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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 31, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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it came as thousands protested around the uk against the travel restrictions. good morning, it's tuesday, the 31st of january. also this morning: the wildlife traffickers putting the future of the chimpanzee under threat. we'll have a special report after a year long undercover investigation. a row over a term—time family holiday reaches the highest court in the land today. we need to get back on. back where? to the future. 2017 needs us. the timelord calls time. peter ca paldi announces he'll step down from his role as doctor who at the end of the year. there is a building boom going on in
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some of our biggest cities and its busiest right here in birmingham. so what does the state of the construction industry tell us about the economy? i'll be finding out. in sport, it's the tie they wanted. the lowest—ranked side left in the fa cup sutton united will host the 12—time winners arsenal in the last 16. tastes like burnt rubber! and carol has the weather. a cloudy and wet start to the day with rain or drizzle. brightening up later in northern ireland but for the rest of us what you start with is more or less what you're going to end up with during the day. more in about 13 minutes. good morning.
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first, our main story. donald trump has sacked the united states‘ top legal advisor after she told government lawyers not to enforce his travel ban. sally yates was the latest critic to speak out against his decision to stop refugees and citizens of seven mainly muslim countries from coming to the united states. meanwhile, barack 0bama has made an unprecedented intervention in the immigration row, warning that american values are at stake. here's our washington correspondent david willis. donald trump's controversial travel ban is facing resistance on a variety of france after a weekend of mass protests, chaos at airports and a diplomatic outcry came an unusual act of defiance on the part of america's top law officer. sally yates, appointed us attorney general by barack 0bama, said in a letter to lawyers at the justice department that given her responsibility to ensure that the government stands for what is right,: deeming that an act of betrayal, mr
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trump promptly sacked her, installing dayna bentaleb as the new attorney general pending the swearing in of mr trump's preferred candidate, alabama senator jeff sessions, whose confirmation has been delayed by democrats in congress. sally yates is not alone in her misgivings, though. barack 0bama said in a statement that he fundamentally disagreed: us diplomats have also registered their concerns, leading to this tongue lashing from the white house. these career bureaucrats have a problem with it? i think they should either get with the programme or they can go. later today mr trump is due to announce his pick for a place on the us supreme court. the choice he said was one that would appeal to
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evangelical christians who may also be hoping it leads to some better headlines. david willis, bbc news, washington. meanwhile, a former head of the foreign office has accused theresa may of putting the queen in a very difficult position by inviting president trump to make a state visit to the uk. lord ricketts said it should be downgraded to an official visit to spare the queen more controversy. thousands of people joined anti—trump protests in london and around the uk yesterday. a petition calling for his trip to be cancelled has gathered more than 1.5 million signatures. the prime minister's office said theresa may was very happy to extend the invitation on behalf of the queen. mps are to begin two days of debate over the government's proposal to get the formal process of brexit under way. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has ordered his mps to vote with the government, but some are expected to defy him. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is outside parliament this morning, is there any danger that article 50 won't be triggered?
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iimagine i imagine there will be vociferous debate but is there any doubt this will go through? no doubt whatsoever, sorry about the spoiler alert. this will go through for a number of reasons. first there will be attempt to try to stop the triggering of article 50, the process of leaving the european union, in its tracks by the snp, the liberal democrats and some labour rebels but that's likely to fail because conservatives are worried about leaving the eu and single market haven't put their heads above the parapet and the labour leadership is instructing their mps to vote in favour of triggering article 50, although they will want some changes to negotiations along the way. nonetheless labour's divisions on the issue will be laid bare. it used to be conservatives who were famous for divisions over europe but today we will see others defying their leadership and they will speak out againstjeremy corbyn‘s line and tomorrow they will
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vote against triggering article 50. some trouble their. a counter—attack from the government, david davies, the man in charge of the department for exiting the european union will accuse them of trying to defy the will of the people. thanks for the spoiler! btu later. —— bid to you later. —— speak to you later. police in canada have charged a french—canadian student, after six muslim worshippers were shot dead at a mosque in quebec. alexandre bissonnette did not speak during a brief appearance in court. a number of other people were injured in the attack. he faces six counts of murder and five of attempted murder. a legal battle over the rights of parents to take their children out of school for term—time holidays reaches the supreme court today. the case will have ramifications for families across england, as our education correspondent gillian hargreaves explains. isle of wight businessmanjohn platt says d oze ns isle of wight businessmanjohn platt says dozens of parents get in touch with him every day about term time holiday finds. he decided to fight it all the way and says he has no
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regrets after taking his daughter to disneyland when she had 90% attendance at school. the legal row is about what going to school regularly means. i believe that she attended school frequently or very often but there position is it means every day. that is the most draconian interpretation of this legislation you could possibly have. councils from the isle of wight to the north of england have different policies. some issue thousands of finds. 0thers almost none. the rules say if a head declares an absence of an authorised the local council can find each parent £60 per child. that find each parent £60 per child. that find can double if it's not paid between dominant within 21 days. ministers say exam results shape children's futures and missing even a few days can make a clear difference. many head teachers agreed. it's important because young
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people only get one chance at their education and one week, two weeks out of that can make an enormous difference in the progress they're able to make in any given year and overall in terms of there education. 35 councils have told the bbc they revise their guidance since mr platt took his case to court. the outcome could have a big impact. the supreme court will make a decision within months. gillian hargreaves, bbc news. two suspected animal smugglers have been arrested in ivory coast following a year—long bbc investigation into the trafficking of baby chimpanzees. the animals are seized from the wild and sold as pets for about £10,000 each. here's our science editor david shukman. of all the crimes involving wildlife the trade in baby chimpanzees is among the most shocking. we were sent these videos by dealers offering to sell us the tiny animals. there in big demand as pets. this one is about a year old,
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a male, captured in thejungle and orphaned, like the others, when poachers killed his family. he was shown to our undercover reporter who used a hidden camera to film him being held by a dealer called ibrahim traore from the ivory coast. the police were waiting nearby and moved in. the dealer and his uncle we re moved in. the dealer and his uncle were arrested and now face charges relating to wildlife trafficking. so, the police havejust made all the arrests. it's pretty edgy here, the arrests. it's pretty edgy here, the atmosphere, and it's all about this, a baby chimpanzee taken from thejungle. the this, a baby chimpanzee taken from the jungle. the real tragedy this, a baby chimpanzee taken from thejungle. the real tragedy of this, a baby chimpanzee taken from the jungle. the real tragedy of this trade is that to get one infant chimpanzee out of the jungle, all of the adults in its family have to be killed, that's as many as ten adults slaughtered just to get one chimp here ready for trade. for the police
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officer in charge, it's vital to stop the traffickers from wiping out the chimpanzees. the police seized the dealers' mobile phones. they revealed a global network of smugglers. but for the moment the international police effort is focused on other types of wildlife crime, not chimpanzees. without the funding we can't do anything but what we're trying to become is more intelligence led, so we're trying to look at what the threats are and what law enforcement need to in addressed to maintain a level of security. primates u nfortu nately level of security. primates unfortunately with our information holdings is not as strong as it should be. the baby chimp was hungry
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but safe in the zoo at dijon. his keepers gave him a name, nemli junior. he's doing well, others aren't so lucky. david shukman, bbc news, in ivory coast. you can see the second part of david shukman‘s report on the bbc news at 10 this evening, and a longer version of that report is on the bbc news website. peter capaldi has announced his plans to hang up his sonic screwdriver and step down from doctor who. i'm a bit gutted about that! i shouldn't say but i am! he will leave the tardis for the last time during the christmas special later this year, saying he felt it was time to move on. dan johnson has more. we need to get back. back where? to the future. 2017 needs us. leaving us the future. 2017 needs us. leaving us in need of a new time lord. peter cooke paoli will hand over the sonic screwdriver at the end of this yea r‘s screwdriver at the end of this year's series. he shocked fans with
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last night's announcement on live radio. i've always been somebody that did a lot of different things. i've never done onejob that did a lot of different things. i've never done one job for three yea rs. i've never done one job for three years. this is the first time i've done this and i feel it is time for me to move different challenges. and it means a familiar challenge for the show. now in its 54th year, with millions of fans, young and old, around the world. exterminate! of course, some things never change. dalek. what's a garlic? never mind, it's a dalek. regular regeneration has become the walmart of a time traveller used to riding his luck. it's an early wall machine. the new doctor will be number 1a. the question, as ever, will be who. danieljohnson, bbc news. who will it be? isas that we will be
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discussing that later. let us know if you think you have good candidate —— i suspect. can we learn to love our greens? primary school children around the uk may have found the answer. as part of bbc learning's terrific scientific campaign, pupils from four schools have been eating kale every day, in an effort to prove why some people don't enjoy their vegetables. the research found that the more they ate it, the more they came to like it. have you ever eaten raw kale? we are 110w have you ever eaten raw kale? we are now assessed with it. you just put it around salad tables before. now people eat it. we are eating it wore! things have changed! it was spinach, dan. i remember
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thinking that i can't force that down. i remember getting taken by the air by a french ski instructor asking me why i wouldn't eat my spinach. —— by the dear. asking me why i wouldn't eat my spinach. -- by the dear. are you sure that really happened? yes, he pulled me on the ear and made me eat it. anyway, let's move on from the spinach trauma. anyway, let's move on, no premier league ties. dreams have come true for non—league sutton united. cheering the moment the lowest ranked side left in the fa cup learnt they will host 12—time winners arsenal in the fifth round of the fa cup. it's transfer deadline day, and sunderland were busy yesterday. they signed bryan 0vi—edo and darron gibson. the pair team up with manager david moyes once again, after working together at everton.
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hull city's ryan mason has been released from hospital following his head injury earlier this month. he'll continue his recovery at home from a fractured skull after a clash of heads with gary cahill against chelsea. england propjoe marler will be fit for their six nations opener against france on saturday. the forward is back in full training, after making a quick recovery from a fractured leg. and i will have more sport at 6:30am. and we are gonna look at the papers ina 6:30am. and we are gonna look at the papers in a moment? we are doing things differently, so that we can get to carol on time, which is what we know that everyone wants. good morning. this morning it is fairly cloudy and wet. we have been coming in from the west. there is also some drizzle. if you are stepping out you will need to take something waterproof review. we have a weather front coming from the atlantic —— with you. in central and eastern
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pa rt with you. in central and eastern part it is chilly but not as cold as yesterday, —10 in braemar yesterday. at the moment it is three degrees. having said that, if you are out in the rain it is not going to feel warm, itjust the rain it is not going to feel warm, it just won't feel as cold the rain it is not going to feel warm, itjust won't feel as cold as it was yesterday, quite a lot of rain around, hillfog and murky conditions, nasty in the mountains of scotla nd conditions, nasty in the mountains of scotland where it is also very windy. in northern ireland you have heavy rain and you have still had it overnight, still a few hours to come, and ahead of it for england and wales quite a bit of cloud around, hillfog and drizzle and something dry for east anglia in the direction of kent but even so we cannot rule out drizzle. and ahead of it too in south—west england it isa mild of it too in south—west england it is a mild start and it is also a murky one. through the day we lose the rain for northern ireland, it will be across scotland, england and we re will be across scotland, england and were on and off at times of some of us were on and off at times of some of us will see some brightness but it
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will be at a premium and the bright skies in northern ireland —— england and wales. you can see temperatures 9-11 and wales. you can see temperatures 9—11 further south, six and seven pushing into the north—eastern corner. now, through the evening and overnight, the first band of wrinklies but then we've got another poll is coming up from the south, moving across england and wales. some of it will be heavy and persistent —— pulse. we are looking at hill fog associated with that, clear skies for the far north, will hear, four and five, seven and eight into the south. tomorrow we start off with all of this rain before it moves into the north sea. some brighter skies developed, still a fair bit of cloud at times and then later on our next system brings patchy rain into the west, with temperatures climbing. remember, last week, we struggled with double figures, now most of us are easily getting into double figures. and then thursday. there is still a wee bit of uncertainty about it but what we think is we have rain coming in
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from the south—west pushing north eastwards through the course of the day but it is going to be accompanied by very windy conditions. across some of the south—western approaches we could be looking at gales, even severe gales but it will be windy inland as well and look at the double figures extending further north. and then for friday and into the weekend it remains unsettled. the positioning of this low pressure on friday is very important because if it is a bit further south it will have an impact on where we see the strongest wind. but at the moment this is what we think. it is going to bring wet and windy weather in from the south—west, but of course i will tell you if the track of the low pressure does change. 0k, carol, for the moment, thank you. right, 0k, as promised, we start with the papers. 0k, promised, we start with the papers. ok, let's have a look at the front page of the times, the main story, the trump visit will hurt the queen, theresa may is told, and we were told about this later on, lord rickards, permanent secretary at the
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foreign office, the man who made the claim, and the main picture on the front is the political science student in quebec, alexander bissonet, accused of shooting the six people dead at a mosque in quebec. and the daily mail have thousands of protesters marching to whitehall to protest donald trump's travel ban on seven majority muslim countries, lots of the papers talking about this as well. and pa rents talking about this as well. and parents have as much responsibility to ca re parents have as much responsibility to care for the elderly mothers and fathers as for their children according to a david mart care minister, saying we have to look after the ageing population. and if you are worried about gin and juniper berries, do not be worried, there was concern that they were blighted by a fungus but there has been a seed saving exercise is, so the gin is safe. the gin is safe. the front of the guardian, more protest pictures, may defiant over
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trump visit is the headline, and the daily mail, the main story, we need to look after our own elderly, and a picture of gary lineker and his son at the protest yesterday. picture of gary lineker and his son at the protest yesterdaylj picture of gary lineker and his son at the protest yesterday. i was still reading this article because i am still undecided in the times, there is a debate, 18 majors each, who is the greatest, jack nicklaus, 18 majors over 24 years in golf, or roger federer who won 18 grand slam titles at the australian open. roger federer who won 18 grand slam titles at the australian openm roger federer who won 18 grand slam titles at the australian open. it is a difficult position. it is almost impossible but i think i am leaning towards jack impossible but i think i am leaning towardsjack nicklaus. impossible but i think i am leaning towards jack nicklaus. didn't he finished second about a gazillion times as well? 19 times runner-up. not quite a gazillion. well, that is the debate raging. what is tougher, a major in kennesaw in golf and i think i am beginning to —— a major in tennis ora think i am beginning to —— a major in tennis or a major in golf. what do you think is harder to win?
