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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 30, 2017 3:00pm-4:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 3pm: theresa may under pressure over britain's response to donald trump's travel ban. boris johnson faces mps in the commons shortly. a petition to cancel president trump's state visit to the uk gathers more than one million signatures, but the prime minister says it will go ahead. despite huge protests in his country and around the world, president trump has defended his immigration order against people from seven muslim—majority countries, saying "there are a lot of bad dudes out there". six people are shot dead at a mosque in quebec. canada's prime minister calls it a terrorist attack against muslims. also in the next hour... identified at last thanks to a bbc investigation. an american with dementia found two years ago lost in hereford with no id. he'd been abandoned by his family. a senior police officer has been
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allowed to keep herjob with greater manchester police after drunkenly baring her breast to a junior colleague and criticising her "boobjob". good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. more thani million people have signed a petition calling on the government to cancel a planned state visit to the uk by president trump. it follows his temporary ban on visitors from seven, predominantly muslim, countries from entering the usa. labour leaderjeremy corbyn said the visit should be postponed. but downing street said that would "undo everything" achieved in mrs may's recent visit to washington. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. the demonstrations in america against president trump's imposition of a temporary travel ban are likely to be repeated here,
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with protests planned outside downing street later today and in other uk cities. although the foreign office have clarified that british citizens are exempt from the ban, the foreign secretary has been under pressure to say why it took so long to get clarification. i'll be talking to you in the house of commons, that's the place. house of commons — be there! this conservative mp was born in iraq, one of the seven countries which are subject to president trump's travel ban. he's pleased with confirmation now that, as a british citizen, he will be able to visit the usa. but he is still opposed to the policy. clearly the, foreign secretary had worked throughout sunday and into the night, talking directly to the white house, was my understanding, as did the team at number ten, and i applaud them for the work they did, certainly on behalf of families like mine. i mena, the anguish we have suffered in the last 72 hours has been horrific. there are millions of people in the uk and the rest of europe
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who are dual nationals, or originally nationals of those countries, who will be worried. and now, more thani million people have signed an online petition, calling for president trump's planned state visit to the uk to be called off. they say it could embarrass the queen. that's the second highest number of signatories since the current policy on petitions was introduced. and the numbers are still rising. but it's worth noting that almost half a million people signed a petition backing a policy similar to donald trump's, calling foran immigration ban until isis is defeated. when a petition gets more than 100,000 signatures, mps must consider it for debate. a decision on that will be taken tomorrow, but parliamentary sources are stressing it would be inconceivable if president trump's planned visit was not discussed here at westminster. now even if a majority of mps decided they wanted that visit scrapped, they could not rescind an invitation from buckingham palace and downing street, but they could embarrass the prime minister. prime minister, should president trump's state visit go ahead? she was tight—lipped today, but downing street have made it clear it would be a populist gesture
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to scrap president trump's invitation, and they intend to do so. —— they do not intend to do so. but this former labour leader urged her to rethink. this cannot go ahead, given the outrage, the impact on britain, and the impact on the world, frankly, of president trump's muslim town. -- muslim ban. and this formerly the dem leader agrees. they feel queasy that the red carpet is being rolled out for a man, who, with each passing hour, seems to behave in an evermore erratic, unpredictable and divisive way. but it met with the approval of the first british politician to have met
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him after the election. what has happened here, is the countries upon which trump has put a temporary travel ban, while they work out how they are going to put extreme setting in place, that list was drawn up by the 0bama administration. —— extreme vetting. what was a diplomatic success now looks like a political difficulty. getting close to the new us administration could be good for the post—brexit economy, but not necessarily for theresa may's domestic popularity. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. at lunchtime saying that the pm is quote very happy to have invited donald trump on this state visit, despite a growing backlash with that petition signed by more than 1 million people, some protest as the prime minister left that joint ministerial council in cardiff. is being expressed notjust by the labour leader but also by the lib dem leader. —— unease. a number of
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conservative mps as well. we will hear from the foreign secretary borisjohnson later this hear from the foreign secretary boris johnson later this afternoon. joining me is a conservative mp. what do you want to the foreign secretary say? i want him to say the action is taking place by the president of the united states, by executing the order which he did, banning people from certain countries with a muslim background coming into the united states, is com pletely coming into the united states, is completely discriminatory, and it stands against our british values of tolerance, respect and freedom. but also, those actions feed into the hands of extremists and terrorists like daesh and al-qaeda. and therefore they make our world more ofa therefore they make our world more of a dangerous place. given that, do you think the government should scrap the? i've never said that the government should scrap the state visit for donald trump. the president of the united states, we have an excellent relationship with the united states committee should come, because if we ban him, what is the difference between us and him?
