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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  January 30, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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today at 5: donald trump's state visit to the uk will go ahead — despite mounting criticism of his travel ban on people from seven muslim countries. an online petition calling for the state visit to be cancelled has now attracted 1.3 million people — but the foreign secretary says the travel ban does not affect british passport holders. we have received assurances from the us embassy that this executive order will make no difference to any british passport holder, irrespective of their country of birth or whether they hold another passport. but some mps insist mr trump's policy is a "propaganda gift" to extremists around the world. we need a prime minister who is prepared to tell him to stop, not one who simply proffers her hand and
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silently helps along. but the president has again defended his policy — saying he needs to keep a lot of "bad dudes" out of the us. we'll have the latest on reaction to the trump travel ban and the plans for a state visit to the uk — with protests planned in british cities this evening. the other main stories on bbc news at 5: six people — including former hbos bankers — are found guilty of bribery and fraud that cost customers and shareholders hundreds of millions of pounds. after six people were shot dead in what's described as a terror attack at a mosque in canada — two suspects have been arrested. in cardiff, leaders of the devolved governments in wales, scotland and northern ireland meeting with theresa may, have demanded a greater say in the brexit process. and — mapping the mood of urban britain — we hear from the man who's walked more than a thousand miles to do so. it's 5 o'clock.
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our main story is the continuing worldwide reaction to president trump's order banning travellers to the us from seven countries with a mainly muslim population. here, downing street has said that theresa may was "very happy" to invite the president for a state visit to the uk later this year. there are protest marches planned in several british cities this evening. and the foreign secretary boris johnson has just told mps that british passport holders will not be affected by the travel ban. so far, an online petition urging the uk government to retract the invitation to mr trump, has now been signed by more than 1.3 million people since it was launched at the weekend. mr trump said his temporary ban was necessary — because there were a "lot of bad dudes out there". and he blamed the chaos at us airports on an airline computer failure.
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our correspondent daniel boettcher has the latest. this is how divisive the issue has become — shouted arguments between opponents of donald trump's travel ban and those supporting it. this protest was in portland, but they have continued in many us cities, and at several airports, where there is still confusion about how the president's order should be implemented. there have also been a number of legal challenges. protection of the nation from foreign terrorists. the executive order suspends the entry of nationals from seven muslim—majority countries. it stops the us refugee programme for four months, and there's an indefinite ban on all syrian refugees. that's a concern for abdul shata, a refugee from homs, who has settled in california. he had hoped that his wider family could be reunited, but fears that won't happen now. translation: we hope things go back to how they were, and that these orders are eased, because our people have suffered. our people are not trouble makers,
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and there's nothing wrong with us, it's just that history has dealt us a difficult hand. opposition to the policy has grown outside the us. angela merkel spoke this morning. the un commission of human rights said discrimination on nationality alone was forbidden under human rights law. and here, a petition calling for donald trump's state visit to be cancelled keeps growing. a former head of counterterrorism said mr trump is that measures could do more harm
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than good. this sort of ban on travel makes the huge impact around the world and rather feed the narrative of extremist islamist terrorists that the americans and all the allies are fundamentally against us because of our religion. donald trump has said only 109 out of 325,000 people were detained and held for questioning after he signed his executive order, and at a meeting of small—business owners, he said unlike the previous administration, his team were making real changes. we're moving things along and we are moving along fast. we actually had a very good day yesterday in terms of homeland security. sunday we have make the move and we decided to make the move. donald trump's aides insist the measures are not about religion but about tackling terrorism and this is an interim measure on new policies are drawn up. here, foreign
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secretary boris johnson policies are drawn up. here, foreign secretary borisjohnson has said it is right that the incoming president of our closest ally should be accorded the honour of a state visit. let's pick up on that point on boris johnson who has appeared in the house of commons in the last hour or so house of commons in the last hour or so to give a reaction. there has been a lot of scrambling to get more clarity and there was a lot of confusion earlier in the day about how british passport holders might be affected. mrjohnson tried to give clarity in the house. let's join our political editor norman smith. a bit more on the day's reaction there? that is true. boris johnson did try to clarify the situation but i think what he will have taken away most from his appearance in the commons was the level of anger from mps on all sides. what many mps view as profoundly misguided policy by
