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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 31, 2017 2:00pm-3:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines: president trump sacks his attorney general after she refuses to implement his controversial immigration ban. following yesterday's protests, more than 70 mps call for donald trump to be banned from addressing parliament if his state visit to britain goes ahead. downing street says it's months away and no timings have been worked out. at the core of this bill lies a very simple question. do we trust the people or not? the road to brexit — this is the scene live in westminster as mps debate the government's bill to formally trigger the process of leaving the european union. also in the next hour, fears that more adoption cases could end in failure, following a cap on funding for specialist therapy. we hearfrom one family how they had to return a child to care. he was violent
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towards my wife, she got kicked, thumped, things like that, quite a lot. a lot of emotional abuse to her, as well. a legal battle over whether parents should be allowed to take their children on holiday during term time gets underway at the supreme court. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. president trump has sacked his acting attorney—general, accusing her of betrayal after she told government lawyers not to defend his controversial travel restrictions in court. sally yates, who was appointed by president obama, had said she was not convinced mr trump's temporary ban on travellers from seven muslim countries was legal. richard lister reports.
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it's a battle over american values and it's going on all across the county. in columbus, ohio last night it was met with pepper spray. in dallas, texas there was a silent vigil and concern over what the future holds. we came from mexico. things aren't great there now. to deny somebosy an opportunity to build a future seems completely wrong. the most significant protest came from sally yates, an obama appointee asked by president trump to stay on as acting attorney general. she said it was her duty to stand for what is right. she was sacked within hours.
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a furious white house said she betrayed her department and accused her of being very weak on illegal immigration. protection of the nation from foreign terrorists... the executive order might be controversial, but polling suggests at least half the country supports a temporary immigration ban against the seven predominantly muslim nations. these seven nations, one, they are not our friends and are not willing to provide the necessary background information on their nationals for us to even consider allowing them to visit our country. washington is preparing for another day of congressional confrontation. democrats say the president's approach is causing chaos. if this continues, this country has big trouble. we cannot have a twitter presidency. we cannot have a presidency that thinks, this sounds good and let's go do it and not think the consequences through.
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in a sign of the unusual time, the former president broke with protocol to say he fundamentally disagrees with the notion of discrimination because of faith or religion. there is much at stake. president trump will announce his pick for the supreme court later today. a hardline conservative will influence the course of american government for years to come. congratulations, mr president. in ten days, donald trump has changed america to the point that the european council said it was among the biggest challenges faced by the eu in its history. letter talk to barbara platt usher in washington. donald trump sounds like he is taking everything that sally yates has said very personally
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indeed, accusing her of betrayal. he will portray this as taking on the washington establishment. is he setting himself, ultimately, on a collision course with the supreme court? no come i don't think he is setting himself on a collision with the supreme court, because he has quite a lot of authority now to shape the supreme court. he is going to be announcing his choice for the va ca nt to be announcing his choice for the vacant seat on the court. at the moment, there are eight members. they broadly divide liberal and conservative, but not entirely. he has the chance to put a conservative justice into that sit, which will tip the scales much more towards a right—leaning court, which is something that has been very important to his supporters. he promised he would do this and the supreme court is very important because it has the final say on many issues, including social policies like abortion writes. he is going to
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shape thejudiciary like abortion writes. he is going to shape the judiciary in a way that could bring conservative principles and values to dominate even long after he has left. so far, his presidency has been marked by the use of executive orders. might we see more of those today? it is possible. he has been meeting the promises he made during the campaign. in his first weeks, he wa nted campaign. in his first weeks, he wanted quick action on things he promised to supporters, hence the executive order on the wall with mexico, hence the executive order on the immigration ban, which he said will deal with terrorist threats. now he is moving very quickly to appoint supreme court justices. now he is moving very quickly to appoint supreme courtjustices. he has other executive orders in the wings. there was a lot of criticism, not only from democrats, but from some republicans that the orders have been put together quite hastily bya have been put together quite hastily by a small group of white house advisers. they haven't really been vetted by the different departments. you can see the confusion with the immigration ban and the growing
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resista nce immigration ban and the growing resistance to it. mr trump's argument would be that he wanted to show his supporters quickly that he was taking seriously his promises. by was taking seriously his promises. by and large, his supporters seem to be happy. downing street says president trump's state visit to the uk is "months away", and no timings have been decided. more than 1.5 million people have now signed a petition urging the government to cancel it. our diplomatic correspondent james robbins reports. say it loud and say it clear, refugees are welcome here! they don't like the new president or his policies. they don't want him here as an honoured guest of the queen. there's never been so much public protest. the government is standing firm, its invitation to donald trump on behalf of the queen still stands though it was issued
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far too quickly. it is the government's role to make sure the queen isn't dragged into political controversy. i think they have to watch that dimension, given the level of public concern about this state visit invitation. the state visit is the highest accolade the country can pay to a foreign leader. normally, it's offered after a us president has been in office for several years. and to issue the invitation in the first days of president trump being in the white house, to happen in the next few months felt to me a bit premature, frankly. president obama, much more popular in britain, was in his third year of office when he was given a state visit in 2011. he'd been before on politically—focussed official visits but it's the pomp and pageantry of a state visit which delivers the coveted imagery. is the government embarrassing the queen? today, cabinet ministers were staying silent on the controversy. number ten is now stressing
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it's months away. prominent pro—brexit mps are behind the invitation. this is an important state visit in the national interests. it represents the recognition in this country of the united states in relation to the whole of our foreign policy, our alliances through two world wars and the whole of the brexit question as well. no date has yet been set for the state visit. but the petition against it is steadily gaining support. james robbins bbc news. mps have just begun debating the bill which gives the government the authority to start the formal process of leaving the eu. the legislation allows for the triggering of article 50. it looks set to be approved in a vote tomorrow, with labour mps being told byjeremy corbyn that they should back the bill. but some labour mps say they willjoin the snp in voting against it. our political correspondent ian watson reports. the phoney war is over.
