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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  January 30, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

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hello. it's monday, it's nine o'clock. i'm victoria derbyshire. welcome to the programme. this programme has discovered that aston villa sacked a scout accused of sexually abusing boys in 1988, but did not go to police. professional player tony brien has waived his right to anonymity to tell us he went to the club to tell them about the abuse he was subjected to from ted langford. that full exclusive interview at 0915. also on the programme: after worldwide backlash against new restrictions on travel to the united states, the white house insist immigration bans against seven countries aren't directed against muslims. they say it is based on a policy first introduced by president obama. if you are a christian in syria, it was impossible, very tough to get into the united states. if you were a muslim you could come in, and i thought it was very, very unfair. and as mps launch an investigation
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into how damaging fake news is, the editor—in—chief of one fake news website tells us politicians should focus their attention on newspapers instead. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until 11. latest breaking news and developing stories to come — a little later in the programme we'll hear how one school is advertising for a "school detention director" who will be a "sergeant major in the detention room". it's thought to be the first time such a role has been advertised. we'll get reaction. do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning. use the hashtag #victorialive. if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today: six people have been shot dead and eight others wounded at a mosque in the canadian city of quebec. police have detained two suspects. the canadian prime minister justin trudeau described
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the incident as "a terrorist attack against muslims". sarah corker‘s report contains flashing images. police closed off the area surrounding the quebec city islamic cultural centre as armed officers entered the mosque. it was during evening prayers on sunday that witnesses say gunmen opened fire on a0 worshippers inside. ambulances continued to take away the dead and injured. quebec provincial police confirmed two suspects have been arrested. we consider the event like an act of terrorism and we can confirm that we have six persons pronounced dead and eight persons is in hospital with minor or severe injuries. the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau said in a statement: on twitter the quebec premier said:
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the city rejects this barbaric violence and express solidarity with victors‘ families. while the public safety minister said: the motive for this attack is unknown but incidents of islamophobia in quebec have increased in recent years. sarah corker, bbc news. joining us now from quebec is local reporter peter tardif. it's the middle of the night there now and he's in you havejust come back you have just come back from the scene. what's the latest? all we know is what has been reported, six people dead, eight wounded, 39 other
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people dead, eight wounded, 39 other people who were inside safe and sound, but i split —— at this point, it is just sound, but i split —— at this point, it isjust coming sound, but i split —— at this point, it is just coming to terms with the shock and reality. tell us a little bit about quebec and the diversity of the population. quebec city is the second biggest city in this province, and so a very peaceful city. the murder rate here is extremely low, less than one person per year, so this is shocking news to people. often we hear about these types of things south of the border or in other places. quebec has had some shootings in the past, but this type of incident is something completely new to people. very peaceful, very quiet, and those are words that keep coming up with regards to this incident, simply disbelief that this could happen
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here of all places. are there any early thoughts about why muslims might be targeted in quebec? there is really no inkling as to what happened here, what transpired here, why did this happen. politicians, the mayor, the premier, the minister for public security, not confirming any details, police also not confirming details, saying this is not a time for politics, it is a time to mourn. but we know that at this particular mosque this past summer this particular mosque this past summer there was this particular mosque this past summer there was a this particular mosque this past summer there was a pig's head deposited near it during ramadan, so people mentioning this again today asa people mentioning this again today as a possible hate crime, islamophobia at that time present, and now this event, trying to link those two, that is something people are talking about. thank you very much, peter. let's bring you the
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rest of this morning's news. joanne is on the bbc newsroom. good morning. protests have intensified across america against president trump's travel ban on people from seven mainly—muslim countries. the president insists the ban is not about religion, but about protecting the us. politicians here are concerned about the impact it might have on british people. here's our washington correspondent david willis. man chants: no ban, no wall — new york for all. in a country built by immigrants, many find donald trump's travel ban unpalatable. they took to the streets in cities across the nation, as the crackdown sparked chaotic scenes at some airports and promptied criticism from senior members of the president's own party. neal behgooy and his wife underwent several hours of questioning after touching down in texas from iran. over the weekend about 300 people were either prevented from travelling or detained. they asked her about her family, about her brothers and sisters and her parents.
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what they did. how long we stayed. president trump issued his controversial order without input from or giving notice to the government departments that will need to implement it, hence the concern of officials here and elsewhere in trying to interpret it in the face of a flurry of lawsuits and the concerns of leaders around the world. the foreign office says the ban only applies to people travelling to the us from one of the seven countries on the list. travellers from the uk won't be affected and neither will uk citizens travelling from any of those seven countries to america, unless, that is, they'rejoint citizens of one of the seven nations, in which case they're likely to face additional checks. for all the confusion, mr trump's aides have deemed the travel ban a success and they issued a statement seeking to dispel suggestions that it amounted to a ban on muslims:
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despite the backlash, donald trump knows that many of those who voted for him did so specifically because of his promise to combat the threat of so—called radical islamic terrorism. to them, this just represents another promise kept. david willis, bbc news, washington. this programme has discovered that aston villa sacked a scout accused of sexually abusing boys in 1988 but did not go to police. 20 years later, that scout — ted langford — was jailed for sexual offences against young boys between 1976 and 1989 — a year after he left the club. former professional player tony brien says he was abused numerous times by langford from the age of 12 whilst playing for local youth team dunlop terriers. we'll have more on this in the next few minutes. a group of mps is to carry out a parliamentary inquiry
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into so—called ‘fake news'. the commons, media and sport committee will investigate inaccurate or false news stories being shared on social media. members of the committee say they've noted concerns over people being fed false information from nontraditional news sources. a free school in london is advertising for a "school detention director". the advert says they need someone who will be a "sergeant major in the detention room". the advert goes on to say the role isn't suited to someone who wants to be every child's best friend, but for someone who believes children need clear, firm discipline. the department for education says it isa the department for education says it is a matter for the school to comment on. in the next few minutes, we will be talking to tony brian, he is with us this morning, he has waived his right to anonymity to speak out
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publicly for the first time about the abuse he said he was subjected to bya the abuse he said he was subjected to by a scout at a youth team when he was aged 12. as a teenager, he reported the scarratt. the scout was then working at aston villa. aston villa decided to sack this garret, but they didn't go to the police. we will talk to him in the next few minutes. do get in touch with us throughout the morning. use the hashtag victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. let's get some sport with tim hague now. tim, plenty of big shocks in the fa cup over the weekend, but not everybody is happy with the big teams this comes up every year! you are right, victoria. people not very happy at all. you would think we would be talking about the likes of sutton, lincoln wolverhampton wanderers, all bringing brilliant result in knocking out premier league and championship side, but the teams rested 51 players from
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their previous games, an incredible amount, and imagine, as a fan, you travel hundreds of miles to watch your team play, and you are left embarrassed by the result, but most of your team are not even regulars. leeds made ten changes, and non—league sutton outplayed them yesterday. it was the same for brighton, nine there. the biggest shock of the weekend was at anfield on saturday lunchtime. walls just too good forjurgen klopp's liverpool. he made nine changes, while oxford beat newcastle side also with nine rested players. i think it is fair to say that former england captain alan shearer is not happy about it at all.|j england captain alan shearer is not happy about it at all. i think they are cheating the fans. newcastle fa ns are cheating the fans. newcastle fans travelled 250 master oxford expecting their team to win, and he puts out a weakened team. newcastle have one of the biggest and best teams in the championship, six points clear with a game in hand of
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third place, so it is very disappointing. not everyone is disappointed. despite 13 premier league clubs in the fourth round making 98 changes to their line—ups, it makes for a more other‘s competition, some think. every team is making changes, notjust the think. every team is making changes, not just the premier think. every team is making changes, notjust the premier league teams. i think it is making the fa cup better, once you get the fifth sixth round, a lot of clubs are playing at home to limit changes, but i think it has been fantastic for the cup that we have seen so many upsets. i am all for playing the kids. you can see phil neville's point of view, but many feel that the fa cup is devalued with a rested players. it is the fifth round draw on the one show later this evening, nobody can make changes to that! thank you. good morning, welcome to the programme. this programme has discovered that aston villa sacked a scout accused of sexually abusing boys in 1988, but did not go to police. 20 years later that scout, ted langford, was jailed for sexual
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offences against young boys between 1976 and 1989 — a year after he left the club. former professional player tony brien says he was abused numerous times by langford from the age of 12 whilst playing for local youth team dunlop terriers. he's waived his right to anonymity to speak exclusively to this programme. tony brien, who then went on to play for leicester, chesterfield, west brom and hull city, says that whilst at leicester — at the age of 18 — he reported langford — who was then working as a scout at aston villa — to the bosses at villa. they sacked him — but we've learnt they did not report him to the police. mr brien decided to speak publicly after seeing our interview with andy woodward and three other former players. they now campaign for better safeguarding in sport and hundreds of other alleged victims have now come forward after our initial interview with mr woodward. we can speak to them both now —
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as you'd expect with an interview of this nature — we will hear some graphic details of sexual abuse which you may not want young children to hear. good morning, both of you. thank you very much for coming on the programme. tony, thank you for talking to us this morning. you decided to speak out after seeing our interview with andy woodward. i tried to speak out 30 years ago, andi i tried to speak out 30 years ago, and i was listened to, and when i saw andy woodward go on the television and speak out about it, it inspired me to come out and say what happened to me, because i waited long enough, and ifelt as though the time was right, because when andy first sat on the sofa, he was alone. he urged victims to come forward and everything like that, so ijust forward and everything like that, so i just couldn't ignore forward and everything like that, so ijust couldn't ignore it any more, andi ijust couldn't ignore it any more, and i decided to come forward. i telephoned the nspcc helpline, and