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donald trump, mps fear full about the impact it will have on relations with friendly muslim countries, concerned about the morality of the travel ban, the legality of the travel ban, the legality of the travel ban, the legality of the travel ban and whether it flouts the 1951 geneva convention. and although mrtrump was able 1951 geneva convention. and although mr trump was able to offer some clarity, he suggested that he had managed to secure a special deal for reduced passport holders. he called itan reduced passport holders. he called it an exemption by which anyone with a british passport, including dual nationals, even if they were flying from one of the seven named countries would not face any restrictions at all. i don't think really that satisfied the disquiet among many mps. but mrjohnson's view was the fact that he had managed to secure a deal, he said, underlined the benefit of theresa may trying to forge those close ties with donald trump. we have an
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invention for uk passport holders, where the dual nationals or otherwise. and i think most fair—minded people would say that actually showed the advantages of working closely with the trump administration, the advantage of having a relationship that enables us having a relationship that enables us to get our point across, and to get the vital protections for uk passport holders that they need. and i may say that the approach taken by the party opposite, pointlessly to demonise the trump administration would have achieved the very opposite. from the labour side there has been criticism today notjust from jeremy corbyn but from the former leader ed miliband. one mp mike gates called the prime minister theresa the appeaser. this was the response of the shadow foreign secretary emily thornberry. when it
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comes to foreign rights, when it comes to foreign rights, when it comes to foreign rights, when it comes to women rights, when it comes to torture and the treatment of minorities, president trump is already heading down a very dangerous slope, and when that happens, we need a prime minister to tell him to stop, not on his simply proffe rs tell him to stop, not on his simply proffers her tell him to stop, not on his simply proffe rs her hand tell him to stop, not on his simply proffers her hand and silently helps him along. boris johnson said the government does not support donald trump's policy and in the commons there was backing for mrs may's attempt to forge closer ties with donald trump. tory mps said it is not ourjob to tell america and to run its immigration policies. support as well from the former ukip leader nigel farage, who said he wa nted leader nigel farage, who said he wanted britain to introduce a similar travel ban. we already have a problem with home—grown terror. it will take many years to work on integration with our communities. the last thing we want to do is to to it from outside. mercifully, we are not part of the schengen area.
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we see the terrible mistakes that angela merkel has made over the last couple of years and yes, i want us to be as careful as we have. my senses theresa may and the government have been caught off—guard by the ferocity of the reddish —— views of the british people but forging closer ties with the us is absolutely essential to oui’ the us is absolutely essential to our long—term strategic interests. thank you. with me to discuss how state visits work and the protocol involved is our royal correspondent nick witchell. how unusual is it for a president so early in his term to get the full works offered in this way? it is very unusual, in fact, it is unprecedented. there have only been four previous us presidents who have had full scale state visits, reagan, clinton, george w bush and obama. reagan was 17 months into his
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presidency. clinton and george w bush were both nearly three years into their terms as us president before they came. obama was two and a half years. so, to receive an invitation so early in the presidency is unprecedented. however, most unusually buckingham palace did not disclose in advance who the state visitors this year would be. normally, they are flanked up would be. normally, they are flanked up in advance. my guess is they were keeping a slot for a us president, whoever that might have been, to come this year. the british government i think would be keen to have a state visit, the ultimate form of state hospitality. downing street indicated last november that they were considering a state visit. by they were considering a state visit. by then donald trump had been elected as us president. let's talk about where the decision is made,
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the triangle of buckingham palace, downing street and the foreign office. who has the biggest say? the government and the foreign office. there is a committee which considers all these questions about where the role family should go on this visit and who should receive this accolade ofan and who should receive this accolade of an invitation from queen elizabeth, queen of the united kingdom to visit her and stay at buckingham palace. it is not something that buckingham palace decides. that is a most important thing to say. it is an invitation from the queen on the recommendation of the british government. i think there will have been some dismay at buckingham palace that earlier today downing street were saying that the prime minister was delivering an invitation from the queen, leaving out the words on the recommendation of the government. this is an invitation to them by the foreign office and downing street —— driven by the foreign office. what do you
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think are the driving forces behind this. clearly, there are big initiatives involve, with the new president and brexit, how are you picking that up? what boris johnson the foreign secretary has been telling the commons, and he is still on his feet now, that this plan is united kingdom wants to keep freight close to the president of the united states, whoever that turned out to be last november. this will be the driving force in the political environment, the brexit environment, that those sitting on the foreign office committee felt that this was a year that it would be appropriate and helpful to have a us president visiting for a state visit. thank you. nicholas witchell with his latest thoughts. and we'll have more on all the latest developments from the trump white house tonight at 7pm in our programme 100 days — with katty kay in washington, and christian fraser in london.