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the courts have given parliament a say over whether and when britain leaves the european union. so now mps have to nail their colours to the mast — are they going to argue over what type of brexit they want, or are they going to oppose it entirely? the government's warning that for mps to vote against triggering article 50, the formal process of leaving european union, would be defying the will of the people. at the core of this bill lies a very simple question. do we trust the people or not? the democratic mandate is clear. the electorate voted for a government to give them a referendum, parliament then voted to hold a referendum, the people voted in that referendum and we are now honouring the result of that referendum. if the legislation to leave the eu were compared to, say, a train, it would be a eurostar on a fast—track. mps getjust two days of debate this week, three days next,
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and the government hopes it will all get through the house of lords by early march. if you were to stand here, at the very heart of parliament, at any time over the last quarter of a century, you would meet plenty of tory mps who were willing to defy the party line on europe. but, over the next two days of debate, it is labour's divisions that will be on display. jeremy corbyn has already lost two members of his top team and i'm told three shadow cabinet members are considering whether to resign over his instructions to trigger article 50. perhaps around two dozen former ministers and shadow ministers are likely to rebel, too. one of them is the man who challenged jeremy corbyn for labour's leadership. i asked him why he was still defying his leader, and now, also, his constituents. i still think that brexit is likely to make our country poorer, and our politics meaner. i think some of us need to stand for the interests of the people they represent, and stand against this headlong rush to the european union,
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and send us over a cliff. and other opposition parties will attempt to stop britain's exit from the eu in its tracks. we need to protect scotland's place in europe. that is why we are not prepared to give the uk government a green light, carte blanche, to do whatever it wants in relation to the brexit negotiations. but many of the conservative mps who have qualms over brexit are flagging up that they won't rebel now. the prime minister has said that mps will get a final vote at the end of the process. this bill we are considering this week and next week is a process to start negotiations to trigger the notice. so, expect a lively debate in parliament, but don't expect a major upset. ian watson, bbc news, westminster. let's talk to our chief political correspondent vicki young. he's not wrong, it is a lively debate? it certainly is. there will be 11 hours of mp‘s discussing this today, about seven more tomorrow, and then votes at seven o'clock. we
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don't expect an upset at this point. there are very many mps, as we heard come on the labour side in particular, although they campaigned incredibly hard for the uk to remain in the european union, they feel they have to respect the will of the people, the referendum that was held. keir starmer, their spokesman, made his speech in a very solemn tone, explaining why labour would be voting for article 50. have the outcome been to remain, we would have expected the results to have been honoured. that cuts both ways. a decision was made on the 23rd of june last year to leave the eu. two thirds of labour mps represent constituencies that voted to leave. one third represent constituencies that voted to remain. this is obviously a difficult decision. i wish the result had gone the other way. i campaigned passionately for that. but, as democrats, our party
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has to accept the result. a real dilemma for many labour mps, wrestling with their conscious. many would like to block out of 50, but feel it would be betraying their constituents. jeremy corbyn has ordered them to pass article 50, to get the negotiations started. there will be some rebels. we will find out tomorrow how many. on the other side of the chamber, ken clarke also a pro—european all his life, he said when hejoined a pro—european all his life, he said when he joined parliament a pro—european all his life, he said when hejoined parliament in 1960, it was just as harold macmillan when hejoined parliament in 1960, it wasjust as harold macmillan had made the first application to join what was then the european economic community. ken clarke says he was not changing his views, he would vote with his conscience. he quoted the philosopher edmund burke, on his advice as to what mps should do.|j never advice as to what mps should do.” never quote him, but i paraphrase him. he said to constituents, if i no longer give you the benefit of my judgment and simply follow your
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orders, i am judgment and simply follow your orders, iam not judgment and simply follow your orders, i am not serving you, i am betraying you. i personally should betraying you. i personally should be voting with my conscience content in this vote. when we see what unfolds hereafter, as we leave the european union, i hope the consciences of other members of parliament remain equally content. plea from ken clarke to some of those labour mps. someone his own side as well. but it does seem like he will be the only conservative tomorrow to oppose article 50. in his party, over those decades, he has, for a very long time, fought against many of those that campaigned for brexit. one of those, said bill cash. we must trust the people. what they would be doing is voting against the people and their vote, as expressed in the referendum. the house of lords, if i may touch on that, if they were to do the same, they would be
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committing political suicide if they we re committing political suicide if they were to attempt to stand in the way of the votes of the british people. this westminster parliament is now the focus where the instructions of the focus where the instructions of the british people have to be carried out. that is what we will do. another conservative that has campaigned for many decades for the uk to leave the eu is iain duncan smith. he is on his feet in the commons. robust democratic institutions in many of the states of europe. it has always been my view that where we have democracy and strong democratic institutions, with open trade, where people trade with open trade, where people trade with each other, war will never happen. it is because those democracies will simply not do that. therefore, i sense about this that the direction of travel for the european union from that moment of maastricht was bound on a course that was going to lead to the uk ultimately deciding it could no longer stay within it. therefore, i