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the rest is where i am today. can i ask you about the abuse that ted la nkford ask you about the abuse that ted lankford subjected you to. he was like somebody we always looked up to, somebody like that. he used to turn up at my school and speak to me at games on sunday and said he needed something from me. and i used to asking, what is it you need from me? i'm not telling you yet, but i need something from you. if you want to bea need something from you. if you want to be a footballer, i need something from you. this went on for quite a number of months, and in the end, he turned around to me and said he needed a sperm sample of mine. i was in shock, to say the least. i asked him, could i not do this at home or anything like that, and he said, no, it needs to be fresh. he said the
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reason why he needed it was so that leicester city doctors could examine it to see if i had a gene inside of me that would make me become a footballer. a foot all's jean? and being so young at that time, you believed anything that people said to you. he mass debated me, and himself as well, and it happened on several occasions where he just kept saying that the sample wasn't correct, i need you to do it again, and again. until one day i said to him, this stops now. otherwise i will chop your venus of. what age where you when you said that to him. 14. where would this abuse take place? he used to take me to a golf
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course, at the back of the old school that i used to go, a school in handsworth and there was a golf course at the back there and he used to drive up there. that's where it took place. how did it make you feel? at the time, you would have done anything because i thought it was right, but you know, of all the years, now, i just feel dirty and i can't explain. it's just, you would just feel dirty and i can't explain. it'sjust, you would have just feel dirty and i can't explain. it's just, you would have done anything in them days, your dream was to become a professional footballer. you know you believed things that people said to you. and i would have done anything to become a professional footballer, i would have done anything to become a professionalfootballer, but i didn't know what i was doing then was, you know, actually wrong because i trusted adults. and when
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at 14 you told him where to go, what had changed? did you know that this, what he was doing to you was wrong? yeah, it's just, i what he was doing to you was wrong? yeah, it'sjust, i knew something wasn't right. i knew from, you know, we used to go on trips abroad and kids were coming out with love bites all over their neck and things like that and it was just, it was just, it was just terrible to see it. why did he say he had to keep on doing it? he said that my sperm hadn't come back from the doctor's with the right results. it wasn't, a test that had been completed properly. right results. it wasn't, a test that had been completed properlym was inconclusive? yes. so he would say we have to do the test again, but we'll leave it for a few weeks. we would have to do the test again. unbelievable. yes. this happened six
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or seven times over that period of two years or so. how did he treat you after it stopped? after you stopped him. after! stopped him, i used to always be sat in the front of the van when we used to go to matches and i think his way of dealing with it, he would put me to the back of the van. and you told your mum, didn't you? when i was 18, yes, i revealed it, yes, i did. how did she react? obviously, she was in shock. no mother likes to see her child hurt. she only knew about it when i had actually reported it. in terms of reporting it, in 1988 you we re terms of reporting it, in 1988 you were 18, you were playing at leicester, ted langford was then working at villa with an assistant manager called dave richardson, he was assistant manager to graham
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taylor, you worked with dave richardson at leicester and you say he decided to tell dave richardson what ted langford had done to you, what ted langford had done to you, what did you say to dave richardson? i told him what happened and it was over a number of phone calls. the phone calls went on more about three to five weeks. and i was told that something, they were dealing with it. they were dealing with it. and then i got a phone call to say to me can you really be doing with all of this teeny? can you dealing with the obscenities from the terraces. just sweep it underneath the carpet, i was told. dave richardson denies that he discouraged you from going public. he says he would never have done that. he says he did everything possible to protect young players. when we first spoke to him, he initially appeared to remember speaking to you, several times, over
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the phone back in 1988, but in a statement last night, he clarified his comments and he said he did not believe he had ever spoken to you about the abuse. you say you suffered, but he says that he and graham taylor and doug ellis had heard claims of abuse from other pa rents heard claims of abuse from other parents and decided to sack ted langford. this is dave richardson's statement last night. during the 1987, 1988 pre—season i was told of some alarming allegations by mr la ngford some alarming allegations by mr langford by a member of staff at aston villa. i took these seriously and began making inquiries. these led me to speak to the parents of two young footballers at aston villa who each told me their sons were abused by ted langford. i asked them if they were going to report the allegations to the police or if they wa nted allegations to the police or if they wanted to. after consulting with each other, both sets of parents told me they didn't want the matter reported to the police. i don't think you were aware that other
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pa rents think you were aware that other pa re nts ha d think you were aware that other parents had reported the abuse until now? i have never been aware of that. some months after you flagged this abuse to villa, langford was sacked. but he wasn't reported to the police by the club, what do you think of that? why? why was he not reported? how does that make you feel, the fact that they didn't? what were they were trying to do at the time, i don't know. all i know, i reported to the people i thought it was right to report it to. for them not to report it to the police, ijust them not to report it to the police, i just can't understand them not to report it to the police, ijust can't understand why them not to report it to the police, i just can't understand why they didn't do it. what do you think about the fact that other parents talked to staff at villa about their own boys being abused? well, when i first went forward to reveal what had happened to me, i asked three other lads to come with me as well.
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they didn't have the courage at the time to come forward. and ijust did what i had to do victoria. 20 years after you flagged this, after you first raised the alarm over langford he was convicted of abusing boys at villa and leicester. at least one conviction is of abuse in 1989. so after you raised the alarm about him, what do you think about that? it could have been stopped. it could have been stopped. ted langford died in 2011. when you rang the police to tell them what had happened to you, they told you, so they couldn't take it any further. on friday, i think, you heard that the fa want to meet you? i had a phone call off the west midlands police saying that a solicitor of the fa was trying to get hold of my details, is it ok to
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pass them on which i thought they would have been passed on automatically, but i had no objection to that whatsoever. right. i think the west midlands police had alerted the fa in december though when you went to the police first of all? i went to the police on the 1st december this year and i reported it to them and they did an interview with me and they passed the information on to the fa within a couple of days. the west midlands police in this have been outstanding. they are keeping me informed about things. so yes, i passedit informed about things. so yes, i passed it on on the 1st december. would you have expected to have heard from the fa by now? yes. what do you think about the fact that you haven't? i find it unbelievable that i haven't been contacted. you know, i saw i haven't been contacted. you know, isawa i haven't been contacted. you know, i saw a television interview with somebody from the fa saying they would speak to every single football player that comes forward and i've
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not had a phone call. what kind of impact did the abuse that you endured have on your playing career? i don't know what impact it had on my playing career, but my personal life, how i feel, after all these yea rs, life, how i feel, after all these years, i tried to report this 30 yea rs years, i tried to report this 30 years ago and i was ignored. so, the way it makes you feel, it makes you feel dirty. it makes you feel did i encourage it? it makes you ask yourself all sorts of questions. it's always inside your head, you just can't get rid of it. you can't get rid of it. after you say you reported it to villa, then do you, you just keep it in, do you, for decades? well, i obviously expected something to be done, but i was just told do i really want the
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obscenities from the terraces? you know, i just thought, obscenities from the terraces? you know, ijust thought, that's it. what can i do about it? i've tried to report it. and it has not got me anywhere and i have to get on with it. in terms of your personal life, what affect has the abuse had on your life? it's took an impact where, you know, i've lived a normal life. of course, i've lived a normal life, as normal as i can, but when you've got something like that inside of you, it's something that is going to stay with you until the day that you die. i've had two failed marriages. and also, you know, i drunk heavily as well. and you know, it's just know, i drunk heavily as well. and you know, it'sjust things know, i drunk heavily as well. and you know, it's just things that i tried to do to forget about it. but it is always there. let me bring in
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andy. i know you wanted him alongside you as you talk to us. andy, your reaction to what tony has told us today? ijust am so, so proud of him and he gave me a call and told me what had happened and each time i get something, it is just, everything isjust so shocking. i wasjust so just, everything isjust so shocking. i was just so shocked to hear that he reported it when he was 18 and the fact that nothing happened for him, you know, that's terrible. and ijust, you know, i wasjust so pleased terrible. and ijust, you know, i was just so pleased and terrible. and ijust, you know, i wasjust so pleased and i'm so proud of him and he's so brave to do this because it takes so much, like everybody else, and we had the phone call on that sunday, didn't we, tony? and we were both in tears, you know, because it'sjust so emotional. it has been an emotional time for everyone, but ijust feel like now oum' really proud that i did it initially and there is so many now that are doing the right thing and things are getting done. what about the fact that villa
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didn't report ted langford to the police because they say other pa rents, police because they say other parents, whose boys had been abecaused, didn't want them to? it's abecaused, didn't want them to? it's a difficult one that, isn't it? it's something that, it is only them back then that can discuss that, it is such a long time ago, but you know, it'sjust shocking, isn't it, to think of those things were happening then and it was reported and not reported to the police and it goes back to that mandatory reporting, doesn't it? well, it does. are you one of those who thinks that mandatory reporting should be introduced to force clubs and anyone else actually to report to the police if they suspect abuse is going on? i mean, the mandatory reporting, i've spoken to people from different countries and when i speak to people in australia, or the us, they're shocked that mandatory reporting isn't in this country. i
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mean it is for the politicians to discuss that and come up with a strategy around whether they can do that or not, but surely, you know, there has to be something to report these sort of things that are going on because it's still happening now and we're having the reports to the nspcc about them happening now so something has to be done at some point. it has to be discussed.” wa nt to point. it has to be discussed.” want to ask you about the former director of crewe who has been suspended by crewe, dario gradi. yesterday he was at sutton united. they say he wasn't a guest of honour of theirs. the fa tell us dario gradi's ban, or suspension, of theirs. the fa tell us dario gradi's ban, orsuspension, doesn't stop him attending a game as a spectator in a personal capacity, but he was there on the pitch, i think we've got pictures to show that. what's your reaction to that?