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that's at 7pm here on the bbc news channel. six people, including two former hbos bankers, have been found guilty of fraud and bribery that cost the bank's customers and shareholders hundreds of millions of pounds. the group, who squandered some of the money on prostitutes and luxury holidays, now face long jail sentences. andy verity has been following the story. chauffeur driven bentleys at no charge, ferraris and trips to vegas and brown envelopes stuffed with cash. just a few of the perks of being a corrupt bank manager at hbos or one of those bribing him and all paid for by the bank and its business customers. this businessman, michael bancroft, arranged prostitutes and other favours for an hbos bank manager seen here on the left, lynden scourfield. here he is as a younger man on the right in 2004 on holiday in barbados with bancroft on the left and another fraudster, david mills, in the middle.
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in exchange for the bribes, scourfield would insist the bank's business customers use mills' firm of turnaround consultants, quayside corporate services. but far from helping turn businesses round, mills and his partners in crime were milking them for huge fees and using their relationship with the bank to bully the business owners and strip them of their assets. £28 million went through the accounts of david mills' wife and their companies, but the fraud overall cost much more. walking up this lane, you wouldn't guess that this was the epicentre of an investigation into a major fraud costing hundreds of millions of pounds. but the most remarkable thing about this story is that it was discovered, not by the police, not by the bank, but by a middle—aged couple fighting to keep their home. for ten years, nicky and paul turner have survived on pasta and benefits. in 2006, scourfield imposed quayside on their start—up publishing firm. in april 2007, hbos told them out
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of the blue it was closing down their account. suspicious, they started investigating. we would phone up the owners of these companies, most of the companies had gone down by then, and say we think you've been part of a massive fraud involving lynden scourfield and quayside and people would bejust be, oh my god. people would cry. this was fraud on an industrial scale. they alerted the bank's directors, the serious fraud office, and downing street, but instead of supporting a prosecution, the bank went to court 22 times to try and evict them. the most shocking thing for me being in court, we have been through ten years of hell and so have other victims for no reason at all. the bank has always known. reporter: will you apologise? lynden scourfield pleaded guilty last august. a decade on, hbos' owner,
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lloyds banking group, hasn't acknowledged the full—scale of the fraud or offered to compensate its victims. the foreign secretary borisjohnson says the us has reassured britain that british passport holders remain welcome in the us. his assurance comes amid mounting criticism of president trump's travel ban. six people, including hbos bankers have been found guilty of bribery and fraud which cost customers and shareholders hundreds of millions of pounds. after six people were shot dead in what is described as a terror attack ina what is described as a terror attack in a mosque in canada, two suspects have been arrested. and in sport, with the football tra nsfer and in sport, with the football transfer window closing tomorrow, sunderland have had a busy day.
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the six nations chief executive says there will be no relegation from the tournament in the short to medium term, despite georgia and romania pushing to be included. and the former team sky coach who delivered a mystery package for bradley wiggins in 2011 has been invited by mps to give evidence at a doping enquiry. i will be back with more on those stories after half—past. leaders of the devolved governments in scotland, wales and northern ireland have demanded a greater role in brexit negotiations, during their talks with theresa may in cardiff. the scottish and welsh governments have published plans that would allow them to keep full access to the european single market — but mrs may has warned that the devolved administrations will not be given a decisive role in brexit talks. first ministers and the dup leader, gave their reaction to how
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the discussions had gone. a useful discussion. it is constructive. you want but to continue. we want the uk's exit to ta ke continue. we want the uk's exit to take account of the views of the devolved government. we talked about the progress that has been made at the progress that has been made at the jm cem, which is the monthly meetings which have been taking place. there is a second plenary we have had. also a recognition that their intense to be an engagement between the different devolved administrations and the westminster government. so far the only compromise has come from the scottish government. there has been no attempt at compromise from the british government and time is running out and they have not
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listened to scotland's voice in any way. the prime minister theresa may who attended that meeting has now gone to dublin for talks there. our ireland correspondent chris buckler is in dublin. theresa may arrived in under an hour ago. we expect to hear many discussions which echo those about brexit. the republic of ireland is the nearest neighbour to the uk within the eu and of course, one of the biggest trading partners and is very concerned about brexit and what the impact could be between the land border with the uk and another eu country. these things all have to be discussed. and there are political concerns about what is happening in northern ireland, north of the irish border as well, because of the colla pse border as well, because of the
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collapse of the power—sharing executive there. that will also be discussed, and it is worth mentioning that that ministerial summit in cardiff was supposed to have happened in belfast but because of the political instability they moved it to cardiff. it is also worth saying that when a news conference takes place in an hour's time, theresa may and enda kenny the irish foreign minister will not be able to escape the shadow of donald trump. they will be asked questions about that. and enda kenny is in a position about whether he should go to the white house on st patrick's day as is customary for the irish prime minister. lots to be discussed here today. thank you. we will talk to you later on when those talks have been completed. that was chris buckler in dublin. what happened in
