoins us now.
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iam i am slightly anxious about coming on here. it can have an immediate impact, anxiety. how important do you think sleep is, it sounds ridiculous to talk about it but it is important for our health? ridiculous to talk about it but it is important for our health7m ridiculous to talk about it but it is important for our health? it is, we spend a third of our lives sleeping but it‘s not entirely clear why we need to sleep. we know it is essential. you can survive longer without food than sleep for example. what happens in the body, what good stuff ta kes what happens in the body, what good stuff takes place while we have the eyes shut? probably the functions of sleep can be divided into, mainly it isa sleep can be divided into, mainly it is a necessary time for the brain to conduct its repair processes —— in. also the physical processes and the memory processes and dealing with incidents that have happened during the day —— in. it‘s an important time for consolidating memories and
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pa rt time for consolidating memories and part of that process happens during the dreaming part of sleep. —— in. it also allows the body‘s metabolism, the rest of the body, to change from coping with food coming in and the activities of moving around, seeking out food and so on to repairing and resetting. let's pick up one of the thoughts the last lady was talking about, she wakes up in the night and is really restless, does that matter? sometimes you might think you‘re awake and you‘re not necessarily, when does it matter? it does matter but i think our recollections of what happens when we‘re asleep are not always entirely accurate. the idea two idea of sleeping continuously for eight hours is normal is a relatively recent construct —— the idea of. 200 yea rs recent construct —— the idea of. 200 years ago it was conventional to go to bed much earlier because it was
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getting dark and then be awake in the night and then having a separate sleep. that idea was far more prevalent in those times. in terms of preparing for sleep, there‘s a lot written these days about the dos and don‘ts and i‘m sure many people watching this morning check their phones and tablets before bed and thatis phones and tablets before bed and that is so bad because of the brightness of the screen? that's right. sleep has been dismissed as a sign of weakness perhaps, something where people think they can burn the candle at both ends, stay up late and go to get up early, there are phases of preparation for sleep. having a quieter time before bed, avoiding caffeinated drinks for example. bright lights late at night, particularly lights with a blue wave length light, for example ipads, phones, tvs and so on can also prevent your brain preparing
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for sleep. there is an important sleep promoting hormone called melatonin which normally rises at dusk and prepares our body for sleep, and that is strongly suppressed by light. is that what you call sleep hygiene, which aims to bea you call sleep hygiene, which aims to be a new thing to say, doesn‘t it? when should people be worried about their sleep do you think? it's interesting, worried about sleep. i think if people wake up in the morning and they feel refreshed then irrespective of what they think has happened during the night then they are ina happened during the night then they are in a good place. if people are consistently waking up tired and being tired during the day, that should be a cause for some concern. the really worrying signs is when people are falling asleep during the day, because if you‘re driving and operating machinery, being unable to stay awake is very dangerous and that should be assessed on a fairly urgent basis by seeing your gp and talking that through. lots of comments about this. anxiety
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about getting up keeps me up at night. someone in london anonymously said got to bed at ten, no tv in the bedroom ever. i am always in bed within 20 minutes. mis in bed within seven hours even with a baby boy. --m. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. how did you sleep, carol? like a log. go to bed i‘m sleepy. ——i go to bed when i‘m sleepy. we will have a change in the weather. spells of rain. it has been dry. it will also be mild that also windy. particularly towards the end of the week. fewer stepping out, the temperatures have dropped in the last hour. in braemar, it is bone chillingly minus ten. comfort the
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south with more clout, some rain, some drizzle. some patchy fog around the central lowlands. it will slowly lift. for much of england, northern england and northern ireland, it will be cloudy. the the rain will bid making progress. look at this, 11 celsius being the top temperature. for the west of wales, dry. there will be dual fog. for northern ireland, sun hill fog, some dampness in the air. also some clear sunshine. a beautiful, crisp winter is day for you in scotland. some sunny spells around but feeling
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nippy. as we come south, back under this vale of cloud. here and there, the odd bit of brightness but for most, damp. heading into the evening and overnight, parts of england and eastern england, early frost and clear skies. we have two fronts coming our way. as they approach, they will intojuice coming our way. as they approach, they will into juice more clout and some rain. we will be frost free overtime we get to tomorrow morning. —— introduce more clout. nothing like that tomorrow. tomorrow, cloudy. the breeze is coming from the south—east. again, a lot of cloud around. the breeze is coming from the south—west. as the rain moves slowly, very slowly, eastwards, you might not even notice the movement, high and it it will brighten up in northern ireland with some sunshine coming through. as we head on into wednesday, it will fizzle eventually. we are looking at