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it's difficult really because i'm quite emotional about everything that's happened and yeah, i was shocked and you know, hurt and angry, i will say that personally i was because there is an investigation going on and that independent investigation will reveal what's revealed, i'm not suggest that anything is going to happen with dario gradi, but there isa happen with dario gradi, but there is a lot of people that are out there, us survivors, that would be deeply upset by it. dario gradi has been suspended pending an investigation suggesting that he smoothed over, that is a quote, an accusation in the 70s. he isn't accused of any abuse himself. there is a meeting next week between the fa, what are you hoping to achieve? i have been talking to an adviser around strategies, how we can make for all a safer place, and thatis
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can make for all a safer place, and that is my mission to, to go and make it a safe place. these organisations have agreed to meet me, and that is progress, and they are all collectively going to meet me and! are all collectively going to meet me and i will discuss those things with them, how we can improve and make it a safer place, also from foot ball make it a safer place, also from football coaches, because there are so football coaches, because there are so many brilliant coaches out there, there are loads of strategies we can put in place that we can deliver to them, and hopefully they will assist with safeguarding children. those who are speaking out, are they getting enough support? are you getting enough support? are you getting enough support? that is the other thing. i have getting enough support? that is the otherthing. i have been diagnosed with ptsd. i also want to speak to the governing bodies about how we can put things in place for all of the survivors, because there are so many of us now, that is another strategy we need in terms of getting the right help and therapy, because it deeply affects us, as tony said,
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and it is still affecting us. over the last eight weeks or so, i have been really suffering, i have had to see my psychiatrist, and this is ongoing for us, so we do need that support and help, and i have a strategy in place but i want to deliver to them for them to support us, because they owe us that. tony, cani us, because they owe us that. tony, can ijust us, because they owe us that. tony, can i just read us, because they owe us that. tony, can ijust read you to three m essa g es can ijust read you to three messages from our audience who have been watching speak today. this viewer says, i just want to say what a brave, brave man is with you today. you are an inspiration to others that can't find the strength to come forward, keep your head high and keep speaking out because the whole nation supports you. this tweet from john, i feel so sorry for this man, it is sickening. and also unbelievable that the fa have not yet contacted him. and patrick says, watching the interview about abuse these young players went through, it breaks my heart.
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what would you say to anyone who might be considering speaking out, but just doesn't might be considering speaking out, butjust doesn't know if it is the right thing. come forward. simple as that, come forward. don't be frightened. this man started it all off, that is why i came forward. just come forward, because it's big, and it happened, and it happened to and it happened, and it happened to a lot of people. and it's something that you can't keep inside yourself for ever. if you come forward, at least you will get some help, and that's my mission, victoria, so we can get that help, and there is so many more out there. we know there is, we have both said it. everybody who talks about it says, there are so who talks about it says, there are so many who talks about it says, there are so many more, we know who talks about it says, there are so many more, we know it. when you
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finally contacted the police, tony, how different did you feel, once you had taken that step? like i had got the world off my shoulders. really? yes, like i had the world off my shoulders. for so many years, you just want the truth to be told, and to actually get it out and speak to people, it just felt like to actually get it out and speak to people, itjust felt like the world was lifted off my shoulders, because after 35 years i got the chance to tell somebody about it, even if it wasn't in good circumstances or anything. but i was relieved. thank you very much for talking to us. i really appreciated, thank you. thank you both coming the programme. aston villa told us they consider "the safeguarding and welfare of all players and staff to be of paramount importance. and that they would encourage anyone with any allegation or concern regarding safeguarding or other
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potential wrongdoing to contact the relevant authorities." leicester told us the club has "no indication of any current or historic allegations made against or in relation to employees. "we would, of course, investigate fully in the event any further information comes to light." bruce elliott, the chairman of sutton united, says, "dario gradi was not a guest of honour at sutton's fa cup fourth round match against leeds united. this was to do with a game that had been played 47 years ago and sutton united asked all of the players that are still around if they wanted to come to the game. dario gradi was one of a number of players from the sutton united side that came to the game. the fa has introduced a dedicated hotline, staffed by nspcc professionals, which is available 24 hours a day on 0800 023 2642. and you can find a list of other organisations that help
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with sexual abuse on the bbc action line — bbc.co.uk/actionline. and we'll bring you more reaction to that exclusive story later in the programme. still to come in the next half—hour, asa still to come in the next half—hour, as a petition calling for donald trump's trip to the uk to be cancelled nears 1 million, trump's trip to the uk to be cancelled nears1 million, we will hear from cancelled nears1 million, we will hearfrom mps cancelled nears1 million, we will hear from mps who are calling on theresa may to cancel the visit. and mps are also launching an investigation into how damaging fake news is — the editor—in—chief of one fake news website tells us politicians should focus their attention on newspapers instead. that's still to come on this mornings programme. here'sjoanna in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. six people have been shot dead — and eight others wounded — at a mosque in the canadian city of quebec.
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police have detained two suspects. the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau described the incident as ‘a terrorist attack against muslims.‘ more than 50 people were at the mosque at the time of the attack. president trump has insisted that his travel ban is not about religion, but about protecting america. the restrictions close us borders to all refugees for four months, and to citizens of seven mainly—muslim countries for three months. uk nationals with dual citizenship will be largely unaffected, but could face extra checks if they're travelling directly from one of the named countries. this programme has discovered that aston villa sacked a scout accused of sexually abusing boys in 1988 but did not go to police. 20 years later that scout, ted langford, was jailed for sexual offences against young boys between 1976 and 1989, a year after he left the club former professional player tony brien says he was abused numerous times by langford from the age of 12 whilst playing for local youth team dunlop terriers. speaking to victoria
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in the last few minutes, he described it as something that is always there which will stay with him until the day he dies. at the time, i would have done nothing, because i thought it was right. but after all the years, now, ijust right. but after all the years, now, i just feel dirty. i right. but after all the years, now, ijust feel dirty. i can't explain. a free school in london is advertising for a "school detention director". the advert says they need someone who will be a "sergeant major in the detention room". the advert goes on to say the role isn't suited to someone who wants to be every child's best friend but for someone who believes children need clear, firm discipline. the department for education says it is a matter for the school to comment on. black actors have dominated the screen actors guild awards in hollywood. denzel washington was named the best actor for fences. the event was notable for the outspoken criticism of
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donald trump's immigration policy. the actor ashton kutcher opened proceedings by welcoming "everyone in airports", saying they "belonged in america". that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10am. here are some more comments from you m essa g es here are some more comments from you messages from eva tony brown and andy woodward. incredible gentlemen, we are all behind you. this one says, this man is amazing, i am a ca re says, this man is amazing, i am a care support worker and i know how people feel in difficult circumstances. for him to speak out is extremely brave. and veronica, keep going, you brave man, you have been through so much, and we are all behind you. thank you very much for those. he the sport. it was a weekend of shocks in the fa cup fourth round. sutton united joined another non—league team, lincoln city, in the hat for the fifth round draw after beating leeds
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united yesterday. several former players including alan shearer have criticised premier league and championship teams for fielding weakened line—ups. celtic extended their unbeaten domestic run 27 matches by beating hearts 4—0 in the scottish premiership. their win broke 50 record set by lisbon lions. england captain eoin morgan says poor umpiring cost england victory in the second t20 match against india.jonah in the second t20 match against india. jonah reed was co ntroversially india. jonah reed was controversially out in the last over as the tourists lost byjust five runs. the decider is on wednesday. and roger federer says he has no intention of retiring after winning his 18th grand slam title yesterday. the new australian open champion climb to tenth in the world rankings after his incredible victory over rafa nadal in melbourne. did you watch that, victoria? i listen to it on the radio, and it
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was fabulous, it really was. thank you. prime minister theresa may has made it clear the devolved administrations will not be given a decisive role in the uk's divorce from the european union ahead of talks later this morning with leaders from across the uk. our correspondent thomas morgan is in cardiff. hello, tomos, what is happening today? i will be discussing brexit and what the devolved ministers would like to see. carwynjones of the labour government here in cardiff has always said he would like to stay in the single market and have a norway style soft brexit where we stay in the single market and people can come to the uk as long as they have a job. that is in fa ct long as they have a job. that is in fact the white paper he put to westminster this time last week, with leanne wood of plaid cymru. that is in sharp contrast to what theresa may said just two weeks ago,
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when she said staying in the market was not going to be in option. nicola sturgeon said she and carwyn jones share similar views on brexit, and they both wanted to have a vote in their different senedd, here adding edinburgh for their devolved nations. so that they have some sort of say as to what happens in brexit. but of course what we heard last tuesdayis but of course what we heard last tuesday is that there wouldn't be a meeting but there would be a consideration when the brexit talks continue in westminster. are there —— are they going to be able to reach an agreement? difficult to say, because they are both speaking from completely different points of view and want different things. theresa may set out what she thought would be the most possible realistic way for the uk leaving the european
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union two weeks ago. in sharp contrast to what carwyn jones wanted, which was to stay in the single market. he believes it is so important for wales as businesses rely on the single market. wales was the only other country in the uk that voted the european union, but of course carwynjones, first minister, of labour, campaign to stay in the eu, so difficult position for him to try to get his voice and what he would like to see happen. but with nicola sturgeon coming down as scotland having voted to remain, he does have extra help when they consider these to scotians later in cardiff. thank you very much, tomos. tens of thousands of people in america have taken part in protests against president trump's ban on citizens of seven mainly muslim countries entering the us. the president says the restrictions would be lifted once policies to improve america's security have been implemented. the foreign office says uk nationals travelling to america shouldn't be affected by the travel ban. the foreign office has now clarified that brits with dual nationality from one of the seven countries
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won't be banned from travelling to the states, but could face extra border checks. here's how the story has unfolded over the last 48 hours. do you know, if you are christian in syria, it was impossible, at least very, very tough to get into the united states. if you are a muslim, you could come in, and i thought it was very unfair. it is, and as my sign says, morally wrong and blatantly unconstitutional. it is unacceptable. it goes against everything this country stands for, everything this country was built on. it is incredibly distressing. i think it's really terrible. it is un—american, it is unconstitutional. it has to be revoked and changed and fought against. trump has got to go!
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no ban, no wall! when i left home, i was not sure if i was going to make it because there were so many twisting news about people who were detained. the executive order was not very clear. so everybody is panicked right now in afghanistan. let them in! the values that our president seems to have espoused are so not mine and so not the ones of this country. i have a little baby here. i have a toddler at home and i don't want him to grow up in a world where we act from hate and fear of people that look different than us.