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agree with much of what my right honourable friend said. yes, i come toa honourable friend said. yes, i come to a different conclusion. but i wa nt to a different conclusion. but i want to say from the start, i fully respect any of those who decide today to vote against the triggering of article 50. they were sent here to use their judgment. of article 50. they were sent here to use theirjudgment. no matter what else, yes, i believe the british people have made that decision, but, nonetheless, as mps, i have to say that ourjob is to use out i have to say that ourjob is to use ourjudgment i have to say that ourjob is to use our judgment on these i have to say that ourjob is to use ourjudgment on these matters. if somebody chooses to oppose it, i respect that. i disagree with them, but i think they deserve a hearing and we should in no way attempt to shut them down whatsoever. can i just say, yes, i will give way...” had the honourable member for giving way and his thoughts on democracy. would he accept that in this house, members of parliament have less information on this crucial decision than the average local ward councillor on their budget, their annual budget? well, i am grateful
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for that intervention. i have to say to the honourable lady that i don't actually agree. over the last 40 years, if anyone actually agree. over the last 40 years, ifanyone in actually agree. over the last 40 years, if anyone in this house does not have enough information to make a decision about this, i wonder where they have been in the last 40 years, all of the years they have spent in here? of course we have enough information. the question she is referring to is the publication of the white paper. the government said they are going to publish it. i stand by that. i think it is a good idea. my right honourable friend the prime minister made a good fist of it in prime minister made a good fist of itina prime minister made a good fist of it in a recent speech, in which she set out 12 points that would guide her negotiation. i hope the government reprints that with a couple of diagrams, the other explanation and a nice picture. i think that would make an excellent white paper. i don't agree with my honourable friend that my party is somehow anti—immigrant. absolutely not. that is the one area where i would say not. when i was in government with him, in coalition, and also subsequently, this government has done more to help
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those that are dispossessed as the result of wars in syria, libya, afghanistan, than any other country ican imagine. afghanistan, than any other country i can imagine. i think as a government and a country we should be proud of our support for immigration, regardless of what other countries decide to do, we put ourselves on the side of those that flee in terror. we are not anti—immigrant, idon't flee in terror. we are not anti—immigrant, i don't think anyone is that voted to leave the european union. there is a big difference between being anti—immigrant and anti—uncontrolled immigration. it was that that the british public we re was that that the british public were against. they wanted control. many people of different backgrounds voted to leave the european union.” am grateful to my honourable friend. that is the point. they wanted to ta ke that is the point. they wanted to take back control. they are not anti—immigration. basically want to make sure it is controlled immigration. a level that the country can absorb without any difficulties. that is where we should be on this, that is where the party should be, that is where we stand and i intend to pursue that. i
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am not going to give way, i have literally a matter of seconds and he will have plenty of time. we will keep an eye on that and return to the commons, should anybody else of note taped to their feet. —— take. a woman has gone on trial in bristol after a toddler was shot in the head with an air—rifle, leaving him seriously injured. emma horseman is alleged to have told her partner to shoot the child, to frighten him. her partner, jordan walters, has already admitted the offence. jon kay is following the case. this goes back tojuly of last this goes back to july of last year. a block of flats, in the hartcliffe area of south bristol. little harry studley, 18 months at a time, lived on the top floor with his parents. every friday afternoon they would go downstairs to the flat of some friends, some neighbours, and they would hang out together and the children would play together. last year, on a friday afternoon injuly,
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harry was playing in the flat that belonged to emma horseman and jordan walters, family friends. harry, it is claimed in court, became tired, was whingeing and crying. jordan walters was in the process of cleaning an airgun. we are told emma horseman, his partner, told him to shoot the gun to scare harry, to shut him up, the court was told. she says she can't remember saying that. she is now on trial for gbh, says she can't remember saying that. she is now on trialfor gbh, accused ofaiding and she is now on trialfor gbh, accused of aiding and abetting. she says she can't remember those words. today we have heard a cross—examination of emma horseman. she told, we have been told, the police, after she had been told, the police, after she had been arrested last year, that she had seen her partner cleaning the gun and aiming the gun, that he had been trying to fire at a curtain. today, she told the court she could not remember seeing him and could not remember seeing him and could not remember seeing him and could not remember what she had seen or heard. the prosecution have put it to her that she is lying and has
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given two completely different accounts. the defence say that she cannot remember what has happened, she is an honest, good person that was not really involved in this at all, who has not pulled the trigger, who was not responsible for the gun and who there is no evidence, it is said, encouraged her partner to fire it. the jury have said, encouraged her partner to fire it. thejury have heard both accounts. the prosecution and defence are summing up. the jury will be given directions by the judge and we expect them to begin considering their verdict late this afternoon. it has been a short trial, only a couple of days. it started yesterday. emma horseman pleads not guilty to aiding and adapting gbh. her partner pleaded guilty some time ago. let's ta ke let's take you back to the brexit debate. nick clegg hasjust let's take you back to the brexit debate. nick clegg has just sat down. we willjust here who is coming up next. the house of commons, the first day of a two day debate on the bill to formalise the
