Skip to main content

tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 30, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

11:00 am
this is bbc news. and these are the top stories developing at 11. the petition to cancel president trump's state visit to the uk gathers more than a million signatures — downing street says it will go ahead. more protests against the travel ban in the united states — president trump says it's an interim measure, and not a muslim ban. six people have been shot dead — and eight others wounded — at a mosque in the canadian city of quebec. the canadian prime minister says it isa the canadian prime minister says it is a terrorist attack. mps are to conduct an inquiry into what's known as fake news — false information presented as true facts which spreads via social media. also, in hollywood, black actors dominate the screen actors guild awards. this follows criticism last year that they were too white. denzil washington wins best actor for his role in fences. several actors voiced anger over donald trump's policies on immigration. and a man with dementia who was found in a car park without any id, had been dumped in england by his american family.
11:01 am
good morning and welcome to bbc newsroom live. downing street has rejected calls to cancel the state visit to the uk by president trump, which is expected to ta ke president trump, which is expected to take place this summer. an online petition calling on the prime minister to withdraw the invitation has gathered more than a million signatures. government sources say it is in britain's long—term interest to maintain links with the us. foreign secretary borisjohnson will give a statement to mps this afternoon after the us says britons
11:02 am
who have shared nationality with one of the seven middle eastern and african countries would not be stopped from coming into america. the uk foreign office has advised that only those dual nationals travelling from one of the blacklisted seven countries would be subject to extra checks — and those travelling between the uk and us would not be affected. thousands have gathered at us airports in protest at the measures. president trump says the ban is an interim measure. but attorney generals from 16 saito said they will fight what they call an order. man chants: no ban, no wall — new york for all. in a country built by immigrants, many find donald trump's travel ban unpalatable. they took to the streets in cities across the nation, as the crackdown sparked chaotic scenes at some airports and prompted criticism from senior members of the president's own party. neal behgooy and his wife underwent several hours of questioning after touching down in texas from iran. over the weekend about 300 people were either prevented
11:03 am
from travelling or detained. they asked her about her family, about her brothers and sisters and her parents. what they did. how long we stayed. president trump issued his controversial order without input from or giving notice to the government departments that will need to implement it, hence the concern of officials here and elsewhere in trying to interpret it in the face of a flurry of lawsuits and the concerns of leaders around the world. the foreign office says the ban only applies to people travelling to the us from one of the seven countries on the list. travellers from the uk won't be affected and neither will uk citizens travelling from any of those seven countries to america, unless, that is, they're joint—citizens of one of the seven nations, in which case they're likely to face additional checks. for all the confusion, mr trump's aides have deemed
11:04 am
the travel ban a success, and they issued a statement seeking to dispel suggestions that it amounted to a ban on muslims. whatever needs to be done, has to be done. this is for the safety of everybody. we are living in a dangerous world and donald trump's job is to protect the american people. we live in a democracy and of the majority of people feel threatened, we should be able to have things in place. despite the backlash, donald trump knows that many of those who voted for him did so specifically because of his promise to combat the threat of so—called radical islamic terrorism. to them, this just represents another promise kept. norman smith is in westminsterfor us. good morning. no sign of the
11:05 am
controversy dying down final —— following donald trump's travel ban. there will be a statement to the house of commons this afternoon by borisjohnson. there are calls for an emergency debate. and the petition calling on the government to suspend the planned state visit has now had more than1 million signatures. mps will decide tomorrow if that should be debated. downing street are rebuffing any suggestion at the moment that the state visit should be scrapped. their argument being that the invitation has been issued and accepted. were they to withdraw it, they say that would undo everything that theresa may has achieved during her visit to washington. this morning, the foreign secretary was tackled over the trump travel ban. i will be speaking later this afternoon in the commons. you will
11:06 am
have a statement later on. should mr trump be banned from coming to the uk? will be talking to you in the house of commons. that is place. be there. what about the clarification you were given at the weekend?” would ask you to be so kind as to contain your impatience. rather less forthcoming was the prime minister, in cardiff to attend a joint ministerial council with the leaders of the welsh and scottish assemblies. she was loquacious on the subject. should president trump's state visit go—ahead? will you condemn his immigration policy? no response from the prime minister. meanwhile, labour have stepped up the pressure, with shadow attorney
11:07 am
general shami chakrabarti accusing theresa may of appeasement. we should not be rewarding human rights abuses by rolling out the red carpet in this country. theresa may has said america is a huge and important ally and great britain needs to think long—term. ally and great britain needs to think long-term. i'm afraid that sounds like appeasement to me. the word is in a very precarious situation at the moment and we will not make this world a safer or fairer by appeasing bullies like mr trump. i'm joined by fairer by appeasing bullies like mr trump. i'mjoined by the chair fairer by appeasing bullies like mr trump. i'm joined by the chair of the home affairs select committee, yvette cooper. this is all synthetic indignation. we knew president trump was going to do this. he is doing it. i think what doing is very dangerous, to say that he will have a ban on refugees and target muslims in the way that he is doing, i think has huge repercussions notjust in america but across the world. implications for the geneva
11:08 am
convention on refugees, but also the whipping up prejudice and hatred. he signed this order on holocaust memorial day, a day on which we should be reminded for the reasons for speaking out against hatred. that is why it is so important that countries across the world, as well as so many countries across the world, as well as so many people across the united states, are speaking out against what he is doing. downing street say they are standing by the invitation. realistically, the invitation couldn't be withdrawn now, could it? you are right to say that some of the signs of what president trump is doing what they are on the campaign. i think theresa may was unwise to have offered such an early ceremonial state visit to president trump in the first place, without knowing quite what he was going to do and where he might take things, and what really dangerous things he might enterup doing. and what really dangerous things he might enter up doing. of course you need meetings between heads of government. the prime minister and the president needs to be able to meet, maybe in the united states,
11:09 am
maybe here or elsewhere. but to accord a ceremonial state visit at this time would be very inappropriate, very wrong. and you've seen the strength of feeling there is. if you were in government now, surely it would be impossible to rescind the state visit because of the damage it would do to us— uk relations? like it or not, the visit will go ahead. i think a lot of damage would be done by trying to hold a ceremonial state visit in the circumstances. of course they can have meetings. of course president trump should be able to come to britain to have those discussions, so we can britain to have those discussions, so we can make those points to him as part of democratic debate, so we can argue and so as part of democratic debate, so we can argue and so we can put as part of democratic debate, so we can argue and so we can put the pressure 011. can argue and so we can put the pressure on. but the problem with a ceremonial state visit is that it is a celebration of french ship and shared values, at a time when president trump is ripping up some of those shared values. i don't think it is right there for two
11:10 am
accord him the sort of privileges of accord him the sort of privileges of a state visit and all of the with that, and that i think, would be seen that, and that i think, would be seen as an endorsement that, and that i think, would be seen as an endorsement of some that, and that i think, would be seen as an endorsement of some very seen as an endorsement of some very damaging seen as an endorsement of some very damaging things he is doing. and yet the policy itself only applies to seven out of something like a0 muslim majority countries. it's only in force for 90 days. is it really so controversial? i think it is extremely damaging, yes. it is built on prejudice. the countries he has chosen are based on being muslim countries. we know that this is what he sees as the fulfilment of the muslim ban he called for. what are we saying to british muslims across this country if we are not prepared to speak out against this? that is what he is starting, that is what he has done in his first few weeks. people are prepared to stand up and speak out. what will happen next? what do people think it's acceptable going forward? at a time when there
11:11 am
has been so much division and some the tension is notjust across america but across the world, it is really important to challenge these kind of thing based on prejudice. for a country built on refugees coming to the united states over very many generations, to turn its back on all refugees, i think is a tragedy. yvette cooper, thank you. that statement by boris johnson, tragedy. yvette cooper, thank you. that statement by borisjohnson, we are expecting that about 3:30pm. and when that is over, we should expect a ruling from the speaker as to whether to allow a subsequent emergency debate. if granted, that roll on for another couple of hours. there could be considerable debate in the commons this afternoon. we will have coverage of that. a little bit more detail on the travel ban and how it is affecting people in other countries. we are just hearing, via the facebook page of the us embassy in berlin, that it is
11:12 am
advising nationals and dual nationals of iraq, syria, somalia, yemen... not to apply to visas for the us as visa issuance has been suspended. it seems that in germany the situation that is applying there, and the one with national —— dual nationality with those countries, travelling here would be 0k. it is countries, travelling here would be ok. it is not the same in germany. there is a lack of clarity in how it is actually being applied. the us embassy in berlin is saying that the issuance has been suspended for a dual nationals of those country. initially green card holders were exempt. then it didn't. it has been a fluid situation. we will keep you updated. our correspondent, alex forsyth, has spent the morning at the un refugee offices in beirut, on the first working day after trump's ban has come into force. i'm at the un refugee agency's
11:13 am