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no hate, no fear, refugees are welcome here! the united states is responsible for the united states policy on refugees. the united kingdom is responsible for the united kingdom's on refugees. the prime minister is not a shoot from the hip type of politician. she wants to see the evidence. she wants to understand precisely what the implications are. there is always pressure to respond within a new cycle and so on. important thing is we are saying that we disagree with it and we do think it is wrong. he was elected to get tough. he was elected to say he would do everything within his power to protect america from infiltration by isis terrorists. now, there are seven countries on that list. he says he will revisit the policy? is it he says he will revisit the policy? isita he says he will revisit the policy? is it a u—turn? has the white house been knocked by the wave of criticism from around the world and
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within america, you bet it has. i'm not happy about him coming here until the ban is lifted. look at what is happening with those countries, how many more is it going to be and what's going to be the long—term effect of this on the rest of the world? the last four or five years have required a degree of caution that we have not been exercising before. ithink caution that we have not been exercising before. i think it is appropriate. whatever needs to be done, has to be done and this is for the safety of everybody. we feel very threatened in this country and there is a lot of things that the general public don't know about that the government know abouts as far as security and threats to our country and if they feel this is necessary, then i'm with it all the way. that petition calling for donald trump's state visit to the uk to be cancelled, it is 994, 365. it is on course for one million. let's speak to some people affected by the travel ban.
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in chicago is sananeh khoshini who is iranian, her husband rick silbertis is american. sananeh's parents are currently on holiday in iran. she's worried that they won't be able to return. also with us some brits with dual—nationality. nazjahanshahi is an iranian—born physics student from manchester. khaled el mayet is a libyan—british businessman. abdulaziz lamlum is a libyan—british film—maker. yesterday they all thought they would be banned from travelling to the states, but they now know they can travel there, but will face restrictions. president trump says his policy is similar to what president obama did in 2011 when he banned visas for refugees from iraq for six months. ryan girdusky is a senior writer for red alert politics and a donald trump supporter. just explain how this travel ban is going to affect your family. yes, as you already stated my family and my
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pa rents a re you already stated my family and my parents are visiting family in iraq and based. it will be impacting my travelling plans. both of our travelling plans. both of our travelling plans. both of our travelling plans to see family in new york and also i do travel for work abroad and that's been impacted by this executive order. you, as i understand it, you have a green card as do your parents and the trump administration, have now made it clear that anyone with green cards can travel freely, irrespective of where they were born? that has actually not been fully clear. ok. green cardholders would be allowed to come here. as far as i have seen
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so to come here. as far as i have seen so far, there has been back tracking. i would love to see something with clarity frommed administration in writing or obtheir website. white house chief-of-staff says the order doesn't affect green cardholders moving forward. does that help? ijust, you know, with this situation, you don't know until something forces your hand. so when our parents, when they're coming back, let's see if they are allowed in and allowed on their flight and whether they're detained here. but it doesn't hurt to have some clarity, not just it doesn't hurt to have some clarity, notjust in a press statement, offhand from previous, but to have something that's clearly laid out. fair enough. rye arnings are you surprised at the reaction to mrtrump are you surprised at the reaction to mr trump enacting what he said he was going to do if elected? no, not really. i think that there are
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people who are very emotional about theissue people who are very emotional about the issue and there are some who are willing to oppose him at anything when he abolished t phehlukwayo and you had people like bernie sanders praising him. bernie sanders was attacked by his own supporters saying how dare you give him any congratulations message. let me bring in some other people. abdul and ka lead. are you emotional about this? well, i wasn't really emotional. i didn't think i had anything to do with this at all until i got a message saying, "you can't go to america either." i got quite emotional because it means i can't go to america to do myjob if needs to be as a film—maker, i do commercial work and if an ad, if i need to make an ad in the united states and i can't go and film
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there, ijust states and i can't go and film there, i just lose work states and i can't go and film there, ijust lose work really. states and i can't go and film there, i just lose work really. are you emotional about it? of course, i'm emotional. the main point is not about whether i can travel to states today or tomorrow, or the next few months, for me, it is the backlash, the domino—effect that we might see from this. already in canada we have seen from this. already in canada we have seen what happened in the mosque there. it would be difficult to say that isn't in some way inspired by what trump has been doing and brexit. if only in terms of justifying these beliefs. look at what is happening in greece. look at the riots which we're seeing. if you look at gcses at 16. if you watch a video from history with the nazi with their flags, what we saw in greece looked similar. i'm not saying about trump as an individual, the specific law he signed today, it is the fct and the backlash that's having, the justification it gives the people who may have harboured
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some bigoted and racist views, but ke pt some bigoted and racist views, but kept them to themselves, but only spoke to them to people of similar opinions. the shooter in the back was a muslim? you clearly don't know the facts. attacking my president. no, that's completely and utterly nonsense and how dare you. how dare you. regarding the protests in greece... that's nonsense. as far as a backlash against trump goes, well considering the polls came out yesterday in many european nations, far—right party, the freedom party and marie le pen all leading in polls, apparently it is not that strong of a backlash. that's the backlash right there. the fact that
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people like nigel farage, these right—wing parties are now getting supportment that is the consequence that i am alluding to when i say what trump is doing is allowing those people to allow the public of other countries to justify supporting those people. what did you think, you are an iranian born physics student, you're in manchester. what did you think about the trump travel ban?” manchester. what did you think about the trump travel ban? i was shocked and surprised and upset because in today's world, you don't expect to have to deal with anything like this. this level of discrimination at all. you know the ban no longer applies to uk citizens unless they're coming from one of those seven countries? yes. they will face extra checks? that has surfaced overnight, but there is the worry that upon arriving to the us... sorry, i apologise for interrupting, we're going to hear from
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sorry, i apologise for interrupting, we're going to hearfrom norman. hi norman. i have got on my screen the number of people who have signed the petition calling for the state visit to be scrapped and it is cruised above one million people signing that in the past 36 hours. that's not the biggest ever petition, but it has to be one of the fastest petition. so what will happen now is that mps on the so—called petitions committee meet tomorrow afternoon to decide whether there should be a commons debate about whether president trump should come here. having spoken to folk in downing street, they are adamant that this state visit is going ahead come what may. their argument being that were to scrap it and withdraw the invitation, that would just com pletely invitation, that would just completely undermine everything they believe they have achieved through that visit to washington. so they are minded to press ahead with the state visit regardless of this petition, regardless of a likely debate in the commons and regardless of the outcome of that debate. what
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do you think of that, despite the petition reaching over one million, downing street say look, we extended an invitation for the state visit and it was accepted? well, it'sjust something that we're going to have to come to accept. he's going to come to the uk if that's what the government wants, but he won't be welcomed by the people. do you ee, welcomed by the people. do you agree, abdul? i really don't know. i will see what trump, let's see hat impact really does. for me personally, i don't see how it will affect me until now. as a film—maker, again, i have been thinking about this practically, in terms ofjobs, notjust thinking about this practically, in terms ofjobs, not just film thinking about this practically, in terms ofjobs, notjust film making and art generally, there was an iranian film—maker who was supposed to be at the oscars and can't go now. winning his second oscar, his artistic integrity is down the drain. you have got two passports, is that correct? yes. you got on the
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plane to the states and you arrive. you have got two passports and what impact do you think that's going to have? just to make sure i'm not someone a have? just to make sure i'm not someone a bit dodgy.” have? just to make sure i'm not someone a bit dodgy. i wonder if it would make you think twice about leaving your country for a while? in case you couldn't get back? absolutely. we have built a home that we value very much and we have family and friends. it does make us decide otherwise. we had to fight ha rd to decide otherwise. we had to fight hard to be together. we just never thought it would be the american side of our relationship that would give us the most trouble. ryan, does that, you must feel some sympathy when people like this couple say we are not going to leave the country in case we can't get back to our home and our family in case we can't get back to our home and ourfamily and in case we can't get back to our home and our family and friends?
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yes, it is very concerning and i do hope the trump administration puts out, you know, some kind of document that says what was said on television yesterday reassuring american green cardholders that green cardholder to mattering who come from one of the seven countries that they can freely travel and that theirfamily can that they can freely travel and that their family can come home safe. but a lot of this emotion was set forth by the president obama administration. look, six of these seven countries don't have a government. there is no way to vet some of these people from some of the places. president obama did not ban specific people from entering the usjust ban specific people from entering the us just because they were citizens from seven countries? president obama listed those seven countries exclusively, the same seven, and had travel strictions on them. what trump did was a 90 day hold for six of the seven countries except for syria which is in the middle of a civil war, it was a 90
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day hold which is 87 days, i think. yes, i hope that american green cardholders have some clarification and they are able to travel freely and they are able to travel freely and their rights are respected. but overall, i do think that there is a campaign on this issue and there is a reason, ithink, a lot campaign on this issue and there is a reason, i think, a lot of his supporters will find it fine. thank you all very much for coming on the programme. thank you. the latest news and sport is coming up. coming the latest news and sport is coming oming up, the latest news and sport is coming up. coming up, a school in london is advertising for a school detention director who will be a sergeant major in the detention room. well‘ get reaction to this particularjob being advertised. we think possibly the first time such a role has been advertised for a school in this country. before that, latest weather. here is carol. good morning. it has been a cloudy start to today,
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look at these pictures from our weather watchers. in aberdeen, look at these pictures from our weatherwatchers. in aberdeen, lying snow and clear skies, and in guernsey, quite a lot of cloud around. this week it will turn more u nsettled, around. this week it will turn more unsettled, spells of rain, that it will be mild and windy, particularly towards the end of the week. this morning temperatures are as low as -10 morning temperatures are as low as —10 in parts of the highlands, so it is cold and frosty with patchy fog around, but that will lift leaving some sunshine. for the rest of england, all of wales and northern ireland, it is fairly cloudy. the rain coming in across the south—west will continue to journey slowly north eastwards through the course of the day, getting into southern and south—western parts of wales. murky and low cloud, summerhill fog and drizzle in wales, and northern ireland, a fairly dank day, a fair bit of cloud around with drizzle and spots of rain, but then we are into
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the sunshine across scotland, beautiful, crisp winter‘s day, but feeling nippy if you step out. there are areas of cloud, sunny spells, but for much of england, the odd writer break, and for most it will remain cloudy and damp with some drizzle, then the rain that bit further west. through the evening and overnight, the rain continues to go slowly eastwards. ahead of it, under clearer skies, there could be some early frost, but that will be replaced by cloud and rain coming m, replaced by cloud and rain coming in, temperatures up by the end of the night. quite a different night, for some it will be 16 degrees higher tomorrow morning than it was this morning. tomorrow again, another cloudy, murky, damp day with hill fog, low cloud and all of the rain moving out of northern ireland but remaining across scotland, england and wales to different degrees of intensity. for northern ireland, it will brighten up.