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before we finish, this is huge news, gary barlow has washed his hair. hey? for the first time in 14 years, apparently. every now and again it becomes popular, doesn't it. well, the theory is that it cleans yourself and it makes your hair grow. oh, no. he has done it after 14 years, washed his hair. it is super greasy for a while. 14 years, washed his hair. it is super greasy for a whilelj 14 years, washed his hair. it is super greasy for a while. i have seen people do it. it takes a while before... he has slipped in myself a or—— before... he has slipped in myself a or —— slipped in my estimation. there has been a big increase in high rise developments across the manchester, leeds, belfast and birmingham, according to a survey of cranes hogging our cities skylines. we needed a tall man for this, didn't we? luckily, ben has a head for heights. he's in the midlands for us this morning, where there's been a 50% rise in big building developments. yes, good morning, welcome to
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birmingham, you are right, it is all about cranes this morning, and we assess cranes and deloitte did the study, it indicates not only how the construction industry is doing but about their state of the economy, because when those firms are building they think the economy is doing well, they think it will do well when the housing and office space becomes available for sale. just to say where we are, the heart of birmingham today, this is paradise circuit, you can see the town hall and council house, and right in front they will build two new tower blocks as part of a big development expected to take ten or 15 years to be fully completed. and it is true, if you look at many skylines around the country at the moment there are a lot of cranes and a lot of construction activity under way. here in birmingham there is 1.4 million square feet of office space under construction, that is up 50% last year, there has been a tenfold
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increase in residential property sales and building too, that is important because we often talk about demand outstripping supply when it comes to housing and that is why prices are rising so quickly, so it could be that the has finally got through to those builders and they are finally starting to build a bit more. so it is notjust here in birmingham. it has topped the list deloitte has come up with. it is other places like manchester, leeds and belfast which have also seen a building boom over the last year or so. building boom over the last year or so. so i will be looking at what it means for the economy, what it tells us means for the economy, what it tells us about how optimistic people for the future little later with some guests joining the future little later with some guestsjoining me in birmingham to talk about it, so join guestsjoining me in birmingham to talk about it, sojoin me in about half an hour when we will have more from here at paradise circuit. will do, thank you. loneliness has been called the hidden epidemic and yesterday we looked at the impact it can have on young people. and it was an issue taken up by the late mpjo cox, who was murdered lastjune. today, thejo cox commission on loneliness is launched in her memory.
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breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. it isa it is a horrible problem. you sort of go down and down and down and lose your confidence. sandra's loneliness was all consuming. loneliness, it leads to other things. you know, it affects your mental health and things like that, it makes you depressed. how bad did things get for you? really bad. really bad, where i didn't want to live any more. made aware of her isolation, sandra was visited by her mp,jo cox. isolation, sandra was visited by her mp, jo cox. i wanted to speak to jo, i want to talk about the elderly being lonely, isolated, ill, nobody going to their homes. she was really shocked, really, ithought. she was really listening, you know, intense, andi really listening, you know, intense, and i think she looked a bit upset
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as well. jo had begun setting up a cross— party as well. jo had begun setting up a cross—party commission on loneliness to help tackle the issue when she was murdered. it is one of those issues where she thought she could make a difference. today, with the backing of her family, make a difference. today, with the backing of herfamily, it is officially launched. we have had our very dark days and very dark times as you would expect but actually we will not be beaten by what has happened, and certainly for me i have decided that i am going to come out fighting and i am going to try and make some of the changes and the differences thatjo and make some of the changes and the differences that jo cannot and make some of the changes and the differences thatjo cannot make herself any more. the idea is that politicians, charities and other organisations were together to help those who feel isolated. we were like that from being kids, people is what we get about, so i can't go back to normality, because there is no normality withoutjo, bought what ican do no normality withoutjo, bought what i can do is try to work to continue some of the good stuff she did and to try to make a proud —— but.
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some of the good stuff she did and to try to make a proud -- but. more than 9 million people, around the fifth of the uk adult population, often feel lonely, according to one study. the impact on health can be profound. but admitting that loneliness is a problem can be difficult. hi, sandra. sandra contacted the royal voluntary service, one of 13 organisations supporting the jo service, one of 13 organisations supporting thejo cox loneliness commission. volunteers like victoria ta ke commission. volunteers like victoria take time—out to visit lonely people. the impact can be profound. it is quite a simple thing at the end of the day. i spent one hour of my whole week by stopping on the way home from work. it is no extra effort on my part but actually the benefit that people get out of it i think will be massive in terms of what you can do. i will try and help ifi what you can do. i will try and help if i can. really, really nice people. start a conversation, the motto of the new loneliness
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commission is simple. it is hoped it will be effective. do let us know your thoughts on that and get in touch with us. you can e—mail us or talk about it on facebook as well. yes, we will look at that late on the programme as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. see you in a few minutes. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. more than 400 routemaster buses are being recalled because of a fault with the doors. it means the rear door can be opened while the bus is actually moving, which will then make the vehicle suddenly stop. the buses have already had faults with their batteries and steering. transport for london says, "the recall is just a precaution." a school in east london looking to change its name is being accused of trying to remove the "heritage and culture" of the local bangladeshi community.
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osmani primary in tower hamlets was named in after general muhammad osmani, one of the leaders in bangladesh's war of independence. the school now wants to change its name to what it says is the more neutral vallance primary, but over 1,000 supporters have signed a petition demanding the name is kept as it is. the school will now consult parents. london used to have one of the lowest suicide rates in the country, but in last couple of years the figure's shot up bya third. so this year's comic relief campaign, which launches today, is focusing on mental health. and long—time supporter of the charity, broadcaster sir trevor mcdonald, has been visiting the maytree project in north london, which helps people in a suicidal crisis. you are confronted with this and realise what a need is for this and this place does an absolutely fantasticjob, so you decide it is something we don't like talking about, but there are people who need help. and maytree offers a lovely
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chance for people to come and be listened to. let's have a look at the travel situation now. district line: minor delays between earls court and richmond while after a signal failure. on the roads, traffic is building up on the a13 as usual from dagenham to barking. while on the motorway, the m25 has a lane closed anticlockwise about two miles before j27 for the m11. finally at park royal, the north circular is down to one lane eastbound at the hanger lane gyratory after a vehicle overturned. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. hello, good morning. it is another rather cloudy and damp start to the day, but it is still feeling reasonably mild, we are expecting a few outbreaks of rain through the course of the day, maybe one to this morning for essex and
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kent, but more rain heading across—the—board as we head through the cause of the morning. it will start to break up, some light patchy rain, misty and murky in the afternoon with a maximum temperature getting up to between six and eight degrees, and the temperature is actually going to rise we had overnight. further outbreaks of persistent and heavy rain, so quite a wet night, so the temperature rising to around ten by the time we reached dawn tomorrow morning. so a wet and marvel nights and a wet start to wednesday, this rain will push through, though, that course of tomorrow morning, brightening up in the afternoon and the west you even get a little sunshine. temperatures remain bad but it does become rather windy as we had through to thursday and friday. there is more on the anti—trump protest in downing street and there is more on the bbc radio london station. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: more than 1.5 million people have called
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for donald trump's visit to the uk be called off. but what exactly is a state visit and how do they work? we'll get the lowdown on these grand occasions. when families break up, grandparents can sometimes be prevented from seeing their grandchildren. as campaigners call for improved access rights, we'll find out how to handle a sensitive situation. and the doctor is out. peter capaldi declared last night he'll be stepping out of the tardis for good. of the tardis for good. we'll look back on his time—travels, and speculate as to who might replace him. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news. donald trump has sacked the united states' top legal advisor after she questioned the legality of his travel ban. sally yates was the latest critic to speak out against his decision to stop refugees and citizens of seven mainly muslim countries from going to the united states. here's our washington correspondent david willis. donald trump's controversial travel ban is facing resistance on a variety of fronts
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after a weekend of mass protests, chaos at airports and a diplomatic outcry came an unusual act of defiance on the part of america's top law officer. sally yates, appointed us attorney general by barack obama, said in a letter to lawyers at thejustice department that given her responsibility to ensure that the government stands for what is right: deeming that an act of betrayal, mr trump promptly sacked her, installing dana boente as the new attorney general pending pending the swearing in of mr trump's preferred candidate, alabama senator jeff sessions, whose confirmation has been delayed by democrats in congress. sally yates is not alone in her misgivings, though. barack obama said in a statement:
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us diplomats have also registered their concerns, leading to this tongue—lashing from the white house. these career bureaucrats have a problem with it? i think they should either get with the programme or they can go. later today, mr trump is due to announce his pick for a place on the us supreme court. the choice, he said, was one that would appeal to evangelical christians. he may also be hoping it leads to some better headlines. david willis, bbc news, washington. meanwhile, a former head of the foreign office has accused theresa may of putting the queen in a very difficult position by inviting president trump to make a state visit to the uk. lord ricketts said it should be downgraded to an official visit to spare the queen more controversy. thousands of people joined anti—trump protests in london and around the uk yesterday. thousands of people joined anti—trump protests in london and around the uk yesterday. a petition calling for his trip to be cancelled has gathered more
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than 1.5 million signatures. the prime minister's office said theresa may was very happy to extend the invitation on behalf of the queen. police in canada have charged a french—canadian student after six muslim worshippers were shot dead at a mosque in quebec. alexandre bissonnette did not speak during a brief appearance in court. a number of other people were injured in the attack. he faces six counts of murder and five of attempted murder. a legal battle over the rights of parents to take their children on term—time holidays reaches the supreme court today. five judges will hear an appeal by isle of wight council, which fined a father, jon platt, for taking his daughter to florida without her school's permission. mr platt challenged his fine in the high court, and won. a secret network of wildlife traffickers selling baby chimpanzees as pets has been exposed by a year—long bbc news investigation. the research uncovered a notorious west african hub for wildlife trafficking, and led to the rescue of a one—year—old chimp.
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the animals are seized from the wild and sold as far away as the gulf states and china. louise is coming to terms with the news that peter capaldi is liaising, leaving the role of doctor who. —— leaving. he shocked fans by making the announcement during an interview withjo whiley on radio two. the actor, who has played the doctor since 2013, said he felt it was time to move on. he'll leave at the end of the year. i've always been somebody that did a lot of different things. i've never done one job for three years. this is the first time i've done this and i feel it is time for me to move different challenges. we're already getting suggestions. olivia colman is number one so far. first female. she would be brilliant. i'm in the coleman camp!