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but i would say, the tone and the nature of the state visit should reflect the fact that this is not what he would have got had he not made that executive order, which is discriminatory, wrong and inhumane. surely if we simply invited him but did not grant him a straight visit, we would choke that we are friends with the united states but we did not condone his actions with this travel ban. i would say that we have to be as symbolic as the president of the united states has been with his band. he's gone around, carried out, and he is saying what a great thing it is. we, morally and principally, stand against that without british values, and to a good friend, the united states, we should openly, publicly and frankly say that he is wrong at every level and this puts the world as more of a dangerous place. do you think theresa may underestimated the scale of unhappiness she was likely to provoke by the close ties with president trump? no, not at all. i think you have to look at when the executive order was made. the
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executive order was made. the executive order was signed when the prime minister had left the united states. if the question was put to her at the time, in my own personal view, knowing what the prime minister stands for, respecting our british values, she would have been as clear as she was when she made the comment regarding russia, to savour the united kingdom has a separate policy with regards to russia, the minsk agreement and protocol on that. she would have been very clear have the matter being put at the time. but at the time to move the executive order by the president had not been put into effect. how do you read the fact that more than 1 effect. how do you read the fact that more thani billion people have i'iow that more thani billion people have now signed this petition in the space of 48,000 so ——1 now signed this petition in the space of 48,000 so —— 1 billion. now signed this petition in the space of 48,000 so ——1billion.m shows that great citizens of our country respect liberty, freedom, democracy and tolerance. and therefore i would say the government has to take into account the feelings of our citizens. and the feelings of our citizens. and the feelings of our citizens. and the feelings of our citizens is that, you know, the actions and the behaviour of the president of the united states are discriminatory, contrary to our british values. 0n
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that i would say we have to be very clear in relation to the tone and the nature of the state visit that he gets. well, we will see what borisjohnson does say he gets. well, we will see what boris johnson does say when he gets to his feet at about quarter past. 0ne to his feet at about quarter past. one thing he will have to clear up is some confusion about the advice being issued by the us embassy in london, who, this lunchtime was suggesting thatjewel london, who, this lunchtime was suggesting that jewel british nationals still needn't bother applying for visas, even though mr johnson last night thought he had secured an johnson last night thought he had secured an assurance johnson last night thought he had secured an assurance from the trump administration that dual nationals, britishjewel administration that dual nationals, british jewel nationals, administration that dual nationals, britishjewel nationals, would not be affected by the travel ban. norman, thank you. don't forget, will be at the commons as in the foreign secretary does get up as in the foreign secretary does get up to address mps, which could be any time within the next hour. president trump says only 109 people out of more than 300,000 were detained at immigration for questioning over the weekend, and that the problems at airports were caused by computer issues and protestors, not his travel ban.
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protests have continued across america, and many more are being planned here in the uk this evening in around 30 towns and cities. this report from daniel boettcher. this is how divisive the issue has become — shouted arguments between opponents of donald trump's travel ban and those supporting it. this protest was in portland, but they have continued in many us cities and at several airports, where there is still confusion about how the president's order should be implemented. there have also been a number of legal challenges. protection of the nation from foreign terrorists. the executive order suspends the entry of nationals from seven muslim majority countries. it stops the us refugee programme for four months, and there is an indefinite ban on all syrian refugees. that's a concern for abdul shata, a refugee from homs, who has settled in california. he had hoped that his wider family could be reunited, but fears that won't happen now. translation: we hope things go
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back to how they were, and that these orders are eased, because our people have suffered. our people are not trouble makers, and there is nothing wrong with us, just that history has dealt us a difficult hand. there have been protests against the policy in a number of countries. here, students in the philippines here, and the iraqi parliament have asked its government to retaliate against the us. while canada has offered to give temporary residency to people stranded in the country by the ban. we will continue to ensure that our immigration system is about compassion, efficiency and economic opportunity, and the protection of the health, safety and security of canadians. the un high commissionerfor human rights said in a tweet that discriminate in on nationality alone was forbidden under human rights law. he added that the us ban is also mean—spirited and wastes resources needed for proper counterterrorism. here, a former mi6 head of counterterrorism said
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the measures could do more harm than good. this sort of ban on travel makes a huge impact around the world, and ratherfeeds the narrative of extremist islamist terrorists, that the americans and all the allies are fundamentally against us because of our religion. but president trump's aides insist it is not about religion, but about tackling terrorism, and that the order is an interim measure while new policies are drawn up. his supporters argue it is necessary. whatever needs to be done has to be done, and this is for the safety of everybody. donald trump said this is temporary, so i trust him, his number one job is to protect the american people and i think he's doing it. we live in a country of democracy, and if the majority of the people feel they are threatened and they want to have things in place, then we should be able to have things in place. donald trump said only 109 out of 325,000 people were detained and held for questioning following his executive order,