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temperatures picking up as we move further north. for wednesday, we start off with the rain in eastern areas, but it will tend to move away, leaving a veil of cloud behind it. towards the west, a return to some rain and windy conditions, and that leads us to the end of the week. it looks like with areas of low pressure coming our way, we will see some wet and windy weather, with gales possibly severe gales. hello. it‘s monday, it‘s 10 o‘clock, i‘m victoria derbyshire. our top story: this programme has discovered that aston villa sacked a scout accused of sexually abusing boys in 1988 but did not go to police. former professional player tony brien has waived his right to anonymity to tell us he went to the club to tell them about the abuse he was subjected to by scout ted langford. i was dealing with it, and then i got a phone call to say to me, can
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you really be dealing with all this, can you be dealing with all the obscenities from the terraces? just sweep it underneath the carpet, i was told. more reaction to that story after 11. also, the petition for donald trump‘s visit to be cancelled has reached a million signatures since it was launched at the weekend. they comes after criticism from around the world after restrictions on travel to the night of states. the white house insists that immigration bans against seven countries are not directed against muslims. if you were a christian, it was tough to get into the united states, if you were a muslim you could come m, if you were a muslim you could come in, and! if you were a muslim you could come in, and i thought it was very unfair. a free school in london is advertising for a "school detention director" who will be a "sergeant major in the detention room". the role is being advertised by the michaela school in london — which bills itself as the strictest
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school in britain. time for the latest news. here‘s joanna. six people have been shot dead — and eight others wounded — at a mosque in the canadian city of quebec. police have detained two suspects. the canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau described the incident as ‘a terrorist attack against muslims.‘ president trump has insisted that his travel ban is not about religion, but about protecting america. the restrictions close us borders to all refugees for four months, and to citizens of seven mainly—muslim countries for three months. uk nationals with dual citizenship will be largely unaffected, but could face extra checks if they‘re travelling directly from one of the named countries. here the last hour, a petition calling for donald trump‘s state visit to the uk to be called off has been backed by more than a million people. this programme has discovered that aston villa sacked a scout accused
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of sexually abusing boys in 1988 but did not go to police. 20 years later, that scout — ted langford — was jailed for sexual offences against young boys between 1976 and 1989 — a year after he left the club. former professional player tony brien says he was abused numerous times by langord from the age of 12 whilst playing for local youth team dunlop terriers. speaking to victoria in the last few minutes, he described it as something that will stay with him until the day he dies. you dream of becoming a professional footballer. you believed things that people said to you. and i would have done anything to become a professional footballer, but i didn‘t know what i was doing then was actually wrong. because i trusted adults. theresa may says she will not "shy away" from tough talks on brexit when she meets representatives of the devolved governments of wales, scotland and northern ireland today. the prime minister will chair a meeting of thejoint ministerial
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committee in cardiff to discuss how all parts of the uk can work together to support trade and investment. last week the supreme court ruled that devolved assemblies cannot block the triggering of article 50. black actors have dominated the screen actors guild awards in hollywood. denzel washington was named the best actor for ‘fences‘. the event was notable for the outspoken criticism of donald trump‘s immigration policy. the actor ashton kutcher opened proceedings by welcoming "everyone in airports" — saying they "belonged in america". that‘s a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30. time for the sport now with tim. there will be two clubs in the fa cup fifth round. sutton united joined another non—league team, lincoln city, in the hat for the fifth round draw after beating leeds leeds made ten changes to their team, and the decision by premier
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league and championship teams to feel weak and sizes been criticised by former players. newcastle fans travel 250 miles expecting their tea m travel 250 miles expecting their team to win, and he put out a weakened team, newcastle have one of the best teams in the championship, six points clear with a game in hand of third place. so it is very disappointing. watford were another premier league team to get knocked out in the fourth round. they lost 1-0 at out in the fourth round. they lost 1—0 at league1 out in the fourth round. they lost 1—0 at league 1 millwall yesterday. anotherformer 1—0 at league 1 millwall yesterday. another former player sat next to alan shearer there, phil neville, thinks the number of changes made by the bigger clubs is not devaluing the bigger clubs is not devaluing the competition. every team is making changes, not just the competition. every team is making changes, notjust premier league teams, sol making changes, notjust premier league teams, so i think it is making the fa cup better. once you get to the fifth and sixth rounds, a lot of clubs are playing at home and making changes. we have seen so many upsets so far, it is fantastic for the clubs, and i think it is good to see the kids play. celtic extended their unbeaten domestic run to a
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record and went 22 points clear at the top of the scottish premiership. callu m the top of the scottish premiership. callum mcgregor opened the scoring, scott sinclair scored twice and patrick roberts added another. that win broke the 50—year—old unbeaten record set by celtic‘s famous lisbon lions team. england captain eoin morgan says a poor umpiring decision in the final over cost his side victory in the second 2020 match —— second twenty20 match against india. england needed just eight runs from six balls when giroud was given out lbw, although replays showed he actually hit the ball with his bat. england eventually lost by five runs, and the review decision for correcting mistakes made by umpires is not in place in this series, set england had no way to challenge this. if this was a world cup and we
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lost a world cup final, you would be spewing. so the fact that it is not, but there is a concern, there is as much on the line is that is in a one—day game are test match, so there is no reason why it shouldn‘t be used. tennis, and dan evans is the new british and two after his impressive run to the fourth round of the australian open last week. he is up toa of the australian open last week. he is up to a career—high 45th, two ahead of kyle edmund. meanwhile several bookmakers have made 35—year—old roger federer odds—on to win another grand slam tournament after his stunning australian open victory over rafael nadal yesterday. federer ended a five—year wait for his 18th major with an epic five set win. when i heard that in switzerland people were following me, and! switzerland people were following me, and i saw peoplejust being generally really happy for me that i won a slam again, it is a fairy tale after the comeback to combat this week, the goal was absolutely to be
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playing, which is why took the six months off and hopefully continue playing for a couple of years. what a story, quite a player, that roger federer! vitoria. thank you very much, tim. this morning, this programme has discovered that aston villa did not go to the police after parents and boys raised concerns about a scout at the club abusing boys. he was however sacked by villa within months of the abuse being raised. 20 years later, that scout, ted langford, admitted sexual offences between 1976 and 1989, a year after he left the club. this morning in an exclusive interview, former professional player tony brien has waived his right to anonymity to tell us about the abuse he was subjected to by ted langford whilst at another club, and how he tried to flag concerns about langford whilst he worked at villa. i was iwas in i was in shock, to say the least. i
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asked him, could i not do this at home, or anything like that, and he said no, it needs to be fresh. and he said that the reason why he needed a sperm sample was so that the leicester city doctors could examine it to see if i had a gene inside of me to make me become a footballer. a footballer's gene? yes, and being so young at that time, you believe anything. our reporterjim reed is here. and has been looking into the details of what happened at aston villa and leicester back in the 1980s. ted langford had links to leicester and villa in the 1980s — was a scout at both clubs. this is the only photo we could find of him. he is now dead. we now know he was responsible for abusing a large number of boys back then. he went to prison for it. he was convicted of historic offence ten years ago and was sent to jail before he died in 2011.
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and you‘ve found out aston villa were aware of his abuse and sacked him? yes. so we now know langford was sacked by villa in 1988 after they received reports of abuse. the club‘s assistant manager was dave richardson — he says he started hearing rumours, spoke to a number of players and went to other senior members of staff at the club. he says took this extremely seriously — held meetings with two sets of parents involved. the decision was made to get rid of the scout. and langford was sacked. but the club didn‘t go to the police? no and this is a key point and says a lot about the way abuse cases were handled back in the 1980s. these days a club would almost certainly go straight to the police with an accusation like that. it was a different situation back in the 1980s. there wasn‘t the safeguarding in place at the clubs. staff at villa at the time say
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they felt they couldn‘t go that far without getting permission from the parents involved. and — they say — those parents didn‘t want to take it any further. dave richardson — who went on to be head of youth development for the premier league told us: "i did what i felt was right at the time for the club and the boys who were abused. parents told me they did not want the matter reported to the police." but tony brien also says he came forward? so tony says he called dave richardson at aston villa back in 1988 to tell the club he had been abused by the scout. he also said he spoke to another member of staff there at the time. he would have been 18 or 19 at the time so not a child. tony feels he was put off from going public with the abuse. we spoke to dave richards and at
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aston villa. dave richardson at villa initially appeared to agree he rememberd speaking to tony. but in a later statement he said he could not recall the conversation. he says he would never tell a victim of abuse not to come forward. what happened to the scout after he was sacked? this is where it‘s unclear. the trail goes quiet for 20 years. nothing from him until he is arrested. one of those offences took place — we believe — in 1989. so the year after he was sacked by aston villa. langford then went to prison and died in 2011. what do the club say about it all? aston villa say they are considering the safeguarding of all staff to be of paramount importance, and their courage anyone to come forward with new reports of abuse. it should also be pointed out that
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villa was under no legal obligation to go to the police about this. even now, that law does not exist. leicester have also said they will investigate allegations of abuse if they come to light. it‘s now thought this is a case the fa is looking into as part of its inquiry into sexual abuse in football. thank you very much, no legal obligation but possibly a moral one. let‘s hear more from that exclusive interview with tony brien — he describes his abuse in graphic detail — you may not want young children to listen. where would this abuse take place? he used to take me to a golf course, at the back of the old school that i used to go to, a school in handsworth and there was a golf course at the back there. and he used to drive up there. that‘s where it took place. how did it make you feel?