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by brilliant. i'm in the coleman camp! by the end of the programme, let's sort it out, dan! as if we had any influence! good morning! we are talking about the fa cup fifth round and the draw made last night. it was great. two nonleague sides in the fifth round for the first time in its current format. lincoln at home to burnley would have been the perfect role. normally the premier league sides get the home draw. but sutton have arsenal going to their ground. tiny changing rooms, little benches, amazing pictures on social media of where the big names for arsenal, if they play, controversial topic, will be hanging up their kids if they play in that tie. dreams have come true for non—league sutton united. the lowest—ranked side left in the fa cup will host 12—time winners arsenal in the fifth
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round of the fa cup. it means something for the fans and players alike to look forward to next month. arsenal at home, can't ask for much better. there's such a buzz around the town at the minute and a few of the town at the minute and a few of the lads obviously coming through the lads obviously coming through the arsenal academy, a great chance for them to play against the team they started with. so we're buzzing. it's still sinking in but that is an unbelievable draw for us, home to a clu b unbelievable draw for us, home to a club like arsenal is what dreams are made of. i'm just delighted for paul and all the players because they worked so hard to get to this stage and that is a magnificent draw for this double club. meanwhile, fellow non—league side lincoln city will travel to premier league burnley. holders manchester united will go to blackburn rovers, while premier league leaders chelsea face a trip to liverpool's conquerors' wolves. go to the bbc sport website for more details. hull city's ryan mason has been released from hospital following his head injury earlier this month.
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mason suffered a fractured skull after a clash of heads with gary cahill against chelsea. but he was discharged last night from st mary's hospital in london and will continue his recovery at home. the transfer window closes today and sunderland have already been busy, bringing in bryan oviedo and darron gibson. the pair team up with manager david moyes once again after working together at everton. oviedo has signed until 2020, while gibson's is an 18—month contract. david moyes, though, has sold patrick van aanholt, who's moving from sunderland to crystal palace for an undisclosed fee. the dutch left—back has signed a four and a half year contract. england propjoe marler will be fit for their 6 nations opener against france on saturday. the forward is back in full training after making a quick recovery from a fractured leg. great credit has to go tojoe. he's been incredibly diligent, he's done
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everything that's been asked of him to encourage the healing process and to encourage the healing process and to make sure he's in the best physical shape possible to be able to play test match rugby and that's what he's done. england will wrap up their tour of india today in the third and final deciding t20 international in bangalore. attentions will then turn to the tour of west indies in march. moeen ali will fly home with the rest of the squad later this week, with a mixed assessment of the team's fortunes in bangladesh and india. from the team's point of view obviously it's been a little bit disappointing losing the test series and roaring the one in bangladesh. winning the od! series in bangladesh was very good because they're a good side and hopefully winning t20 would bea side and hopefully winning t20 would be a last dom i could play to finish. from a personal point of view it's been good. i kind of expected that anyway during the winter. and finally it turns out last year's great scottish run wasn't quite as great as the organisers hoped. some runners complained the half marathon held last october was shorter than it should be. the route through glasgow
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was re—measured over the weekend and found to be 150 metres short of the full 13.1 miles. as a result the times of the 32,000 runners no longer count, including the course record set by winner callum hawkins. the organisers have apologised, but not offered refunds. you would be furious. all those people that got personal bests. would be furious. all those people that got personal bestslj would be furious. all those people that got personal bests. i have done 2/2 marathons, i hate running and they were awful experiences. you sound angry! for someone to tell me that time didn't count i would be furious. donald trump was invited for a state visit to the uk just a few days ago, but already a petition objecting to it has attracted more than 1.5 million signatures and demonstrations in several towns and cities. but what happens during a state visit? who decides who gets an invitation, and have any others attracted so much controversy?
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a state visit is a formal occasion involving a head of state to a foreign country. in the uk the head of state is the queen, not the prime minister. but little—known royal visits committed approves who gets those invitations once they've had a chat with the foreign office. these are grand occasions involving a state banquet in the ballroom of buckingham palace. the queen has hosted 109 state visit since she became the monarch back in 1952. some have proved more controversial than others. zimba bwe's some have proved more controversial than others. zimbabwe's president robert mugabe received the royal treatment in 1994 and was awarded an honorary knighthood. he was later stripped of that for rigging elections and leading a violent regime. in 2003, us president george w bush was met with 100,000 demonstrators in london's trafalgar
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square. they were protesting against the war in iraq. and most recently in 2015, china's president xi jingping's visit was criticised because of the country's record on human rights. joining us from our cambridge newsroom is the historian anne whitelock from royal holloway university of london. thank you very much for your time this morning. before we get to the specifics of donald trump's state visit and some of the controversy around that, can you explain how exactly a state visit works? it is an occasion of great pomp and pageantry. it's where the host nation, the uk, puts on a show for the foreign head of state and it involves various spectacular moments really, very public moments, and some private ones too. so the foreign head of state will be welcomed by the queen and members of the royalfamily, welcomed by the queen and members of the royal family, often welcomed by the queen and members of the royalfamily, often at welcomed by the queen and members of the royal family, often at horse guards in, and then after surveying the troops there is a carriage
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procession down the mall. if we rememberfrom previous procession down the mall. if we remember from previous state visits, the flags of the countries of the uk and the foreign country are waving down the mall. then on the yvonne that welcome there is normally the state banquet, which is a huge occasion, as your package said, the buckingham palace ballroom, 150 or so important dignitaries. then there's the moment where the queen makes a speech and offers a toast to the foreign head of state and then the foreign head of state and then the foreign head of state returns the foreign head of state returns the compliment and makes a toast to the compliment and makes a toast to the queen and one could perhaps anticipate in the case of donald trump that could be a moment of potential sensitivity or controversy. the rest of the visit is spent being hosted by the prime minister, the mayor of london, meeting various business and commerce dignitaries. it's a great occasion of spectacle. baring all that in mind, when you hear the
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former head of the foreign office has accused theresa may of putting the queen in i think the quote was a difficult position, do you agree, is that right, has theresa may not stitched up the queen but put her in a difficult decision? you know what, if there's anyone that can handle donald trump it's the queen! the queen has met some of the most controversial figures of the second half of the 20th century, from robert mugabe to saudi arabian presidents, chinese presidents, the list goes on. she can completely handle donald trump. she is a total pro. although many people would say that the donald trump visit is unwise, certainly the queen can handle it if that's what's going to happen. is it unusual that donald trump has been extended this invitation so early in his role as president? past presidents have had to wait quite a while for an
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official state visit, haven't they? absolutely. it is pretty hasty. the offer was made within a week of him becoming president. we don't know yet when he will come but the fact be in the tate and has been made so quickly certainly is rather unusual —— invitation. again it plays into the whole argument that the uk is courting the us and is desperate for this alliance. 0k, ok, thank you, fascinating information about what may or may not happen on a state visit if and when donald trump turns up. absolutely. shall we have a look at what is happening with the weather. this morning it is a cloudy start to the day and some of us start with some rain. if you haven't got it yet the chances are you will see it through the course of the day. we have a weather front in from the atlantic, bringing mild air across south—western areas, ahead of it in central and eastern parts it is a nippy start and we have all this
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rain heading our way, it is already across northern ireland, for example. in braemar yesterday it was — ten. today it is three degrees, so a13 — ten. today it is three degrees, so a 13 degrees hike in temperatures in the last 24 hours, but if you are heading out and you are in the rain it will feel on the chilly side. we have rain for scotland, heavy in the next couple of hours for northern ireland, and for england and wales a lot of cloud, drizzle and also some light green but across east anglia and the south—east at the moment it is mostly dry, mostly because there is mostly dry, mostly because there is drizzle here and there, and then as we move into the south—west and wales we have bits and pieces of rain, hillfog, wales we have bits and pieces of rain, hill fog, low cloud and generally damp conditions. now, through the course of the day, the weather front will glide to the east, taking the rain with it. it won't be raining all the time. it will be on and off. some of us may see some sunshine but the sunshine will be a premium. for northern ireland you are likely to see
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sunshine and fewer showers. mild in the south and west, not as mild as we pushed to the north—east. now, by the end of the afternoon, positive rain coming from the south—west, that will move across the channel islands and overnight across england and were. eventually we will see some of it getting to southern scotland. it will be windy to the west. we could see the odd pocket of frost in the shelter under clear skies. more especially so in the highlands. so, we start off on that note tomorrow, a wet one, with all of this rain continuing to push off eventually, albeit slowly, to the north sea, leaving behind dry conditions, cloud at times, but we will see some sunshine tomorrow. and then by the end of the day the next weather front here showing its hand in the west, introducing some patchy rain. temperatures climbing up into double figures that bit further north but even in the north temperatures rising by one or two degrees. on thursday at the moment it looks like we will see some
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showers and then another system coming in from the west introducing some rain and it is also going to be a windy day especially inland, but more especially across coastal areas in the south—west where we will have gales or even in the south—west where we will have gales 01’ even severe in the south—west where we will have gales or even severe gales. by then double figures across most of us. and then heads up on friday, this vigorous area of low pressure coming in our direction. the positioning of it is important for the wind strength. it might come across us, it might move to the south of us, but it will bring rain and windy conditions whatever it does. i will tell you more on that as we go through the week when we firm up the details. what food did you not like growing up? ham and red peppers. ham isa growing up? ham and red peppers. ham is a weird one. i know, i wouldn't eat it. i was anti- liver. is a weird one. i know, i wouldn't eat it. iwas anti- liver. in is a weird one. i know, i wouldn't eat it. i was anti- liver. in all honesty, i still am, eat it. i was anti- liver. in all honesty, istillam, because eat it. i was anti- liver. in all honesty, i still am, because liver and bacon smell... ok, well, as any pa rent and bacon smell... ok, well, as any parent will know, mealtimes can be
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difficult. but new research has found you can train little ones to enjoy certain foods. it's all part of the bbc‘s terrific scientific scheme, to get more youngsters involved in science. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to a school in cardiff to find out more. this is kale. it is packed full of chemicals that are really good for us chemicals that are really good for us but it tastes quite bitter. this is what the kids think of it in cardiff. it tastes like burnt rubber. this is day one of a three—week citizens science experiment to find out why some children find it so hard to like certain foods. i feel sick. and if they can be trained to acquire a taste. a month later we are back.
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every day for the last three weeks one every day for the last three weeks u every day for the last three weeks one group has eaten raisins, another kale. what we found is that children who had kale every day were more likely to like it that the children who had raisins every day. it shows us who had raisins every day. it shows us that we just need to keep trying these things and gradually we can learn to like them. so children like jack have gone from this to this. from two out of ten to eight out of ten. that is quite good, isn't it? from three to seven, brilliant. ten. that is quite good, isn't it? from three to seven, brilliantm is really nice. really? from zero to nine. but it didn't work for everyone. this is still a pleasant? is it better? no. why might it be? the next part of the experiment tried to find a reason. with a bit of food dye and a magnifying glass, they went in search of... super tasters. super tasters have more
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funky form happy on their tongues, the bombs which hold our taste buds and their children who had the most tended to struggle the most. that's interesting. fussy eaters might not be awkward. there might be a different reason for it. they have a different reason for it. they have a different sensory world they are living in, tasting things more intensely. which might help explain anisha's intense dislike. you had the second—highest number of bombs on your tongue, didn't you? yester weight that is maybe why you didn't like klae? i like throwing up now. —— macro to. like klae? i like throwing up now. -- macro to. children in scotland, wales and northern ireland took part in the experiment as part of the terrific scientific programme. what we have learnt is this, you really do have to try, try and try again when it comes to new tastes. can i
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spit it out? 0h, oh, we all know that feeling, don't we? great reaction from the kids. i had a thing with peppers, if something touched red pepper, ijust couldn't eat it, and i love it now. now you are embracing it.|j couldn't eat it, and i love it now. now you are embracing it. i would even eat it raw. lots of comments coming in. my son is seven and eats nothing green, no vegetables at all. peter says, if we didn't clear the plate, no desert or seconds. mum cooked a fresh meal and not individual meals based on a whim. the science is to try and try again. for more information on how to get involved, go to bbc.co.uk/terrificscientific. we have been doing some experiments with rocket as well. yes. if you want to know how the economy is doing, just look up. cranes on the skyline suggest that businesses are spending a lot of money and aiming high. birmingham is enjoying a building boom, so we've sent ben there. good morning. welcome to birmingham.