reception centre, always a busy place. busy this morning. among the people that have come here to talk to the un about their prospects, there is a sense of hopelessness among some, the news coming out of america. of those refugees in lebanon, only a small proportion would have been resettled in the us. still, people are feeling there has been another door closed. with me is kathleen from the un international refugee assistance project. what are you hearing about the impact of this executive order? we provide legal aid to refugees in resettlement. many of our clients are devastated. these are people who have worked with american forces, many people who have us citizen family members. there have been lengthy and rigorous process applying for entry into the united states. at the last stages they are being told this option no
11:14 am
longer exists. president trump us claim is there has to be better vetting. do you accept that? my experience has been that when people are afraid of refugee admissions, they don't know the details of the process. when they examine it further, they change their mind about refugees. refugees entering the united states are the most abetted individuals who will ever enter the country. they go through rigorous interviews, have biodata taken and that is run through databases at fbi, the department of defence. these agencies are not messing around. if anything comes macro “— messing around. if anything comes macro “ comes up messing around. if anything comes macro —— comes up that 's affiliation with a terror organisation, that application will be immediately halted. the number of refugees who have resettled in the us isa refugees who have resettled in the us is a small proportion of the total number of refugees. the symbolism aside, will this have a big impact? the impact is devastating. the thing to understand
11:15 am
about refugee admissions is that only 1% of refugees worldwide will be resettled. most of them will have to make do in the country their first lead to. but that 1%, that have typically enter the united states. that door is no longer open to them. these are the most at risk refugees in the world. that is why they are being considered for resettlement in the first place. thank you. a sense from people that there is an element of keep confusion about what this will mean for individuals. people here are feeling angry and hopeless about the prospect of leaving lebanon and other countries in the region and starting a new life in the us. kate allen, the director of amnesty international uk, joins me. what do you think about this travel ban due i think it is shocking.” you think about this travel ban due i think it is shocking. i think it is an appalling thing that president trump as enacted over the weekend. it isa trump as enacted over the weekend. it is a travel ban against seven
11:16 am
majority muslim countries, but it is also, as you havejust majority muslim countries, but it is also, as you have just heard from the unhcr official in lebanon, it is a block on all refugees entering the united states. at this stage and at a time when we are in the worst refugee crisis since the end of the second world war, we have seen the united states close its doors. and although president trump says this isa although president trump says this is a temporary ban, ourfears must be that becomes permanent and other countries start to follow. it is something we deed —— really do need to oppose. it is a time when we need to oppose. it is a time when we need to stand up for the values we support. that is why amnesty will be calling upon our government to do everything we can to change this policy, to oppose it. and why i am so pleased that people across the uk will be demonstrating today, to say that they are standing up for the values of supporting refugees, and making sure that we make our voice
11:17 am
is very clear at this time. you say that your fears are that this becomes a permanent situation, but donald trump has been explicit in saying it is temporary, it is being done what secure policies are put in place to in order to protect the safety of americans, and that visas will be issued once again once security has been reviewed? you heard from the unhcr official in lebanon about the process by which people get refugee status. before a refugee sets foot in the united states, they have gone through that process. it takes between 18 and 2a months. it is hugely rigorous. it involves intelligence and security agencies. i am involves intelligence and security agencies. iam not involves intelligence and security agencies. i am not sure how we make that a stronger process. it feels to me that president trump is either not listening to his advisers, or he is absolutely specifically closing the doors to refugees, and we need
11:18 am
to fear that that continues. the devastation of it is enormous. these are some of the most vulnerable refugees. of all the refugees in the world, the people that get resettlement, half into the united states, a re resettlement, half into the united states, are the most vulnerable. the people who are contorted, the people who have been raped. children who have been through the most appalling circumstances. those are the people being denied entry into the united states. do you have a view on the state visit for donald trump? more than a million people have signed a petition saying it should not happen? amnesty will take -- wouldn't take a position on that. but our government needs to be at the forefront of saint president trump that he is abandoning all decent values and we would want people here in the uk to make that clear to theresa may, that it is absolutely important that the voice of the uk government is made very, very clear now and for the longer
11:19 am
term, because i don't think this is going to be resolved quickly. thank you very much. kate allen from amnesty international uk. and we'll have more on all the latest developments from the trump white house tonight at 7pm in our programme 100 days — with katty kay in washington, and christian fraser in london. that's at 7 here on the bbc news channel. just to bring you a bit of information that we're getting from the us embassy in london. we're hearing that it is saying that if you are a national... i will read it out. it is an urgent notice prior that executive order on going to the united states if you are from those seven “— united states if you are from those seven —— seven named mainly muslim countries. if you are a national, or a dual national one of those countries, do not schedule a visa appointment or pei any visa fees at this time. the embassy says, if you
11:20 am
already have an appointment, please do not attend the appointment as we will not be able to proceed with your interview. travel for official government purposes, relating to official government businesses, on behalf of the north atlantic treaty organisation ‘s is not subject to this suspension. that is interesting, obviously. it seems to contradict what we have been told about citizens with dual nationality travelling to the united states from this country. borisjohnson had a conversation with the president's adviser and said that provided people from june —— with dual nationality were travelling to the us from the uk, there wouldn't be a problem. the us embassy is saying, don't schedule any visa appointments or attend any if they have been scheduled. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the petition to cancel president
11:21 am
trump's state visit to the uk has gathered more than a million signatures but downing street says it will go ahead. more us protest against the immigration ban. president trump says it is an interim measure. six people have been shot dead and eight others wounded at a mosque in quebec. the canadian prime minister says it is a terror attack. in sport, canadian prime minister says it is a terrorattack. in sport, non—league sutton united and lincoln city arranged the hat for tonight's fifth round draw. they beat leeds united and brighton have weekend. eoin morgan says poor umpiring caused england victory in the one—day international against india yesterday. and then evans is the number —— dan evans is the new british number? . he reached the fourth round of the australian open.
11:22 am
morejust after half fourth round of the australian open. more just after half past. six people have been shot dead — and eight others wounded — at a mosque in the canadian city of quebec. police have detained two suspects. canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau described the incident andy moore reports. police closed off the area surrounding the cultural centre as armed officers entered the mosque. it was during prayers on sunday. some of those wounded are said to be seriously injured. quebec city police confirmed two suspects were arrested but gave no further details. we consider the event like an act of terrorism. and we can confirm that we have six persons announced ——
11:23 am
pronounced dead, and eight persons in hospital with minor or severe injuries. the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, said in a statement: the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, said in a i want to say a few words to muslims in quebec. we're with you. this is your home. you are welcome here. we should work together and try to build together a society which will be more open and peaceful, to, even in this troubled world. last year, a pig's head was left in front of the mosque. i never have encountered any hatred
11:24 am
or animosity towards them. i am really shocked by all of this.” just can't imagine awful things like that happening here, where i imagine most of the people are respectful about that. solidarity rallies are planned across quebec today. solidarity rallies are planned across quebec today. kelly grieg is a reporter for global news montreal. she joins me on the line from the scene of the shooting in quebec. just bring us up—to—date? just bring us up-to-date? at this hour, the police have cordoned off a large part of the borrow. it is a very residential area. they say they have two suspects in custody. we're waiting for an update on the state of the suspect and of the victims. there is little information right now. but exactly who these people are, who committed this act. what
11:25 am
reaction has been? it is really one of disbelief. quebec city is a city that really does not have a large crime rate. nothing like this has happened. there has been a large outpouring of support. we have had people come by with —— just wanted to see where the event happened. some tears have been shed. there has been an outpouring of grief. there are memorials planned throughout the day in quebec city and in montreal. thank you very much. prime minister theresa may faces tough talks on brexit today, when she meets representatives of the devolved governments of wales, scotland and northern ireland. mrs may will chair a meeting of the joint ministerial committee in cardiff, to discuss how all parts of the uk can work together to support trade and investment. but the scottish and welsh governments have produced plans that would allow them to keep full access
11:26 am
to the single market, something which the prime minister has ruled out. vicki young is in cardiff. that's right. theresa may said to nicola sturgeon, the first minister, when she met her on becoming prime minister, that scotland and the devolved nations would be fully involved in brexit talks, talking about negotiations. that is why they are meeting today. the devolved nations are not happy. they feel they are being ignored. what has changed all of this is theresa may's speech, or is she said the united kingdom would be leaving the single market. that has upset the leaders in wales and in scotland. they think it would be catastrophic forjobs. they think it would be bad for investment. they are trying to find a way where wales and scotland could stay in the single market, even if the uk were to leave. that is the
11:27 am