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and he tweeted that the homeland security secretaryjohn kelly said all was going well with very few problems. well, let's speak to our washington correspondent, kim ghattas. she says president trump remains defiant, despite criticism. president trump has taken to twitter, his favourite means of communication. he has been up since 7am this morning tweeting first as we heard there in this report about the fact that actually there were no big problems, the executive order implementation is going very well. and then the latest two tweets are, if the ban had been announced with a wea k‘s if the ban had been announced with a weak‘s notice, if the ban had been announced with a wea k‘s notice, the if the ban had been announced with a weak‘s notice, the bad would have rushed into our country, a lot of bad dudes are out there. not exactly the kind of language that we usually hear from the kind of language that we usually hearfrom a president, but certainly president trump is very unusual. and
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he is standing by his executive order, even though the white house has pulled back a little bit on some of the details of the implementation, saying, for example, that green card holders, permanent residence of the united states from other countries, are not affected by the ban. he tried to temper the tone a little bit in a statement that the president put out yesterday, saying that he wanted to help other countries, this was not a muslim ban, despite what he said was for reporting by the media, that the key was to protect the country from terror. and a poll this morning shows that 48% of americans support suspending immigration from terror prone countries, even if it means turning away refugees. so it is really all about the phrasing. because if you put it to somebody that this executive order is about keeping terrorists out, then people would be hard pressed to say, no, i oppose that. so that's how the white
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house is also making sure that it phrases things in ways that appeals to its supporters, but of course we've seen the criticism and the protests across the country as well. have the white house made any reference to these huge protest that have been going on, and also any reaction to the petition here in the uk, over1 reaction to the petition here in the uk, over 1 million reaction to the petition here in the uk, over1 million people now have signed it, saying they do not want him to come. no reaction yet to the petition that is circulating in the uk. but, yes, there was a tweet again, from the president, saying that the problems were rarely caused by computer outages at the airline companies, and protesters and the tea rs of companies, and protesters and the tears of one democratic senator, chuck schumer. rejecting the possibility that this executive order is facing a backlash. that is somewhat standard operating procedure for the president, rejecting the idea that his actions
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caused criticism or a backlash. but you can see very clearly from the way that white house officials have been speaking and putting out state m e nts been speaking and putting out statements over the last few days, they were taken aback a little bit by direct all the fact that this executive order is causing. now, it's not uncommon for white house officials in their first week in the white house to suddenly realise the enormity of the weight of every word they to, every action they take. we've seen it with pastor penetrations. —— word they are tough. —— we have seen it with past administrations. it is very for a president to face of criticism in his first week in office. a bit of breaking news from the courts. we are hearing that five out of six defendants in a trial for fraud, corruption and money—laundering by employees of hbos and a firm of co nsulta nts employees of hbos and a firm of consultants have been found guilty. it is fraud of £245 million, the allegation. they allege that hbos
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money was used to prop up failing businesses in return for guests, including money for escorts and luxury holidays. all six defendants pleaded not guilty, and five out of the six have been convicted. let's go to andy verity, who has been covering the case. what's the background, andy? well, you gave some of it there, simon. 0ne background, andy? well, you gave some of it there, simon. one small correction, not all of these businesses were failing when they came under the purview of a bank manager whose name we can now reveal, ten years after the scandal took place. linden generates garfield, a bank manager at hbos in reading, was accepting bribes including prostitutes, cash, drugs, and foreign holidays, in exchange for imposing his firm of turnaround co nsulta nts, for imposing his firm of turnaround consultants, who have been found guilty of bribing him and of fraudulent trading. what was going on was that the manager had small business customers who were supposed
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to be looking after, and what he was doing was requiring them to have his firm of consultants could quayside corporate services come in. farfrom wanting to turn them around, they wa nted wanting to turn them around, they wanted to extract the maximum fees and strip out the assets of those customers. so corruption, bribery, at hbos, something that has been covered up for the last ten years. we haven't heard about it, not least because this trial was taking place. five out of six of those who did stand trial, who didn't plead guilty, there seven people one was acquitted, i've found guilty today. they have been found guilty of something extraordinary. hundreds of millions of pounds involved, and a trial like no other we have seen. we can show you a film which will give you some of the background to what happened at hbos reading. i don't know if we can go to that now, but it should be with you soon. andy, we look forward to showing that when we eventually get it. that andy verity
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at southwark crown court. canada's prime minister, justin trudeau, says the fatal shooting at a mosque in the city of quebec was a "terrorist attack" against muslims. six people were killed and several others wounded — five are critically ill in hospital. police have arrested two men. andy moore's report contains flash photography. police closed off the area surrounding the cultural centre as armed officers entered the mosque. it was during evening prayers on sunday, witnesses say gunmen opened fire on more than 50 worshippers inside. some of those wounded are said to be seriously injured. quebec city police confirmed that two suspects have been arrested. they called it an act of terror. the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, said in a statement: quebec's premier said the canadian people categorically rejected what he called this barbaric violence.
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i want to say a few words to our fellow quebeckers. muslim quebeckers. we are with you. this is your home. you're welcome here. we are all quebeckers. we should work together, strive to build together a society which will be even more open, peaceful too, even in this troubled world. last year, a pig's head was left in front of the mosque. but local people said there was usually a spirit of tolerance. in terms of the quebeckers i have encountered, i never have encountered any sort of hatred or animosity towards them. so i'm really shocked by all of this. ijust can't imagine awful things like that happening here, where i imagine most of the people are respectful. solidarity rallies are planned across quebec today. andy moore, bbc news.