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we have often discussed house prices are rising because supply isn't keeping up with demand. at if you look around at most guidelines they are full of cranes and they tend to indicate what everyone is thinking about the economy. if you are building, people might havejobs, they might be looking to move, and a regeneration of city centres, like here in birmingham. this used to be the public gnabry but it has been demolished and here they are going to put up a big office block, now another one with shops and offices and things, really reflecting the booming demand for accommodation, commercial or residential. with me to shed some light on this, edwin from deloitte, and rob from the development. good morning. birmingham is topping the list as far as crane activity is concerned. we might smile but it is serious and
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important because it shows that developers are confident about the economy? yes, absolutely. we are seeing activity in all sectors, especially strong in residential, and a big upset in residential units being put into birmingham, so it is a very positive time and a lot is going on. why has it taken so long because we talk a lot, when it comes to residential and housing, that we think, the demand is there what they don't seemingly see them built, so it takes time? yes, planning and development takes time to work through and delivery of projects can ta ke through and delivery of projects can take many years, but the activity is strong and we are seeing an awful lot happening in the pipeline, so looking ahead there is a lot committed next year and beyond. you are the developer, building this huge site, it is a big site, a lot of planning has got into it, it has taken time see the tower starting at? that is right, 2009 is when it
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started, when the show will hit the ground in the beginning of 2015, it is six or seven years of planning, putting the land together, working with our public sector partners, birmingham city council, we are right in the middle of the city centre, complicated, we have the a38 beneath the site, music halls, concert facilities, museums, so it took a lot of planning but it will be well worth it in the end when you see the transformation of the heart of the city. and just one final thought on the confidence in terms of how confident you are that these things will be full, business will move in, you must think business is looking at? absolutely, people refer to it as birmingham's decade, it is birmingham's renaissance, the uplift has been fantastic. it has been driven by the public sector but now the private sector are doing their
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bit with major investment in the city centre. thank you very much. we will talk to them a little more later. we will show you around here when it is light because it is a huge construction site with lots going on, but the building work cannot start until 8am because they are penned in on all sides by hotels and offices, so they have to keep the noise down, so we will be back a little later. i can imagine people are grateful. thank you. the drilling starts at eight o'clock. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. more than 400 routemaster buses are being recalled because of a fault with the doors. it means the rear door can be opened while the bus is actually moving, which will then make the vehicle suddenly stop. the buses have already had faults with their batteries and steering. transport for london says, "the recall is just a precaution." a school in east london looking to change its name is being accused of trying to remove the "heritage and culture" of the local
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bangladeshi community. osmani primary in tower hamlets was named in after general muhammad osmani, one of the leaders in bangladesh's war of independence. the school now wants to change its name to what it says is the more neutral vallance primary, but over 1,000 supporters have signed a petition demanding the name is kept as it is. the school will now consult parents. london used to have one of the lowest suicide rates in the country, but in last couple of years the figure's shot up bya third. so this year's comic relief campaign, which launches today, is focusing on mental health. and long—time supporter of the charity, broadcaster sir trevor mcdonald, has been visiting the maytree project in north london, which helps people in a suicidal crisis. you're confronted with this and realise what a need is for this and this place does an absolutely fantasticjob, so you decide it is something we don't
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like talking about, but there are people who need help. and maytree offers a lovely chance for people to come and be listened to. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the district line, minor delays between earls court and richmond while after a signalfailure. on the roads, northbound traffic blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. there are long delays on the eastbound a40 from northolt into the hanger lane gyratory, where there are restrictions on the eastbound north circular to recover an overturned lorry. finally, the woolwich ferry is down to a one boat service due mechanical problems. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. it's another rather cloudy and damp start to the day, but it's still feeling reasonably mild. we're expecting a few outbreaks of rain through the course of the day, maybe one or two to this
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morning for parts of essex and kent, but more rain heading across the board as we head through the course of the morning. it will start to break up, some light, patchy rain, quite a misty and murky afternoon with a maximum temperature getting up to between six and eight degrees, and the temperature is actually going to rise as we head overnight. further outbreaks of more persistent and heavy rain, so quite a wet night, but the temperature rising to around ten by the time we reach dawn tomorrow morning. so a wet and mild old night, and a wet start to wednesday. this rain will push through, though, the course of tomorrow morning, brightening up a little in the afternoon. to the west, you may even get a little sunshine. temperatures remain mild but it does become rather windy as we head through to thursday and friday. va nessa vanessa feltz is on the radio station in a few minutes. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. donald trump fires his top lawyer after she says she's not convinced his immigration
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ban is legal. the white house says sally yates betrayed her department. it came as thousands protested around the uk against the travel restrictions. good morning, it's tuesday, the 31st of january. the wildlife traffickers putting the future of the chimpanzee under threat. we'll have a special report after a year long undercover investigation. a row over a term—time family holiday reaches the highest court in the land today. there is a building boom
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going on in some of our biggest cities and its busiest right here in birmingham. so what does the state of the construction industry tell us about the economy? i'll be finding out. in sport, it's the tie they wanted. the lowest ranked side left in the fa cup. sutton united will host the 12—time winners arsenal in the last 16. we need to get back on. back where? to the future. 2017 needs us. the time lord calls time. peter ca paldi announces he'll step down from his role as doctor who at the end of the year. carol has the weather. good morning. a cloudy start to the day, some rain around. the rain will be on and off through the day with limited sunshine. the best sunshine will be in northern ireland with a few showers here by the afternoon. more details in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump has sacked
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the united states' top legal advisor after she told government lawyers not to enforce his travel ban. sally yates was the latest critic to speak out against his decision to stop refugees and citizens of seven mainly muslim countries from coming to the united states. here's our washington correspondent david willis. donald trump's controversial travel ban is facing resistance on a variety of fronts. after a weekend of mass protests, chaos at airports and a diplomatic outcry came an unusual act of defiance on the part of america's top law officer. sally yates, appointed us attorney general by barack obama, said in a letter to lawyers at the justice department that given her responsibility to ensure that the government stands for what is right: deeming that an act of betrayal, mr trump promptly sacked her, installing dana boente as the new attorney general.
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pending the swearing in of mr trump's preferred candidate, alabama senator jeff sessions, whose confirmation has been delayed by democrats in congress. sally yates is not alone in her misgivings, though. barack obama said in a statement: us diplomats have also registered their concerns, leading to this tongue—lashing from the white house. these career bureaucrats have a problem with it? i think they should either get with the programme or they can go. later today, mr trump is due to announce his pick for a place on the us supreme court. the choice, he said, was one that would appeal to evangelical christians. he may also be hoping it leads to some better headlines. david willis, bbc news, washington. meanwhile, a former head of the foreign office has accused
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theresa may of putting the queen in a very difficult position by inviting president trump to make a state visit to the uk. lord ricketts said it should be downgraded to an official visit to spare the queen more controversy. thousands of people joined anti—trump protests in london and around the uk yesterday. a petition calling for his trip to be cancelled has gathered more than 1.5 million signatures. the prime minister's office said theresa may was very happy to extend the invitation on behalf of the queen. mps are to begin two days of debate over the government's proposal to get the formal process of brexit under way. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has ordered his mps to vote with the government, but some are expected to defy him. mps will vote on triggering article 50 tomorrow. police in canada have charged a french—canadian student after six muslim worshippers were shot dead at a mosque in quebec. alexandre bissonnette did not speak during a brief appearance in court. a number of other people were injured in the attack. he faces six counts of murder and five of attempted murder.
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a legal battle over the rights of parents to take their children out of school for term—time holidays reaches the supreme court today. the case will have ramifications for families across england, as our education correspondent gillian hargreaves explains. isle of wight businessmanjon platt says dozens of parents get in touch with him every day about term time holiday fines. he decided to fight it all the way and says he has no regrets after taking his daughter to disneyland when she had 90% attendance at school. the legal row is about what going to school regularly means. i believe that regularly meant attending school frequently or very often but their position is it means every day. that is the most draconian interpretation of this legislation
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you could possibly have. councils from the isle of wight to the north of england have different policies. some issue thousands of fines. others almost none. the rules say if a head declares an absence of an authorised the local council can find each parent £60 per child. that fine can double if it's not paid between dominant within 21 days. ministers say exam results shape children's futures and missing even a few days can make a clear difference. many head teachers agreed. it's really important because young people only get one chance at their education and one week, two weeks out of that can make an enormous difference on the progress they're able to make in any given year and overall in terms of there education. 35 councils have told the bbc they revise their guidance since mr platt took his case to court. the outcome could have a big impact. the supreme court will make a decision within months. gillian hargreaves, bbc news. two suspected animal smugglers have
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been arrested in ivory coast following a year—long bbc investigation into the trafficking of baby chimpanzees. the animals are seized from the wild and sold as pets for about £10,000 each. here's our science editor david shukman. of all the crimes involving wildlife the trade in baby chimpanzees is among the most shocking. we were sent these videos by dealers offering to sell us the tiny animals. they're in big demand as pets. this one is about a year old, a male, captured in thejungle and orphaned, like the others, when poachers killed his family. he was shown to our undercover reporter who used a hidden camera to film him being held by a dealer called ibrahima traore in ivory coast. the police were waiting nearby and moved in.