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dry conditions, rain towards the west, particularly for the end of the week, vigorous areas of low pressure coming our way. it will be introducing a wet and windy conditions and for some of us, at this stage anyway, it looks like we will see possible severe gales. we think at this stage it will be in the west but i will keep you updated on night as we go through this week. vigorous areas of low pressure sound quite scary, carol. thank you. the fry up is dead. really? cereal‘s been killed. and toast is... well, toast. our breakfast habits are changing rapidly. ben is speaking to the boss of weetabix about how the business is adapting. it's it‘s about adapting to more of us eating on the go. traditionally, you sit at home, you have your bowl and then you go to work. it‘s the most important meal of the day apparently — and so it‘s big business for the firms that make it. but our morning habits are changing. a third of us eat breakfast
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on the move, at least once a week. one in seven of us do every day. as a result we‘re buying £80—million less traditional cereal like cornflakes and muesli. this morning weetabix — the company that also makes alpen and ready brek — is announcing a £30 million investment in its uk facilities that amongst other things will make its new on—the—go ranges. we can talk to the boss giles turrell. your traditional market is changing. we‘re sitting down as much to that all of cereal at home and we are doing it on the move. you have to change how you sell your stuff? we still see that 90% of family still have breakfast at home. the investment we are talking about todayis investment we are talking about today is about traditional breakfast cereals. we believe this is an important role became plate which is why we are investing 30 million. where will that money go and what
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will it be spent on? it will be about expanding brands like weetabix and expanding our brand market share in the uk and exporting to 80 markets around the world and specifically into china where we saw our business double last year. you export as well into europe and the big trading partner. let‘s talk about brexit. it is a significant investment in the uk. you clearly have no worries about your trading relationship with the continent? europe is an important part of our visitors. we bring a lot of raw materials into our business from europe. what we know about brexit is it impacts the currency. we will have to manage that carefully as we move forward. our investors have backed us, they believe in what we are doing and there is a role for healthy breakfast cereals in the morning. two issues. healthy. we
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wa nt to morning. two issues. healthy. we want to talk about sugar. i know a lot of parents will be looking at this this morning. i‘ve looked at the statistics on your product. weetabix on the go. a liquid version. 20 g of sugar per serving. that is 2a% sugar. those are not healthy snacks that you just talked about. we have a whole range of products. we still want families to sit down and have something like weetabix. the weetabix on the go drink is targeting a significant... £20 of sugar in a small bottle! or, something more healthy. -- 20 g. 20 9 something more healthy. -- 20 g. 20 gof something more healthy. -- 20 g. 20 g of sugar. how can you make a product that you say is healthy and on the go and yet it is full of sugar? we monitor the sugar content across all of our range. we take our
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responsibility very seriously in that area. let's talk about prices. you talked about the weak pound affecting the cost of your imports. what is important for your retailers, a lot of stuff comes from europe, for materials. what sort of a difference will that make the euclid mark will you have to put up your prices? our primary responsibility will be looking at absorbing those costs. we need to make our business run more efficiently and more effectively. as a result of what has happened with the pound, we import a lot of our raw materials, we have two increase our consumer prices but that would bea our consumer prices but that would be a last resort. it is good to talk to you. the executive director of the weetabix. what exactly do you feel walking through your home town? stressed, excited, interested ? that question inspired national geographic explorer,
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i spend a lot of time looking up at the architecture. that question inspired national geographic explorer, daniel raven—ellison‘s journey through 69 of the uk‘s cities equipped with new emotion tracking technology.he‘s trying to create what he hopes will become a mood map of urban britain. david sillitojoined him as he came to the end of his tour of urban britain. meet dan. he‘s an explorer of urban britain. 2.5 million steps, 69 cities he has crossed. and on every step, this has tracked his emotions. this is an emotiv eeg wearable headset. it has a series of sensors that can detect what is going on inside my brain and can work out if i am stressed,
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relaxed, focused, interested. so we agreed to meet in the city that registered high on the interest of scale. so the place you brought me to is? stoke. ok, convince me. let‘s go for a walk. yes, this is an urban stoke. it‘s actually an old spoil heap that‘s now a park. as we walked, it was a chance to discuss the other cities that he crossed. exciting? bristol. swa nsea ? do you know, swansea is the brunt of so manyjokes but my experience was just a flow of woodland going alongside the city, gorgeous hill, wonderful sea, street art. southampton? wild. surprisingly wild. the far north of southampton is suburbia. more birdsong than any other part of the uk i visited maybe. newcastle ? um, just so many children. loads of children playing out. that‘s unusual, is it?