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let's return to our story about donald trump and that travel ban. caroline lucas mp joins donald trump and that travel ban. caroline lucas mpjoins me from donald trump and that travel ban. caroline lucas mp joins me from the house of commons. i am looking at the list of constituencies that have signed the signatory, it is now 1.3 million. your constituency is number four on the list. do you agree with them? i absolutely agree with them. 0ne them? i absolutely agree with them. one in 20 of my constituents have signed this petition. they, as i, feel ashamed, frankly, of the fact that our prime minister repeatedly refused a call—out president trump on these executive orders. you know, this isn't diplomacy from our prime minister, it is compliance with tyranny. we should be standing up to who is meant to be the most powerful person in the world and saying that we absolutely have to uphold human
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rights across the world. the idea that you simply close the door to whole countries think based on our religion is utterly wrong. the backlash we are seeing right across the country on the world shows that. it isa the country on the world shows that. it is a temporary ban, a ban he announced when he was running for president, a ban that he was voted into offers presumably to carry it out and he has. i don't think everybody who voted for him expected it to happen like this. there was absolutely no administrative preparation for it. i disagree with it fundamentally on principle, but if you were going to do it, you wouldn't do it in a weight which leaves people at airports not knowing whether they can rejoin their families or not. we have seen pictures of refugees who have got all of their papers in order, working for years to get there, now having them struck through with the line of a pen. these are people's lives, dreams, being crushed in a way that has absolutely no standing in international law. 0ur prime
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minister should have been standing up minister should have been standing up and saying that to the president of the united states. what really worries me is that she is now so worried about being friendless after brexit that essentially she will acce pt brexit that essentially she will accept any kind of relationship with any kind of bigot around the world, in the same weekend we saw her coming back from holding hands with president trump she was then off to turkey to sign arms deal agreements. this is deeply worrying, and i think our country is better than this. to be fair, aren't we better off keeping channels of communication open if there is a state visit with donald trump here. aren't we hugely more influential with him here, having those chats that go on behind the scenes, as you know they do, isn't that more important than writing him off and saying, we disagree with you, we should be talking to you? i don't think anybody is suggesting, certainly i am not suggesting, that we shouldn't talk to him. the issue with the petition is whether a state visit is appropriate, with all of the trappings of statements of both
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houses of parliament are going down, with the flags by having the queen being part of this whole process, but is deeply inappropriate. being part of this whole process, but is deeply inappropriatem being part of this whole process, but is deeply inappropriate. it is the office, he is the president of the office, he is the president of the united states, it is his capacity in that office... of it is precisely what he is doing in that office which has led to this backlash. 0f office which has led to this backlash. of course i understand that conversations have to happen andl that conversations have to happen and i would far rather people are talking than not talking. i'm not suggesting that he does not come to the united kingdom. what i'm saying that for as long as these executive orders or outstanding, we should not be rewarding him with all of the trappings, all of the symbolism that goes along with the state visit. you will find people on all of the site of the house of commons saying exactly the same thing. so you wouldn't welcome him coming to address both houses of parliament?” would not. ithink address both houses of parliament?” would not. i think that isjust a gesture that is made to people where we are sharing values. right now, seeing what president trump is doing, ido
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seeing what president trump is doing, i do not think those values are shared. given that he is being ill offers a week is this where you thought we would be? -- he has been in office a week. i think it is worse than we thought it would be. we didn't have high expectations. the speed with which he has acted, the carelessness and recklessness with which he has acted is deeply worrying. the actions that he has taken, supposedly to keep the united states safe, is actually more likely to whip up the kind of narrative that precisely set the west on a collision course with islam. they're ple nty of collision course with islam. they're plenty of people who would like that being the narrative. i don't get should be the narrative, but that is what he is pursuing by the actions he has taken, and it is dangerous. aren't these the actions who is of somebody who is learning very fast ina new somebody who is learning very fast in a newjob. no, i think they are the actions of a racist bigot and we have to stand up to bullies and that is what the uk should be doing. caroline lucas, thank you for your time. theresa may has been meeting political leaders from scotland, wales and northern ireland.
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they've been discussing the uk's exit from the european union. the talks are taking place in cardiff, and our chief political correspondent vicki young is there. well, the talks lasted a couple of hours. nicola sturgeon, the first minister of scotland, has in fact just left. theresa may has moved on to meet the irish prime minister in dublin. now, theresa may promised she would keep the devolved institutions of the uk full year involved in the brexit process. and as the clock ticks down to article 50 being triggered at the end of march, then these talks really are becoming more and more important. i suppose the question is whether they are about the uk government and theresa may informing others about what is going on all whether she is listening to their own ideas and their thoughts. this is what a couple of them had to say after the meeting today. a useful discussion. we are playing a full part in the discussions, we want that to
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continue. we are going to be constructive. we want to make sure that the uk's exit takes account of the governments that are part of the process. i think it was a useful engagement today. we obviously talked about the progress that is being made at the gmc eem, which is the monthly meetings that have been taking places. this is the second plenary we have had with the prime minister, what was a reflection back on has been achieved today. there is also a recognition that there needs to be an intensification between the different devolved administrations on the westminster government. now, the dynamic is quite interesting. ca rwyn the dynamic is quite interesting. carwyn jones being the dynamic is quite interesting. carwynjones being pretty cautious, because wales of course the vote leave eu, even though he personally campaign to remain. then you have the snp nicola sturgeon being much more outspoken. we haven't heard from her yet, we should get something from her in the next few minutes. but she is concerned about the uk and team may saying we are
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leaving the single market. today the discussion was about whether there was awake that wales and scotland could stay in the market even if the rest of the uk were to leave. nicola sturgeon said that time is rapidly running out for compromise on this and she is frustrated that the issue has not been tackled by theresa may. it is very hard to see how any compromise can be found all of that. thank you, vicki. all the headlines coming up andjust thank you, vicki. all the headlines coming up and just couple of minutes. first, it's time for the weather. it is phil avery with the latest forecast. bot thank you. we have a real ying and yang of weather. if you like, the simon and maxine of whether. we have gorgeous looking weather across a good part of scotland. elsewhere it is rather dourand of scotland. elsewhere it is rather dour and grey. you can see the balance of it. scotland's standing loud and proud, but further south there is enough of cloud to be reined. it won't stay there for the