proposal on the table. so for the snp have said that time is running out for the prime minister to heed the voice of scotland. the british gum and, in response, has said they will look carefully at any proposals. —— the british government. the line from uk ministers is that they will be trying to get the fullest and best possible access to the single market for the united kingdom. they hope that that will placate other people. i think it is notjust scotland, wales, it is notjust devolved administrations who think that maybe they have had the rug pulled out from underneath them with that speech by theresa may. we have hard labour mps speech by theresa may. we have hard labourmps and speech by theresa may. we have hard labour mps and others saying it is not something they want, it is not something they feel is good for the united kingdom. when the article 50 bill united kingdom. when the article 50 b i ll starts united kingdom. when the article 50 bill starts to be debated tomorrow in parliament, we will see a raft of amendments, change has been put down, particularly by the snp, who have promised more than 50, on which
11:28 am
she will try to pin theresa may down. she has to produce the document before triggering article 50. let mejust document before triggering article 50. let me just bring you more on the immigration ban by donald trump. the european union is analysing the ban on the entry of people from seven muslim majority countries to see if it would affect europeans, a spokesman for the executive has said. the block is getting conflicting input on whether the ban will affect eu citizens with dual nationality from the countries affected. it is just more on that lack of clarity over whether eu citizens with dual nationality are affected or not. there was a p pa re ntly affected or not. there was apparently an assurance that if citizens with dual nationality travel directly to the us from the uk would not be affected. but then
11:29 am
the us embassy in berlin has said this morning that people should not be applying for visas. we are hearing that similarly the us embassy here is saying the same. we will continue to report on this as we get more on it. we will keep you up—to—date. now let out the weather. this week is looking pretty unsubtle. we could see something in the form of gales or severe gales towards the end of the week. at the moment i willjust tell you it is going to be wetter than we have had recently. it has been a very dry winter so far. it will become milder by day and by night. that mild area to the south—west. with it, outbreaks of rain. in scotland and the far north of england, the best of the sunshine. some fog patches lingering through the day. here it is quite chilly. further south, wetter and milder. the milder it
11:30 am
spreads northwards and eastward this evening and overnight. it will produce rain. wintry over the high ground in scotland. heavy and more persistent in northern ireland. a frost free night for much of scotla nd frost free night for much of scotland and north east england. indy tuesday, a grey and cloudy day. heavy bursts of rain in scotland. we could see some brightness moving into northern ireland later. temperatures very mild in the south. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: the petition to council president trump's state visit the uk gathers more than a million signatures but downing street says it will go ahead. the protests against a travel ban in
11:31 am
the united states, president trump says it is an interim measure and not directed against muslims. six people have been shot dead and eight others wounded at a mosque in quebec. the canadian prime minister says it is a terrorist attack. two suspects are arrested. mps are to conduct an enquiry into what is known as fake news, balsam cremation spread by social media, saying it is a threat to a member man with dementia found in a car park with no lady had been dumped in england by his american family. we are getting words that the iraqi parliament is voting to retaliate against the us travel ban. no further information on what that would mean that the iraqi parliament has voted to retaliate against the
11:32 am
travel ban. let's catch up with the sport. there will be two non—league clubs in the fa cup fifth round draw tonight. sutton united joined lincoln city in the hat, after pulling off a 1—0 win at home to leeds united yesterday. leeds made 10 changes for the match though. the decision by championship and premier league teams to field weakened sides has been criticised by some former players. i think they are cheating the fans. newcastle fans travelled 250 miles behind oxford yesterday expecting 13 to win. the put out a weakened team. it is again very very disappointing. watford were one of two premier league teams to get knocked out yesterday. they lost 1—0 at league one millwall, while hull were well beaten at fulham. another former player, though, phil neville, thinks that the number of changes made by the bigger clubs isn't devaluing the competition. every tea m
11:33 am
every team is making changes, not just the premier league teams. i think it is making the fa cup better. once you get to the fifth and sixth premier league rounds, the premier league clubs will change their teams. i'm all for playing the kids. i'm all for playing the kids. celtic extended their unbeaten domestic run to a record 27 matches by beating hearts a—0 to go 22 points clear at the top of scottish premiership. callum mcgregor got the pick of the game's goals. scott sinclair scored twice and patrick roberts added another. the win broke the 50—year—old unbeaten record set by celtic‘s famous lisbon lions team. patrick van aanholt has completed his transfer from sunderland to crystal palace. he signed a a.5 year contract and will be reunited with sam allardyce, contract and will be reunited with sam alla rdyce, having contract and will be reunited with sam allardyce, having made easy work with the manager of the stadium of light. england captain eoin morgan says poor umpiring in the final over cost his side victory in the second
11:34 am
twenty20 match against india in nagpur yesterday. the series decider is on wednesday england needed just eight runs from the last six balls whenjoe root was given out lbw, but replays showed he actually hit the ball. england eventually lost by five runs. the decision review system, where replays are used to correct mistakes made by umpires, is not in place for this series, so the tourists had no way of challenging the decision. if this was a world cup game tonight and we had lost the world cup final, yeah, you would be spewing. the fact that it yeah, you would be spewing. the fact thatitis yeah, you would be spewing. the fact that it is not is a concern. there is no reason why it shouldn't be. there is no reason why it shouldn't be. dan evans is the new british number two after his impressive run to the fourth round of the australian open last week. he's up to a career high a5th place, two ahead of kyle edmund. evans beat seventh seed marin cilic and bernard tomic in melbourne during his best ever run in a grand slam. evans and kyle edmund will represent
11:35 am
great britain in the singles in the davis cup tie against canada. andy murray retains his number one ranking despite his early exit in melbourne. it's the first time in 11 years that there have been three british men in the top 50. meanwhile, several bookmakers have made 35—year—old roger federer odds on to win another grand slam tournament after his amazing australian open victory over rafa nadal yesterday. federer ended his five year wait for an 18th major in that five set win. when i heard that in switzerland people were following me and i saw people were following me and i saw people being generally really happy for me that i won a slam again, particularly this one may be, it is a bit ofa particularly this one may be, it is a bit of a fairy tale to come back this way. the goal is absolutely to be playing for a couple of years,
11:36 am
hopefully. that's all sport for now. despite a weekend of protests, petitions and court orders against it, the white house is standing firm over president trump's ban on immigration from seven countries. the president signed his executive order on friday, bringing to an end a hectic first week in the oval office. it halted the entire us refugee programme for four months, as well as instituting a three month travel ban for nationals from iran, iraq, libya, somalia, sudan, syria and yemen. but on saturday, as thousands gathered at airports across the country to protest, the order was challenged in the courts, with officials from 16 states describing it as "unconstitutional". that led to confusion all over the world. after seeking clarification, the foreign office said yesterday that uk nationals travelling to america shouldn't be affected. and responding to criticism of the ban, the president issued a statement last night saying he's not targeting muslims, and that visas would be reissued once new security measures had been implemented. while there have been numerous
11:37 am
protests in response to the immigration ban, there are also many people who support it. tougher immigration rules were a major part of donald trump's campaign, and many see the move as the president doing what he promised. the bbc has also been hearing from some supporters of the policy on new york's staten island. whatever needs to be done has to be done. this is for the safety of everybody. donald trump's number one job is to protect the number one people. we live in a democracy and of the majority of people feel they are threatened and they want to have things in place then we should be able to have those things in place. i think circumstances in the middle east over the last four or five yea rs have east over the last four or five years have required a degree of caution that we have not been exercising. accordingly, ithink this is appropriate. i have mixed
11:38 am
feelings because members of my family came here as immigrants but they keep you out of much different time in history and now with all the lone wolves that operate and attacked the us, we really need to have some form of the thing in place. donald trump said this is temporary and they trust them because his number one job is to protect the american people and he's doing it. that is why he was voted in. do i agree with everything he is doing right by? no, i don't, buti feel he has a reason for doing what he is doing and we have to wait and see. my parents are immigrants as well and although they came here legally with their own visa and stuff like that, hopefully in the future they can also have a future the way our family did. personally i feel people want to come to my country and live here and stay here, if as part of the process than that to be acceptable to them as if i
11:39 am
went to the country and there was a betting process in place that i would have to abide by. we are very threatened in this country and there area threatened in this country and there are a lot of things that the general public does not know about that the government knows about as far as security to our country, threats to our country and they feel this is necessary , our country and they feel this is necessary, then i am with it all the way. with me is tim montgomery, a columnist at the times newspaper and the former editor of the grassroots tory website conservativehome. he has spent a long time in the united states in the last year as you have been watching things unfold from inside seat, what is your view with this immigration ban?” from inside seat, what is your view with this immigration ban? i spent a year following this extraordinary presidential race of donald trump. what we are seeing over the last week was a very energetic set of announcements, knitting in this band
11:40 am
for immigration from the seven countries. he is doing what he said on the campaign trail that he would do. normally a politician keeping their promises is something we would welcome and many, many of americans are welcoming the fact that they think they have a refreshing change ofa think they have a refreshing change of a president in the white house. even without looking up the substance of what he has done, the fa ct substance of what he has done, the fact that it was so rushed and an apartment for homeland security which administers the borders of america was only given hours of notice of this huge change partly explains why we have seen the chaos at the american airports that we have. 16 american state attorneys saying this is unconstitutional. it isa saying this is unconstitutional. it is a country with a very strong immigrant background. there is the constitution. how much constraint
11:41 am