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having walked across all the cities in the uk, it is unusual to see children playing out. birmingham? far greener than you would imagine. i loved dudley. dudley? have a look at this map, the green space in and around wolverhampton and dudley. this is swansea. and this, the six towns of stoke—on—trent where we met up with some ramblers to see if they were feeling what dan was feeling. we are starting to do more urban walks. people who live in the area are proud of being here. for me, what‘s brilliant about walking across a city, especially like stoke, from the bricks to the graffiti, to the bridges, to the trees, to the lichen, to the flats, there is so much interest going on, so much to enjoy every step of the way. do you agree? oh yes, the diversity is of the place is tremendous. the ambition is to add other people‘s emotional responses to create a mood map of our city. so far we have dan‘s data which reveals that things like this excite hiim and one
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particular thing, appals him. i would speak to people about not putting dog poo in bags and then adorning trees head—hight with those bags. you put the dog poo in the bag, you take the bag away with you. that‘s everywhere, is it? it‘s all over the country. and with that thought, we came to the end of this emotional journey across urban britain. the final feeling, confusion, as to why we were the only walkers in a place like this. david silitto, bbc news, stoke—on—trent. that is a good question. what a lovely place to walk. time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i‘m asad ahmad. civil liberties groups
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and the human rights group amnesty international is urging londoners to join a protest this evening outside downing street against president trumps ban on muslims and refugees. they‘ll follow yesterdays angry protests in america against an ‘order‘ which restricts immigration from seven muslim majority countries. just over a week ago, 100,000 — mainly women — protested in trafalguar square over fears that women‘s rights will be eroded under the new us president. a number of developers building high rise properties in london are paying—off councils — so they don‘t have—to include any ‘affordable homes‘ in their plans. there are dozens of tower blocks currently under construction with hundreds more in the pipeline — and many of them include little or no affordable homes. developers are instead offering tens of millions of pounds in cash to local authorities — so they can build cheaper homes instead. and it‘s causing anger. the biggest problem
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with developments like this is that their stated aim is to increase the value of property in the area. and that‘s not a good thing because people already struggle to find somewhere they can afford to buy round here and it‘s going to make it even worse. there‘s more on that story on inside out london, tonight at 7.30 on bbc one. let‘s have a look at the travel situation now. metropolitan line: minor delays between baker street and wembley park, due to an earlier fire alert at neasden. piccadilly line: no service between arnos grove and cockfosters only, due to a signalling problem. tickets are being accepted on buses. on the trains, southeastern services are back to normal after the freight train derailed last week in lewisham. on the roads, there‘s a break down on the aa into london between the hogarth roundabout — and hammersmith flyover, blocking a lane and causing queues from chiswick. on the trains, southeastern services are back to normal after the freight train derailed last week in lewisham. lets have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. it‘s a rather grey start to the week. a lot of cloud and outbreaks of light rain and drizzle.