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the dealer and his uncle were arrested and now face charges relating to wildlife trafficking. so, the police havejust made all the arrests. it's pretty edgy here, the atmosphere, and it's all about this, a baby chimpanzee taken from the jungle. the real tragedy of this trade is that to get one infant chimpanzee out of the jungle, all of the adults in its family have to be killed, that's as many as ten adults slaughtered just to get one chimp here ready for trade. for the police officer in charge, it's vital to stop the traffickers from wiping out the chimpanzees. the police seized the dealers' mobile phones. they revealed a global
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network of smugglers. but for the moment, the international police effort is focused on other types of wildlife crime, not chimpanzees. without the funding we can't do anything. but what we're trying to become is more intelligence—led, so we start looking at what the threats are and what law enforcement need to address to maintain a level of security. with primates unfortunately our information holdings is not as strong as it should be. the baby chimp was hungry but safe in the zoo at abidjan. his keepers gave him a name, nemli junior. he's doing well, others aren't so lucky. david shukman, bbc news, in ivory coast. a fascinating report. you can see the second part of david shukman's report on the bbc news at 10 this evening,
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and a longer version of that report is on the bbc news website. peter capaldi is stepping down from the role of the doctor in doctor who. he shocked fans by making the announcement during an interview withjo whiley on radio two. the actor, who has been in the role since 2013, said he felt it was time to move on. he'll leave at the end of the year. i've always been somebody that did a lot of different things. i've never done one job for three years. this is the first time i've done this and i feel it is time for me to move different challenges. he doesn't go for a while. send in your suggestions about the next doctor. mps will begin debating the uk's exit from the european union today, as the government pushes ahead with its plans to trigger article 50 by the end of march. whilejeremy corbyn has ordered his party not to oppose the process, a number of labour mps are expected to defy his instructions and vote against it. one of them is ben bradshaw,
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mp for exeter and former cabinet minister. good morning. nice to talk to you. why are you voting against article 50 when the majority of voters decided it was time to leave in the referendum. are you a democracy deny? no, my constituency voted remain but the main reason is i could not vote to destroyjobs and prosperity in exeter, my city, and around the country and theresa may has made clear she wants the hardest pa rt has made clear she wants the hardest part brexit is outside the single market and the customs union. that would be damaging enough but she said if she doesn't get that she would fall back on world trade organisation rules and that would be catastrophic for the economy and i could not support that level of self harm. did you wake up this decision heavily? you are defying your leader and ata heavily? you are defying your leader and at a time when lots of people are looking at the labour party and
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saying it is so divided, you must have thought long and hard about the fa ct have thought long and hard about the fact this would further divide the party? all of us are thinking carefully about this and we are looking at the interests of our constituency and i hope all mps will do that. this is the single biggest decision we will face in our lifetime, the consequences of which generations will have to live with for decades to come. i thought about it carefully. if theresa may hadn't gone for the damaging hard brexit i may have supported the imposition of article 50 but that wasn't on the ballot paper last year, and it will do so much damage so i couldn't support it. how much pressure is being put on you and others by the leaders of this? not a great deal because there are so many labour mps feeling the same as me —— leaders of this. we have had overwhelming support from labour party members in
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my constituency for the position i've taken. hundreds of letters of support and only three critical. for the first time in 20 years in parliament i will vote against the party whip on a piece of legislation. there will be a backlash across the nation, you say you're not a democracy deny. the result was pretty narrow.|j understand it was narrow but it was still yes we would like to leave the eu, it wasn't no. it wasn't yes to leaving the single market and the customs union and mps are called upon to exercise ourjudgement. we are elected representatives, not mandated delegates and mps need to think carefully about whether future generations will forgive us if we make the wrong decision and do damage to the economy. jeremy corbyn, i know you say you will defy your leader, but he says he will seek to hold the government to account on every phase of this
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process. surely that's what you should be doing? the problem with thatis should be doing? the problem with that is once article 50 is triggered, that is a1 waste out of the european union. there's no going back. this could be my and my collea g u es back. this could be my and my colleagues only chance to stop the tories' hard damaging brexit, what at least to soften its blow, and thatis at least to soften its blow, and that is what we will try to do over the next two, two and a half weeks. we will be talking about dr who later, my favourite subject of the day. you are genuinely sad? i am a lwa ys day. you are genuinely sad? i am always sad when they change him. we generate the doctor all the time, don't we? maybe ijust like generate the doctor all the time, don't we? maybe i just like the change. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. you have to move to keep up with the weather this week. it is all over the place. today what we have is a cloudy day it had with rain at times and sunshine at a premium unless you are in northern ireland where it
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will brighten up quite nicely but not at the moment with heavy rain at the moment in northern ireland moving steadily eastwards through the course of the day. so this morning it is a mild start under all the rain for western areas but for central and eastern areas it is a cold start and having said that yesterday this time in braemar it was —10, at the moment it is three degrees, so that is a jump in temperature. having said that, if you are in the range you won't notice it because it is going to feel chilly. heavy rain continuing across northern ireland. across northern england, we have a lot of cloud and rain and drizzle and some helpful. it is the same in wales, cloudy with spots of rain and hill fog, and you can see the rain extending into the isle of wight. something drier in east anglia and kent, with a little drizzle, and for south—west england a lot of dampness, low cloud, hill fog and drizzle, and the rain extending into the channel islands. now, through the channel islands. now, through the course of the day, the rain moves to the east, you can see there
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will be some drive slots in between the rain. even limited sunshine, a few of us will see some, but most won't, —— dry slots. northern ireland sticking out like a sore thumb with sunshine and showers. 11 degrees, pleasant in belfast, and you can see in the south we look at nine — 11 degrees. through the evening in overnight, the rain goes, the next polls comes from the south—west, extending across england and wales, getting eventually into southern scotland, —— pulse. hill fog associated with this too and for clear skies there will be a touch of frost but it won't be particular widespread. so tomorrow we start with the rain continuing its journey, moving off eventually into the north sea. behind it right and up, it dries up and we will see some sunshine. later on we have the next band of patchy rain and windy conditions coming in across the west. temperature—wise, double figures east and in further northwards, and in scotland and northern ireland and the far north
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of england, seven or eight, with temperatures also climbing. on thursday, it is looking like a messy picture with low pressure coming from the west, rain rotating around it, and also strong wind, so it will be windy inland, but we might be looking at coastal gales, even severe gales, for the south—west and the west. by then most of us in double figures. and they want to draw your attention to friday because there is a level of uncertainty about this vigorous area of low pressure coming our way, bringing wet and windy conditions. we might have stormy conditions but it depends where it will end up —— our way. further south, it it depends where it will end up —— ourway. furthersouth, it will affect where we have the strongest winds, so i will keep you posted. when will you know that about friday, is it a couple of days away? it is evolving. we are looking at different models and they are not converging at the moment, so, yes, a couple of days hence and we will be able to tell you with more conviction. ok. thank you. the
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sister of the murdered mpjo cox says she is going to continue fighting the work on loneliness her sister began. breakfast‘s tim muffett has been talking tojo's sister, as a commission on loneliness is launched in her memory. itis a horrible problem. —— it is a horrible problem. you sort of go down and down and down and lose your confidence. sandra's loneliness was all—consuming. loneliness, it leads to other things, you know, it affects your mental health and things like that, it makes you depressed. how bad did things get for you? really bad. really bad, where i didn't want to live any more. made aware of her isolation, sandra was visited by her mp, jo cox. i wanted to speak tojo, i want to talk about the elderly being lonely, isolated, ill, nobody going to their homes. she was really shocked, really, i thought. she was really listening, you know,
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intense, and i think she looked a bit upset as well. jo had begun setting up a cross—party commission on loneliness to help tackle the issue when she was murdered. it's one of those issues where she felt she could make a real difference. today, with the backing of her family, it is officially launched. we have had our very dark days and our very dark times, as you would expect, but actually, we're not gonna be beaten by what has happened, and certainly for me i have decided that i am going to come out fighting and i am going to try and make some of the changes and the differences that jo cannot make herself any more. the idea is that politicians, charities and other organisations work together to help those who feel isolated. we were like that from being kids, people is what we cared about, so i can't go back to normality, because there is no normality
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withoutjo, but what i can do is try to work to continue some of the good stuff she did and to try to make her proud. more than 9 million people, around a fifth of the uk adult population, often feel lonely, according to one study. the impact on health can be profound. but admitting that loneliness is a problem can be difficult. hi, sandra. hi, are you ok? sandra contacted the royal voluntary service, one of 13 organisations supporting thejo cox loneliness commission. volunteers like victoria take time—out to visit lonely people. the impact can be profound. it is quite a simple thing at the end of the day. i spent one hour of my whole week by stopping on the way home from work. it's no extra effort on my part but actually the benefit that people get out of it i think will be massive in terms of what you can do. i'll try and help if i can. really, really nice people.
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"start a conversation," the motto of the new loneliness commission is simple. it's hoped it'll be effective. jo cox's friend and conservative mp seema kennedy, who is one of those launching the new campaign, joins us now. morning to you. we talked about loneliness in young people, in children yesterday, it does go across generations, doesn't it. how do you see it affecting people?m affects people from all ages, all parts of the country, all social backgrounds, and it can be really profoundly detrimental on your mental health but also on your physical health. if you are chronically lonely, it is as bad as smoking 15 cigarettes per day. you might have increased risk of high blood pressure, risk of falls, it is a serious problem. as you said, it is across all ages, and this is what
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jo was so determined, from the first timea jo was so determined, from the first time a had to discuss it, she wanted to shine a spotlight on how loneliness affects people of all ages. and do you see it in your constituency talking to people? yes, really do. people are quite proud, and first of all, they might not realise they are lonely, and also they want to put a brave face and say, iam they want to put a brave face and say, i am fine, i am getting on with it, but we are humans and we need human contact, you know, so people need face—to—face contact that some of these fantastic groups, like those you mentioned in your clip, the organisations we are working with as part of the commission, provide. there are can be days when someone doesn't speak to anyone at all, maybe apart from if they go to the shop or whatever it might be, so how can you change it? unfortunately it isn't just how can you change it? unfortunately it isn'tjust days. some people go weeks without it. obviously, people with physical impairment, the elderly, there are fantastic
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telephone services, such as silver line, they run great things like that, and social media has a role. if you can connect with people in the virtual world, as long as it makes you connect with them in the real world , makes you connect with them in the real world, i think that's important. we really do need face—to—face contact. important. we really do need face-to-face contact. can you give us more face-to-face contact. can you give us more detail on whatjo cox's plan was and how it worked? so, first of all, she was a real doer, she wanted something practical. from the first meeting she said, i've worked on loads of reports but all that happens is they sit on somebody‘s shelf, they might read the introduction and that is it, so she wa nted introduction and that is it, so she wanted all of us to say, this is a call to action, we almost somebody we should have called, someone we should have, you know, made contact with — we can all do it. should have, you know, made contact with - we can all do it. i suppose if you have 53 minutes, what can you do with it? well, for example, i
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have thought i should phone my grandparents more —— five three minutes. people living alone, those who cannot get out of the house, it makes a difference. reach out to your next—door neighbour, talk to someone on the bus, start a conversation. we need the permission to talk to people. and also, there are wonderful schemes, i know, to talk to people. and also, there are wonderfulschemes, i know, in leyla nd, are wonderfulschemes, i know, in leyland, my constituency, various key youth, they run lunch clubs, you can volunteer and talk to people and help them get out and about and make contact with people. and volunteering in its own can start a conversation, can't it? yes, absolutely, and volunteering helps the people and also the volunteer can share those experiences. it isn't just older can share those experiences. it isn'tjust older people, it can be younger people, university students have wonderful schemes with shared living between young people and old people, reading schemes where you
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have grandparents reading to children, that crossgenerational stuff is pa rt children, that crossgenerational stuff is part of it, but it is also, these... loneliness is often trigger point, britain and, becoming a carer, retirement. it is about saying to people, build up the connections in your younger years so that when the trigger points come you are ready to face the world —— griezmann. and face the possibility of loneliness. we have done that he on bbc breakfast as well. thank you. coming up on breakfast: ben is in birmingham this morning. if you want to know how well the economy is doing, then all you need to do is look up. why's that, ben? yes, good morning, welcome to birmingham. here is a question, what does it tell you about the state of the economy? well apparently a lot because if you look on your skyline ina because if you look on your skyline in a city or town near you, there is a lot of those things there, well, the chances are things are picking up, suggesting building and
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construction is more confident about jobs, people coming to the town, so they are building to cash in on the boom of arrivals for office space and houses. we talked on the programme about how demand for housing has exceeded supply, which is why prices have been pushed up, and builders are listening, building more to caterfor the and builders are listening, building more to cater for the demand. and particularly in places like this, because birmingham, this is a big development, there are two huge tower blocks coming, all of this on the old library block in the centre of the city, but it is also manchester, leeds and belfast topping the list because people are moving out of the capital, moving to big cities across the country, and they are responding by building, so a lot of work is going on in the cities and it would suggest the economy is picking up. i am going to speak with some guests, the people who compiled the report and those building this, sojoin me then. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. more than 400 routemaster buses are being recalled because of a fault with the doors. it means the rear door can be opened while the bus is actually moving, which will then make the vehicle suddenly stop. the buses have already had faults with their batteries and steering. transport for london says, "the recall is just a precaution." a school in east london looking to change its name is being accused of trying to remove the "heritage and culture" of the local bangladeshi community. osmani primary in tower hamlets was named in after general muhammad osmani, one of the leaders in bangladesh's war of independence. the school now wants to change its name to what it says is the more neutral vallance primary, but over 1,000 supporters have signed a petition demanding the name is kept as it is. the school will now consult parents. london used to have one of the lowest suicide rates
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in the country, but in last couple of years the figure's shot up bya third. so this year's comic relief campaign, which launches today, is focusing on mental health. and long—time supporter of the charity, broadcaster sir trevor mcdonald, has been visiting the maytree project in north london, which helps people in a suicidal crisis. you're confronted with this and realise what a need is for it and this place does an absolutely fantasticjob, so you decide this —— and this place does an absolutely fantastic job, suicide is something we don't like talking about, but there are people who need help. and maytree offers a lovely chance for people to come and be listened to. sir trevor mcdonald there. let's have a look at the travel situation now. on the district line, minor delays between earls court and richmond while after a signalfailure. on the roads, there are long delays on the eastbound a40 from northolt into the hanger lane gyratory which is closed to recover an overturned lorry. in walthamstow, the north circular is down to two lanes westbound