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at the time, you would have done anything because i thought it was right, but you know, overall the yea rs right, but you know, overall the years now, i just right, but you know, overall the years now, ijust feel dirty right, but you know, overall the years now, i just feel dirty and right, but you know, overall the years now, ijust feel dirty and i can‘t explain. it‘s just, years now, ijust feel dirty and i can‘t explain. it‘sjust, you years now, ijust feel dirty and i can‘t explain. it‘s just, you would have done anything this them days to, you know, you dream of becoming a professional footballer. to, you know, you dream of becoming a professionalfootballer. you know, you believed things that people said to you and i would have done anything to become a professional footballer, but i didn‘t know what i was doing then was actually wrong because i trusted adults. and when at 14 you told him where to go, what had changed? did you know that this, that what he was doing to you was wrong? yeah. it's just, that what he was doing to you was wrong? yeah. it'sjust, i knew something wasn‘t right and i knew from, we used to go on trips abroad
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and you know kids were coming out with love bites all over their neck and everything like that and it was just, it was just terrible to see it. why did he say he had to keep on doing it? he said that my sperm hadn‘t come back from the doctor‘s with the right results. it wasn‘t a test that was completed properly. with the right results. it wasn‘t a test that was completed properlym was inconclusive? yes. so, he would say we would have to do the test again, but he‘d leave it for a few weeks. we‘d have to do the test again. unbelievable. yes. this happened six or seven times over that period of two years or so. how did he treat you after it stopped? after you stopped him? after! stopped him, i used to always be sat in the front of the van when we used
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to go to matches and i think his way of dealing with it, he put me at the back of the van. and you told your mum, didn‘t you? back of the van. and you told your mum, didn't you? when i was 18, i revealed t yes, mum, didn't you? when i was 18, i revealed tyes, i did. mum, didn't you? when i was 18, i revealed t yes, i did. how did she react? obviously, she was in shock. no mother likes to see her child hurt. but she only knew about it when i‘d actually reported it. we‘ve had lovely comments from you for tony brien. a texter says, "well done, tony. i bet this is the tip of the iceberg and i bet that football isn‘t the only sport to be tainted by these sick individuals." julie says, this is heartbreaking." rebecca says, "incredible strength." audrey, "abuse of any human being is just out and out wrong. talking is the way forward. i applaud tony brien for speaking outment you were not to blame." this texter says,
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"this man is amazing. i am a care support worker and i know how people feel in difficult circumstances for him to speak out is brave." veronica says, "keep going. we are all behind you." this e—mailer, "i can understand what these guys have been through. for many years, teacher did roughly the same as what tony went through. if you did what he wanted you to travel in his car to football. for a long time the nightmares would continue until i plucked up the courage to tell me mum " plucked up the courage to tell me mum." the gentleman today on your programme are to be admired for what they are doing as i know how much it hurts and i‘m in hears as i write this. let‘s hope this helps with the future of youngsters in any sport." thanks for those. we appreciate them. conservative mp damian collins leads a group of mps who investigate sport. he has previously told us he‘s
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concerned that claims have been brushed under the carpet in the past. your reaction to tony brien‘s story? well, incredibly powerful story. your reaction to tony brien‘s story? well, incredibly powerfulstory. i think i salute his bravery in coming forward and speaking about it which is not an easy thing to do. it is concerning as this abuse in football has developed, we are seeing another example of a club being aware of abuse or a complaint or an allegation being made and not referring that to the authorities andi referring that to the authorities and i think as part of this investigation, into abuse in football, there has to be greater kks now to the legal obligation to declare and report to the police incidents or allegations where abuse has happened. even though apparently, parents of two boys who we re apparently, parents of two boys who were abused by this scout, ted langford, said to the club, "i don‘t wa nt langford, said to the club, "i don‘t want you to report it to the police." well, i think, want you to report it to the police." well, ithink, it is want you to report it to the police." well, i think, it is a difficult issue. the government is consulting on this with regard to sporting clubs and we have to look at the abuse and say could
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intervention earlier by reporting the abuser to the police have safeguarded more of the young people in the care of those clubs? the clu bs in the care of those clubs? the clubs have the responsibility for the care for the players, the young players in their academies. they are fulfilling their dreams by playing at the club and they trust the club and the club has to protect them. you‘re right on that point, it was 20 years after tony brien raise the alarm about langford that he was convictedment one of the convictions months after he was sacked by villa? we would want someone out of that to be out of circulation and face the appropriate criminal charges rather than being allowed to continue his crimes at other clubs. baroness joan walmsley is a liberal democrat peer who‘s campaigned for legislation to force clubs and others to report any suspected child abuse. imean, do i mean, do you feel it is a matter of time now before the legislation is changed ? of time now before the legislation is changed? good morning, victoria. well, i certainly think so. it
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should happen and i hope it will because it is yet another sad day when we have had another courageous footballer being able to come forward and tell how adults around him let him down many years ago. and although i think things have changed although i think things have changed a great deal, in those days people we re a great deal, in those days people were concerned about their corporate reputation if anything was known about child abuse. now, i think it has changed and people lose their reputation when it is found out that they don't have good child safeguarding policies and that if something happens they don't do something happens they don't do something about it. well, if things... part of the problem is there is no legal obligation to do something about it. you have just told us that you think things have changed. it would be inconceivable that a club in 2017 would not go to police if reports of abuse were made to them. why do we need manttry reporting? well, we are notjust talking about football clubs and not just talking about 20 years ago. up
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until very, very recently there have been cases in situations where people have care of children, a duty of care people have care of children, a duty of ca re of people have care of children, a duty of care of children, where abuse has taken of care of children, where abuse has ta ken place of care of children, where abuse has taken place and people have been so scared of their reputation that they have not come forward and told the authorities. and that's got to change. do you think damien collins it is conceivable that a club now that, that any organisation now, if abuse was reported to them, that they wouldn‘t go to the police? abuse was reported to them, that they wouldn't go to the police?” think it probably is inconceivable now. it doesn‘t mean to say there shouldn‘t be a mandatory requirement. there is something else we have to look at in football particularly with the independent inquiry and that‘s the safe spaces that allow whistle—blowers to come forward. it is a big step for a young player to take whose entire world admission is to become a professional footballer and will do everything the coaches say to
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realise that position to be put into a situation where they are a victim of abuse and to have to report that to the club is difficult. we have to look at where are the safe spaces people can come forward and bring the allegations. fa have yet to contact anybody we have spoken to in connection with this case. does that tell you anything? that's concerning. the fa might want the qcs to handle the complaints, but the fa should respond when a complainant has come forward and make sure their case is being considered as part of the review. david beckham spoke about abuse in football yesterday. there was never anything at manchester united and it is disgraceful. nothing at manchester united, the closest part would have been certain professionals that if we had gone out of line, they would make us to do a funny dance in middle of the changing room, in front of the professionals. so a
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degree of humiliation? that's all it was. but that was all to teach us a lesson. there was never any wrongdoing. do you think that the clu bs a re wrongdoing. do you think that the clubs are doing enough to address it? do you think the fa‘s response has been adequate?” it? do you think the fa‘s response has been adequate? i would like to think that the clubs are all on board with this and i‘d like to believe that the fa are doing everything that they can to find out about the allegations and the more these ex—professionals voice their opinions that‘s when there will be change. he has confidence in the fa, do you have confidence in the fa? the fa set upa have confidence in the fa? the fa set up a review that is led by someone set up a review that is led by someone outside of football and has the power to investigate the allegations and to look at the culture within football and what needs to change. i want to see that review completed and i‘m sure my committee 234 parliament will take a strong interest in their recommendations and how they‘re implamedded. can i ask you about another issue, your committee is
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launching an inquiry into fake news. can you stop it? should you stop it? well, we‘re particularly interested in malicious content that is entirely fabricated and spread online. so, for example, there was a story from america last year, crime story, that was fake. it was shared by over 500,000 people on facebook and that story was said that the police found the bodies of 19 white women in freezers, each one of them had got marked on their skin the words, "black lives matter." probably inciting hatred and dividing communities. this is highly damaging, it is notjust celebrity tittle—tattle, it is really unpleasant stories that are presented as if we‘re real and spread like wildfire across the internet. there are two things i‘m interested in, in particular, should news sources have verification tags, in the same way that twitter has verification tags and the other thing is the responsibility of
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social media platform like google to derank news. should we consider the real sources of fake news as a similar problem? we are talking to a couple of people who write fake news and satire, they say, you should be looking at newspapers for fake news? newspapers misreport of the there are the regulatory bodies for the press and we know where they are. action can be taken. a story can be taken down and corrected or an apology issued. when we are talking about fake news websites based in macedonia or parts of the world that‘s difficult to reach even when the story is known to be fake, it is ha rd to the story is known to be fake, it is hard to stop it being disseminated online. we have to look at how we do that, how is news presented online and how can we help inform consumers of the news so it is easier to identify sources of news that are likely to be false versus the legitimate sources. thank you very much, damien collins. the fa has introduced
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a dedicated hotline, staffed by nspcc professionals, which is available 24 hours a day on: 0800 023 2642. you can find a list of other organisations that help with sexual abuse on the bbc action line, bbc.co.uk/actionline. we‘ll bring you more reaction to that exclusive story later in the programme. we will talk to people who write fa ke we will talk to people who write fake news and satire. the editor of one of the websites tell us that really politicians should, but utt out. a free school in london is advertising for a "school detention director" who will be a "sergeant major we‘ll find out why. the canadian prime ted minister
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described the incident as a terrorist attack against muslims. president trump has insisted his travel ban is not about religion but about protecting america. uk nationals with dual citizenship will be largely unaffected but could face further checks if they enter the us from one of the named countries. a petition calling for a donald trump‘s visit to the uk has attracted more than a million signatures. this programme has discovered that aston villa sacked a scout accused of sexually abusing boys in 1988 but did not go to police. 20 years later — that scout — ted langford — was jailed for sexual
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offences against young boys between 1976 and 1989 — a year after he left the club. former professional player tony brien says he was abused numerous times by langford from the age of 12 whilst playing for local youth team dunlop terriers. speaking to victoria this morning, he described it as something that will stay with him for the rest of his life. when you dream of becoming a professional footballer, you when you dream of becoming a professionalfootballer, you believe things that people say to you, and i would have done anything to become a professional footballer, but i didn‘t know what i was doing then was wrong, because i trusted adults. theresa may says she will not "shy away" from tough talks on brexit when she meets representatives of the devolved governments of wales, scotland and northern ireland today. the prime minister is chairing a meeting in cardiff to discuss how all parts of the uk can work together to support trade and investment. last week the supreme court ruled that devolved assemblies cannot block the triggering of article 50. black actors have dominated the screen actors guild awards in hollywood.