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but it is feeling mild. some temperatures around london — nine or 10 celsius to start the day. the cloud stays with us, not much in the way of brightness today, unfortunately. looking at a maximum temperature of around 9. overnight tonight, we are hanging on to the cloud. quite a murky night, a bit of mist but outbreaks of rain heading our way. they tend to break up as they head towards us. light, patchy rain and drizzle and misty conditions as we head through to dawn. a mild night tonight with a minimum temperature of around five and six. as we head through tuesday, we start to see the weather front heading towards us. may get some outbreaks of light rain and drizzle at first but the heavy, more significant rain heads for us on tuesday evening and into wednesday. quite an unsettled week on the whole and turning breezy as we head through thursday. vanessa feltz has got a special programme this morning focusing
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on the issues around knife crime — which is at a five year high in london. her programme is on bbc radio london. i will be back in half an hour with our next update. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. downing street has rejected calls to cancel president trump‘s state visit to the uk. a petition against his visit has gathered more then 900,000 but the government said that it would undo everything following theresa may‘s visit to the states last week. more protests have taken place in the us as president trump defends his decision to impose travel restrictions, saying he isn‘t targeting muslims. good morning. it‘s monday the 30th of january.
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also this morning: six people have been killed in a gun attack on a mosque in the canadian city of quebec. the prime ministerjustin trudeau has called it a terrorist attack. so—called "fake news" is going to be investigated by mps amid fears that people are being swayed by propaganda and lies spread online. good morning. the government cuts its stake in lloyds bank to less than 5% — moving it a step closer to full private ownership. it was taken into government hands after a £20bn bailout during the financial crisis. in sport: there‘ll be two non—league teams in the draw for the fifth round of the fa cup tonight. sutton united beat leeds yesterday. round of the fa cup tonight. it was a weekend of dramatic shocks. # i will never give up on you # i will never give up on you # you‘re the one that i‘m running to... and can she conquer europe? we‘ll speak to lucie jones, this year‘s entrant
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for the eurovision song contest. and carol has the weather. good morning. across most of england, wales and northern ireland, it isa england, wales and northern ireland, it is a cloudy start and will remain so through the day. for the far north of england and scotland, cold and frosty with some patchy fog, but you will hang on to the sunshine. more details in 15 minutes. thank you, carol. good morning. first, our main story. downing street has rejected calls to cancel the proposed state visit by president trump to the uk. a petition calling on mrs may to withdraw the invitation has now been signed by more than 900,000 people. a source said to scrap the visit would "undo everything" achieved by the prime minister‘s visit to washington last week. let‘s talk to our political correspondent iain watson. so, they have issued this statement saying there will be no change about this visit? that is absolutely
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right, although they are under pressure to do so, it looks as though their resolve if anything has been strengthened. they said over the weekend, trump has been invited, he has accepted that invitation. they are denouncing attempts to get the visit scrapped as a populist gesture. there will be demonstrations here in central london against the will trump‘s travel ban, and other uk cities, today. the shadow attorney general shami chakrabarti, former head of liberty, has said that she thinks the ban is divisive, and she urges the ban is divisive, and she urges the prime minister to think again of the prime minister to think again of the controversial state visit. i'm afraid that sounds like appeasement to me. the world is in a very precarious situation at the moment, and we will not make this world safer or and we will not make this world saferorfairer by and we will not make this world safer or fairer by appeasing bullies like mrtrump. safer or fairer by appeasing bullies
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like mr trump. she certainly hasn't been mincing words, and jeremy corbyn takes the same approach, lib dem leader tim farron, too, wants to see the visit postponed, and mps wa nt see the visit postponed, and mps want boris johnson to see the visit postponed, and mps want borisjohnson to come to the house of commons today to find out why it took so long to clarify the british citizens would not be affected by this band. iain, thank you very much. meanwhile, president trump has insisted that his temporary travel ban on people from seven middle eastern and african countries is not about religion but terrorism, and protecting america. uk nationals with dual citizenship will be largely unaffected, but there‘s still concern about the impact that strong border controls might have on british people. here‘s our washington correspondent david willis. man chants: no ban, no wall — new york for all. in a country built by immigrants, many find donald trump‘s travel ban unpalatable. they took to the streets in cities across the nation, as the crackdown sparked chaotic scenes at some airports