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departure of the uk from the european union. we will stay with it for a second to see how it develops and if nick clegg does not return, we will pull away. the insult was that brexit campaigners to liberally withheld from the british people what they meant by brexit. it was deliberate, it was effective, but highly cynical, the tactic. we never received a manifesto with the views of nigel farage, the foreign secretary, the former education secretary, the former education secretary, explaining what brexit meant. therefore, when we finally know what brexit really means in substance, rather than in utopian promise, of course the british people should have their say. no, i wish to make progress. that is the reason why i believe this house does not have a choice, but has a duty to withhold from the government the right to proceed with brexit in the way they have planned. that would
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not stop brexit, it would simply urge them to go back to the drawing board and come back to this house with a more sensible and moderate approach to brexit. some people, and i really want to make progress, some people say there is no alternative. we must leave the single market. there was no remote chance we would find an accommodation with our european partners. nonsense! iwill, for instance, confirmed to the house that i have recently heard on very good authority that senior german decision—makers, shortly after the prime minister, no doubt to her surprise, finding herself as prime minister without a vote, without a shot being fired, were keen to explore ways to explore an emergency break to the uk prime minister, in return for what they hoped would be an and disrupted economic brexit. what did this government choose to do? it decided to spurn all friendship links with europe. it
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decided to disregard the needs of scotland, northern ireland and our great capital, here, london. it decided to placate parts of the conservative party, rather than serve the long—term strategic interests of this country. it decided to pander to the eye—popping vitriol and bile we see every day from people like the editor of the daily mail, the other members of the moneyed elite that run the right—wing brexit media in this country. this government has become too slavishly preoccupied with their opinions. above all, this government matter has decided to disregard the hopes, dreams and the aspirations of 16.1 million of our fellow citizens. that is more than have ever voted for a winning party in a general election. 242 westminster constituencies represented here voted for remain. no, i have
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really... all right! mr speaker, my apologies for that device, i have a very simple question to ask. does he re call very simple question to ask. does he recall that during the course of the referendum campaign, the then prime ministerand many referendum campaign, the then prime minister and many others on the remain side said that if the british people voted to leave the european union, that would absolutely mean that they would leave the single market. did he agree with that at the time? this is a novel concept, the time? this is a novel concept, the winning side in a competition in both the arguments from the losing side to make a case they didn't make themselves! it's ludicrous! the brexit campaign deliberately did not speu brexit campaign deliberately did not spell out to the british people what it meant, that is why it is right when we finally do know that the british people have another say. mr speaker, the final point is this. the british government has taken the mandate of the 23rd ofjune last year, not only to disregard the 16.1 million people, the 252
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constituencies that voted remain, they have very deliberately decided to ignore the pleas, the dreams, the aspirations, the plans of the people that should actually count most, our children, our grandchildren, the youth of britain. they, nobody here, nobody on the front bench, they are the ones that will have to live with the ones that will have to live with the consequences, which i believe oui’ the consequences, which i believe our fateful consequences, the consequences, which i believe ourfateful consequences, more the consequences, which i believe our fateful consequences, more than anybody in this house. and guess what? conventional wisdom says that the youth of today are politically indifferent, that they don't participate. 64% of 18—24 year—old voters voted in huge numbers. they mobilised in unprecedented numbers. 73% of them voted for a different future. i know the vote of a 19—year—old does not weigh any differently in the ballot box to the vote of a 90—year—old. but when we
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search our consciences, and we have just been asked to do that, we should research our consciences most especially about what country we think we are handing onto the next generation. call me old—fashioned, but when country decides to go on a radical, uncompromising departure to a new and as yet entirely unpredicted future, and does so against the explicit stated wishes of those people that have to inhabit that future, that is a country embarking on a perilous path. i hope oui’ consciences embarking on a perilous path. i hope our consciences will not play with it in future. in conclusion, mr speaker, i have a great sense of foreboding. i feel the negotiations notwithstanding, the personal admiration i have the secretary of state for brexit, he will try to negotiate in good humour. but they will get nasty and acrimonious. think what will happen in the british tabloid press when they
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start arguing about money in the next few months. the government's position is asking for the impossible, the undeliverable. it is not possible to say that you will not possible to say that you will not abide by the rulings of a marketplace and then somehow claim that you will get unfettered access to that marketplace. it is not going to that marketplace. it is not going to happen. european leaders, many of whom i have spoken to, look at us in increasing dismay and disbelief, at the incoherence and the confrontational manner in which this government is proceeding with brexit. my final plea is, look to the long—term interests of our country and your constituents when voting, not the short—term interests of this government. mr speaker, in following the right honourable... studio: nick clegg, former lib dem leader, speaking passionately about the uk's plans to leave the eu. when
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we finally know what brexit means in substance rather than in utopian promise, he said, the people should have their say. talking about what he believes will be the disproportionate impact on younger generations of the vote in the referendum last year. we will return to the house of commons throughout the afternoon for the continued debate scheduled to finish at midnight tomorrow. now, the weather. a stormont its way. —— storm on its way. relatively mild in the south—west. chile in the eastern areas. for some, temperatures of four degrees. —— chilly. more rain on the way overnight. it will become very slow—moving overnight across eastern areas. some fog patches possible for