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denzel washington was named the best actor for fences. the event was notable for the outspoken criticism of donald trump‘s immigration policy. the actor ashton kutcher opened proceedings by welcoming "everyone in airports" — saying they "belonged in america". that‘s a summary of the latest news, join me for bbc newsroom live at 11 o‘clock. thank you. here‘s the sport with tim. it was a weekend of shocks in the fa cup fourth round. sutton united joined another non—league team, lincoln city, in the hat for the fifth round draw after beating leeds united yesterday. several former players including alan shearer have criticised premier league and championship teams for fielding weakened line—ups. celtic extended their unbeaten domestic run to a record 37 matches by beating hearts 4—0 in the scottish premiership yesterday. their win broke 50 record set by lisbon lions.
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england captain eoin morgan says poor umpiring cost england victory in the second twenty20 match against india. joe root was controversially out in the last over as the tourists lost byjust five runs. the decider is on wednesday. and roger federer says he has no intention of retiring after winning his 18th grand slam title yesterday. the new australian open champion climb to tenth in the world rankings after his incredible victory over rafa nadal in melbourne. thank you. downing street have rejected calls to cancel the proposed state visit by the us president donald trump to the uk. despite more than a million signatures on a position to have the state visit bit cancelled, they are not saying don‘t, tall, but they don‘t want it to be a state visit. number 10 say the invitation has been "issued and accepted." demonstrations have been taking place in cities and airports across the united states to protest at his plans to restrict immigration.
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here‘s how the has unfolded over the last 48 hours. do you know, if you were christian in syria, it was impossible, at least very, very tough, to get into the united states. if you are a muslim, you could come in, and i thought it was very unfair. it is, and as my sign says, morally wrong and blatantly unconstitutional. it is unacceptable. it goes against everything this country stands for, everything this country was built on. it is incredibly distressing. i think it‘s really terrible. it is un—american, it is unconstitutional. it has to be revoked and changed and fought against. so, should the invitation for a state visit bit withdrawn? former foreign office minister alistair burt is here, he thinks it should be postponed. and labour mp naz shah in
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leeds says it should be stopped, and he is an extremist. alistair burt, postponed until what? postponed until we have got over this particular period which has so divided people. it was clear from the prime minister‘s successful visit to washington last week that she can have some impression upon him. we don‘t know yet how president trump will respond to people, explain the consequences of his actions, but the bitter decision caused by the decision he made on the travel ban after the prime minister left washington has put the context of the state visit into a different context. but the division remains, even if he changes or modifies this policy, that that that has happened already. and that is true, but as everyone will tell you, there are state visit of all sorts of people to the united kingdom, it is part of relationship building between the united kingdom and other
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people. it is easy to demonstrate against the united states, it is harder to demonstrate against leaders from other places. state visits should be joyous occasions, welcoming occasions, as much as possible, and the difficulty at the moment is it is very hard to see if you are an official in the united states and the united kingdom, at the moment, that being a visit where the moment, that being a visit where the tics of the visit, the reaction of the people on the streets, will be what you would like to see. downing street don‘t agree, the invitation is out there and has been accepted, and it goes ahead.” invitation is out there and has been accepted, and it goes ahead. i think the truth of it is that is probably correct. downing street is not going to withdraw an invitation, that would be terrible. whether or not the united states might look at the situation itself and say, there might bea situation itself and say, there might be a different time to do this. i am might be a different time to do this. iam not might be a different time to do this. i am not arguing for a com plete this. i am not arguing for a complete ban, you have got to have somebody new country, he would then be exposed to what the british press feel about it, what the public feel about it, and who knows where we
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might be in one of a half or two yea rs‘ might be in one of a half or two years‘ time when the negotiations we re years‘ time when the negotiations were leaving the eu have reached a particular stage, the structure conversation we need to have with the united states trade may be in a different place, and bringing the president of the night it to the united kingdom so he can feel what the relationship is of the country with him and his country is not a bad thing in itself, but i think at the moment, the optics are they visited to be difficult. alistair burt, conservative mp, wanted to be postponed. naz shah, what is your position? good morning. i absolutely agree that it is not a state visit, state visits are reserved for people, statesmen and women, and i can't imagine, i don't feel that donald trump deserves to be certainly addressing people on platforms which are given to the likes of mandela and nobel peace prize winners, because that is not rigid values and not what we are about, and it flies in the face of everything we stand for. we have had
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visits from senior chinese officials, we have given them invitations to buckingham palace, and people protested about human rights, and the visit went ahead. is that not what we do? it is, we have conversations, but here is the person who is allegedly a leader of the free world. this isn't where we are in negotiations about human rights abuses, this is a man who is a misogynist, who is racist, who panders to a narrative, who is divisive. if we look at the chaos he has caused across his own assures right now, is this the kind of person we would honour with that prestige at buckingham palace? and i would agree with alistair, absolutely not, certainly not at this time. un agreement with mr byrd, then, that it is a postponement until something changes, until things die down a bit, or are you saying it shouldn‘t bea bit, or are you saying it shouldn‘t be a state visit. i can't imagine mr
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trump changing any of his rhetoric, if anything he has proved to be very dangerous for the world over in terms of what he has done since he has been elected and taken office. what you think of that? do talk to naz shah. i would agree, the moment we seem naz shah. i would agree, the moment we seem to be in a situation where the president is governing as he campaigned. no one was sure whether he would. but also we know from the visit last week that an nato, torture, when he understands the consequences of his words and what he would like to do and listens to other people, there might be a degree of change, hence my argument to say we need to know more about this presidency. there is no fixed weight yet for the state visit, but recognising those difficulties might be in the interests long—term of the united kingdom and the united states. we have been placed in a dilemma by his recent actions, and
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thatis dilemma by his recent actions, and that is tough on the prime minister bearing in mind how successful she was in washington, but there are real difficulties with the president of he goes on governing as he has set out. naz shah, do you want to respond? yes, i hear what alistair is saying in terms of listening to people and the climb—down if you like an nato. however, this is a person whose country is having mass protest and is not listening to the people of his very own country, and more people voted for hillary clinton, so it really smacks in the face of it is democracy in terms of what we stand for, our british values, to have him have a state visit at all. i think we need to listen to the people, the last count was over a million in literally minutes we are having thousands of people signing this petition, and we should be listening to those that elected us and that we represent in great britain and this country, and that stands for british values, democracy. we are a country that
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invites refugees. we have signed up to those. it is what we do as great britain. we do not close our doors to refugees and people fleeing war—torn countries. we do not help refugees because they are muslims, we help them because it is the right thing to do, because they are fleeing persecution and they need refuge. that is the purpose of it. it is nothing to do with religion, and to bring in the muslim ban is atrocious. let's read a couple of messages. where is the counter petition for millions of us who don‘t have a problem with trump‘s visit? and tina says, the keyword of all of this is temporary. it is a sensible temporary idea intended to tighten a vetting procedures and prevent dangerous extremists from entering the usa. alistair burt, naz shah, thank you very much. could president trump‘s policy increase the risk of terrorism on us soil? iran‘s foreign minister —— foreign minister has described it as a gift.
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—— danger. minister has described it as a gift. -- danger. i can see cia operatives around the world face parma, because all the work they have done to build up all the work they have done to build up relationships with their counterparts, us soldiers fighting alongside iraqis, doing allthat work to build this good relationship, and what he has done with this one action is set that all aside and set them back many years, andl aside and set them back many years, and i think they also need to be aware that terrorists are not coming over the mountains to attack us. those people are most effective those that are already in our societies. that is a really good point, all the lethal acts of jihadists terrorist and united states have been carried out by either american citizens or legal residents, none have been the work of refugees. yes, and what we have
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seen of refugees. yes, and what we have seen is the internet being used as a conduit for isis and al-qaeda‘s message. this plays into their rhetoric that says the us is the great enemy, we need to attack. you are already there, go and attack the us. so it does play into exactly what isis and al-qaeda are saying already. but mr trump is delivering ona campaign already. but mr trump is delivering on a campaign promise. absolutely, but he is using a blunt instrument which could have been used slightly better. it could have been better explained, phased in. it is something he hasjob on and i think it will do the us a great deal of harm. thank you very much, chris phillips from the national counterterrorism security unit. thank you. from california we can speak to amin jarbasi an american muslim academic. three weeks ago his wife and newborn daughter went to iran so she could see her grandparents for the first time and he‘s incredibly anxious about whether they will be able to come back to the usa. thank you very much for talking to
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our british audience. tell us about your concerns. basically, the problem is my wife and i are both legal permanent residents here, and my newborn daughter is a us citizen. the problem is it is not clear whether they can get into the country, and at the moment, i may not be able to leave the country, because i might be barred from re—entering. because i might be barred from re-entering. so they are in iran right now. when are they due to come back? the original plan was that i would go to iran to celebrate the persian new year in a months, and then we would all come back together. but you are not going to go now? now it is on a limbo. i have no idea whether i can leave the
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country, they have no idea whether they could leave the country. we hear different stories, yesterday they said that the ban is applied to green card holders, today they are saying it may not, i don‘t know about tomorrow. it is confusing. does your wife have a green card? yes, we both have. so what they say todayis yes, we both have. so what they say today is if you have a green card you will ok. apparently there is a waiver programme that i don‘t know what it means. this is what i heard, that you have to apply, and i don‘t know how to apply to that i also talked to lawyers, and they say it is not clear, the situation. when mr trump says this is not about banning muslims, this is about protecting us citizens from extremists. what do you say? i don't know. i actually
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have no idea about this statement. i am personally very shocked about the whole procedure, about the whole executive order, i am a yale professor, my wife is an artist, creating beautiful stained glasses. it is just unimaginable to me that we cannot leave here. how is your wife? she's ok, she is with family, and has strong family support in iran. in terms of health and everything, she is fine. the plan was for her to come back in a month. the only issue now is whether
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thatis month. the only issue now is whether that is going to happen or not. and just to be clear, our problem might be resolved soon. she might build a comeback, i might be able to go there. the situation is it is more than that. it is about all the people that are trapped in airports. there are children, mothers, who cannotjoin their there are children, mothers, who cannot join their families, it there are children, mothers, who cannotjoin theirfamilies, it is just heartbreaking, unbelievable to me. thank you very much for talking to us. our guest was an academic muslim as you heard. some of you are saying we are promoting the petition. it is newsworthy that it reaches over one million signatures of the that‘s why we showed it. lots of you supporting donald trump‘s policy. gary says,
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"over one million votes is not many ina "over one million votes is not many in a country of over 60 million. please allow for a petition to allow donald trump in to meet the queen." phil says, "ok for a state visit from china." matt says, "i find it hypocritical to prevent donald trump from visiting our queen. it was fine for from visiting our queen. it was fine foer from visiting our queen. it was fine for mr mcguinness, a terrorist." another viewer, "white hate reporting slash propaganda." sue, "trump is sending a clear message that he will be tough on islamist terrorists." meanwhile donald trump‘s immigration policy was heavily criticised by actors at last night‘s screen actors guild in hollywood. this story is about what happens when we put our differences aside. and we come together as a human race. we win. love wins. every time. we're ina race. we win. love wins. every time. we're in a really tricky time in our country and things are inexcusable
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and scary and need action. i'm grateful to be part of a group of people that cares and that wants to reflect things back to society. we will shelter freaks and outcasts, those who have no homes. we will get past the lies. we will hunt monsters. steve holden is here. after last year‘s oscars when there was no black nominees, hidden figures won best ensemble, that‘s the true fore of three black women to helped with nasa‘s space programme which won best film. there was so much anti—trump sentiment. lots of people getting on their feet. anti—trump sentiment. lots of people getting on theirfeet. the man who perhaps got the crowd most geed up was david harbour who stars in staininger things. they went up and he gave a barn storming acceptance
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speech. we repel bullies. we will shelter freaks and outcasts, those who have no homes. we will get past the lies. we will hunt monsters. and when we are lost amongst the hypocrisy, we will punch some people in the face when they seek to destroy... that clip has been shared a lot today. special mention quickly to clare foy, the only british winner last night. she got best tv actress for playing queen elizabeth in the crown. now, pope francis has shocked the world by pledging his support for donald trump. a pizza restaurant in washington dc is the base of a sinister paedophile ring. wikilea ks has confirmed hillary clinton sold weapons to so—called islamic state.