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rest of the day, it is on its way over further eastwards, not amounting to very much for the most part. watch out for murky conditions in the high route is used the new date on tuesday. heavy parts of rain for scotland and northern ireland. a weather front trying to make a little bit of progress further east through the day. the onshore breeze, the cloud and the rain making the miserable fare across eastern counties. the heavy rain notjust scotla nd counties. the heavy rain notjust scotland but returning to the south—west to finish off the afternoon. my older here, and a bit of brightness to finish in northern ireland. hello. this is bbc news with simon mccoy an the headlines at 3.30pm: theresa may faces growing pressure over britain's response to donald trump's travel ban. borisjohnson addresses mps in
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the commons within the next hour — we'll cover that live. a petition to cancel president trump's state visit to the uk gathers more than a million signatures but downing street says it will definitely go ahead. let them in. despite huge protests, president trump is defending his immigration order against people from seven muslim—majority countries — saying there are a lot of bad dudes out there. in other news, six people have been shot dead and eight others wounded at a mosque in quebec. and an american man with dementia who was found in a car park two years ago, without any id, had been dumped in england by his family. now the sports news. the man who delivered a "mystery" package to sir bradley wiggins six years ago — during a race — has been invited to give evidence at a doping inquiry. simon cope travelled from manchester
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in 2011 to hand a parcel to the team sky doctor richard freeman on the final day of the criterium de dauphine in france. mps have said they are concerned with the evidence heard in previous hearings. the team's principal, sir dave brailsford, has previously said the package contained a legal decongestant. six nations chief executive john feehan says relegation from the tournament will not be introduced in the short to medium term. georgia and romania have both been pushing to be included in the annual tournament. italy were added to the old five nations tournament in 2000 and have propped up the table 11 times in the 17 tournaments since, including last season where they lost all five matches. but feehan has no plans to relegate the italians who open their campaign against wales next sunday in rome. it is not that long ago since they beat south africa in the autumn series. are they capable of beating anybody on the day? yes, they are. in the short to medium—term there is
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not any likelihood of that happening and we're happy with how the italians are approaching this. there isa italians are approaching this. there is a long way to go in terms of being competitive, but on any given day they could beat any of the sides in the championship. we believe they are a good addition to the championship. one other six nations line for you, and the england propjoe marler is fit for their tournament opener against france on saturday. the forward is back in full training after making a really quick recovery from a fractured leg. great credit has to go tojoe. he has done everything that's been asked of him to encourage the healing process and to make sure he is in the best physical shape possible so he is ready to play test match rugby and that's what he has done. for the first time in 11 years, three british men are inside tennis's world top 50. dan evans is the new british
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number two after his impressive run to the fourth round of the australian 0pen last week. he's up to a career high 45th — two ahead of fellow brit kyle edmund. evans beat seventh seed marin cilic and bernard tomic in melbourne during his best ever run in a grand slam. evans and edmund will play in the davis cup against canada this friday. andy murray retains his world number one ranking despite that early exit in melbourne. meanwhile several bookmakers have made 35—year—old roger federer odds on to win another grand slam tournament after his amazing australian open victory over rafa nadal yesterday. federer ended his five year wait for an 18th major in that five set win. when i heard in switzerland people we re when i heard in switzerland people were following me and i saw people we re were following me and i saw people were really happy for me that i won a slam again and particularly this one, maybe it is a bit of a fairy
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tale to come back this way. the goal is absolutely to be playing. that's why i took the six months off to hopefully to play for a couple of yea rs. dmitiri payet has been paradedd by marseille today after completing a £25 million transfer to the french club, which has left a bitter taste in the mouth of west ham's owners. payet did not show commitment or respect to west ham, according to david sullivan. in a statement, sullivan went on to say they would have preferred for payet to have stayed in order to make an example of him as no player is bigger than the club. patrick van aanholt has completed his transfer from sunderland to crystal palace for an undisclosed fee. the dutch left—back has signed a four and a half year contract. he will be reunited with sam alla rdyce, having previously worked with the manager at the stadium of light. that's all sport for now. five defendants in a fraud by
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employees of hbos have been found guilty. southwark crown court heard they squandered the profits on holiday and designer hold disand prostitutes. andy verity has been following the case. sofa driven bentleys at no charge, ferraris and trips to las vegas and brown envelopes stuffed with cash. just a few of the perks of being a corrupt bank manager at hbos or one of those bribing him and all paid for by the bank and its business customers. this businessman arranged prostitutes and other favours for an hbos bank manager seen here on the left. here he is as a younger man on the right, in 2004 on holiday in barbados with bonk escape roft on the left. in exchange for the bribes, scourfield would insist business customers use mills' turn
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around consultants. but farfrom helping turn businesses around mills and his partners in crime were milk them for huge fees and bullying the business owners and strip them of their assets. £28 million went through the accounts of david mills' and his wife and their companies, but the fraud cost more. you wouldn't guess that this was the epicentre of an investigation into a majorfraud epicentre of an investigation into a major fraud costing hundreds epicentre of an investigation into a majorfraud costing hundreds of millions of pounds. but the most remarkable thing about this story is that it was discovered, not by the police, not by the bank, but by a middle—aged couple fighting to keep their home. for ten years, nicky and paul turner survived on pasta and benefits. in 2006, scourfield imposed scoop quayside on their start—up publishing firm. in 2007, hbos told them out of the blue it was closing down their account. suspicious, they started investigating. we would phone up the
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owners of these companies, most of the companies had gone down by then, and say we think you've been part of and say we think you've been part of a massive fraud involving linda scourfield and quayside and people would be oh my god. people would cry. this was fraud on an industrial scale. they alerted the bank's directors and the serious fraud 0ffice directors and the serious fraud office and downing street, but instead of supporting a prosecution, the bank went to court 22 times to try and evict them the most shocking thing for me being in court, we have been through ten years of hell and so been through ten years of hell and so have other victims for no reason. the bank has always known. reporter: will you apologise? linden scourfield pleaded guilty last august. a decade on, hbos' owner lloyds banking group hasn't acknowledged the full—scale of the fraud or offered to compensate its victims. theresa may has been meeting political leaders from scotland,