will be on the president? he says these executive orders and that is his will that then gets disseminated. it depends. this could bea disseminated. it depends. this could be a case that reaches the supreme court very quickly. usually they can ta ke court very quickly. usually they can take weeks or months for the supreme court to hear cases, but remember in the 2,000 presidential election where al gore and george bush were at loggerheads, the supreme court that within days. if we find that there are clashes between how different courts in america are interpreting this executive order, we could see the supreme court ruled very quickly. and in sort of circumstances the supreme court is finely balanced, but it has largely been appointed by mainstream politicians, and i think what you would get if the supreme court ruled would get if the supreme court ruled would be a great concern that the focus on muslims on this immigration
11:42 am
battle would be deemed unconstitutional. donald trump would set is not a focus on muslims but on countries that are potentially dangerous to america. when you have people like rudy giuliani saying that donald trump had said to him i wa nt to that donald trump had said to him i want to have a muslim ban how do i make it happen, that is the sort of thing that the court will say that this is really something that is prohibition by a religious test. our assistant political editor is with nigel farage. nigel farage joins me, someone who notes perhaps donald trump's my better than many british politicians. no surprise that donald trump is doing this. do you understand why it has caused such outrage here? yes, because british politicians are sheer hypocrites. in 2011 want to help either terrorists were found in kentucky president obama prod in a
11:43 am
six—month ban on any iraqi coming into the usa. we did not hear a word of protest from any british politician about president obama doing that in the interests of keeping america safe. what has happened here is the countries upon which donald trump is put a temporary travel ban while they work out how they are going to put extreme vetting in place, that list was drawn up by the obama administration. what he is doing is implementing it. it seems to me that went president obama does something thatis went president obama does something that is fine, but somehow donald trump is in the category of being a bag guide. this was all part of his ma nifesto. bag guide. this was all part of his manifesto. in some ways he hasn't gone as far as he said in the campaign. do you think britain to implement a similar process of excessive vetting? i certainly do. we already have a problem with —— a problem with home—grown terror and it will take as many years to work
11:44 am
on integration in our communities. the last thing we need to do is add to orfrom outside. mercifully, we are not part of the schengen agreement area. we have seen the terrible mistakes that angela merkel has made. the most recent terrorist attacks carried out in britain and america have not been by refugees, they have been by home—grown terrorists. the danger of this policy is that it alienates moderates, mainstream muslim opinion. makes it harder to fight terrorism. i don't moderate mainstream —— moderate mainstream muslim opinion will be worried about this, they will be pleased. they will of the relatives can come here. you will always find individual cases where families have problems. i have muslim friends in this country feel badly every time there isa country feel badly every time there is a terrorist attack it makes their
11:45 am
lives harder. do you understand why people are unhappy about what this says about traditional british values of openness and tolerance and what it would mean if we imposed a sort of band that donald trump has? i would get that point and whether it comes from the labour party, the lib dems were the government, but i am not here in condemnation of saudi arabia, qatar and other arab states that refuse to take a single person from syria. i am not hearing criticisms of the 16 countries in the world that ban everybody from israel from even visiting on holiday. i am israel from even visiting on holiday. iam not israel from even visiting on holiday. i am not hearing any consistent message. i heard nothing criticising president obama for banning iraqi citizens for six months. many british politicians are guilty of double standards. there will be much more in the house of commons this afternoon. boris
11:46 am
johnson will be making a statement at 3:30pm on the donald trump man. a man who was found in hereford in november 2015 with no id and no idea of where he came from. an american man with dementia who was found on the street without any id had been dumped in england by his family, a bbc investigation has found. the identity of roger curry had baffled police and social services for months. but bbc panorama traced him to a suburb of los angeles and discovered that his son and wife had flown him to england before abandoning him. darragh macintyre has this report. this man was found in hereford in november 2015 with no id and no idea of where he came from. everyone called him roger because he once said the name roger curry, but the police didn't know if that was his real name. we have a person, we have a possible name, but nothing else. we've got no identity documents, no indication of where he's from. roger has dementia and couldn't help. you speak with an accent from america, are you american? when we visited him last march,
11:47 am
he had already been in a local care home forfour months. what happens if he is identified and he has to leave here? it will be devastating, but then, you know, because the staff, we've adopted him. and for roger it's wonderful, but he's become our roger. yeah... the breakthrough came with this picture from a 1958 american high school yearbook. it featured an 18—year—old roger curry from the far north—west of the us. the likeness was striking. panorama followed the lead and traced the teenager pictured in the yearbook to a current address in los angeles. the home was burnt out and looked abandoned, but neighbours knew roger. can i show you these photographs? that's roger. are you sure? oh, no question about it, no doubt.
11:48 am
100%? i am 100% sure that's roger. we had finally identified roger curry, but this story doesn't have a happy ending. we found that the family had been haunted by illness and trouble. it soon became clear that the 76—year—old had been deliberately abandoned in england. his son kevin flew him to britain. kevin, we need to find out what happened to your dad. kevin, did you dump your father in england? kevin? you're trespassing. you need to leave. kevin then agreed to answer questions, but not on camera. he says that he had nothing to do whatsoever with the abandonment of his father in england. he said his father became ill when they were visiting england on holiday, and that he asked a friend to take him to hospital. his explanation made no sense. why did he leave his father in england for eight months? after we notified the police about roger curry‘s identity, he was flown back to america last july.
11:49 am
he is now in the care of the la authorities. darragh macintyre, bbc news. theresa may's spokesperson has been questioned about the travel ban by donald trump and the petition to cancel the state visit by donald trump to the uk. on the petition, the spokesman has said the uk and the spokesman has said the uk and the us have a strong relationship and it is right to keep working together. on the travel restrictions, the spokesman saying that britain has been clear it disagrees with the travel restrictions. those lines just through from the prime minister's spokesperson. the headlines: dub edition of the
11:50 am
council president trump's state visit to the uk has gathered more than a million signatures, but downing street says it will go ahead. more us protest against the immigration band. president trump says it is an interim measure. six people have been shot dead and the people have been shot dead and the people wounded at a mosque in quebec. the prime minister says it is an attack against muslims. now the business news. the government has cut that state in lloyds banking group. uk financial investments, which manages the stake in lloyds, cut its holding in the lender by about 1%. the taxpayer's share in the bank now stands at a.99%. more than £18.5bn has been returned to government coffers since the lender's £20.3bn bailout, which gave it a a3% stake in the business. ballot papers go out today for union
11:51 am
members to vote on the proposed rescue deal of tata steel plants across the uk. unions are recommending the offer from the company which will close the final pension salary scheme but promises £1 billion of investment. tata inherited the scheme when it bought corus, formerly state—owned british steel, in 2007. the result is expected mid february. we has become the latest company to ward off bright writers because of wea ker ward off bright writers because of weaker pound. wheat is priced in dollars and the weaker pound makes it more expensive. the warning came as the company announced it was
11:52 am
investing £30 million in its uk manufacturing sites. you have heard about the gig economy, the part time economy, and it seems now we are all becoming part of it. and it's not just at the low pay level. there are now an estimated three—quarters of a million people working formally part time in the higher—income bracket. 5.7% more than last year. and these are jobs in the heart of the establishment — at the ministry of defence, guardian media, lloyds, and age uk. there's now a list of the top fifty part time workers. it's called the power part time list. joining me now is karen mattison, joint chief executive, timewise, timewise, which campaigns for flexible working. why has there been this change? surely at the higher levels of management they need to be full—time. management they need to be full-time. what we have seen is a huge growth in the demand for part—time and flexible work right to
11:53 am
the very top. we have a situation as you said were out of the 8 million people who work part—time in the uk, three quarters of a million of them are acts the highest tax bracket. it is mostly women, isn't it? the list tends to mirror the numbers altogether. at the moment a third of men. . . altogether. at the moment a third of men... a third of the people working part—time in the uk are men. that has been a growing number in the last couple of years. why is it happening? at the end of the day, whether you are on a low income or high income, the finite commodity is time. people need to find more time on the working week and those extremejobs at on the working week and those extreme jobs at the top of business work created for the 1950s man with the wife at home. as more women are entering the workforce and wanting to climb of the higher positions, we are having to get creative about the way we design jobs are having to get creative about the way we designjobs in are having to get creative about the way we design jobs in the are having to get creative about the way we designjobs in the uk. are having to get creative about the way we design jobs in the uk. but
11:54 am
does it work for the company? they are not getting all the time that they need perhaps to run some of these big companies at a high—level? absolutely. what companies need most of all are the right people, the right talent. we have seen companies losing huge numbers of people that they have trained and supported in progress because they haven't been able to find that flexibility. now we have find not only people doing part—time roles, but a huge growth in the numbers of people sharing jobs. that has been a realfeature of this year's list, the highest numbers of jobs shares. of this year's list, the highest numbers ofjobs shares. that means the businesses are getting the copper across the week that the individuals are getting the flexibility. taking on a part-time role of that sort of level, one of the problems is not being fully involved in the company, not getting the water cooler moment, the buzz of the water cooler moment, the buzz of the office, knowing what is going on and the opportunities for promotion.