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scotla nd areas. some fog patches possible for scotland and northern ireland. a touch of frost in the countryside. otherwise, mild. wednesday, wet start to the day. band of rain slowly edging eastwards. struggling to clear eastern scotland. eventually brighter weather coming in. then the next atlantic system coming into northern ireland, eventually bringing damp weather to wales and south—west england. stormy conditions potentially on the way for friday. more on that in the next half an hour. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: president trump sacks his acting attorney general after she questions the legality of his controversial travel ban. after protests across the country yesterday, more than 70 mps call for donald trump to be banned from addressing parliament if his state visit goes ahead. this is the scene live in westminster as mps debate the government's bill to formally
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trigger the process of leaving the european union. claims that lord coe misled an mps' inquiry grow, as emails seen by the bbc reveal he was aware of allegations of russian doping, four months before they became public. john watson has the latest from the sports centre. good afternoon. claims that lord coe misled an mps' inquiry are growing after new emails confirmed he knew about corruption allegations in his sport four months before they became public. the iaaf president told a select committee in december, 2015, he was not aware of specific allegations of corruption around the russian doping scandal. but an emailfrom lord coe to the iaaf‘s ethics commission in august, 2014, states, "i have now been made aware of the allegations." lord coe denies there is any discrepancy between his evidence and what the emails suggest he knew. ireland fly—half jonny sexton will miss his side's opening six nations match with scotland.
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he's failed to recover in time from a calf injury picked up earlier this month while playing for leinster. peter o'mahony also misses out with a hamstring injury. today is transfer deadline day with premier league spending in the january transfer windiow expected to reach a record high. the bbc‘s kevin kilbane is here to look ahead to some of the transfers we can expect to see. before we do, big game in the premier league tonight. sevenin seven in total. the big onesies liverpool against chelsea. a tough task potentially for liverpool. not on the best run of form themselves. —— the big one is. on the best run of form themselves. -- the big one is. not being very creative. they were opening up teams that will earlier in the season. they cannot get back to that form. i feel they have to win. if they do not win tonight and they get a draw, there is still the ten points. you
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would expect arsenal and tottenham to win tonight as well. i feel it has to be a winter night or nothing for them. if liverpool lose, it would be their fourth straight defeat. let us hearfrom would be their fourth straight defeat. let us hear from the managers. i would give the advice to everybody who wants to help, stay positive, there is no reason for anything else, absolutely not. if you want, you are absolutely welcome and actually in the short—term, it would help a lot against chelsea, because they are not a really bad team. it is very important but also after these games, we have to play 14 games. to finish the championship. for this reason, 14 games. to finish the championship. forthis reason, it is important, the result, but it does
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not finish the league after these two games. a lot of pressure. let us say chelsea get a result, do you think it is hard to see beyond them going on and winning the premier league? yes, they have a tough run of games where they will be playing topsides. but i think if they win tonight, i think it certainly puts liverpool out of it. you would expect arsenal and tottenham would be decides to compete. but they are in sucha be decides to compete. but they are in such a strong position. —— the sides. defensively, the back to the solid unit a couple of seasons ago. the window closes at 11pm in england, midnight in scotland. it is a chance for teams to bring someone in if they are struggling. but it is unsettling. if you have been linked with another club, there is no guarantee the move will go through. trying to prepare, preparing for the games, the managers cannot fully
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prepared, knowing full well some deals they are trying to get over the line, it is unsettling all around. it is the way it is, the modern—day football is this way, the tra nsfer modern—day football is this way, the transfer dealings, even when the window shuts, they will be dealing towards the next transfer window. a lot of the deals would kind of be in place before now but the last eight speeds things up. the managers do not necessarily appreciate it. unlikely we will see a big deal later? it does seem unlikely. we might seea later? it does seem unlikely. we might see a bit of movement. it is up might see a bit of movement. it is up to the likes of that sunderlands, the whole —— hull, at the bottom, thatis the whole —— hull, at the bottom, that is where the priority is. you can that is where the priority is. you ca n follow that is where the priority is. you can follow it all on twitter. we have got it covered from bbc sport centre. you can follow it on social
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media. bbc deadline day. that is all of the sport. plenty more in the next hour. adoption organisations have told the bbc a cap on funding for specialist therapy could lead to a rise in the number of placements breaking down. the adoption support fund which provides financial help for therapy was capped last october to £5,000 per child. agencies fear families with children with difficult start to life will not be able to cope. our reporter investigated. adoption breakdown, disruption, as it is sometimes called, happens when a child goes back into care or a care home. one adoption charity things as many as a quarter of all families are in crisis, needing help to keep the elation ships together. —— relationships. rob and his wife have children of their own but they
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adopted three siblings. the report has warned the eldest had problems but nothing prepared them for the reality. he was violent towards my wife. she got kicked, thumped, things like that, quite a lot. and quite a lot of emotional abuse to her as well. this is from a four, five—year—old kid, and we were just shell—shocked, really. five—year—old kid, and we were just shell-shocked, really. what was the trauma like on you and your wife? well, my wife shows the symptoms you would expect from someone who has suffered domestic abuse. at times. hejust became suffered domestic abuse. at times. he just became untenable which was why we finally had to ask the local authority to step in and move him back into foster care. it is not