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cardiff? theresa may was with carwyn jones, nicola sturgeon and arlene foster. they said they wanted a bigger say in the brexit process. i can speak now to the snp leader in westminster angus robertson. thank you forjoining us. welsh government are saying the differences with theresa may are not irreconcilable. those are the words used. would you recognise that sentiment given what happened today in the talks? that would be hugely welcoming if that was the case. both the welsh government and plaid cymru have presented plans to the uk government and it seems, especially given how big a challenge brexit is, that the uk government should fully work with the governments of scotland, wales and northern ireland, to come up with a plan. the scottish plan has already been published. it is detailed and the scottish government has indicated that one is willing to compromise and in those circumstances, given we
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are told that scotland is an equal partner in the united kingdom, that the uk prime minister should not just meet, although that is to be welcomed, the devolved administrations, but also intensify and seek to find an agreement with the different governments across the uk, given how challenging the brexit process is. what you say to critics that a plan to have access to the single market as you define it, is simply not compatible with the para meters simply not compatible with the parameters on limits set out by mrs may already? i think it would be foolish and wrong to rule out the possibility of getting a spoke arrangement for the different nations and regions of the uk, because the uk government has said it is very keen to find solutions to particular challenges, challenges facing the city of london, for example, or the car industry in sunderland, or finding a solution to theissues sunderland, or finding a solution to the issues of northern ireland where your colleague in dublin wasjust
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explaining how important it is to find an arrangement between the uk and the irish republic. if it is possible to prioritise these different sectors in parts of the uk, then surely the uk government would also see it is important to reach an agreement with the governments of scotland and wales, on the basis that both of them have produced documents and proposals to simply agree to meet, but then to not take the suggestions they are making seriously. that would be a flawed approach, and it would lead the scottish government and the snp to conclude that we would have to look at other options, otherwise protecting our interests in a european context. can you give us a clearer readout, on today's talks and tell us what kind of response the leaders there got from mrs may? i think the thing that is to be welcomed is the prime minister has ignored and infa ntilisation welcomed is the prime minister has ignored and infantilisation of discussions around the specific
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proposals around the scottish and welsh governments about article 50 being trigger —— intensification. people in scotland could conclude that having voted to remain in the european union, but being told they had to vote no in the independence referendum to remain in the eu, that if uk is not going to fight their corner then it is uk only in name, it is not actually respecting the concerns of the people and dealing with them. it is a bit of the uk government. it is up to them to see if they are going to try to seek to reach an agreement or not otherwise people will look back at the meeting today and say it was just a photo opportunity, it was just window
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dressing and i hope that is not the case. it is a very busy day, do you mind ifi case. it is a very busy day, do you mind if i turn to the statement made by the foreign secretary in the house of commons an hour ago. he said that he has confirmed that british passport holders will not be affected by the executive order. on the one hand it is good to have that exemption that it only affects the uk. i think there has been a pretty universal decision by the decision by the incoming president that it is not acceptable. we are signed up to a whole series of international obligations and one of them, very importantly, is we do not turn away refugees, and we certainly do not do it that they come from certain countries or they have certain religions. that is not acceptable in a civilised world. on the one hand it is to be welcomed that there is
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confirmation of exemptions for the uk, it does not get to the nub of the problem writ large. and in relation to the potential state visit of president trump, it is very ha rd to visit of president trump, it is very hard to imagine, given the controversy of this situation, that our head of state, her majesty the queen, should be instructed by a uk government to entertain a president in the circumstances. a state visit is supposed to be the highest honour that any country can the stow on a visiting head of state, and given the controversy, it would be unimaginable to foresee circumstances that unless there is a change in us policy, that that could ta ke change in us policy, that that could take place. thank you for coming in. that is the snp leader at westminster, angus robertson. now, let's talk about events in canada. canada's prime minister, justin trudeau, says the fatal shooting at a mosque in the city of quebec, was a "terrorist attack" against muslims. six people were killed and eight were wounded. police have arrested two men
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in connection with the killings. andy moore has this report — which does contain some flash photography. police closed off the area surrounding the cultural centre as armed officers entered the mosque. it was during evening prayers on sunday, witnesses say gunmen opened fire on more than 50 worshippers inside. some of those wounded are said to be seriously injured. quebec city police confirmed that two suspects have been arrested. they called it an act of terror. the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, said in a statement: quebec's premier said the canadian people categorically rejected what he called this barbaric violence. i want to say a few words to our fellow quebeckers. muslim quebeckers.