11:55 am
do you get left behind a bit? and think that traditionally has been a challenge and businesses have to work hard to get creative on that. the most common working part in other than the jobs shares i said this year, are people doing say a four—day week. they are working but just project —— protecting a tiny proportion of the week for nonwork time. we do have a problem in the job market around people progressing because such a small proportion of jobs are actually advertised as part a more flexible. i know you work part—time. did you actually find yourself more than you would work if yourself more than you would work if you are working full time because of the other thing to take on the legal part—time? the other thing to take on the legal part-time? no. it is been importing from either the last 18 of airport flexibly and part—time. i have grown the business, work four days a week. i have designed the role around that and it has worked incredibly well. a quick look at the markets. they
11:56 am
are all down, i'm afraid. about 0.5% for the footsie. the point is pretty much level against the dollar but the dollar has been generally quite weak, worries about protectionism in the united states and that is affecting the dollar. the pound is also quite weeks so the net result is actually quite a flat market. headlines coming up in the moment. naidoo, the weather. we are seeing a change to the weather this week. so forjanuary has been exceptionally dry. this week we will get spells of rain, it will be milderfor all, and that will be milderfor all, and that will become windy as well, with the risk of severe gales at the end of
11:57 am
the week. as the mild there are moves in, seems like this across a lot of the uk with leaden skies, missed and mark. but scotland that has been another cold and bright start. a little bit of freezing fog may linger across central parts of scotla nd may linger across central parts of scotland where we will see the best of the sun chang. in the south that will be turning breezy and milder and wetter. plenty of sunshine for scotla nd and wetter. plenty of sunshine for scotland through the afternoon, but it will be cold, temperatures from freezing up to 56 degrees. northern ireland, a great start and the rain will push in the afternoon wears on. northern england, cold star care with good spells of sunshine. elsewhere across england it is looking cloudy and increasingly damp, some low cloud and health four wheels on the south—west. in getting more persistent. those temperatures, ten or 11 degrees in the south—west, cooler than that for the rest of
11:58 am
england. that way and starts to bridge way northwards this evening and overnight. we could see some snow over the high ground of scotland. that mild there are really pushing across southern and south—western areas as we head towards the end of the night. elsewhere, frost free night. for tuesday, it is looking pretty messy. some of the rain will be quite happy across scotland through the day, generally like lighter and patch over england and wales. for northern ireland, the skies will brighten up in the afternoon, sunshine here, 10 degrees. 1112 in the south—west. on wednesday, the weather front will clear away, so dry interlude for a time but then is turning windier in the west and south—west with another band of rain moving in. it will be fairly mild across—the—boa rd. band of rain moving in. it will be fairly mild across—the—board. this area of low pressure will bring weapon windy weather for the estate. this area of the pressure could bring a spell of severe gales to southern and western part of the uk
11:59 am
through friday. we will keep you updated on that. this is bbc news. and these are the top stories developing at midday. the petition to cancel president trump's state visit to the uk gathers more than a million signatures — downing street says it will go ahead. more protests against the travel ban in the united states — president trump says it's an interim measure, and not a muslim ban. six people have been shot dead — and eight others wounded — at a mosque in the canadian city of quebec. the canadian prime minister says it is a terrorist attack. mps are to conduct an inquiry into what's known as fake news — false information presented as true facts which spreads via social media. also, in hollywood, black actors dominate the screen actors guild awards. this follows criticism last year that they were too white. denzil washington wins best actor for his role in fences. several actors voiced anger over donald trump's policies on immigration. and a man with dementia who was found in a car park without any id,
12:00 pm
had been dumped in england by his american family. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. downing street has rejected calls to cancel the state visit to the uk by president trump, which is expected to take place this summer. an online petition calling on the prime minister to withdraw the invitation has gathered more than a million signatures. government sources say it is in britain's long—term interest to maintain links with the us. foreign secretary borisjohnson will give a statement to mps this afternoon after the us says britons
12:01 pm
who have shared nationality with one of the seven middle eastern and african countries would not be stopped from coming into america. thousands have gathered at us airports in protest at the measures. president trump says the ban is an interim measure. but attorney generals from 16 states said they will fight what they call an order. here's our washington correspondent, david willis. man chants: no ban, no wall — new york for all. in a country built by immigrants, many find donald trump's travel ban unpalatable. they took to the streets in cities across the nation, as the crackdown sparked chaotic scenes at some airports and prompted criticism from senior members of the president's own party. neal behgooy and his wife underwent several hours of questioning after touching down in texas from iran. over the weekend about 300 people were either prevented from travelling or detained.
12:02 pm
they asked her about her family, about her brothers and sisters and her parents. what they did. how long we stayed. president trump issued his controversial order without input from or giving notice to the government departments that will need to implement it, hence the concern of officials here and elsewhere in trying to interpret it in the face of a flurry of lawsuits and the concerns of leaders around the world. the foreign office says the ban only applies to people travelling to the us from one of the seven countries on the list. travellers from the uk won't be affected and neither will uk citizens travelling from any of those seven countries to america, unless, that is, they're joint—citizens of one of the seven nations, in which case they're likely to face additional checks. for all the confusion, mr trump's aides have deemed the travel ban a success,
12:03 pm
and they issued a statement seeking to dispel suggestions that it amounted to a ban on muslims. whatever needs to be done, has to be done. this is for the safety of everybody. we are living in a dangerous world and donald trump's number one job is to protect the american people. we live in a democracy and if the majority of people feel threatened, we should be able to have things in place. despite the backlash, donald trump knows that many of those who voted for him did so specifically because of his promise to combat the threat of so—called radical islamic terrorism. to them, this just represents another promise kept. norman smith is in westminsterfor us. if number 10 were hoping the
12:04 pm
controversy if number 10 were hoping the co ntrove rsy over if number 10 were hoping the controversy over donald trump's travel ban might die down, i think there will be disappointed. it looks like it is going to ricochet around the house of commons this afternoon. we will have a statement from boris johnson. there may well be an emergency debate if the speaker agrees to that. number 10 appears to be hunkering down, insisting there can be no question of one the offer ofa can be no question of one the offer of a state visit to donald trump. similarly, number 10 believe they secured a result by the reassurances that the ban will not impact on british national ‘s or dual nationals. this morning, boris johnson was tackled on the ban. this morning, boris johnson was tackled on the ban. i will be speaking later this afternoon in the commons. you will have a statement later on. should mr trump be banned from coming to the uk? you will have a statement later on. i will be talking to you in the house of commons. that is the place. house of commons.
12:05 pm
be there. what about the clarification you were given at the weekend? i would ask you to be so kind as to contain your impatience. characteristically, mrs may was perhaps less forthcoming when she was tackled over the trouble ban quote was attending a meeting of the joint ministerial council in cardiff. should president trump's state visit go ahead? will you condemn his immigration policy? amidst the widespread condemnation of mr tom's travel ban, there has been some support, including from former ukip leader nigel farage, who said he believes a similar ban ought to be enforced here by the british government. we already have a
12:06 pm
problem with home—grown terror, and goodness knows it will take many years to work on integration within our communities. the last thing we need to do is to invited in from outside. mercifully, we are not part of the schengen area. we have seen the terrible mistakes angela merkel has made. we have to be as careful as we can. nadim zahawi is a conservative mp and was born in iraq. are you satisfied now that the clarification, the reassurances which number 10 say they have received? well, the statement was put out last night and i commend the foreign secretary for working on sunday. it was very clear that families like mine, whose country of origin was iraq, who are british citizens, can travel to the united states. last february, we had to go for interview to the us embassy because of our country of origin. we
12:07 pm
couldn't be granted the online visa waiver. the concern was the wording of this order initially said aliens from the seven countries. my immigration lawyer in american thought this would apply to us again as it did last february. but i am pleased we got clarification for british citizens. theresa may, since she has come home, said priority was to protect british citizens and ensure they have the right to travel to the united states. she also said that the order was wrong and it is not something she would be looking to do in the united kingdom. they seem to be signals here in the us embassy, telling dual national is not to apply for a visa. there still seems to be confusion? we need to make sure that the foreign office and the us embassy in london are on the same page on this. but clearly, the same page on this. but clearly, the foreign secretary had worked throughout sunday into the night am
12:08 pm
talking directly to the white house, was my understanding, as did the tea m was my understanding, as did the team at number10. was my understanding, as did the team at number 10. i applaud them for the work they did, certainly on behalf of families like mine. the anguish we have suffered has been horrific. i am a successful guy, i have a platform to talk to you. there are millions of people in the uk and the rest of europe who are dual nationals who will be worried about this. the more clarity we can get from the white house, the sooner, the better. what about the message it sends out? do you think it helps or hinders in the fight against terrorism? it is counter—productive. this plays into the narrative of daesh and isil. theresa may gave a brilliant, eloquent speech to republican congressmen and women in philadelphia. she talked about not only fighting daesh on the battlefield, but combating the
12:09 pm
ideology, defeating the ideology. this sort of divisive ban, the language of division, plays into their narrative. and i guarantee you one thing, one think there will be doing today, which is sad and horrific, they will link the burning of the mosque in texas, the shootings of muslims in quebec, canada, to president tom's man —— banning of muslims. that will be a great recruiting sergeant for impressionable young men and women to say, this is what the west does, they are about division and hatred, we have to combat them. that is the wrong place for us to be. it is so important that we speak with one voice in parliament to say, please reconsider. president trump is a big man, he is a compassionate man, and he isa man, he is a compassionate man, and he is a christian. i hope he is big enough to reconsider this and do the right thing. thank you. an awful lot more of this in the commons this afternoon where we have that
12:10 pm
statement from boris johnson. afternoon where we have that statement from borisjohnson. we may get the emergency debate. tomorrow, mps will decide whether they should debate whether that state visit goes ahead for donald trump. the controversy will rumble on for some time. our correspondent kim ghattas is in washington one british mp there saying he hopes donald trump will reconsider the ban. is that at all likely? there is no sign of that. president trump issued a statement yesterday, at the end of the day, after seeing the protests erupting old here across the united states, and also the reaction from allies across the atla ntic reaction from allies across the atlantic and other parts of the world. standing by that decision, very much so. except that they are backtracking a little bit on some aspects. for example, the fact it
12:11 pm
would not apply on green card holders, permanent residence in the united states. there is still a lack of clarity on whether it will apply and how to dual citizens. i know the gentleman there was speaking about how there was progress, that dual citizens may not be affected. it is not clear for everyone just yet. if you are a french syrian citizen, for example, i know that in the past few days a few organisations here in the us were hosting people who are dual nationals, have a lot of trouble trying to figure out whether these people would be able to come into a tent lectures, give talks etc. ——, in attend. it is clear the president and his advisers have been taken aback a little bit by the forceful reaction to this order the idea is they want decisive action just nine days into his presidency, to deliver ona days into his presidency, to deliver on a key campaign promise. that is
12:12 pm
going down very well with mr trump's supporters, but they are being criticised for the haphazard, slapdash way in which they have done this, which has caused so much confusion in recent days. one sources quoted as saying, this is a sources quoted as saying, this is a source close to the ministration, as saying this is chaos. it is hard to saying this is chaos. it is hard to say if the white house don't understand how government works or whether it is wilful incompetence. there was no proper consultation, no input from government departments tasked with implementing it. what has been said about how this has been done? well, it's hard to know exactly which one of the two of those ideas you put out there is the correct one. but you have to remember that the president is a businessman. and in the past, whatever decision he took within his
12:13 pm
business had limited ramifications. i think that what a lot of people find is that they come into government, and that applied also to president obama and two hillary clinton when she came through the state department, is that they are suddenly faced with the impact of every word they ought, and every action they take. the enormity of that task and that responsibility suddenly becomes very clear. was it wilful incompetence, was it designed to cause chaos? we don't know. the end result is it has caused chaos. the white house has been forced to ta ke the white house has been forced to take a step back and reconsider how they are going about this. but they are not withdrawing this executive order, certainly. thank you very much. in the commons later, boris johnson will be making a statement on that. on the situation with the travel. that is at 3:30pm. six people have been shot dead —
12:14 pm
and eight others wounded — at a mosque in the canadian city of quebec. police have detained two suspects. canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau described the incident the incident as "a terrorist attack against muslims". andy moore reports. police closed off the area surrounding the cultural centre as armed officers entered the mosque. it was during prayers on sunday. witnesses say gunmen opened fire micron more than 50 worshippers inside. some of those wounded are said to be seriously injured. quebec city police confirmed two suspects were arrested but gave no further details. we consider the event like an act of terrorism. and we can confirm that we have six persons pronounced dead, and eight persons in hospital with minor or severe injuries. the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, said in a statement:
12:15 pm
i want to say a few words to muslims in quebec. we are with you. this is your home. you are welcome here. we should work together and try to build together a society which will be more open and peaceful too, even in this troubled world. last year, a pig's head was left in front of the mosque. i never have encountered any hatred or animosity towards them. i am really shocked by all of this. i just can't imagine awful things like that happening here, where i imagine most of the people are respectful about that.