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known how many adoptions breakdown but the estimated figure varies from just over 3.2% to, according to one charity, nearly 9%. there are new schemes... this professor has written the definitive research into adoption disruption. it is whether they want to be adopted, if they are older, and how long they have been exposed to adversity in their life. the professor says specialist therapy is needed for adopted youngsters who have been in care and who have often suffered early trauma. but it is expensive and changes to england's adoption support fund means there is now a maximum budget of £5,000 per child for counselling. many interventions for counselling. many interventions for these children need a lot more than just for these children need a lot more thanjust one—off for these children need a lot more than just one—off therapy. this is
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therapy that needs to be ongoing and will cost a lot more than 5000. the saddest it for me is that we gave everything that we had but the people we thought were going to be backing us up and giving the bits we couldn't, just one not there. —— the saddest bit. a french canadian student has appeared in court charged with the murder of six muslim worshippers shot dead at a mosque on sunday. alexandre bissonnette, 27, did not speak in a court appearance. he faces six cou nts court appearance. he faces six counts of murder and five of attempted murder. the jewels counts of murder and five of attempted murder. thejewels have been held across canada. —— vigils. a legal battle has reached the supreme court today. five judges are hearing an appeal by a council which find a father for taking his
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daughter to florida without her school's permission. he challenged it in the high court and won. our education correspondent reports. a dad from the isle of wight fighting his case in the highest court in the uk, overa his case in the highest court in the uk, over a £120 fine for taking his daughter on holiday to florida. it isa daughter on holiday to florida. it is a shocking situation that if i lose today any unauthorised absence of any child in any school in england, a criminal offence will have been committed. warm seas, soft sand, trying to book a family break without a big increase in price during the school holidays, it is a big challenge for most families. they should not take weeks out of school, but i do not think one family holiday per year will affect a child's education. it is a little bit too inflexible system. there can be lots of mitigating family
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circumstances. in the school term, your —— the rest of your classes coming in getting education, it is not fair you get to take the time off. the government agrees, saying, even a few days away from school can have a big impact on exam results. teaching unions think fining parents is not the answer. it is important children attend school and heads are given the professional responsibility to make discretion and it is important schools do not get into conflict with parents. better to engage and educate pa rents. better to engage and educate parents. this morning the judges we re parents. this morning the judges were told the case rests on whether it is right to find a parent for taking their child out of school if the pupil usually attends school regulate. who doesn't dream of a warm summer regulate. who doesn't dream of a warm summer holiday on a miserable january day? the great challenge for thejudges at the january day? the great challenge for the judges at the supreme court is to decide whether parents have the right to take back holiday at a time
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of their choosing. 35 schools have told the bbc they have revised the guidance since jon platt's told the bbc they have revised the guidance sincejon platt's case went to court. the prince of wales has warned that the world is in danger of forgetting the lessons of the past. he made the comments at a fundraiser for the world jewish relief charity, in what's been seen as a thinly—veiled attack on donald trump's immigration ban. the charity also supports young agricultural entrepreneurs in rwanda where people tragically share with the jewish community a where people tragically share with thejewish community a first—hand knowledge of the evils of genocide. and in this way, world jewish relief shows us how vital it is to learn lessons from the horrors of the past. now, when i arrived here this evening, i had the great pleasure of
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speaking to a wonderful man who i first met through my patronage of the holocaust memorial day trust. he survived the horrors of a concentration camp. he is a man of extraordinary grace and strength, as you would expect from someone who captained the british weightlifting tea m captained the british weightlifting team at the olympics in 1956 and 1960. to meet him and others like him who haven't you at indescribable persecution is to be reminded of the danger of forgetting the lessons of the past —— who have endued. the work of this charity enables us to rally together to do what we can to support people practically, emotionally and spiritually, particularly at a time when the
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horrific lessons of the last war seemed to be in increasing danger of being forgotten. the prince of wales on speaking last night. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour. but first, the headlines on bbc news. president trump sacks his acting attorney general after she questions the legality of his controversial travel ban. after protests across the country yesterday, more than 70 mps call for donald trump to be banned from addressing parliament if his state visit goes ahead. the road to brexit. mps are currently debating a bill in parliament to trigger britain's exit from the eu. in the business news... deutsche bank has been fined £504 million by us and uk regulators. it relates to a russian money laundering plan. under the scheme, clients illegally moved $10 billion out of russia via shares bought and sold
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through the bank's moscow, london and new york offices. authorities said the bank had missed several opportunities to detect the scheme. a boom in building work — cities across the uk are reporting record levels of construction. birmingham, manchester, leeds and belfast are building close to pre—crisis levels. royal dutch shell will sell almost £2.5 billion worth of north sea assets to oil exploration firm chrysaor. shell wants to sell £24 billion of assets by 2018 to help pay off debt following its takeover of bg group. at school, you may have found sums a doddle, perhaps you use maths regularly in yourjob, but for more than half of us, a new study suggests it's a subject in which we lack confidence. a survey produced by citizen maths, which is trying to get more of us to brush up on our skills, says this lack of numerical nous when shopping for deals on the high street and online is costing uk consumers more than £1 billion every year.