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we are with you. this is your home. you're welcome here. we are all quebeckers. we should work together, strive to build together a society which will be even more open, peaceful too, even in this troubled world. last year, a pig's head was left in front of the mosque. but local people said there was usually a spirit of tolerance. in terms of the quebeckers i have encountered, i never have encountered any sort of hatred or animosity towards them. so i'm really shocked by all of this. ijust can't imagine awful things like that happening here, where i imagine most of the people are respectful. solidarity rallies are planned across quebec today. ina
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in a moment we will have a quick update on the day's headlines and we will catch up with the day's sports news. in the meantime, the weather with darren. good evening. we have had some sunshine across parts of northern england and scotland. chilly here. we will get some rain and drizzle moving in. there will be some low cloud and hill fog and heavy and persistent rain coming into scotland later on. a pretty mild night on the whole. we will see the wind strengthened through the day. some pockets of rain and drizzle pushing eastwards a cross pockets of rain and drizzle pushing eastwards across england and wales. the heavy rain in northern ireland clears away. the wet and windy weather sets in across eastern scotland. there will be a chilly filter the day that elsewhere, temperatures not rising bremen
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overnight. we could find temperatures in double figures. still some more rain around on wednesday. most of it creeping out into the north sea. some more rain arriving in the south—west later on. this is bbc news at five. the headlines: theresa may faces growing pressure over president trump's travel ban on people from seven muslim countries. but the foreign secretary says the travel ban does not affect british passport holders. we have received assurances from the us embassy that this executive order will make no difference to any british passport holder, irrespective of their country of birth or whether they hold another passport. in other news, six people, including former hbos bankers, are found guilty of bribery and fraud that cost customers and shareholders hundreds of millions of pounds. two suspects are arrested in canada
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after six people were shot dead in what's described as a terror attack at a mosque in quebec. in cardiff, leaders of the devolved governments in wales, scotland and northern ireland, meeting with theresa may, have demanded a greater say in the brexit process. sport now — here's jessica creighton. with the transfer window closing tomorrow, sunderland have had a busy day. they have brought in bryan oviedo and darron gibson. the pair teamed up with manager david moyes once again after working together at everton. oviedo has signed until 2020, while gibson's is an 18 month contract. moyes has brought them in a day before they face tottenham in the league, which is also transfer deadline day.
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ido i do not think it is great planning by the premier league. i think they could have either shut the window tonight or opened it for a day longer. it is not ideal. but that is the way it is. and earlier, sunderland sold patrick van aanholt to crystal palace for an undisclosed fee. the dutch left—back has signed a four—and—a—half—year contract. the 26—year—old will be reunited with sam allardyce, having previously worked with the manager at the stadium of light. hopefully his impact is instant, and he was instrumental in our fight to get out of the bottom three at sunderland last year, and of course not just as a sunderland last year, and of course notjust as a defender but also as a very good attacking fullback, with his assists and his goals. meanwhile, leicester striker leonardo ulloa has signalled his intentions to leave the club in no uncertain terms. ulloa tweeted this, this afternoon. this comes after ranieri
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saying this earlier. yes, i know he is very anxious. but we do not change our mind. for us it is important, we do not want to sell. you don't want to sell him? i don't want to. because we have slimani, a target man. six nations chief executive john feehan says relegation from the tournament will not be introduced in the short to medium term. georgia and romania have both been pushing to be included in the annual tournament. italy were added to the old five nations competition in 2000 and have propped up the table 11 times in the 17 tournaments since, including last season, where they lost all five matches. but feehan has no plans to relegate the italians, who open their campaign against wales next sunday in rome. we will always look at scenarios
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with various nations as they come and go. at the moment, it is only 2000 since italy came into the championship. we could argue they are still acclimatising a little. it does take a little bit of time and effort. it would have to be consistent, you cannot just effort. it would have to be consistent, you cannotjust take one good team that could disappear overnight and then suddenly, they are walloped every week. we just have to be careful about that and have to be careful about that and haveit have to be careful about that and have it unfolds over time. at the moment, we are going to remain as six, but we do always review these things. staying with the six nations, england propjoe marler will be fit for their tournament opener against france on saturday. the forward is back in full training after making a quick recovery from a fractured leg. great credit has to go tojoe, he
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has been incredibly diligent, done everything that has been asked of him, to make sure he is in the best physical shape possible so he is ready to play test match rugby and thatis ready to play test match rugby and that is what he has done. the former british cycling coach who delivered a mystery package to sir bradley wiggins during a race has been invited to give evidence at a doping enquiry. simon cope travelled from manchester in 2011 to hand a parcel to the team sky doctor richard freeman on the final day of the criterium de dauphine in france. mps have said they are concerned with the evidence heard in previous hearings, where the team's principal, sir dave brailsford, had previously said the package contained a legal decongestant. that's all the sport for now, you can keep up—to—date with all the stories on the bbc sport website. i will have much more for you in sportsday at half past six. let's get more than our main story, the continuing worldwide reaction to president trump's order, banning travellers from seven countries with a majority muslim population.