12:16 pm
solidarity rallies are planned across quebec today. a short time ago i spoke to kelly grieg, a reporter for global news montreal who was at the scene of the shooting in quebec. at this hour, the police have cordoned off a large part of the borough. it is a very residential area. they say they have two suspects in custody. we're waiting for an update on the state of the suspect and of the victims. there is little information right now, about exactly who these people are, who committed this act. what reaction has there been? it is really one of disbelief. quebec city is a city that really does not have a large crime rate. nothing like this has ever happened. there has been a large outpouring of support. we have had people come
12:17 pm
by who just wanted to see where the event happened. some tears have been shed. there has been an outpouring of grief. there are memorials planned throughout the day in quebec city and in montreal. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the petition to cancel president trump's state visit to the uk has gathered more than a million signatures but downing street says it will go ahead. more us protest against the immigration ban. president trump says it is an interim measure. and not directed against muslims. six people have been shot dead and eight others wounded at a mosque in quebec. the canadian prime minister says it is a terror attack. now all of the sport with tim.
12:18 pm
there'll be two non league clubs in the fa cup fifth round draw tonight. sutton united joined lincoln city in the hat after pulling off a 1—0 win at home to leeds united yesterday. leeds made ten changes for the match though. watford were one of two premier league teams to get knocked out yesterday. they lost 1—0 at league one millwall, while hull were well beaten at fulham. patrick van aanholt has completed his transfer from sunderland to crystal palace for an undisclosed fee. the dutch left—back has signed a four and a half year contract. the 26—year—old will be reunited with sam allardyce, having previously worked with the manager at the stadium of light. dan evans is the new british number two, after his impressive run to the fourth round of the australian open last week.
12:19 pm
he's up to a career high a5th place — two ahead of kyle edmund. evans beat seventh seed marin cilic and bernard tomic in melbourne during his best ever run in a grand slam. evans and kyle edmund will represent great britain in the singles in the davis cup tie against canada. andy murray retains his number one ranking despite his early exit in melbourne. it's the first time in 11 years that there have been three british men in the top 50. meanwhile, several bookmakers have made 35 year old roger federer odds on to win another grand slam tournament after his amazing australian open victory over rafa nadal yesterday. federer ended his five year wait for an 18th major in that five set win. when i heard that in switzerland people were generally happy for me that i won grand slam again, particularly this one, maybe it's a bit of a fairy tale, to come back
12:20 pm
this way. the goal is absolutely to be playing. that is why i took six months off, to hopefully still be playing for a couple of years. england captain eoin morgan says poor umpiring in the final over cost his side victory in the second twenty20 match against india in nagpur yesterday. the series decider is on wednesday. england needed just eight runs from the last six balls whenjoe root was given out lbw, but replays showed he actually hit the ball. england eventually lost by five runs. and the decision review system — where replays are used to correct mistakes made by umpires — is not in place for this series, so the tourists had no way of challenging the decision. if this was their world cup game tonight and we are out of the world cup, or lost their world cup final, you would be furious. the fact there isn't so much on the line, there is no reason why it shouldn't be used. that is all the sport. some tweets from donald trump. he
12:21 pm
has just started tweeting about the reaction to the travel ban, those seven mainly muslim countries named and no restrictions on people travelling from those countries to the us. there has been a huge reaction to that. he has tweeted in the past five minutes to say that only 109 people lead of 325,000 were questioned and held —— were detained and held for questioning. big problems at airports were caused by computer outage, protestors and the tea rs of computer outage, protestors and the tears of senator schumer. all is going well with few problems. make america safe again. those tweeds in the last few minutes. he is back on twitter with his reaction to the protests. make america safe again, he said. it is not about muslims. it is about improving security for
12:22 pm
americans. we will keep you updated. a group of mps is to carry out a parliamentary inquiry into so—called fake news — inaccurate or false news stories shared on social media. the trend came to international attention during the recent us election campaign, when there were fears voters were swayed by untruthful reports. amol rajan reports. purveyors of fake news are often motivated either by the desire for a quick buck, or a particular and sometimes extreme political cause. because their product tends to be salacious and remarkable, it can be more widely shared on social media platforms such as facebook and twitter, quickly reaching millions of people. now the culture committee is to investigate the growing prevalence of fake news and what can be done about it. we're interested in the responsibility of companies like google and facebook to their users, and to warn people and alert people to likely sources of fake news. we're also interested in the sources of fake news, are there particular groups and organisations or servers located in particular parts of the world where we know fake stories originate
12:23 pm
from, so therefore what action can we take about them? ultimately the answer to that question may be not much, but facebook has introduced new tools in america and germany allowing users to flag material that looks suspicious. it also employs independent fact checkers to verify stories that appear dubious. deliberate falsehoods masquerading as news are the tiny fraction of the total material shared on social media. but with high profile cases still reaching millions and donald trump intent on using the phrase to describe journalism he doesn't like... you are fake news. ..fake news seems certain to be a growing presence in all our lives. prime minister theresa may faces tough talks on brexit today, when she meets representatives of the devolved governments of wales, scotland and northern ireland. mrs may will chair a meeting of the joint ministerial committee in cardiff, to discuss how all parts of the uk can work together
12:24 pm
to support trade and investment. vicki young is in cardiff. that meeting has been going on for the last hour. it is due to break up shortly. theresa may promised the devolved nations would be fully involved in the run up to brexit. she said she wanted to make sure that everyone was on the same side. that hasn't happened. it has been deeply disappointing so far. nikolic at —— nicola sturgeon said time was running out for the prime minister to heed the voice of scotland. this has been given added impetus because of theresa may's speech, where she said she felt the uk should leave the single market. that has upset nicola sturgeon in particular. she wa nts scotla nd nicola sturgeon in particular. she wants scotland to stay within the single market, even if the rest of the uk leaves. a paper drafted by
12:25 pm
the uk leaves. a paper drafted by the scottish government is being discussed today. not many people are optimistic that will change things. when you hear from the snp and the first minister of wales, eight times what some labour mps are saying in the house of commons. they feel theresa may has decided on a certain kind of brexit and she will not change. britain —— british ministers say they will look closely at any proposals and that they are determined to work together. we know the debate on article 50 will start in parliament tomorrow. the snp will table 50 amendments. they want a white paper. they want to make sure thatis white paper. they want to make sure that is published very soon. i'm sure that will have been raised today. they also want eu citizens to be told they can stay in the united kingdom. we will see when this brea ks kingdom. we will see when this breaks up what the reaction is from nicola sturgeon and others. thank you. let's get the latest on the us travel ban and how it is affecting
12:26 pm
people from the uk and around the world. with me is christiejackson, an immigration lawyer. thank you for coming in. the government says that if you are a uk citizen with dual nationality, you will be fine to go to the united states. the foreign office has said that again. but it has said that if you are not sure if you are affected, you should contact the us embassy. the us embassy said this morning, don't schedule a visa appointment. and if you've got an appointment, don't attend. we are seeing that across the board. part of the problem is the confusion and the chaos that is happening because this order was signed on friday before the weekend, and then left for customs and border protection to figure it out. they didn't have any guidance. we will see more clarity as the days go by this week. that is what we are waiting on. i do think
12:27 pm
the foreign office guidance should be fine. i don't think you are going to be fine. i think you need to check. and even in checking it may depend where you are flying into. some airports are more favourable. they are letting people in. others are not. boston logan, for instance, is pretty favourable to the immigrants at the moment from the seven countries. are you saying that effectively at boston airport would seem to be ignoring the executive order? or honouring the four judgments that were made over the weekend by federal courtjudges. there was a federal courtjudge in massachusetts and several judgments across the country effectively saying you can't hold permanent residence, you can't deport them. there is so much confusion right now as to who is actually being affected. does it affect all nationals? the order was not written very clearly. it's just points to
12:28 pm
people from these countries. we don't know if from means born in, holds a passport in, or maybe once held a passport in. if somebody here has dual nationality and they have a trip planned, what should they do?” think proceed with caution. hopefully they have the flex ability to change their trip should they need to. maybe put it off for three months? maybe. possibly longer. we may have more insight as to who it applies to with regards to dual nationals in the coming days. we may also see new countries added. i think this will be an ever—changing topic in the coming months. my advice to clients is, be cautious. perhaps reconsider travel. or at least be prepared to consider their rights, what they can expect at the airport, have legal counsel on the ground there to receive them. i really be prepared and seek legal
12:29 pm
advice before going, so they know what they need to do. but can people really be clear about what their rights are in this situation? no. but i think they can be prepared for what the possibilities are. there are only a few possibilities. they will either be admitted, they may be questioned and admitted, they may be questioned and admitted, they may be questioned and admitted, they may be questioned and detained, or possibly deported. every case is different. it depends on the circumstances. i couldn't opine on every single person's situation. but in a standard, dual national british, maybe they hold an iranian passport, maybe they hold an iranian passport, maybe they hold an iranian passport, maybe they want to go on holiday, i would say, be wary. if the embassy is not honouring appointments and people do need appointments for theses, they will not be able to get them and travel anywhere. this will only affect people who are able to travel visa free, which wanted to do
12:30 pm
iranians and other nationalities, because they have already been stopped. thank you. let us bring another tweet from donald trump. he has said there is nothing nice about searching for terrorists before they can enter our country. this was a big part of my campaign, studied the world. that is the latest tweet from donald trump, pointing out that it was one of the key thing is that he campaigned on during the campaign. he said muslims would be banned from the united states. he said this is absolutely not about banning muslims, it is about security for americans and it isa about security for americans and it is a tempest situation while secure measures are put in place on immigration. he has now started tweeting again this morning, just in the last few moments. that is the latest tweet from him, saying there
12:31 pm
is nothing nice searching for terrorists before they can enter the country. we will keep you updated with more reaction as we get it. let's catch up with the weather. there is some sunshine in scotland, but when you get south of the border, it is missed and merck. there is also rain and hill fog. milder here, but not for very long. fairly brisk further north, but glorious sunshine to enjoy in the afternoon. the weather fronts will be pushed into the east overnight. it will stay cold macro. tuesday is about trying to move these weather fronts further east, but they are
12:32 pm
wriggling around. cool on the east coast. it will brighten up eventually in northern ireland with a high of around 10 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: the petition to cancel president trump's state visit to the uk gathers more than a million signatures — but downing street says it will go ahead. the prime minister issued the invitation at the white house last week. more protests against the travel ban in the united states — president trump says it's an interim measure and not directed against muslims. his aides call it a massive success story. six people have been shot dead and eight others wounded at a mosque in quebec. canada's prime minister says it's a terrorist attack. two suspects are arrested.