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joining me now is zoe griffiths, primary mathematics masterclasses coordinator at the royal institution. what is the problem? is it arithmetic or clever advertising? what is the problem? is it arithmetic or clever advertising7m isa arithmetic or clever advertising7m is a good question. clever advertising probably has something to do with it. a particular example i have been thinking about recently is in supermarkets, that advertising of multi—byte offers, sometimes they do not add up, they are not better value than buying the normal things. i was shopping yesterday and i saw that you could get a multi—byte of four 200 grams tins of sweetcorn and it would cost you £1 50 and next to it would cost you £1 50 and next to it was a medium—sized can being sold on its own and it was 400 grams and it would cost you 75p. if you do the maths, you look past the advertising, you will see that 100 grams of sweetcorn in both cases costs the same. definitely if you ta ke costs the same. definitely if you take multi—buy offers and
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supermarket offers on face value, you might lose out. it is important for people to look at the small print and supermarkets often show you what it is per 100 grams and think about the price per unit and do maths. would you recommend people to try to improve there arithmetic or is ita to try to improve there arithmetic or is it a case of taking a few more minutes and looking at the weight and the price relative to each other? definitely the latter. thinking about what the price is per unit is important. also, as you say, it is really important that adults as well as children invest time in improving maths skills. especially so improving maths skills. especially so that if adults are thinking about how important it is to do maths in our lives, hopefully our children will as well. what about companies and local associations, what can they do to help people improve working out offers and improving everyday lives when it comes to challenges like these? that is a really good question. in terms of offering advice, for example,
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thinking about if you are going to get a new bank account, there are often a lot of numbers involved, there might be a fixed fee, and interest rate, taxed, not taxed, if you're not very confident, it might be difficult for people to work out and interrogate the figures and work out what is best. if companies can offer advice, that would be good. one thing that might be a problem is that there seems to be in our society a culture of it being funny to not be good at maths, it is cool to not be good at maths, it is cool to not be good at maths, it is cool to not like maths. if we want our young people to think maths literacy is as important as literacy, then we really need to all get behind as adults to changing the perception as maths —— of maths. in other business news, bookmakers are furious about what they have called a flawed report on gambling by mps. the bookmakers‘ trade body has reacted angrily to the report on fixed—odd betting terminals.
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mps have recommended that the maximum stake for gambling on the electronic terminals in a bookmaker‘s shop is cut to just £2. currently, the maximum stake is £100 and they account for more than 50% of bookmakers‘ profits. nintendo has reported better—than—expected profits thanks partly to the success of its games for mobile phones. the japanese gaming giant saw profits of £456 million in the three months to december. nintendo is set to launch its newest console, called switch, in early march. and online grocer ocado has delivered a significant rise in annual profits — they reported a 21.8% increase in pre—tax profits to £14.5 million for the year to the end of november. however, the average order size fell almost 3% to £108.10 against the backdrop of continuing supermarket price wars. let us look at the markets. figures out this morning show eurozone inflation hitting a nearfour year
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high in january. inflation jump inflation hitting a nearfour year high injanuary. inflationjump to 1.8% last month, from 1.1% the month before. that's all the business news. i will be back in an hour. breaking news, confirmation that thousands of men have been posthumous lea pardoned. that announcement coming from thejustice minister, the so—called alan turing law after the world war ii code breaker who committed suicide after he was convicted of a gay sex offence. that just coming he was convicted of a gay sex offence. thatjust coming to us in the last few moments, and right now we are going to go back to the commons to the article 50 debate. labour's kate hoey is speaking now. i want to raise a couple of issues people keep saying and it does rather annoying me. people didn't know what they were voting for, they
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voted to leave, but they didn't know what it meant, they didn't understand it. it really is patronising and it is part of the reason why so many people voted to leave, that they were fed up being treated as if they knew nothing and that those in power knew more than they did. yes, i will give way. i am grateful to the honourable lady. i just wanted to say, did she recall in the course of the referendum that from my experience and i hope from her is that there was much more engagement, much more questioning, interest and bigger turnouts than in any general election i have ever been involved in, with people really knowing and trying to find out what it was all about? i think he is quite right about that and certainly at the many meetings i spoke at all over the country, there was a fervent interest in the issue and people wanted to know more. i