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it has led to calls for the state visit by president trump later this year to be cancelled. the foreign secretary says the travel ban does not affect british passport holders, that was the statement he gave to mps this afternoon. joining us is the conservative mp crispin blunt, chair of the foreign affairs select committee. thank you for coming to talk to us. first of all, we come to the travel ban issue in a second, we heard earlierfrom ban issue in a second, we heard earlier from nicholas witchell that it is unprecedented for a president so early in the time to be offered the honour of a state visit. is this the honour of a state visit. is this the right decision? i suspect what happened was, in order to get theresa may in first, the prospect ofa theresa may in first, the prospect of a state visit may have been dangled in front of the president's aides. it is an example of britain's
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soft power. ideally we should have said there would be a head of government was at first followed by a state visit after we had signed a free trade deal with the united states perhaps in 2020. but we're not in an ideal world and it is important for us to establish our primacy in the relationship with the united states. theresa may achieved a very significant thing in that meeting with donald trump, which was to get him to accept the importance of nato in terms, and if you recall the press conference, when she stated what they had agreed, looked at him with a gimlet eye and invited him to rub at it and he did not, he said, it is true. as an achievement for that first visit for a european leader to president trump, but was very significant, and a huge bonus for europe, and now making clear the united states is absolutely guaranteed to the article 5 guaranty of security of europe and the rest
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of security of europe and the rest of nato. notwithstanding that, and you made that quite clearly, we have the prospect of a very controversial state visit later this year, but lots of people, clearly, are not going to be happy about. do you think that risk was worth it? entirely unpredictable, but within hours of theresa may leaving, he was then going to sign this ludicrous executive order, which was both administratively impractical, but all the cases of that have now come to light of people being held in detention and the rest, and the uncertainty about having to clear up the canadian and british passport position, which has now been done a couple of days since this, but it is also, i agree with republican senators lindsey graham and john mccain, who have issued a joint statement making clear that this is very likely to be a self—inflicted wound in the wider battle against terrorism. what we have got to do is
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to make sure that the british interests, the international interests, the international interests, a re interests, the international interests, are being played into the republican caucus in congress, who in the end will actually set the legal context for how the trump administration is able to operate and make clear that the british view, which chimes with much of the republican congressional party, is the view that in the end prevails will stop the early visit by the prime minister and the huge and warm reception she got from the republican caucus in philadelphia, the first part of her visit, was very important in establishing a clear relationship with those decision—makers in the us. clear relationship with those decision-makers in the us. just to be clear, if one of your constituents says to you, do you think the state visit should go ahead, what would you say?|j think the state visit should go ahead, what would you say? i would say yes, the invitation has been issued and the invitation has been accepted. i think we have got to
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honour the word of the united kingdom and having given that invitation. we have now got these set of circumstances and it is really for the united states to come toa really for the united states to come to a view about whether the reaction there has been to this and how long that reaction will last, and this executive order will fall away after 120 days, and that is likely to be before any state visit, they have got to decide whether they should seek to change it. but we have given the invitation and we should honour it. i think going back on our word would not be a wise course of action. on the travel ban, you have made your view clear, what does it tell you about the way this white house is trying to run government and its relations with the rest of the world? it strikes me as a very immature administration. it has only beenin immature administration. it has only been in office for about ten days and the proper relationships between the white house and the other departments of state in the united
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states, the state department, the pentagon and, security, plainly not properly in place yet, because any properly in place yet, because any proper consideration of this executive order by those departments would have pointed out it's obvious practical and wider false. thank you very much for talking to us. —— faults. let's get the latest now from washington, where president trump has said visas would once again be issued once "the most secure policies" were in place, and denied it was a muslim ban. let's speak to our washington correspondent, kim ghattas. what do you make of his latest pronouncements on this? the problem is he has —— president trump has been tried to push back against criticism of the executive order that he signed on friday. there was a tweet this morning saying that what this executive order would achieve and the reason why it was
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done so quickly without prior consultation was that if you consult, you announce you're going to put out an order like that, the bad people would come out, and his attention was to keep the bad dudes out, as he put it. there was criticism that this is being done in a slapdash way and had not taken into account the process, and that is of course criticism of democrats who are trying to get organised and trying to push back against this. we have chuck schumer, leader of the democrats in the senate, who chalked up democrats in the senate, who chalked up over the weekend as he talked about how opposed he was to this travel ban, he is planning to introduce legislation in the senate to overturn the executive order. it isa to overturn the executive order. it is a tall order but they will try. and president trump had a few things to say about that as well. it would be nice if we could have our cabinet asa be nice if we could have our cabinet as a cabinet which is outstanding, it is going through a lot in terms