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after a mutli—vehicle accident. delays go back to the woodford rd at waterworks corner. finally the woolwich ferry is down to a one boat service due mechanical problems. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. it's another rather cloudy and damp start to the day, but it's still feeling reasonably mild. we're expecting a few outbreaks of rain through the course of the day, maybe one or two this morning for parts of essex and kent, but more rain heading across the board as we head through the course of the morning. it will start to break up, though, some light, patchy rain, quite a misty, murky afternoon with a maximum temperature getting up to between six and eight degrees. now, the temperature is actually going to rise as we head overnight. further outbreaks of more persistent and heavy rain, so quite a wet night, but the temperature rising to around ten by the time we get to dawn tomorrow morning. so a wet and mild old night,
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and a wet start to wednesday. this rain will push through, though, the course of tomorrow morning, brightening up a little in the afternoon. towards the west, you may even get a little sunshine. temperatures remain mild but it does become rather windy as we head through to thursday and friday. welcome vanessa feltz is talking about the government bill which will lead to a vote on the uk withdrawal from the eu and mps are discussing it today, it is on bbc radio london. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. the headlines: donald trump has sacked the united states' top legal advisor after she questioned the legality of his travel ban. sally yates was the latest critic to speak out against his decision to stop citizens of seven mainly muslim countries from entering america. former president barack obama also made an unprecedented intervention in the immigration row, warning that american values are at stake. meanwhile, a former head of the foreign office has accused
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theresa may of putting the queen in a very difficult position by inviting president trump to make a state visit to the uk. lord ricketts said it should be downgraded to an official visit to spare the queen more controversy. thousands of people joined protests in london and around the uk yesterday. a petition calling for the president's trip to be cancelled has gathered more than 1.5 million signatures. downing street said theresa may was very happy to extend the invitation on behalf of the queen. mps are to begin two days of debate over the government's proposal to get the formal process of brexit under way. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has ordered his mps to vote with the government, but some are expected to defy him. mps will vote on triggering article 50 tomorrow. this is the single biggest decision we will face in our lifetime, the consequences of which
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generations will have to live with for decades to come. i thought about it carefully. if theresa may hadn't gone for the damaging hard brexit i may have supported the invocation of article 50 but that wasn't on the ballot paper last year, and it will do so much economic damage so i couldn't support it. police in canada have charged a french—canadian student, after six muslim worshippers were shot dead at a mosque in quebec. alexandre bissonnette did not speak during a brief appearance in court. a number of other people were injured in the attack. he faces six counts of murder and five of attempted murder. a legal battle over the rights of parents to take their children on term—time holidays reaches the supreme court today. five judges will hear an appeal by isle of wight council, which fined a father, jon platt, for taking his daughter to florida without her school's permission. mr platt challenged his fine in the high court, and won. a secret network of wildlife traffickers, selling baby chimpanzees as pets,
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has been exposed by a year—long bbc news investigation. the research uncovered a notorious west african hub for wildlife trafficking, and led to the rescue of a one—year—old chimp. the animals are seized from the wild and sold as far away as the gulf states and china. peter capaldi is leaving doctor who. he shocked fans by making the announcement during an interview withjo whiley on radio two. the actor, who has played the doctor since 2013, said he felt it was time to move on. he'll leave at the end of the year. i've always been somebody that did a lot of different things. i've never done one job for three years. this is the first time i've done this and i feel it is time for me to move different challenges. as far as you understand he will still be there for the christmas
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special, which will be very special. and steven moffat is going as well. exactly, double hit. big changes ahead. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather. as you said earlier, you don't like change! we always do the sport at around this time, that's how louise likes it! the fa cup draw was dreamy and brilliant —— was brilliant. we've been talking about it for the wrong reasons over the last week with big teams fielding young players and reserve teams, people said what happened to the magic of the cup, disrespecting lower league teams, this isn't the way it should be moving forward and the big teams should play the big players because that's what the fans want. the fans wa nt that's what the fans want. the fans want a story like this, sutton united against arsenal and lincoln city go to burnley in the premier league as well! maybe we'll be moving on, maybe they won't play their big players next time, arsenal
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or burnley, but we will all be tuning in! i'm sure sutton won't care! dreams have come true for non—league sutton united. the lowest—ranked side left in the fa cup will host 12—time winners arsenal in the fifth round of the fa cup. it means something for the fans and players alike to look forward to next month. arsenal at home, can't ask for much better. there's such a buzz around the town at the minute and a few of the lads obviously coming through the arsenal academy, a great chance for them to play against the team they started with. so we're buzzing. it's still sinking in but that is an unbelievable draw for us. home to a club like arsenal is what dreams are made of. i'm just delighted for paul and all the players because they worked so hard to get to this stage and that is a magnificent draw for this football club. meanwhile, fellow non—league side lincoln city will travel to premier league burnley. holders manchester united will go to blackburn rovers, while premier league leaders chelsea face a trip
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to liverpool's conquerors' wolves. go to the bbc sport website for more details. hull city's ryan mason has been released from hospital following his head injury earlier this month. mason suffered a fractured skull after a clash of heads with gary cahill against chelsea. but he was discharged last night from st mary's hospital in london and will continue his recovery at home. the transfer window closes today and sunderland have already been busy, bringing in bryan oviedo and darron gibson. the pair team up with manager david moyes once again after working together at everton. oviedo has signed until 2020, while gibson's is an 18—month contract. david moyes, though, has sold patrick van aanholt, who's moving from sunderland to crystal palace for an undisclosed fee. the dutch left—back has signed a four—and—a—half—year contract. england propjoe marler will be fit for their 6 nations opener against france on saturday. the forward is back in full training
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after making a quick recovery from a fractured leg. great credit has to go tojoe. he's been incredibly diligent. he's done everything that's been asked of him to encourage the healing process to make sure he's in the best physical shape possible to be able to play test match rugby, and that's what he's done. england will wrap up their tour of india today in the third and final deciding t20 international in bangalore. attentions will then turn to the tour of west indies in march. moeen ali will fly home with the rest of the squad later this week, with a mixed assessment of the team's fortunes in bangladesh and india. from the team's point of view obviously it's been a little bit disappointing losing the test series and drawing the one in bangladesh and then winning the od! series in bangladesh was very good because they're a good side. hopefully winning this t20 would be a nice way to finish. from a personal point of view it's been alright. i've had some good performances and some poor ones. i kind of expected that anyway during the winter.
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and finally, it turns out last year's great scottish run wasn't quite as great as the organisers hoped. some runners complained the half marathon held last october was shorter than it should be. the route through glasgow was re—measured over the weekend and found to be150 metres short of the full 13.1 miles. as a result the times of the 32,000 runners no longer count, including the course record set by winner callum hawkins. the organisers have apologised, but not offered refunds. 32,000 angry people i imagine waking up 32,000 angry people i imagine waking up to that news this morning. robbed. pretty disappointing having run that far there wasn't that extra few metres. maybe a little loop at the end of it. run around your kitchen a few extra times if you're one of the 32,000 people. if you want to know how the economy is doing, just look up. cranes on the skyline suggest that
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businesses are spending a lot of money and aiming high. birmingham is enjoying a building boom, so we've sent ben there. good morning. good morning. welcome good morning. welcome to good morning. welcome to birmingham. there are a lot of cranes here and you're right, it tells us about the state of the economy because when the builders are building it suggests they're confident they will be more demand for office space, housing and shops. in birmingham they're doing that, they have demolished the old central library and they're demolished the old central library and they‘ re building demolished the old central library and they're building a new development with offices, shops and commercial space in the centre of birmingham. why are they so confident chris jo? birmingham. why are they so confident chrisjo? let's ask them, the boss of birmingham city council is with us —— so confident? john, let me start with you, your office is just over the way. let me start with you, your office isjust over the way. it isjust there, i took over as leader about a year ago and there, i took over as leader about a yearago andl there, i took over as leader about a year ago and i watched this over the la st year ago and i watched this over the last 12 months developing into something we are excited about in
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the city, the citizens of birmingham are excited about it. it's about confidence in the city, it's about office, residential, student accommodation as well, it is a big student city and its about leisure in the city centre as well. everytime you see a crane see millions of pounds of investment underneath it and hundreds ofjobs, and that's what matters. you're the developer, rob, you're building this. why is it so important and it has taken a lot of workjust to get to this point to have diggers in the ground? we started on this in 2007/2008, so several years of planning before we hit the ground. in the heart of the city centre, big complicated structures underneath us and an important neighbour next door to us. a huge amount of investment as well. this first phase development you can see, it's around £180 million to get this under way. another £500 million to go yet for
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future phases. how do you decide what to build, how do you know the right mix of office space, shops, commercial premises and flats? on this development it is offices with ground floor use like restaurants and retail. when we do this we look at demand in terms of people already based in the city. for the people coming to the city like hsbc and deutsche bank, and living in london is even more costly and we are seeing more interest in birmingham with what it has to offer for new occupiers. we are thinking about providing space for those people. john, you're always thinking about that, you want big businesses to set up that, you want big businesses to set up and bring the staff and the money. how do you plan that, this ta kes a money. how do you plan that, this takes a long time, you have to be thinking ten, 15, 20 years ahead? we are a very young
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thinking ten, 15, 20 years ahead? we are a very young city, one of the youngest in europe. people want to invest here. it's notjust about investing in the city centre, you have to invest across the entirety of the city as well. there may be cranes elsewhere in the city to accommodate that growth and the confidence in investing in birmingham from around the world, never mind the uk. for now, guys, thank you very much. it looks really interesting because we've been down here this morning and you will notice the building site is very quiet at the moment because the diggers can't start because of the neighbours until 8am. i don't know if you can see in the distance, this is the old music school and the violinist practising this morning, quite a calm start to the day amid all the construction, demolition and all the construction, demolition and all sorts of things. a nice way to end the morning. they look like they're working hard as well. thank you very much conor benn. we nearly had a bit of surprise music! very
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cultured —— very cultured. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: donald trump has sacked the united states government's top lawyer after she called into question the legality of his travel ban. mps are to begin debating the bill which will allow theresa may to launch formal brexit negotiations with the european union. we often get asked what is behind the desk. are you really going to show them? a pepper. in fact, a brace of peppers. there's a reason for this, we are talking about food you didn't like when you were growing up and you hated peppers. you didn't like when you were growing up and you hated pepperslj growing up and you hated peppers.” hated anything that had been touched bya hated anything that had been touched by a red pepper. nowi hated anything that had been touched by a red pepper. now i love them. you embrace them? i might eat them raw, i won't do it at the moment! and interesting breakfast creek. carol, what did you hate when you we re carol, what did you hate when you were growing up? -- and interesting
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breakfast treat. runny eggs, i hated those. you haven't recovered? no, if they are not hard, they are something else, but if they are runny! we will tell you why we are talking about it later, if you eat it over and over again you might be all no thank you! the weather is barely cloudy. it is wet for some of us. the rain is already in some parts and it will move from the west to the east during the day courtesy of this weather front. —— fairly cloudy. it is pretty mild. ahead of it in central and eastern areas it is pretty chilly. quite a lot of rain in northern ireland during the night, that is getting into western scotland, some rain in parts of wales and the south—west and the channel islands. picking up that band of rain, through the day it will continue to glide over to the east. it won't be raining all the
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time, there will be some drier interludes in between and a few will see some sunshine but the lion's share of the sunshine today will eventually be in northern ireland. this afternoon in scotland, you can see the back edge of the rain pushing away. some drizzly bits and pieces left behind and quite a lot of cloud. you might see some sunshine in argyll and bute but it will be at a premium. in northern ireland, some sunny spells and a few showers. in northern england, there goes the first band of rain, behind it, low cloud, drizzly conditions. not raining all the time in england and wales, some hill fog. in wales, drying out but some drizzle here and there. in the south—west, more rain coming your way and this rain through the evening and overnight will be heavy and persistent as it crosses in a north—easterly direction across england and wales, getting into southern scotland. behind it there will be some clearer skies but there will still be a fair
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bit of cloud around and drizzle. in the clear skies across the islands we could see a touch of frost. tomorrow we start off with the rain in central and eastern england, southern scotland and that will eventually go into the north sea leaving behind it a veil of cloud that will break up and some will see sunny skies. by the end of the afternoon the next system comes in from the west introducing patchy rain and strengthening winds. by then temperatures only up. most of england and wales seeing ten or 11, northern ireland, scotland and the far north of england, 7—9. for thursday, an area of low pressure coming our way will have bands of rain rotating around it and some of it could be heavy. at how mild it will be across—the—board, more most in double figures but it will be windy wherever you are to the west and south—west we could have gas to gales, even severe gales. another area of low pressure comes our way
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on friday. wet and windy conditions, very windy, stormy for some all it takes is for the low pressure to go further south and that will change where we're going to have the strongest winds. i'll keep you posted on that through the week. i know you will. we shall see you in half an hour. thank you. what are you laughing at? i have spilt your drink. all over my porridge? excellent, thank you. now, as any parent knows, meal times can be difficult. but new research suggests you can actually train children to enjoy certain foods if they have enough of it. carroll says roni eggs, she never got into it. and i was trained to eat red peppers. it's all part of the bbc‘s terrific scientific project, aimed at getting more youngsters involved in science. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to a school in cardiff to find out more. this is kale. kale is a vegetable packed full of chemicals that are really good
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for us but as a result it tastes quite bitter. this is what the kids think of it in cardiff. it tastes like burnt rubber. this is day one of a three—week citizens science experiment to find out why some children find it so hard to like certain foods. i feel sick. and if they can be trained to acquire a taste. a month later we are back. every day for the last three weeks one group has eaten raisins, another kale. what we found is that children who had kale every day were more likely to like it than the children who had raisins every day. it shows us that we just need to keep trying these things and gradually we can learn to like them. so children like jack have gone from this... to this. from two out of ten to eight out of ten. that is quite good, isn't it?
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from three to seven, brilliant. it is really nice. really? from zero to nine but it didn't work for everyone. this is still unpleasant? is it better? no. why might it be? the next part of the experiment tried to find a reason. with a bit of food dye and a magnifying glass, they went in search of... super tasters. super tasters have more filiform papillae on their tongues, the bumps which hold our taste buds, and the children who had the most tended to struggle the most. that's interesting. fussy eaters might not be awkward. there might be a different reason for it. they have a different sensory world they are living in, tasting things more intensely. which might help explain anisha's intense dislike.