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wales and northern ireland and they've been discussing the uk's exit from the european union. the talks are taking place in cardiff and our chief political correspondent vicki young is there. well, theresa may promised that the devolved institutions of the united kingdom would be kept fully informed and fully involved in the brexit process. today they have had a two hour meeting, theresa may has now gone off to dublin to meet the prime minister of ireland, but ume aide joined by the first minister of wales, ca rwyn joined by the first minister of wales, carwynjones. what was the atmosphere like at the meeting and what did you discuss? well, we made it clear that we need to know what the uk government is thinking now. we produced a detailed white paper that's there to help the debate and we think that should be incorporated in what they are going to propose in the future, but we've gone beyond the future, but we've gone beyond the thinking about things now, we need to know what their thoughts are. theresa may has made it clear she thinks the uk should be leaving
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the single market, what's your response. that's wrong. we want to make sure we don't lose jobs. we have the lowest unemployment rate of the four nations. we want the fullest access to the single market. we put forward a proposal. they haven't come forward with a proposal themselves, what is important is welsh businesses don't face extra costs or barriers. do you feel that you're being listened to or are the meetings more of a talking shop and they're informing you what the thinking is? the prime minister said this isn't a talking shop. i hold her to that. it is important that we're part of the process. but also pa rt of we're part of the process. but also part of the negotiation because there are some areas farming and fishery where the uk doesn't exist, everything is either european or welsh. we have to make sure that wales' interests are protected. this is not a debate about brexit, that's happening, it is how we leave and making sure the four nations of the uk have their voices heard and are
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pa rt of uk have their voices heard and are part of the negotiation. as the negotiation start, assuming article 50 is triggered by the end of march as theresa may wants, how can you have your say as the negotiations continue? there are challenges here for the uk. let's pretend the uk isn't creeking. when we leave the eu, there have been to a mechanism for all four governments to agree rules perhaps on farming and the way in which we provide subsidies for businesses and grants. we can't have that imposed on us by westminster. there has to be a court that looks at how that works. all these things have to be worked through and that work has to start now so the uk is ready in two years' time to leave the eu. underthis current ready in two years' time to leave the eu. under this current structure it is not ready at all. carwyn jones, thank you very much indeed. nicola sturgeon says the time is running out for compromise, she wa nts scotla nd running out for compromise, she wants scotland to remain in the single market. vicki young, thank you. a petition to cancel the president's
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proposal state visit to the received more than one million signatures. theresa may said downing street was happy to invite donald trump to the uk. our assistant political editor norman smith is in westminster. will she remain happy? to date i don't think she has got any intention of scrapping the state visit or back tracking in terms of her support for donald trump. that said, she is facing considerable opposition. i'm joined said, she is facing considerable opposition. i'mjoined by said, she is facing considerable opposition. i'm joined by the former liberal democrat leader, paddy ashdown. just give me your take on where theresa may now finds herself? look, i have to think, i have to say i think this has been a most unseemingly and ill—judged affair. i mean, look, did she not know that donald trump was in favour of the break—up of the european union? did
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she not know that he was likely to generate these kind of public feelings in britain? so, did she not know that by dashing over there in a scramble to be the first through the door, she will have created in the european union a belief, not wholly unfounded perhaps that she is being used as a trojan horse to break up the european union. so in exchange for a bit of pr and a trade deal sometime in the future, she has damaged her bargaining power with europe and we will be less able to get the good deal she says she needs from the european union and at the same timel from the european union and at the same time i have to say, dangling buckingham palace in front of him has only brought us into a position where when he comes here, they will be the biggest public demonstration that has been seen, whether it embarrasses her majesty, we don't know and shouldn't ask, she will do her duty, but it is likely to end up with him being embarrassed. what is britain gaining from this? we have made ourselves look rather stupid
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abroad and we generate add situation from which nobody will emerge unembarrassed. number ten say what this is about is trying to cement in place a long—term strategic relationship with america, our key ally, that's what it's about? there was a better way of doing it, by perhaps leaving it longer before she went. here is the inevitable outcome. i know this because i was speaking to people in the european union, donald trump wants to break up union, donald trump wants to break up the european union. we say mrs may says her first priority is to get the best deal she can. she sides with somebody who wants to break up the european union. that's going to diminish her bargaining power. power secondly, she has got into a position where a politician who is deeply, deeply, deeply unpopular is about to come to this country and go and see her majesty the queen as well and face public demonstrations i think of a greater order than we have seen before by which thin
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skinned and sensitive that he is, he is going to be a, either embarrassed or angry or both. how does that benefit britain? where does britain in this? is there any way mrs may could withdraw the state visit now? that's a good question. my answer is i hope some sensible person can find some face—saving way to get out of this. probably she has to go through, but if somebody can find a way without dabbling face for her majesty the queen above all, but for the government and president trump to get out of this foolish invitation we would be better off in my view including the government and including mrtrump. my view including the government and including mr trump. paddy ashdown, thank you. this will be debated in the commons shortly where we're expecting boris johnson the commons shortly where we're expecting borisjohnson to give a statement on the trump travel ban and state visit. norman, when, five, ten, minutes, when? i think at 4.15pm. norman, thank you very much. let's have a closer look at the numbers of people affected by the ban. the executive order suspends the us refugee admissions
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programme for 120 days. but syrian refugees have been suspended indefinitely — their entry is deemed detrimental to the interests of the us. the united states admitted 85,000 refugees last year, more than 12,000 from syria. travellers from iran, iraq, libya, somalia, sudan, syria and yemen are not permitted to enter the us for 90 days. there's confusion whether the ban applies to those with dual nationality travelling from another country. in 2015, nearly 90,000 people from the seven named countries applied for immigrant or visitor visas to the us. betsy fisher is the director of policy, at the international refugee assistance project. they have provided lawyers to help people at airports in new york. good afternoon. tell us about what