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of what they have been going through in the senate. they did it only for political reasons. i said, why did they do that? just politics. i noticed that chuck schumer yesterday with fake tears, i am going to ask him who was his acting coach. i know very well, i do not see him as a crier. there is about 5% chance it was real but i think they were tears. what do you think the reaction will be in the white house the fact we now have some big corporate names in america expressing their dismay at this travel ban? several companies including ford and goldman sachs have said they do not support the ban, they do not support any policies that go against their values, as they put it. goldman sachs said it was a policy that was disruptive. a lot of these companies have employees who are dual
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citizens, working from across the world and travelling, you also had google and other companies like that who are concerned about how this ban will disrupt their work, then you had companies that were more muted in reaction because they have to tow a fine in reaction because they have to tow afine line, in reaction because they have to tow a fine line, do they criticise the white house and risk a backlash which could be detrimental to their performance, or do they risk —— stay quiet and risk a backlash from their consumers who are concerned they are not standing up for what has been described as american values? wick—mac —— described as american values? wick-mac -- tim, thank you very much. —— kim. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: the foreign secretary, borisjohnson, says the us has reassured britain that british passport holders remain welcome in the us. his assurance comes amid mounting criticism of president trump's travel ban. six people, including former hbos bankers, have been found guilty of bribery
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and fraud that cost customers and shareholders hundreds of millions of pounds. after six people were shot dead in what's described as a terror attack at a mosque in canada, police question one suspect over the incident. let's pick up again on the plans for this state visit of president trump. downing street has said the state visit to britain by president trump will go ahead, despite calls for it to be cancelled. more than 1.3 million people have signed a petition saying the invitation should be withdrawn. this evening, protest marches are being held in at least a0 towns and cities across the uk, from london, edinburgh and cardiff to aberystwyth and the isle of wight. our correspondent sian grzeszczyk is in whitehall. just bring us up—to—date on what is
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going on there, the car —— kind of crowd you're seeing gavin, what do you make of it? this protest is not due to start until six o'clock but for the last hour, dozens of people have started to gather, as you can see, there are plenty of placards behind me as people gather together to share their frustration. i have been having a chat with many people in the crowds here. one person who isa in the crowds here. one person who is a student said he has never protested before but once the ban was announced by president trump, he said that was the final straw for him. there is deep frustration as well when you talk to protesters in the crowd about the reaction to this policy from theresa may stub lots of people wanting to their voices heard here. it has all been organised within the last 48 hours by elin
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jones, a columnist who decided to lodge a facebook page —— went. more than 23,000 people said they were going to come. you can already get a sense that thousands of people are going to come out. there is a strong police presence here. we have already seen police horses here tonight. speakers will be addressing the crowd when it does get under way, including the shadow attorney general, shami chakrabarti, the lib leader tim farron, also a seminarian refugee —— syrian refugee is to address the crowd and also people from black lives matter, and from friends of the earth. people are wanting to make their message heard. thank you for the latest. our correspondent ben ando is in cambridge. what is the state of affairs there?
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well, cambridge is a place where they welcome international students and they welcome students from the united states. at the moment there are around 80 undergraduates and more than 500 postgraduates who are studying here. one of them told me that one of the reasons were coming here was that he wanted to be part of what you might consider as the global community of learning. cambridge in particular has been a university town for many centuries, a place where people have come to study, to increase their learning and perhaps to put something back into what humanity knows for many years. there are probably around 500 to 600 people here. this demonstration was set up by a facebook group but has been supported notjust facebook group but has been supported not just by facebook group but has been supported notjust by students but by all members of the community. the students and protesters here are taking some heart from a tweet from the vice chancellor of kimmeridge university himself, who said when
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governments seek to curb freedom of movement, we will make committed to the best and brightest from around the best and brightest from around the world. —— we remain. the message here is that whatever president trump is choosing to do in the united states, kimmeridge itself is a place where anyone, as long as they are clever and willing to learn, is welcome. —— cambridge itself. we will talk to you again later, ben ando. how do you feel about your home town or city? well, for six months, one man has been crisscrossing the uk, making a "mood map" of urban britain. 1000 miles later, dan raven—ellison has collected information that it is hoped will show how landscape influences our mood, health and happiness, and how technology can improve our quality of life. our correspondent david sillito caught up with him. meet dan. he is an explorer of urban britain. 2.5 million steps, 69 cities he has crossed, and on every step, this has tracked his emotions.