12:33 pm
mps are to conduct an inquiry into what's known as "fake news" — false information spread via social media — following concerns that it represents a threat to democracy. despite a weekend of protests, petitions and court orders against it, the white house is standing firm over president trump's ban on immigration from seven countries. the president signed his executive order on friday, bringing to an end a hectic first week in the oval office. to an end a hectic first week in the oval office. it halted the entire us refugee programme for four months, as well as instituting a three month travel ban for nationals from iran, iraq, libya, somalia, sudan, syria and yemen. but on saturday, as thousands gathered at airports across the country to protest, the order was challenged in the courts, with officials from 16 states describing it as unconstitutional. that led to confusion all over the world. after seeking clarification, the foreign office said yesterday that uk nationals travelling to america shouldn't be affected. and responding to criticism of the ban, the president issued
12:34 pm
a statement last night saying he's not targeting muslims, and that visas would be reissued once new security measures had been implemented. while there have been numerous protests in response to the immigration ban, there are also many people who support it. tougher immigration rules were a major part of donald trump's campaign, and many see the move as the president doing what he promised. the bbc has also been hearing from some supporters of the policy here, the labour leader jeremy corbyn has been giving his reaction to the us immigration row. will obviously i'm pleased that british citizens went be affected, but is quite shocking that they would be affected in the first place. it is far wider than this. the president has signed an order preventing people from certain countries from visiting. it is outrageous. it is illegal as well as
12:35 pm
being immoral. we should stand up to the values we believe in as we don't discriminate. do you think we should be looking at the bigger picture? we have big trade deals to be done, especially following brexit. the bigger picture is peace, justice and human rights. the bigger picture is good trade arrangements and the two things are mutually exclusive. we should say candidly and firmly to friends and to those we don't agree with, human rights are important, the rights of people are important in weather does this lead to? if you start saying people because they are muslims cannot travel to the united states, where does that lead to? we would condemn any other country in the wealth are doing this and we should do the same and same to the united states president we are sorry and we cannot support you and agree with you on this one. will you be attending the anti—trust rally today? i will be sending someone from our team and if i can, i will be there. is it right that the leader of the opposition should be
12:36 pm
there? it is right i should make the position clear on the views that i have on the proposed state visit by president trump, which is that it should not happen and we should make that clear and in view of the number of people that have come out over the last two days, a substantial number of the british public agree with me on that. well here in britain, more than a million people have signed a petition calling for a state visit by president trump, scheduled for later this year, to be cancelled. with me to discuss how state visits work and the protocol involved in nick witchell, the bbc‘s royal correspondent. nick, that petition is fast gaining more signatures. it's not far below 1.2 million now. in terms of how it all works, comments have come out of downing street this morning saying that it is not downing street that issues the invitation effectively, it comes from the foreign office. what is the protocol around that?
12:37 pm
well, the invitation comes from the queen. that is what state visit is all about, but is not —— but it is not the queen buckingham palace that decide to vcs and invitation. it is a decision by the government who should be invited by this ultimate in hospitality, a state visit with everything that goes with it. there area everything that goes with it. there are a few heads of states who would not be flattered by an invitation in the name of queen elizabeth, to stay at buckingham palace or windsor castle, a state banquet and all the protocol that goes with it. now, she has hosted 109 state visits throughout her reign. she has hosted popularforeign leaders throughout her reign. she has hosted popular foreign leaders and unpopularforeign popular foreign leaders and unpopular foreign leaders. they have been some deeply controversial ones in recent times. we remember the visit of the chinese prime minister
12:38 pm
recently. also when the japanese prime minister came here in 1969. she is well used to hosting whoever it is that the government decides should receive one of these invitations. the interesting thing is that most unusually, buckingham palace had not announced to the state visitors were to be this year. normally buy now we would know who was coming and i suspect, although buckingham palace is saying nothing about this, i suspect that they have been keeping a slot open for whoever emerged as us president, whether it was trump or hillary clinton. so the idea that they have rushed this throughjust to idea that they have rushed this through just to get donald trump over here, i think it is erroneous. i think those in being current political environment were keen to
12:39 pm
get the american president ever hear it quickly. and much is being made about when it happens, presumably it's good to be in the summer... let me answer that. it will be either early summer, it is too late to be the spring because there is an awful lot to arrange. two diaries to coordinate. early june lot to arrange. two diaries to coordinate. earlyjune is being suggested or the autumn, which is october. so people are speculating about what will be said if prince charles meets donald trump because obviously they both have strong views on climate change, but they don't meet. clearly they don't. prince charles would always meet an incoming state visit. there is a very laid down format for state visits. the state visit would normally be received and welcomed first by prince charles who would escort him to meet his mother. he would normally have tea at clarence house with the state visitor and i
12:40 pm
have no doubt that that format will be followed for this. it will be most unusual if it weren't and i think that buckingham palace and clarence house expect that to happen. again, you have to remember that just like his happen. again, you have to remember thatjust like his mother, prince charles is used to navigating the diplomatic minefield that some state visits represent. although he does have strong views on climate change and the environments, it is a matter of massive importance to him, but he's not the type of person to start lecturing anybody and certainly not aus lecturing anybody and certainly not a us president. he's always hesitant in putting forward his views, but i am sure that assuming donald trump does come and assuming that the prince of wales does have some contact with him that one of the things they will discuss will be climate change, yes. thank you very much, nick. in a week of anger and
12:41 pm
demonstrations, this was america's most elite, most exclusive, best—dressed protest. hidden figures, about three black female mathematicians who helped put americans, into space was the winner of the night's top award, best ensemble. this story is about what happens when we put our differences aside and we come together as a human race. we win. the only british winner played the ultimate british figure, the queen, and she used her speech to thank co—star matt smith. you're not only a really spontaneous, exciting, incredibly talented actor, but you're also my friend, matt, and thank you for making the job a joy. there was surprise best actor award for denzel washington in fences, and emma stone's success was no a shock, the musical la la land is the talk of this town.