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and promptied criticism from senior members of the president‘s own party. neal behgooy and his wife underwent several hours of questioning after touching down in texas from iran. over the weekend about 300 people were either prevented from travelling or detained. they asked her about her family, about her brothers and sisters and her parents. what they did. how long were we staying. president trump issued his controversial order without input from or giving notice to the government departments that will need to implement it, hence the concern of officials here and elsewhere in trying to interpret it in the face of a flurry of lawsuits and the concerns of leaders around the world. the foreign office says the ban only applies to people travelling to the us from one of the seven countries on the list. travellers from the uk won‘t be affected and neither will uk citizens travelling from any
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of those seven countries to america, unless, that is, they‘rejoint citizens of one of the seven nations, in which case they‘re likely to face additional checks. for all the confusion, mr trump‘s aides have deemed the travel ban a success, and they issued a statement seeking to dispel suggestions that it amounted to a ban on muslims. despite the backlash, donald trump knows that many of those who voted for him did so specifically because of his promise to combat the threat of so—called radical islamic terrorism. to them, this just represents another promise kept. david willis, bbc news, washington. six people have been killed during a shooting at a mosque in a suburb of quebec city in canada. police say two people have been arrested after the shooting which the canadian prime minister has described as a terrorist attack. sarah corker‘s report contains flashing images.
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police closed off the area surrounding the quebec city islamic cultural centre as armed officers entered the mosque. it was during evening prayers on sunday that witnesses say gunmen opened fire on a0 worshippers inside. ambulances continued to take away the dead and injured. quebec provincial police confirmed two suspects have been arrested. we consider the event like an act of terrorism and we can confirm that we have six persons pronounced dead and eight persons is in hospital with minor or severe injuries. the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau said in a statement: on twitter, the quebec premier said:
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while the public safety minister said: the motive for this attack is unknown, but incidents of islamophobia in quebec have increased in recent years. sarah corker, bbc news. theresa may has said she will not "shy away" from tough talks on brexit when she meets representatives of the devolved governments of wales, scotland and northern ireland today. the prime minister will chair a meeting of thejoint ministerial committee in cardiff to discuss how all parts of the uk can work together to support trade and investment. last week the supreme court ruled
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that devolved assemblies cannot block the triggering of article 50. a group of mps will carry out a parliamentary inquiry into so—called fake news. the commons, media and sport committee are going to investigate inaccurate or false news stories being shared on social media. it came to international attention during the recent us election campaign when there were fears voters were swayed by untruthful reports. we will be speaking to the mp behind the new inquiry and a former facebook executive in about ten minutes‘ time. black actors have dominated the screen actors guild awards in hollywood. denzel washington was named the best actor for fences and his co—star viola davis won the best supporting actress prize. but the event was dominated by outspoken criticism of the trump administration. our los angeles correspondent james cook was there. in a week of anger and demonstrations, this was america‘s most elite, most exclusive, best—dressed protest.
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hidden figures, about three black female mathematicians who helped put americans into space, was the winner of the night‘s top award, best ensemble. this story is about what happens when we put our differences aside and we come together as a human race. we win. the only british winner played the ultimate british figure, the queen, and she used her speech to thank co—star matt smith. you're not only a really spontaneous, exciting, incredibly talented actor, but you're also my friend, matt, and thank you for making the job a joy. there was surprise best actor award for denzel washington in fences, and emma stone‘s success was no a shock, the musical la la land is the talk of this town. the cast of stranger things took the prize for tv drama ensemble, and its star david harber surely won most blistering acceptance speech.
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we will shelter freaks and outcasts or those who have no homes, we will get past the lies, we will hunt monsters. this is another awards ceremony where art has been overshadowed by politics, as many stars in this most liberal of cities are concerned about the direction in which their country is heading. james cook, bbc news, los angeles. it's it‘s just coming up to 12 minutes past eight. let‘s take you back to one of the main things we are talking about. the pope did not endorse donald trump, and the mexican drug lord el chapo did not, in fact, escape prison for the third time last year — despite reports to the contrary. both stories were widely shared online in a phenomenon that has become known as fake news. now a parliamentary inquiry has been set up to look at the problem. damian collins, the mp behind the inquiry, joins us from westminster, and former facebook executive elizabeth linder is with us on the sofa.