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you had the second—highest number of bumps on your tongue, didn't you? that is maybe why you didn't like kale? ifeel like throwing up now. children in scotland, wales and northern ireland took part in the experiment as part of the terrific scientific programme. what we have learnt is this, you really do have to try, try and try again when it comes to new tastes. can i spit it out? we all, whatever age we are, can relate to those experiences. what a great experiment. joining us in the studio is the scientist, dr maggie aderin—pocock. it was so interesting, lots of pa rents it was so interesting, lots of
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parents have heard, try and try again, but it can change, your taste. your perception. i loved it, some kids loved it, some hated it, apart from the super tasters. it is looking at a scientific treatable. you come up with a theory. you can then investigate and that is what it is all about. the super tasting, i am sure people will do it, you are counting the red docks. —— dots. am sure people will do it, you are counting the red docks. -- dots. the best way to do is to put food colouring on your tongue and you get a hole punch and cover a certain area, and you see how many bumps you see, because as you press down, it sticks up and you can see how many taste buds there are, so they are more sensitive to different food. so, if there is a child, or an adult, who cannot eat, there is a
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scientific reason why they might not be able to. there might be. they can do the taste buds test and measure it and there might be a reason why they don't eat those foods.” it and there might be a reason why they don't eat those foods. i think lots of people will be doing that. lots of people getting in contact about trying to convince kids treat certain food. andy says he struggles to get his son to eat his greens, aged 24, he says never give up. stephanie says i keep trying them a lot and now i like them. caroline, this has vindicated my parenting style. pa rsnips were always this has vindicated my parenting style. parsnips were always the biggest challenge. food time can be from a parent's point of view the ha rd est from a parent's point of view the hardest time of day?” from a parent's point of view the hardest time of day? i have a six—year—old. hardest time of day? i have a six-year-old. you know all about it? she has interesting ideas of what she likes, so it is quite nice. it is persistent and hard work. if you keep on trying, they will eat it. the real thing from the experiment is they didn't like what they were eating but it was done in a fun way,
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so maybe if you try it at home it can help. living life as an experiment is quite fun. one of the things i often do myself. the point of it is trying to engage children and especially girls in science, because there is a problem of bringing girls into seeing it as a career? yes, over the last eight yea rs i have career? yes, over the last eight years i have seen 250,000 schoolkids, going to talk to them, and often i see girls saying, science isn't for us, and if you look at the numbers, 15% of kids consider a career in science and it is 20% boys and 9% girls. we need scientists for the future. all of the challenges we face. wonderful for the economy to have more scientists. and especially the girls, they sometimes don't see the releva nce girls, they sometimes don't see the relevance of it. what on earth has it got to do with real—life? so, with practical experiments, we have a series coming up, it shows what
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you learn in the classroom is releva nt you learn in the classroom is relevant outside. i love to talk to you because you are clearly passionate on what you do. is it answering questions, what is it the fundamental that you love? science gives you answers, so the whole scientific method is to come up with an idea, like, why don't kids like vegetables, the new test it, you give them vegetables and find out the results, and you go through the process to allow trouble solving in an amazing way. and on a small scale, like vegetables, to sending a rocket to pluto or something, so it works on every level and it transforms lives. you say that we are going to do this for a while. you mentioned a rocket. we are doing bicarbonate soda and vinegar rocket, so we have a competition next week. 0h, so we have a competition next week. oh, iwillgive so we have a competition next week. oh, i will give you some handy tips. we can see who the real scientist is. there is a scientist in
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everyone. laughter. one more comment, because it shows how it can sometimes be... sometimes taste makes no sense. my wife loves bone of the pie and hates bananas, loves malibu but hates coconut and loves malibu but hates coconut and loves tomato sauce but hates tomatoes. it is all about context. lovely to see you. and for more information, follow the website, and we will be live at a primary school and doubtless they will be trying things in about an hour. coming up later on breakfast: we'll be talking about what happens when grandparents aren't allowed to see their grandchildren as campaigners lobby mps for a change in the law. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. dan is going to have his cup of tea. laughter. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. more than 400 routemaster buses are being recalled because of a fault with the doors.
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it means the rear door can be opened while the bus is actually moving, which will then make the vehicle suddenly stop. the buses have already had faults with their batteries and steering. transport for london says, "the recall is just a precaution." a school in east london looking to change its name is being accused of trying to remove the "heritage and culture" of the local bangladeshi community. osmani primary in tower hamlets was named in after general muhammad osmani, one of the leaders in bangladesh's war of independence. the school now wants to change its name to what it says is the more neutral vallance primary, but over 1,000 supporters have signed a petition demanding the name is kept as it is. the school will now consult parents. london used to have one of the lowest suicide rates in the country, but in last couple of years the figure's shot up bya third. so this year's comic relief campaign, which launches today, is focusing on mental health. and long—time supporter of the charity, broadcaster
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sir trevor mcdonald, has been visiting the maytree project in north london, which helps people in a suicidal crisis. you're confronted with this and realise what a need there is for it and this place does an absolutely fantastic job. suicide is something we don't like talking about, but there are people who need help. and maytree offers a lovely chance for people to come and be listened to. sir trevor mcdonald there. let's have a look at the travel situation now. a good service on the tubes. you might want to take a photograph. the district line has even cleared up. on the roads, big problems on the north circular. it's down to one lane eastbound at the hanger lane gyratory to recover a lorry involved in an accident. congestion is also causing westbound queues from the m1 at staples corner. what you can see is the eastbound delays, which extend along
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the a40 to uxbridge. in walthamstow, the north circular is down to two lanes westbound after a mutli—vehicle accident. delays go back to the woodford rd at waterworks corner. let's have a check on the weather now with kate. good morning. it's another rather cloudy and damp start to the day, but it's still feeling reasonably mild. we're expecting a few outbreaks of rain through the course of the day, maybe one or two this morning for parts of essex and kent, but more rain heading across the board as we head through the course of the morning. it will start to break up, though, some light, patchy rain, quite a misty, murky afternoon with a maximum temperature getting up to between six and eight degrees. now, the temperature is actually going to rise as we head overnight. further outbreaks of more persistent and heavy rain, so quite a wet night, but the temperature rising to around ten by the time we get to dawn tomorrow morning. so a wet and mild old night, and a wet start to wednesday. this rain will push through, though, the course of tomorrow morning, brightening up a little through the afternoon. towards the west, you may even get a little sunshine. temperatures remain mild but it does become rather windy as we head
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through to thursday and friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. donald trump fires his top lawyer after she says she's "not convinced" his immigration ban is legal. the white house says sally yates "betrayed" her department. it came as thousands protested around the uk against the travel restrictions. good morning, it's tuesday 31st january. also this morning. the wildlife traffickers putting the future of the chimpanzee under threat. we'll have a special report after a year—long undercover investigation. a row over a term—time family holiday reaches the highest
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court in the land today. we need to get back. back where? back to the future, 2017 metres. the time lord calls time. peter ca paldi announces he'll step down from his role as doctor who at the end of the year. what do these things tell us about the state of the economy? a lot. when the skyline is full of cranes, things are looking up and business is booming. at what does it tell us about the rest of the economy? i will find out. in sport, it's the tie they wanted. the lowest—ranked side left in the fa cup sutton united will host the 12—time winners arsenal in the last 16. comedian russell howard's just returned from a trip to liberia to see how the money you raise on red nose day can improve lives. he'll be here to tell us more.
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and carol has the weather. it isa it is a cloudy day, and wet, with rain and drizzle on and off. but for northern ireland, after the heavy rain this morning, you will see sunny spells and a few showers. more details in 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. donald trump has sacked the united states' top legal advisor after she questioned the legality of his travel ban. sally yates, who was acting attorney general, said she couldn't defend his decision to stop refugees and citizens of seven mainly—muslim countries from entering america. donald trump's controversial travel ban is facing resistance on a variety of fronts. after a weekend of mass protests, chaos at airports and a diplomatic outcry came an unusual act of defiance on the part of america's top law officer. sally yates, appointed us attorney general by barack obama said in a letter to lawyers
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at the justice department had given her responsibility to ensure that the government stands for what is right... deeming that an act of betrayal, mr trump promptly sacked her, installing dana boente as the new attorney general. pending the swearing—in of mr trump's preferred candidate, alabama senator jeff sessions, whose confirmation has been delayed by democrats in congress. sally yates is not alone in her misgivings, though. barack obama said in a statement that he fundamentally disagreed with the notion of discriminating against individuals on the basis of faith or religion. us diplomats have also registered their concerns, leading to this tongue lashing from the white house. if these career bureaucrats have a problem with it, i think that they should either get
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with the programme, or they can go. later today, mr trump is due to announce his pick for a place on the us supreme court. the choice, he said, was one that would appeal to evangelical christians. he may also be hoping it leads to some better headlines. a former head of the foreign office has accused theresa may of putting the queen in "a very difficult position" by inviting president trump to make a state visit to the uk. lord ricketts said it should be downgraded to an official visit to spare the queen more controversy. let's talk to our political correspondent iain watson. has it may put the queen in a difficult position? downing street say this official invitation has been issued, and it has been accepted been issued, and it has been a cce pted by been issued, and it has been accepted by the white house, so the state visit is going ahead. but
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there was some ballast for theresa may from a former conservative leader, william hague, who said the queen has had to host african and eastern european dictators. he said she will be able to take a brash billionaire from new york in her stride. it is felt by people at the top of the party that britain's strategic interests are best served by offering a state visit to donald trump. the pressure will grow, because not far from where i am standing, last night demonstrators flooded into parliament square, they lined up to the doors of downing street, protesting against donald trump's offal ban, and in some other major cities around britain as well. whitehall is where lord ricketts inhabited until recently. he has questioned the wisdom of inviting a donald trump for the state visit, but i can tell you all so some
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conservative mps are wondering whether she was wise to rush into this early invitation to donald trump before he had established his credentials. plenty to say on that subject, lots of you getting involved. we will talk about that in five minutes. mps are to begin two days of debate over the government's proposal to start the process of leaving the european union. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has ordered his mps to vote with the government, but some are expected to defy him. police in canada have charged a french—canadian student after six muslim worshippers were shot dead at a mosque in quebec. alexandre bissonnette did not speak during a brief appearance in court. a number of other people were injured in the attack. he faces six counts of murder and five of attempted murder. a legal battle over the rights of parents to take their children out of school for term—time holidays reaches the supreme court today. the case will have ramifications for families across england. isle of wight businessmanjohn platt
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says dozens of parents get in touch with him every day about term time holiday finds. he decided to fight it all the way and says he has no regrets after taking his daughter to disneyland when she had 90% attendance at school. the legal row is about what going to school regularly means. i believe that she attended school frequently or very often but their position is it means every day. that is the most draconian interpretation of this legislation you could possibly have. councils from the isle of wight to the north of england have different policies. some issue thousands of finds. others almost none. the rules say if a head declares an absence unauthorised the local council can find each parent £60 per child.