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this is an emotive eeg, wearable headset, with a series of sensors that are able to detect what is going on inside my brain and can work out if i'm stressed, relaxed, focused, interested. and so, we agreed to meet in the city that registered high on the interest scale. so, the place you have brought me to is...? stoke. 0k! convince me. we'll go for a walk. yes, this is urban stoke. it is actually an old spoil heap that is now a park. and as we walked, it was a chance to discuss the other cities he had crossed. exciting. bristol. swa nsea. you know, swansea is the brunt of so manyjokes, but my experience was just a flow of woodland going alongside the city, gorgeous hill, wonderful sea, street art. southampton.
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wild. surprisingly wild. the far north of southampton is suburbia, more birdsong than any other part of the uk i've visited, maybe. newcastle. um, just so many children. loads of children playing out. how unusual is this? in all the cities in the uk, it is unusual to see children playing out. birmingham. far greener than you would imagine. i love dudley. dudley?! have a look at this map. the green space in and around wolverhampton and dudley. this is swansea. and this, the six towns of stoke—on—trent, where we met up with some ramblers, to see if they were feeling what dan is feeling. yeah, we are starting to do more urban walks. people who live in the area are proud of being here. for me, what's brilliant about walking across the city, especially a city like stoke, is that from the bricks to the graffiti to the bridges to the trees, to the lichens, the flats, there is so much interest going on. there is so much to enjoy,
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every step along the way. do you agree? oh, yes. the diversity of the place is tremendous. the ambition is to add other people's emotional responses, to try to create a mood map of our cities, but so far, we have dan's data, which reveals that things like this excite him, and one particular thing appals him. i would speak to people about not putting dog poo in bags, and then adorning trees at head height with those bags. you know, you put the dog poo in the bag, you take the bag away with you. it's everywhere, is it? it's all over the country. and with that thought, we came to the end of this emotional journey across urban britain, and the final feeling — confusion as to why we are the only walkers in a place like this. david sillito, bbc news, stoke—on—trent. bbc news at six is coming up with
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george in a few minutes. stay with us george in a few minutes. stay with us for outside source, including is some remarks were theresa may. she is in dublin this evening for talks with the taoiseach, enda kenny. in the meantime, darren is back with the weather. i'm sure some such and will have lightened the mood today. if it is mile that this time of year it usually means it is cloudy. that is what we have seen a lot of today. a rather misty and murky day as well with temperatures in double figures perhaps here in swanage, but there was some sunshine across scotland, a more chilly feel here, some patches of fog as well. earlier we had some sunshine across the far north of england. you can see a difference in temperature from earlier, double
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figures towards the south west, three celsius in the highlands. tumbling for a while in scotland and perhaps the north—east of england before this cloud comes in slowly from the west, bringing some rain and drizzle. the more substantial rain comes into northern ireland and western scotland later. a lot of low cloud, some hill fog and pretty mild, but chilly for a while across eastern areas. temperatures will be slow to rise during tomorrow. some rain pushing its way east across scotland, some gusty winds, particularly around the moray firth, the wettest weather probably first thing across northern ireland, especially across more eastern parts. spitz and spots of rain and drizzle coming in across england and wales, some low cloud and some hill fog if you're travelling over the m62 and across the south west finland as well where temperatures are still sitting at ten or 11. contrast that with the chilliest pa rt contrast that with the chilliest part of the eastern side of the
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country, we will eventually see some rain or drizzle. we will get some sunshine but rain pushing eastwards across scotland will be rather heavy at times. a chilly wind blowing across eastern parts of england and scotland, much milder further west. premier league football returns tomorrow and returns with this cloudy, mild air, there could be some rain around as well. for the first day of february, wednesday, we will have some cloud and rain, most of it heading into the north sea but lingering in the south east of england. more rain coming into wales and the south west. in between a little brighter. after a chilly start in scotland, temperatures eight to 11. all the weather will be coming in from the atlantic later this week. areas of low pressure pushing up from the south and west, threatening some wind and rain. that is the theme for the week ahead. the wind will get a bit stronger this week. that will blow in some rain from time to time. but on the whole
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it will be on the mild side, a far cry from what we have been used to during the last week or so. tonight at six — the mounting international backlash against president trump's immigration control. here, there's anger over the invitation to meet the queen — more than a million have signed a petition against a state visit. there will be regulation, there will be controlled. we are also waiting on a press conference with the irish and british leaders. if you are watching in the uk, we are on the news
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channel so we can bring this to you
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