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thank you both very much indeed for joining us. damian collins, it is interesting, how do you define what is fake news. and that is the key question. for me, it is when the story is based on complete fabrication. it is not someone‘s analysis or opinion of events that have happened, it is a scenario that has been artificially created and is deliberately sensational to help distribute news. that could be done for profit, for paid for advertising or clicks online, orfor for profit, for paid for advertising or clicks online, or for propaganda reasons, to deliberately spread misinformation. and the next question is, how do you think you might be able to stop it? giving users online the tools they need to help them identify sources of news that come from verifiable sources. social media platforms like twitter have verified users, so the company is can check that they are who they
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say they are. i also think as well in terms of the rankings and presentation of news, all news stories are sometimes presented in the same way, so on google news, there are none of the brand trademarks orfonts there are none of the brand trademarks or fonts you associate with a particular site, everything is presented in the same way and would equal weight, so if you get fa ke would equal weight, so if you get fake news stories from spurious websites mixed in an presented alongside legitimate sources of news, does that give the additional credence? let's give that -- put back to elizabeth linder. should companies like facebook be doing more to felt a right good news from bad? they absolutely are. what is difficult in this situation is that there is so much excitement around there is so much excitement around the ability to share information online, meaning anybody can be their own publisher, which was excited at the beginning, and this flies in the face of some of that, which has made it historically challenging for tech companies to get ahead of this, because they wanted to empower the
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individual voice and give everybody the opportunity to get into this space and share what they believe. but now we have seen very proactive statements coming out of the ceos of the tech companies, looking at how we balance being an arbitrator of truth, which is not what the tech company wants to be, but foster productive dialogue around sincere topics of conversation that impac elections. and what about the financial aspect? there are people who can earn a lot of money from creating the stories would do go around the world so quickly. and there are ways to dis— incentivise that financial reward that people get through hoaxing others. i think it is important as well to see, how do we empower people to report the kind of content that they see online thatis kind of content that they see online that is fake? all social media companies operate on a report and ta ke companies operate on a report and take down model because of the scale of how these companies work, you really have to do it that way. everybody has to be a police officer
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in this space, so one way in which we can use technology to say, if you see something that doesn't look right, help to report it so we can flag this out to some fact checkers and see what is going on. if something is put on facebook and twitter, it can go from one thing so far away from the source. it is sort of like fighting fires, isn‘t it? well, the big fake news stories are shared widely. the biggest fake news story in america was that barack obama was going to ban the oath of allegiance in american schools and that was shared and commented over two million times on facebook. these things can spread like wildfire. the top 20 fake news stories had more traffic and noise on facebook than the top 20 legitimate stories did. we have to look at the scale of this and say is it reach ago point where fa ke and say is it reach ago point where fake news can start to overshadow legitimate sources of news and how
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do we stop that? how can we target the sources of it? so, companies like facebook and google already have a responsibility to look at piracy online or the distribution of illicit content and to take that down. we should be saying we should look at when there are certain websites or parts of the world or locations which are uploading large quantities of fake news all the time, what can we do to identify the sources of it and take action against them? elizabeth, you're nodding to what damien is saying. this has been a problem for a long time. it is not like it happened in the last ten or 12 months? time. it is not like it happened in the last ten or12 months? there time. it is not like it happened in the last ten or 12 months? there was a famous case in kashmir in 2014 when a huge population, thousands of people, started to flee a certain pa rt of people, started to flee a certain part of that region because of a fa ke part of that region because of a fake news story, there was violence that people needed to protect themselves from. this has been going ona themselves from. this has been going on a bit in the further corners of the non—english speaking world and now it is coming home to roost
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because we're seeing it in our own back yards. the framing of the question has to be less digital versus question has to be less digital versus traditional news and more fa ke versus traditional news and more fake news, rumours, gossip, tabloid press is part of a bigger problem and technology can be part of the solution, but it is not traditional versus solution, but it is not traditional versus new media. damien, we know about the petition now. people calling for donald trump‘s visit to be cancelled and nearly one million people, what‘s your thoughts on that? well, look, our relationship with america has been one of our most important relationships. american presidents are routinely offered a state visit here. in the past we‘ve agreed and disagreed with some of those presidents, but we try and develop a working relationship with them. donald trump is a controversial figure, but he should be accorded a state visit because of the position he holds. damien collins, thank you. it is 8.18am. let‘s get the weather.