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shocker us president donald trump was born in pakistan. all of that was totally made up. utter nonsense. fake news. a group of mps is starting an inquiry into the "growing phenomenon of fake news", the deliberate spreading of false information on the internet, and whether sites should be forced to take tougher action. the inquiry will examine the sources of fake news, how it is spread, its impact on democracy and concerns about the public being swayed by propaganda and untruths. let‘s speak to alastair reid. he works for first draft which investigates sources of fake news and he trains news organisations on how to spot it do you? i spent the weekend talking to broadcasters. james set up the rochdale herald. he says what he does is branded as fake news. he doesn‘t want us to use his surname. news. he doesn‘t want us to use his surname. hi james. good
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news. he doesn‘t want us to use his surname. hijames. good morning. tell us about your site then. we started the rochdale herald six months ago because we reallyjust wanted to have a bit of fun and to bring a bit of enjoyment to people's days because there are so many dark things happening in the world right now, but sometimes people just need a little bit of light relief. and an example, the governments of canada and mexico reached an agreement today to build 50—foot tall walls on the proviso the world bank lends them the money for a lid! they have got aeroplanes and everything! so why are you or how do you know you are getting mixed up with being perceived as a site that produces fa ke perceived as a site that produces fake news? you only have to read the comments on our facebook page. when people actually believe that what we write is true. it appears that some people just don't have the ability to read past the headline or the first paragraph. alistair, talk to
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james. that‘s a really good point. it is obvious half the time that it is satire? it is. and you know, the website rochdale herald you put it up website rochdale herald you put it up on the facebook and the web page that it up on the facebook and the web page thatitis up on the facebook and the web page that it is satire. on social media, the stories are presented in the same way. they appear to be exactly the same in people‘s news feeds as stories from the bbc or the guardian. why is it a problem? people can‘t actually see or don‘t notice the brand. they don‘t notice the news brand. in the rochdale herald when you say it is satire, appears in someone‘s news feeds, people aren‘t aware of where it is coming from and some stories like that are made up. so what? so what? would it be fair to say the onion is why people see as being a satirical site. we are no different.” why people see as being a satirical site. we are no different. i think satire is important. so what if people don‘t know what the source is or where it is coming from and
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whether it is clearly labelled satire or fake or legitimate? who is to say what‘s legitimate? satire or fake or legitimate? who is to say what's legitimate? into that vacuum when people aren‘t sure what‘s true and where it is coming from, certain people are stepping into that space, pushing that can com plete into that space, pushing that can complete falsehoods and trying to push their own agenda. we have seen that last year and we are starting to see it build in germany and france, people who want to influence the electorate around to their way of thinking and exploiting people‘s trust in the media or distrust in that space and often you see some of those people saying this is the story the mainstream media don‘t you to know. and that hooks people in and gets a load of clicks. mps are suggesting that there was some kind of tools on google or facebook or whatever it is, that will be able to work out what is fake and what‘s not? yeah. why would we trust them? i believe what they are talking about is reverse image search it checks one picture against the
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database of checks one picture against the data base of pictures checks one picture against the database of pictures on google or on tin eye or on these services that do that and it will show you where that image appeared before. sometimes there might be a picture with someone there might be a picture with someone saying, "these are refugees coming to the uk. do they look like children? ?" it will be from greece or this is a protest that is happening in london, the bbc aren‘t covering it. you can do a reverse image and any picture that makes you go wow and gives thaw response should take a second about whether it is being manipulated by someone. how do you spot a fake news story? give us advice? no quotes. if there are no quotes, no names, and check the about page of a web page. james, thank you from the rochdale herald. check it out. it‘s a satirical site. it's check it out. it‘s a satirical site. it‘s funny. a free school in london is advertising for a "school
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detention director" who will be a "sergeant major in the detention room". the job, with a salary of up to £35,000 is described like this: do you like order and discipline? do you believe in children being obedient every time? do you believe that allowing children to make excuses is unkind? this role is for someone who believes children need clear, firm discipline. this role is for someone who believes tough love is what children need to become better people and grow into responsible young adults. the role is being advertised by the michaela school in london which bills itself as the strictest school in britain and is run by katharine birbalsingh. it‘s thought to be the first school to advertise for a school detention director. sadly the school wouldn‘t talk to us this morning. we can speak now to sir bruce liddington. he‘s a former head teacher
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who was the schools commissioner in the last government. what do you think of the role and secondly the wording of the advert? well, as far as the role is concerned, this is not something i would ever have considered and i was the head of a big town centre boys secondary school with girls in the sixth form. that‘s not to say i didn‘t regard discipline, good behaviour, good conduct, good manners as well as high levels of aspiration as important. i did. but i. aspiration as important. i did. but i, it is nota aspiration as important. i did. but i, it is not a job that i would have considered advertising in this way. as far as the wording of it is concerned, my first reaction on the back of your previous item there was that it might actually be a spoof... 0h that it might actually be a spoof... oh god. the school itself might be sending out a flyer to say look, we are sending out a flyer to say look, we a re really sending out a flyer to say look, we are really very strict. at the end of the day what it comes down to is
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whether they can take the parents with them. if the parents think that this role is good then it stands some chance of working. if the pa rents some chance of working. if the parents constantly resist it then it won‘t i am afraid. well, that‘s interesting. it is an advert in the times educational supplement and we contacted the school for a response, they declined to comment. they didn‘t say it wasn‘t true. yes, bringing the pa rents wasn‘t true. yes, bringing the parents with them, that‘s from a headteacher‘s point of view, that‘s crucial, briefly, sir bruce, isn‘t it? well, yes. i mean the important thing about pupil behaviour and they are children, so they do misbehave sometimes, that‘s part of growing up. you have to accept that if you‘re in an authority role, but the vital thing is for them to learn from their mistakes so this that they become good adults. the majority of children want to be good adults and good parents. they want to be something sesful workers and you sometimes have to help them along the way. ok. thank you so much
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for your time. i appreciate it. on the programme tomorrow, we‘ll look at adoption and ask what‘s causing some adoptions to break down, forcing parents to hand back their children. if you have experience, go do get in touch with me on twitter. we‘re back tomorrow at 9am. have a good day. hello there. after what‘s been a very dry winter so far, we end january on quite a different note. as we head on in towards february it looks like we will see something more unsettled. spells of rain pushing in off the atlantic and it will turn milderfor the next pushing in off the atlantic and it will turn milder for the next few days. and we‘ll also see some wind and we could see gales or severe gales towards the end of the week. today, we have the cold air trapped across northern areas after a really, cold and frosty start with stubborn fog patches. for northern ireland, and the rest
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of england and for wales, we will see thicker cloud and outbreaks of rain with hill fog and low cloud, but mild here. cold in the north. as we head into the overnight period, that milder air and the rain spreads northwards. we could see wintriness over the higher ground of scotland, but it could be transient. but very mild across the south and that takes into tuesday. a milder note for all. a cloudy, damp day with the best of the sunshine for northern ireland. this is bbc news. and these are the top stories developing at 11. the petition to cancel president trump‘s state visit to the uk gathers more
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than a million signatures — downing street says it will go ahead. more protests against the travel ban in the united states — president trump says it‘s an interim measure, and not a muslim ban. six people have been shot dead — and eight others wounded — at a mosque in the canadian city of quebec. the canadian prime minister says it isa the canadian prime minister says it is a terrorist attack. mps are to conduct an inquiry into what‘s known as fake news — false information presented as true facts which spreads via social media. also, in hollywood, black actors dominate the screen actors guild awards. this follows criticism last year that they were too white. denzil washington wins best actor for his role in fences. several actors voiced anger over donald trump‘s policies on immigration.

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