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that fine can double if it's not paid between within 21 days. ministers say exam results shape children's futures and missing even a few days can make a clear difference. many head teachers agree. it's important because young people only get one chance at their education and one week, two weeks out of that can make an enormous difference in the progress they're able to make in any given year and overall in terms of their education. 35 councils have told the bbc they've revised their guidance since mr platt took his case to court. the outcome could have a big impact. the supreme court will make a decision within months. two suspected animal smugglers have been arrested in ivory coast, following a year—long bbc investigation into the trafficking of baby chimpanzees. the animals are seized from the wild and sold as pets for about £10,000 each. of all the crimes involving wildlife, the trade
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in baby chimpanzees is one of the most shocking. we were sent these videos by dealers offering to sell us the tiny animals. they are in big demand as pets. this one is about a year old, a male, captured in thejungle and orphaned, like the others, when poachers killed his family. he was shown to our undercover reporter, who used a hidden camera to film him being held by a dealer called ibrahima traore in ivory coast. the police were waiting nearby and moved in. the dealer and his uncle were arrested and now face charges related to wildlife trafficking. the police havejust made all of these arrests. it is pretty edgy, and it is all about this, a baby chimpanzee taken from thejungle. the real tragedy is that to get one infant chimpanzee out of the jungle,
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all of the adults in its family have to be killed. that is as many as ten slaughtered just to get one chimp here ready for trade. for the police officer in charge, it is vital to stop the traffickers from wiping out the chimpanzees. the police seized dealers' mobile phones. they revealed a global network of smugglers. but for the moment, the international police effort is focused on other types of wildlife crime, not chimpanzees. without the funding we cannot do anything, but we are trying to become more intelligence—led, looking at what the threats are and what law enforcement needs to address to maintain
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a level of security. primates, unfortunately, our information holding is not as strong as it could be. the baby chimp was hungry but safe in the zoo at abidjan. his keepers gave him a name. he is doing well. others are not so lucky. and you can see that full report on the bbc website, and there's also more on the bbc news at 10pm this evening. peter capaldi is leaving doctor who. he shocked fans by making the announcement during an interview withjo whiley on radio 2. the actor, who has played the doctor since 2013, said he felt it was time to move on. he'll regenerate in the christmas special. i've always been somebody that did a lot of different things. i've never done one job for three years. this is the first
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time i've done this. and i feel it's sort of time for me to move on to different challenges. people more before 9am. i have got time to get used to this! we will talk about a super fan later. —— we will talk to a super fan later. the controversies that have marked donald trump's first 11 days in office show little sign of waning. the us president has now sacked his country's top legal advisor, after she questioned the legality of his decision to stop citizens of seven mainly—muslim countries from entering america. let's talk to jan halper—hayes, a member of president trump's transition team, who is in our london newsroom. i know you know the president as well. critics are calling the
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restrictions on american, we see the acting attorney general sacked because she questioned their legality. are they enforce or? they are. let me give you background. the seven countries came from the barack 0bama seven countries came from the barack obama administration, because in 2011 he issued a very similar executive order banning all iraqi nationals from any visas or entering the united states. that is where that came from. the reason those seven nations were targeted or identified is because they cannot provide any of the vetting information that we need, which a nswe rs information that we need, which answers the unspoken question, why not saudi arabia or pakistan. those countries are willing to provide information on their citizens or their nationals which make it very easy for us to be able to issue visas. as far as this acting
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attorney general, i would have fired her as well. it is completely constitutional, it is insubordination, and the example i would give is, if you disagree with what your boss asked you to do in any work situation and publicly came out against it, they would not have theirjob by the end of the day either. but she is a legal adviser, she was talking about legal advice. from his point of view, if you don't disagree, that is what happened? you are talking about the legal advice, she served under barack obama, why did he have no conflict? the seven countries, there was not a ban on seven countries under barack obama. there is a moratorium on the suspension. ban is part of inciting
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the emotional aspect. whether it is seven nations or iraq, the fact is it is based on the same constitutional grounds.” it is based on the same constitutional grounds. i don't want to get too much into an argument about one administration to another, barack obama about one administration to another, ba rack 0bama disagrees about one administration to another, barack obama disagrees on discolouration on the grounds of race or religion, people say it is anti—muslim, when this moratorium is over, why will donald trump give first piracy to christians? because 0bama gave first priority to muslims and in fact he refused, refused, when there were refugees, when christians were being killed, he refused to allow them into the united states. right. let's move forward to what president trump is doing. how does it make america safer? we have critics saying that recent attacks have not been caused
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by people from these countries. well, the thing is that if we do look at the last three attacks, the other aspect of wanting to be able to vet those who have travelled to those nations that are known for either terrorist training or not exactly having favourable views of the united states. we want to identify those people living in america who might have green cards and who might even have american citizenship who are really working against our security efforts. let's just talk about president trump and the sort of international reaction to this. we have seen for example people demonstrating across the uk, people demonstrating across the uk, people talking about this all over the world. is he the kind of man that will be bothered at all by the international reaction, by the fact that there are people here in the uk, he has been invited for a visit and people are demonstrated on the streets. will he be bothered by that? no, he won't be bothered and
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why should he be bothered. first off, he respects free speech and he already had, during his whole campaign, during, you know, the whole achieving being elected, this is nothing new for him, you know. what is it, 48 hours since it has been enacted and you know the world, the people that don't want him, won't give him a chance, won't give him the 90 days to figure out if this is working and he's saying we wa nt to this is working and he's saying we want to look back so we can go forward properly. briefly, do you concede it could have been done in a simpler way that wouldn't have caused this kind of reaction? no. because i think, no matter what trump does there will be people who will have knee—jerk reactions and that won't look at all the facts and will be irrational and ijust wish they'd stop so i can have 24 hours to not have to be on the news defending him and i can get some sleep. thank you very much for your time here on breakfast this morning. a pleasure.
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a pleasure. a tough a pleasure. atough gig a pleasure. a tough gig at the moment. here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. there is a lovely little couple of people on the beach behind you, it isa people on the beach behind you, it is a parent and a child. that's right. good morning. it will be cloudy today and there is going to be rain at time. some of us already have the combination and some of us have yet to see it. what's happening is we've weather front in the west drifting over towards the east. now, in some western parts, it is a mild start. but ahead of that weather front across central and eastern areas, it isa across central and eastern areas, it is a cold start. so if you're just stepping out, in cardiff at the moment it's 11 celsius and in the south—west, it's actually 12 celsius, belfast nine celsius, but as we come into central and eastern areas, we're looking at a range between four and six celsius. so it isa between four and six celsius. so it is a chilly start to the day. now, through the day, after this dry start, in parts of the south—east, with just a little bit of drizzle,
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the weather front moves from the west towards the east. you can see there is gaps in the rain. it's not going to be raining all the time and there will be some drizzle in some of those gaps and also some hill fog. any sunshine today will be at a premium unless you're in northern ireland. so into this afternoon, there goes the first band of rain. still murky damp conditions behind it. you may see a little glimmer of something brighter across ayrshire or indeed argyll and bute, but for northern ireland, you will see sunshine with a few isolated showers. across eastern england we've got the remnants of this morning's rain continuing to edge awayment for the rest of england, it is cloudy, murky, hill fog, some darkness in the air, wales you're drying up, but a little bit of drizzle, but by the end of the afternoon we've got another band of rain coming up from the south—west. through the evening and overnight the band of rain will be pushing north—east wards across all of wales and all of england more or less. getting into southern scotland. away from it, there will be a fair bit of
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cloud around. some breaks across northern ireland and the highlands. here in very sheltered areas, we might seea here in very sheltered areas, we might see a touch of frost, but it shouldn't be anything too substantial. tomorrow we start off with all this rain and it continues to edge off slowly into the north sea. leaving a veil of cloud behind it, but the cloud will break up and we will see more sunshine tomorrow than we're going to see today. out towards the west, the next system is arriving, bringing patchy rain, but temperatures are climbing across england and wales, we're looking at tens to 12s, exempt for the far north of england, northern ireland and scotland we've got seven to nine celsius. and then for thursday, an area of low pressure coming our way has got bands of rain rotating around it. it's going to be a windy day, a mild day, but around the coasts in the south—west, we could have gusts touching gale force even severe gales. so something to keep an eye on, dan and lou. the mother of a man who was found dead after going missing in russia, is raising awareness about how people can be traced using a simple
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15—digit code that each of us has on our phones. fiona scott lazareff wants parents to make a note of the number number of their child's mobile, and she's with us now to explain more. good morning to you. thank you so much forjoining us. just tell us a little bit about what happened to your son, first of all. well, all my children, i've got five children and they have been going to russia for a long time. they know russia very well. they speak russian fluently and my two older sons were in moscow. they went out to a nightclub. they were offered a lift back home from the nightclub and this sounds a stupid thing to do maybe to take up the offer of a lift at night, but in fact, it is quite common practise in moscow and president guys, they're big guys, they climb, they do rock climbing. so, if it wasn't for the fact that they were offered a beer which was
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spiked, obviously what happened would never have happened. and that combined with the fact that temperatures in moscow are currently minus 15. anyway, they, the spiked beer rendered them almost unconscious and they were driven out to the suburbs and they were dumped, they were robbed and they were dumped ina they were robbed and they were dumped in a dark place which was really, there was nobody around. luckily there is one other person in the taxi who managed to get one of my sons up to a main road and hitch a lift back into central moscow, but by that time my other son had u nfortu nately by that time my other son had unfortunately wandered off and the difficult part about the whole process of finding him is that they really didn't know where that place was, where they were dumped. right. and while the authorities were still looking for your son, they asked you about this imei number. what did you
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know about it then and what do you know about it then and what do you know about it now? the first time i ever heard of the imei number was when the russian police asked me for the imei number of my son's mobile. yes. and i didn't have it. right. and that would, how would that have helped if you managed to have it? it's very difficult to say. because there is no guarantee that that can locate somebody, but normally speaking, when the, they can ping a mobile phone using the imei number and they can have a fairly good idea. it could be a very accurate idea. it could be a very accurate idea. it could be a very accurate idea. it might be a less accurate idea. it might be a less accurate idea of where that phone is and obviously where it might have been left, where it has gone to and where the owner might be. it took you a little bit of time to find that because you didn't have that written down anywhere. you had to ring where
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bought the phone from and was that a slow process? i rang amazon because it happened that my son had ordered the phone on my account on amazon and they said they couldn't give it to me and they didn't have and then actually they managed to find it and they gave it to me. right, so what you're asking people to do is and we've, this is what you can do from your own phone, isn't it, you dial this and then you can get the number, can't you? it is on the settings of your phone. what are you saying to parents, it might be worth holding on to thatjust in case? saying to parents, it might be worth holding on to that just in case?” think that everybody should know the imei number of their children's phones for example. there are lots of children that, in their gap year or when they're going, during their university. they spend time in a country which, well, wherever they go overseas, it would be a good idea and it costs nothing. so everybody should do it. the other thing that's
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incredibly important about it is if you have your imei number, if your phone is stolen, you can disable your phone and it means that the phone is really of no value at all to anybody else or very little value. if we all collectively did that, there would be very few phone thefts from now onwards and i think that that would also reduce a lot of violent crime. i appreciate your time. thank you very much for coming to talk to us. it is not complicated... you just have a dial. if you're dialling a number, it is star, hash, 06 hash, you can find the imei number in the settings. and you can make a note of it because it can makea you can make a note of it because it can make a difference. and we'll put it on our social media in case you didn't catch that. there has been a big upturn in high rise developments across the manchester, leeds, belfast and birmingham, according to a survey of cranes hogging our cities skylines. luckily ben has a head for heights. he's in the midlands where there's
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been a 50% rise in big building developments. good morning guys. welcome to a rather damp start in birmingham today, but as you can see construction well underway on this huge site right in the centre of the city. this is where they've knocked down the old central library and they are building big new office developments. talking about cranes, they really do give us an indication of what the economy is doing, when the cranes go up, it suggests that optimism is rising and developers are trying to cash in on the demand for office space. deloitte have been looking at where in the country is doing well and here in birmingham is a great example. 1.4 million square feet of office space is currently under development. that's up 50% on the same time last year, but when you look at residential, there has been a boom in residential houses and apartments and things also growing strongly. but admittedly that's come from a low level over the past few years, but it is not just birmingham, it is leeds, manchester and belfast that have also seen big booms. people have
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moved out of london and more jobs created in these cities and they are building to meet demand. i will talk to the guys behind this project later. and we'll discuss what it tells us about the state of the wider economy. sojoin me then. let's get the news and travel and weather where you are. it is unsettled for the next couple of days. a bit of sunshine tomorrow before things turn windy for thursday and friday. before then, a cloudy day across much of the uk today, with rain at times. the cloud
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will be low, with hill fog. some of the rain heavy across scotland. heavy rain from northern ireland clearing away, it is brighter through the afternoon, with sunshine. still quite a cold feel across eastern england and eastern scotland. the rain continues to move north and east. another ripple pushes into england and wales, some of it heavy. some clear spells for scotland. but it will be a mild night across the south. for wednesday, we still have the rain across central and eastern parts. it clears and leaves cloud and sunshine. a bright afternoon for much of the country before the next rain band arrives for northern ireland, towards the south—west of england. very mild in the south, a touch milder in northern areas. the deep area of low pressure brings us windy weather on thursday. we could
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see outbreaks of heavy rain across southern and western areas. dry interludes continue across eastern parts. despite the wind, it will be mild. this vigorous area of low pressure has the potential to bring in some severe gales to part of the south—west of the uk through friday, along with heavy rain. it will be brighter the further north and east you are. this is business live from bbc news with rachel home and sally bundock. as many big us businesses rally against president trump's travel ban, will he be able to get them back onside with lower taxes on their overseas profits? live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 31st january. with $2.5 trillion stashed overseas, can america's biggest companies be
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convinced to bring it back and boost their own economy? also in the programme, jitters in japan. profits fall at canon and sony sees a big write—down on the big screen.
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