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how is it looking out there? we will see spells of rain and becoming more unsettled. it will be mild and by the end of the week it will become windy. but what we have this morning, under clear skies across scotland and northern england is frost. temperatures have dipped as low as minus ten celsius and patchy fog. it will lift leaving sunshinement for northern ireland, the rest of england and wales, it is cloudy and it is murky and there is hill fog and drizzle and we‘ve got rain coming in across the south—west into the channel islands through the course of the afternoon, but here it will be milder. it will be a beautiful day in the north. it will feel chilly. now, through the evening and overnight, initially there will be a frost across eastern scotla nd there will be a frost across eastern scotland and eastern england, but as we‘ve got two weather fronts bringing cloud and rain, the temperature will rise. so a much milder start to the day tomorrow across scotland, compared to what we have seen and temperatures very similar elsewhere. but you can see
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the progress of this rain across many parts of the uk. now tomorrow, not a lot changes. it will be cloudy. there will be drizzle and hill fog and there will be rain. however, if you‘re in northern ireland, that will move away and you will see sunshine and just a few showers. temperatures tomorrow, tens and 11s and 12s as we push through some western and southern areas, but still lower further north. and then as we head into wednesday, we start off with this rain and then what you will find is it tends to fizzle. a lot of dry weather around. rain waiting in the wings, the wind picking up and as we head through friday and into the weekend it becomes wet and very windy for some of us, dan and lou. 0k, of us, dan and lou. ok, carol, thank you very much. british cities send almost half their exports to the european union. ben has this and all the other big business headlines this morning. good morning. we have been looking at which uk
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towns and cities rely on europe on trade. derby trades least with our european neighbours because rolls—royce engines are sold around the world. exeter in devon is the most reliant — 70% of its trade goes to europe, given that airline flybe is based there. it says a tough market meant fewer passengers were on its planes over the last year. those results follow the departure of the chief executive who stepped down unexpectedly in october. he was in the topjob down unexpectedly in october. he was in the top job for three years. also this morning the government has cut its stake in lloyds banking group to less than 5%. taxpayers bailed out the bank with £20 million during the financial
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crisis. and tech firms have been weighing in on president trump‘s controversial migrant travel ban. travel website airbnb says it will offer free accommodation to people left stranded — and google, microsoft and taxi app uber have all condemned the move. many have highlighted that former apple boss stevejobs, responsible for the ipod and iphone was the son of syrian migrant. that‘s all your business. you‘re up—to—date. i will see you soon. loneliness is something many people may associate with the elderly or those living alone. however the charity childline say it‘s received 3,000 calls from children — some as young as ten — seeking counselling since april last year. our reporter graham satchell spent some time with one girl who spoke about the impact loneliness has had on her life. both her name and voice have been changed to protect her identity. i first started feeling lonely probably in the beginning of teens. probably 13. i just felt trapped and alone.
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i was stuck, not knowing who to talk to with all these questions i had about life. what is the purpose of life, like, why are we here? emma was lost. unable to find answers from friends, family, teachers. she was alone. i didn‘t know what to do to be honest. that‘s why i started going online because i thought maybe that had the answers. i completely believe it‘s as addictive as being on a drug. that your reality becomes a digital world. i knew it was bad for me and i knew it was making me worse. i was crying, like, every day but i had to. i don‘t know why, ijust had to. it is the most lonely thing you can ever do to yourself. emma kept a journal.
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it catalogues a steady decline — loneliness, self—harming and worse. ijust wanted to die, to be honest. ijust can‘t do this any more. no, i can‘t. ijust, yeah, completely alone. emma called childline and spoke to somebody for more than two hours. she ended up being admitted to hospital and stayed there for five months. from there, i kind of just rebuilt myself. rebuilt my life. it‘s taken two years now since i was admitted into hospital. i thought i had to have it all together. know what to do when in reality, no one has it all together. no one knows what to do all the time. everyone has struggles. everyone has down days and everyone needs to talk to someone in their life.