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happened in new york? who the lawyers were and what they were doing. sure. well, thank you for having me. we received word early in the week that there was going to be some executive order and we received a d raft of some executive order and we received a draft of that that had been leaked and it was widely discussed in the media. so early in the week we were able to identify about 1300 people said that whenever something happened they would be willing to go to airports across the country. on friday night, we learned that two of our clients were landing and when they were detained, two of our staff went to the jfk they were detained, two of our staff went to thejfk airport, they learned that other folks were being held and we sent out a call nationwide to folks to go to the airport and if anyone was being detained to secure their release. there have been thousands and
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thousands who joined the protest. what are the steps this week now after the judicial stay, before the next stages? sure. well, first of all we're working with partners in the media, partners in congress to see if there are other steps that can be taken to limit the effects of this order. we're going to be going through thejudicial this order. we're going to be going through the judicial process for the cases that have already been filed including the stay that was issued in brooklyn, but we are hoping to see that people who are being affected about by this ban would be admitted. will you be wanting to ta ke admitted. will you be wanting to take it further as to go down a road to overturn an executive order? well, we have filed a case in federal court that asks the federal judge to dojust federal court that asks the federal judge to do just that. we will see where that litigation goes. but i think it's important to note that there are the people who are in
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detention, who are the first and emergency response individuals affected, but ultimately, you know, the refugees who are still in the middle east, the people who worked for the us got and who are eligible for the us got and who are eligible for visas because of the threats they faced, the people who are going to be denied boarding who are still in the middle east or being denied boarding elsewhere in the world, they will have the more lasting impacts and so we will be continuing to work on this, whether at the airports, in the courts or directly with our clients in the coming months. betsy fisher, thank you. a senior police officer has been told she can keep herjob after exposing a breast, and mocking a colleague during a drunken row. assistant chief constable rebekah sutcliffe from greater manchester police was found to have committed gross misconduct — and given a final written warning by a disciplinary panel. it follows her involvement in a confrontation at a conference last year. in a moment a summary of the business news this hour but first the headlines on bbc news:
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theresa may is under pressure over britain's response to donald trump's travel ban, as a petition calling for his state visit to be cancelled gets more than a million signatures. boris johnson faces mps in the commons after four o'clock. despite protests across america, president trump defends his action banning visitors from seven muslim—majority countries. six people have been shot dead — and several others wounded — at a mosque in quebec. canada's prime minister calls it a "terrorist attack". hello. i'm i'm vishala sri—pathma. in the business news: the government has cut its stake in lloyds banking group to less than 5%. more than £18.5 billion has been returned to government coffers since the lender's
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£20.3 billion bailout. in october the government said it wanted to to sell its remaining shares within a year. tata steel workers will be voting on a new pension offer from today. the current scheme will be terminated in return for a £1 billion investment over 10 years. the deal includes a two—blast furnace operation at port talbot and plans for no compulsory redundancies for the next five years. unions and officials have agreed to fully endorse the proposal. and you might feel a slight pinch on the pennies if you start your day with weetabix. the company has warned of price rises because of the lower pound. it buys wheat in dollars, so a weaker sterling means its costs have gone up. it is however going to be investing £30 million in manufacturing sites across the uk. uk companies remain committed to strong trading relationships with european customers and suppliers despite the uk's vote to leave the eu. that's according to the results of the british chambers of commerce's international trade survey. the findings show that over a third of responding businesses plan
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on putting more resources into exporting to the european market over the next five years. joining me now is dr adam marshall, director general of the british chambers of commerce. adam, let's jugs start by this survey, a third committed to europe. how do the remaining two—thirds feel? what's interesting is, it is really two—thirds committed to europe. 36% said that they were going to put more resource into selling into europe and another third or so said they weren't going to change the amount they were putting into selling into europe and only 4% of all the respondents said they were going to decease the resources that they put into selling their products and services into the european market. what that shows is a commitment to continuing to trade, because of course, it is businesses that trade with each other, rather than governments as this transition continues. now, one of the alternatives to trade with the european union is of course, trade with the united states. donald trump's immigration ban today, how should businesses respond to that?” think businesses are responding
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pragmatically. what they are saying is they don't like the sound of this. they will worry if they have individual staff members who are affected because export and trade is affected because export and trade is a face—to—face game. it is a contact sport and businesses need to be able to travel without delays and bureaucracy and indeed the sorts of scenes that we are seeing at some of the airports in the united states. businesses don't want to see that, but they are putting resources into the american market. it has been a significant market for british businesses and they remain committed to it as the results of this survey show. there has been talk about safeguarding specific sectors when it comes a trade deal with the european union. nissan, the boss of nissan met with the prime minister over the car industry. do you think that's the right approach? well think what we need to see is the best possible terms of trade for british businesses with their cou nterpa rts british businesses with their counterparts right across the economy. it is true that we have some sectors which are particularly sensitive, whether it on things like
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ta riffs sensitive, whether it on things like tariffs or things like the particular type of regulation that the financial services industry amongst others face. we want to make sure the government is paying attention to a broad based deal that helps as many british businesses whether they are in goods or services maintain and in fact grow their market share in europe. 0k, adam, thank you very much. here's some other news we're following today. denmark's pharmaceutical giant novo nordisc is to invest £115 million over ten years in a new science research centre in oxford. it aims to employ 100 academics and scientists. the facility will work on new ways of treating type 2 diabetes. volkswagen is the world's best—selling car—maker. it has beaten toyota to pole position. volkswagen makes the audi, porsche and skoda brands. it saw a 3.8% increase in sales helped by demand in china. the coffee chain starbucks has pledged to hire 10,000 refugees globally over the next five years in response to that executive
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order on immigration that president trump has just signed. the company's boss said the president's order had caused "confusion, surprise and opposition". a quick look at markets. markets across europe are down. analysts are saying that's in response to the executive order that donald trump just signed. vodafone shares are one of the biggest risers after it announced it was selling its indian operations. that's all the business news for now. the identity of an elderly man who was found wandering around a car park in hereford more than a year ago, has finally been discovered. bbc‘s panorama programme traced him to los angeles, and discovered that his wife and his son had flown him to england, and then abandoned him.