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remember very clearly listening to the former prime minister and the former chancellor of the exchequer very clearly warning people, not just warning people, but threatening people, if they dared to leave, the consequences would be they would be leaving the single market. let us not call it the single market, it is an internal market. if you are leaving the eu, of course you have to leave the internal market. i am sure we will be able to get a deal which allows us to have access like any other country outside of the eu. no, iam any other country outside of the eu. no, i am not. any other country outside of the eu. no, iam not. the right any other country outside of the eu. no, i am not. the right honourable member had 22 minutes to speak. mr speaker, that other area... not enough! it was 17. my maths is obviously not as good as yours. the other area i want to raise is the question again of this idea that somehow if you voted to leave, you
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work if not outright racist, and indirect racist, and that has been so indirect racist, and that has been so ridiculous and so appalling that people, the 17 million people who voted to leave, they have been treated in that way. we know what people voted for was not against immigrants, but against the idea that 27 other countries, 26 excluding the republic of ireland, could come into our country without any reason other than they could come, whereas outside the eu, and we betrayed the commonwealth so badly backin betrayed the commonwealth so badly back in 1973, yet those people did not have any right to come here. in my view, it is all about getting back control. i know it sounds like a cliche, but actually, it is taking back control of our own country. once we have left the european union, we will have sharp disagreements in this house and we
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will probably not have such cross— party will probably not have such cross—party views on many of the issues because i think we want to build and! issues because i think we want to build and i certainly want to build a post brexit uk that looks out spending priorities that actually might be very different from collea g u es might be very different from colleagues on other sides of the house. i want to look at how we can use the new freedoms and state aid to give us the power to do things in our own country. but in order to do that, we have to trigger article 50, we have to get into the negotiation and the business and the country generally want to get on with it. we have left ourselves in a situation where we are spending two days of debate now on a very simple bill, the amendments will come next week and there are one or two that i hope the government might accept, but the reality is, this is a process that needs to be triggered, we need to do it soon... studio: labour's kate hoey, urging the parliament to get on with the
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business of getting into negotiations, passing the brexit bill, article 50, and getting on with the negotiations and taking back control, in her words. we will be back with the house of commons shortly to hear more of the debate. now the weather forecast. it is unsettled and the weak will get windy as the days go by. we have several low—pressure systems lining up several low—pressure systems lining up in the atlantic. probably of most concern is an up in the atlantic. probably of most concern is an area up in the atlantic. probably of most concern is an area of low pressure currently around the great lakes. it could bring very stormy weather to the uk on friday. big contrast to the uk on friday. big contrast to thejo whiley is today. relatively mild atlantic air in western areas —— big contrast to the temperatures today. significant wind chill. for most of us, cloudy this afternoon,
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outbreaks of rain. the wettest weather across scotland. rain picking up across wales and south—west england. patchy and light rain in the midlands and south east england. overnight, more significant rain coming in across england and wales. it will be is quite slow—moving so it will be wet in the home counties and stop further west with clear spells for northern ireland and scotland, a few patches of fog and frost in the countryside. otherwise, mild. wednesday, starting ona otherwise, mild. wednesday, starting on a cloudy and wet note. rain very slowly pushing east. looking to ease away from eastern scotland. the skies will brighten up and sunshine for a time ahead of the next system coming in from the west, bringing rain to northern ireland, wales and the south—west towards the end of the south—west towards the end of the day. pressure on thursday, low— pressure the day. pressure on thursday, low—pressure filling up the atlantic, bringing strong winds to ireland on thursday. in the uk,
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quite windy, gales around western coasts and hills. rain pushing east. it should be quite mild. look at this pressure chart for friday. nasty looking area of low—pressure swinging in off the atlantic and targeting the uk. perhaps. we are looking at the potential of severe gales and disruptive weather. the problem with the storm system is we are not sure of the exact track of it at the moment and there are a number of computer models that keep the storm to the south, bringing the disruptive stormy weather to france. it looks like we will see some big weather impacts on friday but we will not sure whether the storm will come to the uk or france. we will work on that over the next few days. that is your weather. this is bbc news.
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the headlines at 3:00: president trump sacks his attorney general after she refuses to implement his controversial immigration ban. the british parliament is to debate donald trump's state visit next month, has more than 70 mps call for him to be banned from addressing parliament. the road to brexit — this is the scene live in westminster as mps debate the government's bill to formally trigger the process of leaving the european union. we must trust the people. what they would be doing is voting against the people. i believe it is in the
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national interest for the united kingdom to be a member of the european union. i believe we have benefited from that position for the la st 45 benefited from that position for the last 45 years. thousands of gay and bisexual men

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