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so yeah, that‘s what i‘d tell myself. i‘d say, go talk to someone and be yourself. i was never really myself at that time. that was graham satchell reporting. joining us now to discuss the issue further is emily cherry, head of childline young campaigners. what sort of stories have you been hearing, similarto what sort of stories have you been hearing, similar to that, very varied? very similar to that. firstly emma is so brave for sharing her story. with childline we have had 30,000 calls in nine months from children feeling lonely. they are telling us they feel neglected and misunderstood by those around them. they feel that they are ugly, that they are, not able to keep up with they are, not able to keep up with the pressure that‘s on them in social media and in her case and in many other cases, children turning to self—harm and suicide to cope with those feelings of loneliness. what can parents do? v—conversations. absolutely number one. look for the signs that your
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child maybe feeling lonely so being withdrawn and becoming isolated and not wanting to go out with friends and talk no them. help them to work out what‘s underneath and what they‘re they feeling and whatever they‘re they feeling and whatever they‘re feeling or facing they‘re they feeling and whatever they‘re feeling orfacing it they‘re they feeling and whatever they‘re feeling or facing it is important to you as a parent and if they don‘t feel they can talk to you asa they don‘t feel they can talk to you as a parent, encourage them to speak to childline and we‘ll help them fin the confidence. that‘s the most important message, there is a way back from those feelings, isn‘t there? there is. emma and thousands of young people who speak to us, once they talk, it is like you can open and unlock yourself. you can recover from this. there open and unlock yourself. you can recoverfrom this. there is help available, but the crucial thing is taking this first step and talking about it. she says everybody has struggles. everybody has bad days, but there is somewhere to go? yes, one of the things she powerfully says and use distraction techniques and artare says and use distraction techniques and art are really helpful to encourage children to build their confidence, but there are places to 90, confidence, but there are places to go, there are teachers and trusted adults and there is childline and if
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young people are feeling and it is normal to feel lonely and anxious to seek support because it‘s available for you. we have that expectation that it for you. we have that expectation thatitis for you. we have that expectation that it is something that affects older people, but it is a big eye opener. if you need to talk to someone about these issues, childline‘s action line is 08001111. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello there. starting to see some changes to our weather this week after a cold and dry winter so far.
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this week we will see more mobile weather, areas of low pressure, i‘m ra kes weather, areas of low pressure, i‘m rakes of rain, milder conditions, and it will become windy, later in the week we could see the risk of some gales. today we have a big temperature contrast, mild and damp across the south, cold and frosty across scotland on the far north of england. for northern ireland and the rest of england and wales, it will be rather cloudy. turning mild and breezy across the south—west. this evening and overnight, the milder weather and the band of rain spreads northwards and eastwards. we could see some transient snow over the high grounds of scotland. further south, a lot of damp weather, hill fog, mis—timed murk around, and it will be a mild night across northern and eastern areas. for tuesday, a cloudy day, many
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places seeing outbreaks of rain, particularly for scotland and large parts of england. it will stay quite damp through the afternoon, with brightness getting in towards northern ireland. double—figure values in the south, and a milder day across scotland in the north east of england. wednesday, another breezy day, cloudy outbreaks of rain but a little dry weather with some outbreaks. this area of low pressure will be quite deep and nearby to the uk, so it will be windy and signs of something more severe pushing into the south—west later in the week. this is business live from bbc news with jamie robertson and sally bundock. the trump administration is standing firm over its ban on immigration from seven countries — despite court rulings and mass protests against it. business leaders worldwide are swift to react. live from london, that‘s our top story on monday the 30th of january. airlinesjuggle flight
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crew and passengers, while the tech giant google urges some staff not to leave the country — we‘ll find out how companies are being impacted by the us travel ban and what you should do. volkswagen has overtaken toyota to become the world‘s best—selling car—maker — recapturing the position
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