12:42 pm
the cast of stranger things took the prize for tv drama ensemble, and its star david harber gave one most blistering acceptance speech. we will shelter freaks and outcasts or those who have no homes, we will get past the lies, we will hunt monsters. this is another award ceremony where art has been overshadowed by politics, as many stars in this most liberal of cities are concerned about the direction in which their country is heading. james cook, bbc news, los angeles. a group of mps is starting an inquiry into the "growing phenomenon of fake news", the deliberate spreading of false information on the internet, and whether sites should be forced to take tougher action. the inquiry will examine the sources of fake news, how it is spread, its impact on democracy and concerns about the public being swayed
12:43 pm
by propaganda and untruths. here are just a few examples. pope francis has shocked the world by pledging his support for donald trump. a pizza restaurant in washington dc is the base of a sinister paedophile ring. wikilea ks has confirmed hillary clinton sold weapons to so—called islamic state. shocker us president donald trump was born in pakistan all of that was of course, totally made up — fake news. the trend came to international attention during the recent us election campaign when there were fears voters were swayed by untruthful reports. with me is elizabeth linder, a former facebook and google executive. it seems like it has suddenly become an issue that has exploded from nowhere. where has it all come from. it has been played a leading pro—longtime. the genesis of the internet, social media comes from this empowering idea that everybody
12:44 pm
can be the own commentator, the broadcaster, can have their own voice. i think that this space and trust of what you see on the internet might be some authentic piece of content from someone's backyard comes from something that was initially positive and empowering. what has happened is it has shifted into a sinister space where people are making up nice to scare others or frighten people. in kashmir in 201a there was a famous case of an episode where we saw thousands of people fleeing a certain region because they had read something online about violence in that area which turned out to be com pletely that area which turned out to be completely untrue. so this has been circulating, it has been brewing in the far reaching corners of the internet and social media for some time. it's only recently that it has hit home to the western democratic world order. you worked for google
12:45 pm
and saw it to thatjourney. how much responsibility should be tech giants be taking for this and when you were there, how much awareness was there and what was being done?m there, how much awareness was there and what was being done? it is a fine tightrope for the technology industry. in part these companies are so big and they do have such a huge impact on millions of people around the globe, but they have to be careful not to be seen as arbitrators of the truth. they have to really ensure they are providing that platform for commentary. interestingly in some of the responses we have seen from the ceos from the tech industry, like mark zuckerberg, we have seen him use the word responsibility that the first time when it comes to fake news to say where are we responsible for addressing this issue head—on and how to use technology to solve the problem? there are solutions to
12:46 pm
encourage more people to report a fa ke encourage more people to report a fake news story when they see it so that that can turn into a warning signal. what would happen if someone reported a fake news story? it is very different from commentary, isn't it? you say that these are a platform for commentary, but when it is not commentary. that's right. facebook are testing situations where am the situation has been flagged, or news has been flagged as force. there is also talk of getting coalitions of news agencies and journalists to verify new stories. the first piece is attacking the
12:47 pm
fa ke the first piece is attacking the fake news question, but the broader peaceis fake news question, but the broader peace is whether we go from here to encourage people to really pay attention to the primary source material that they are getting, thanks to a connected world, but also because of the journalists that help us access that information. the way it was done during the us presidential election has been looked at and it has been said that 50% of people who read fake news do believe it. it's difficult to know what the threshold is, how much awareness is when people look at something and do any research to find out whether it is true or not. absolutely. it reminds me ofjokes that type content, like these media sources that are poking fun and having a good time, but sometimes in
12:48 pm
certain countries it is misinterpreted as being true. it also reminds you of the advertising industry. what kind of awareness are we working on so that young women who are seeing images that have been photo shopped are not impacted by that in terms of how they see themselves. so this space of media and news, ithink themselves. so this space of media and news, i think as it is spread online, it does warrant quite a bit of soul—searching from us as societies, not just as of soul—searching from us as societies, notjust as governments. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the petition to cancel president trump's state visit to the uk covers more than a million signatures, but the government says it will go ahead. president trump says the travel ban is an interim measure and it is not against muslims. an eight people have been shot dead and others injude at a mosque in
12:49 pm
quebec. the prime minister has called it a terrorist attack. an american man with dementia who was found on the street without any id had been dumped in england by his family, a bbc investigation has found. the identity of roger curry had baffled police and social services for months. but bbc panorama traced him to a suburb of los angeles and discovered that his son and wife had flown him to england before abandoning him. darragh macintyre has this report. this man was found in hereford in november 2015 with no id and no idea of where he came from. everyone called him roger because he once said the name roger curry, but the police didn't know if that was his real name. we have a person, we have a possible name, but nothing else. we've got no identity documents, no indication of where he's from. roger has dementia and couldn't help. you speak with an accent from america, are you american? when we visited him last march, he had already been in a local care
12:50 pm
home forfour months. what happens if he is identified and he has to leave here? it will be devastating, but then, you know, because the staff, we've adopted him. and for roger it's wonderful, but he's become our roger. yeah... the breakthrough came with this picture from a 1958 american high school yearbook. it featured an 18—year—old roger curry from the far north—west of the us. the likeness was striking. panorama followed the lead and traced the teenager pictured in the yearbook to a current address in los angeles. the home was burnt out and looked abandoned, but neighbours knew roger. can i show you these photographs? that's roger. are you sure? oh, no question about it, no doubt. 100%? i am 100% sure that's roger.
12:51 pm
we had finally identified roger curry, but this story doesn't have a happy ending. we found that the family had been haunted by illness and trouble. it soon became clear that the 76—year—old had been deliberately abandoned in england. his son kevin flew him to britain. kevin, we need to find out what happened to your dad. kevin, did you dump your father in england? kevin? you're trespassing. you need to leave. kevin then agreed to answer questions, but not on camera. he says that he had nothing to do whatsoever with the abandonment of his father in england. he said his father became ill when they were visiting england on holiday, and that he asked a friend to take him to hospital. his explanation made no sense. why did he leave his father in england for eight months? after we notified the police about roger curry‘s identity, he was flown back to america last july. he is now in the care of the la authorities.
12:52 pm
darragh macintyre, bbc news. what exactly do you feel walking through your home town? stressed, excited, interested ? that question inspired daniel raven—ellison's journey through 69 of the uk's cities, equipped with new emotion tracking technology. he's trying to create what he hopes will become a mood map of urban britain. david sillitojoined him. meet dan. he's an explorer of urban britain. 2.5 million steps, 69 cities he has crossed. and on every step, this has tracked his emotions. this is an emotiv eeg wearable headset.
12:53 pm
it has a series of sensors that can detect what is going on inside my brain and can work out if i am stressed, relaxed, focused, interested. so we agreed to meet in the city that registered high on the interest of scale. so the place you brought me to is? stoke. ok, convince me. let's go for a walk. yes, this is an urban stoke. it's actually an old spoil heap that's now a park. as we walked, it was a chance to discuss the other cities that he crossed. exciting? bristol. swa nsea ? do you know, swansea is the brunt of so manyjokes but my experience was just a flow of woodland going alongside the city, gorgeous hill, wonderful sea, street art. southampton? wild. surprisingly wild. the far north of southampton is suburbia. more birdsong than any other part of the uk i visited maybe. newcastle ? um, just so many children. loads of children playing out.
12:54 pm
that's unusual, is it? having walked across all the cities in the uk, it is unusual to see children playing out. birmingham? far greener than you would imagine. i loved dudley. dudley? have a look at this map, the green space in and around wolverhampton and dudley. this is swansea. and this, the six towns of stoke—on—trent where we met up with some ramblers to see if they were feeling what dan was feeling. we are starting to do more urban walks. people who live in the area are proud of being here. for me, what's brilliant about walking across a city, especially like stoke, from the bricks to the graffiti, to the bridges, to the trees, to the lichen, to the flats, there is so much interest going on, so much to enjoy every step of the way. do you agree? oh yes, the diversity is of the place is tremendous. the ambition is to add other people's emotional responses to create a mood map of our city.
12:55 pm
so far we have dan's data which reveals that things like this excite hiim and one particular thing, appals him. i would speak to people about not putting dog poo in bags and then adorning trees head—hight with those bags. you put the dog poo in the bag, you take the bag away with you. that's everywhere, is it? it's all over the country. and with that thought, we came to the end of this emotional journey across urban britain. the final feeling, confusion, as to why we were the only walkers in a place like this. david silitto, bbc news, stoke—on—trent. in a moment the news at one, but first, the weather. there will be spells of rain at
12:56 pm
times and it will become windy for some of us, but i suspect it may feel a little bit milder eventually thanit feel a little bit milder eventually than it has done of late through the rest of january. size of that change are already there to be held across some western areas and into the south west were the cloud is sufficiently thick and low in the atmosphere to produce some rain. best of the sunshine will be found in the north of england and especially across the greater part of scotland. as soon as the sun is down, temperatures will be falling away. wins across the western part of scotland. once you are south of the border it is where the cloud fills in. dull, dull, dull. it's the anywhere to describe it. as we move across the front, the cloud is lower in the atmosphere. murky conditions
12:57 pm
if you are out and about on the roads. rain will work its way further towards the east during the evening. the sky is made clearfor a time in the east allowing the temperatures to dip. two, three or a degrees to start your day tomorrow. tuesday, frontal systems creeping the way in further with the onshore breeze making for a cold miserable day across eastern parts. perhaps something a little brighter showing its face across northern ireland to finished the day. the same front is wiggling its way across the eastern side of britain on wednesday, taking an age to get away. there will be a window of opportunity, but there is another set of france dangling across the west. wednesday, wet and
12:58 pm
windy and there may be something a great deal more stormy to finish the week. we will keep you posted. more than a million people have now signed a petition to stop donald trump's state visit to the uk. momentum has grown since the us president announced a clampdown on immigration over the weekend. following the executive order, the american embassy in london has now told citizens of the seven countries affected not to apply for visas to the states. donald trump says only 109 people were detained over the weekend and airport problems were caused by computer issues and protestors, not his travel ban. we'll have the latest from washington. and also from westminster where the foreign secretary will address parliament this afternoon. also this lunchtime... six people are shot dead at a mosque near quebec city. canada's prime minister calls it a terrorist attack against muslims.
12:59 pm
theresa may holds talks with political leaders from scotland, wales and northern ireland on her brexit strategy. finally identified — an american with dementia found
1:00 pm

30 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on