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darragh macintyre has this report. rch called him roger because he once said the name roger curry, but the police didn't know if that was his real name. we have a person. we have a possible name, but nothing else. we have got no identity documents. no indication of where he's from. roger has dementia and couldn't help. you speak with an accent from america. are you american? when we visited him last march he had been ina visited him last march he had been in a local care home for four months. what happens if he is identified and he has to leave here? it will be devastating, but then, you know, because the staff, we have adopted him and for roger, it's wonderful, but you know, he has become our roger and yeah. the breakthrough came with this picture from a 1958 american high school yearbook. it featured an 18—year—old
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roger curry from the far north—west of the us. the likeness was striking. panorama followed the lead and traced the teenager pictured in the yearbook to a current address in long angeles, the home was burnt out and looked abandoned, but neighbours knew roger. can i show you these photographs? that's roger. no question. oh, no question about it. no doubt. 10096. question. oh, no question about it. no doubt. 100%. i'm question. oh, no question about it. no doubt. 10096. i'm 10096 sure question. oh, no question about it. no doubt. 10096. i'm10096 sure that's roger. we had finally identified roger. we had finally identified roger curry, but this story doesn't have a happy ending. we found that the family had been haunted by illness and trouble. it soon became clear that the 76—year—old had been deliberately abandoned in england. his son, kevin, flew him to britain. kevin, we need to find out what happened to your dad. kevin, did you dump your father neng gland? happened to your dad. kevin, did you dump yourfather neng gland? kevin? you are trespassing, you need to
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leave. kevin agreed to answer questions, but not on camera. he says he had nothing to do whatsoever with the abandonment of his father in england. he said his father became ill when they were visiting england on holiday and that he asked a friend to take him to hospital. his explanation made no sense. why did he leave his father in england for eight months? after we notified the police about roger curry‘s identity, he was flown back to america lastjuly. he is now in the care of the la authorities. you can watch that story on panorama on bbc one at 8.30pm on bbc one. a man has been rescued afterfalling inside a cement mixer. this happened in county durham. it happened this morning at 11.45pm. the pictures
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we re morning at 11.45pm. the pictures were released by the fire and rescue service showing rescuers working on the vehicle, including the use of cutting equipment on the mixing drum. he slipped inside the mixer as he was cleaning it. under his own weight he fell on his leg and he wasn't able to climb out. he has been taken by ambulance to university hospital in north durham. no indication of his condition at this point. now the weather. it has been a dull day. sunshine in short supply. we have got this rain and drizzle that's creeping in from wales and the south—west, slowly, further eastwards and heavier rain arriving in northern ireland and western scotland together with a stronger wind. a frost—free night just about everywhere, but early on, it could get close to freezing across some parts of scotland. we
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have got a lot of cloud again. tomorrow further mist and hill fog and rain and drizzle across england and rain and drizzle across england and wales. heavier rain clearing away from northern ireland and late sunshine, but the rain heading into scotla nd sunshine, but the rain heading into scotland and with a keen wind blowing down many eastern areas, it will feel chilly. temperatures double figures out towards the west. as we head through the week ahead, it will be mild air across the uk. a different story to last week. we will have strengthening winds and with the south to south—westerly winds we will see spells of rain. this is bbc news. the headlines at 4pm:
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theresa may under pressure over britain's response to donald trump's travel ban. boris johnson faces mps in the commons in the next hour. —— in the next 15 minutes. a petition to stop president trump's state visit to the uk gathers more than 1 million signatures, but downing street says it will still go ahead. despite the protests, president trump defends his action banning people from seven muslim—majority countries — saying there are a lot of "bad dudes" out there. in the next hour: six people, including two former hbos bankers, have been found guilty of bribery and fraud. the scam cost the bank's business customers and shareholders hundreds of millions of pounds. six people are shot dead in a terror attack at a mosque in quebec. two people are arrested.

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