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tv   Witness  BBC News  February 4, 2017 12:30am-1:01am GMT

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ballistic missile test. iran says they breach the deal under which it agreed to curb its nuclear programme. official figures suggest 60,000 people have had their visas revoked under the travel ban introduced by president trump last week. the ban stopped all travel from seven muslim majority countries and caused travel chaos and nationwide protests. for a fourth night hundreds of thousands of romanians have gathered in the capital bucharest to protest at goverment plans to free dozens of officials jailed for corruption. in paris, a man who attacked soldiers with machetes outside the louvre museum has been identified as a 29—year—old egyptian. he arrived in france injanuary. for a fourth night hundreds of thousands of romanians have gathered in the capital bucharest to protest at goverment plans to free dozens of officials jailed for corruption. now it's time for witness. hello, and welcome to witness,
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with me, tanya beckett. i'm here at the british library in london for the last time this year to bring you five of our favourite stories from 2016. we start in north—eastern kenya, the side of the world's largest refugee camp. witnesses have been speaking toa man camp. witnesses have been speaking to a man who grew up in dadaab. her family were among the first to
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arrive back in the 19905 as thousands fled the civil war in somalia. we have been in mogadishu ina big somalia. we have been in mogadishu in a big city with a really good life and then we end up in a refugee camp. in mogadi5hu there were militia groups everywhere. we were scared, dead bodies were scattered everywhere. we were attacked by militia groups, there we re attacked by militia groups, there were about ten. my father survived. we've came from mogadi5hu in 1992
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and we travelled to the border of kenya. my father could not walk so we had a cart and we were trying to ci’oss we had a cart and we were trying to cross the border. if they caught you it was the end of your life. also if you were caught by the soldiers from kenya, that would be the end of your life also. so your likelihood of survival was 50—50. people tried to come to kenya. they gave you a small hat and then covered by plastic. the environment is so har5h. the
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rainfall is so low. it is so hot. sometimes it can go up to 50 degrees. when we arrived in the camp they take away what you have. it was very difficult. it was like a big city. we could have stayed there two years 01’ one year. city. we could have stayed there two years or one year. we cannot get away from it. we cannot go back to somalia. i got a scholarship. ifeel
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better. i have been in kenya for 2h yea rs. better. i have been in kenya for 2h years. dadaab is the world's largest refugee camp and now kenya wants to close it down. will they be forced to leave? many of them have never been anywhere else. we were brought up been anywhere else. we were brought up in kenya. we were caught in between. talking to witness in kenya there. 0ur talking to witness in kenya there. our next witness is the nasa astronaut michael foale, who had one
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of the most frightening experiences everin of the most frightening experiences ever in space. in 1997 he was on board russia's mere space station when a cargo vessel crashed into it. there was a space station built by the russians. the impression you got when you opened up the hatch and went into mirfor the when you opened up the hatch and went into mir for the first time we re went into mir for the first time were twofold, one was the smell, like an oily garage. maybe a little bit of must, because we did have mould on the mir. the other impression is clutter. a5 mould on the mir. the other impression is clutter. as you go through it is like going into the oesophagus of someone's throat. after about six weeks of being on the station, i did my experiments, i was very happy, i get up onjune 25, the commander and the flight engineer had been using radio control equipment to fly a cargo
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ship that weighs about seven tons into the mir station using a tv looking at the station. a5 into the mir station using a tv looking at the station. as i look at the tv screen i can see that the orientation is all wrong for a proper docking to take place. sasha, the flight engineer, says to me, michael... he means the soyuz spacecraft, which isjoined on to the end of the station, which was at that point our lifeboat, but i understood because of the urgency with which he said it, he meant go there to save your life. why float through and i feel the whole space station shudder and move around me —— why float. i'm pretty sure this may be my last breath because i'm looking at the three millimetre thick aluminium walls and just
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waiting for them to part. klaxons go off when there's a pressure leak and then i felt my ears popping, which in this case meant the air is leaving the space station and there was a whistling sound coming from the spectre module. in 23 minutes if we did nothing we would start to go on conscious. sasha comes to me and he doesn't say a word, he starts to move he doesn't say a word, he starts to m ove ca bles he doesn't say a word, he starts to move cables feeding into the spectre module. he looked around for a large hatchback could be put in place, we put it on and as it went on it sucked in. because the station had been hit by the progress we were now tumbling and rolling and at this point there was no electrical power and the batteries were giving out, there was no fan, no carbon dioxide removal, no oxygen regeneration and no communication with moscow or anyone else. it was a total lead dead station. —— totally. this is
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not something you see in movies where it all gets solved instantly by some brainy chap. it took probably six hours. we used the soyuz spacecraft and just fired the jets to stop the space station tumbling and rolling. and wonderfully we came into sunlight after this and all of a sudden the fa ns started after this and all of a sudden the fans started to come on and the lights came on and i said, we've done it. however, for the next month the station was in operable in any normal sense. it could just sustain our lives and nothing else. when finally the shuttle came in october, i was really, really quite happy to see them. and as we backed away from the mir station i looked at it and thought, i don't really mind if i don't ever see that again! the nasa
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astronaut michael foale there. in december, 1999, boris yeltsin shocked russia and the world by announcing his resignation on new year's eve. yeltsin played a key role in bringing down the soviet union, but later became a controversial figure. witness went to moscow to meet his widow. in the heady days of 1990 and early 1991, he was the adored leader of a protest movement unknown since the bolshevik revolution. but if russians like that, they
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didn't like what came next. first the breakup of the soviet union, engineered partly by yeltsin, then a crash course in capitalism that broke the chains of the centrally planned economy. scenes like this at one of moscow's charity canteens today are simply humiliating for most russians, who remember the days when the soviet union itself gave aid to the third world. yeltsin faced a rebellion from his own former powerbase, the russian parliament. his reply, to bombard it into submission. remarkably boris yeltsin clung on to
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defeat the communists and win a second term in office, but there was a price to be paid. his health collapsed. i want to ask for your forgiveness. because many of our dreams did not come to pass. because what had seemed simple turned out to be terribly hard. i ask forgiveness for not fulfilling some of the hopes of the people who believed that we could in one swoop, in one leapjump from the great,
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stagnant, totalitarian past into the radiant, wealthy and civilised future. i am leaving. radiant, wealthy and civilised future. iam leaving. i have radiant, wealthy and civilised future. i am leaving. i have done everything i can. naina yeltsina, the widow of boris yeltsin. remember, you can watch witness every month on the bbc news channel all you can catch up on all of our films channel all you can catch up on all of ourfilms along channel all you can catch up on all of our films along with more than 1000 radio programmes in our online archive. —— or you can. in 200a, archive. —— or you can. in 2004, the environmental campaigner became the first african woman to win the nobel peace prize. when she spent much of her life trying to protect the forests of kenya. witness has been to the
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forests near nairobi to meet her daughter. my my mother was often asked, were you afraid? how can you do all these things. she said what needed to be done was so compelling that had to done was so compelling that had to do it. she grew up surrounded by nature. surrounded by the beauty of nature. surrounded by the beauty of nature. i also remember her describing her mother being a farmer. her mother grew all the food that they ate. and then she goes away to school, the university, out in the united states. she comes back and joined at the very young member of academic staff. she was struck by theissues of academic staff. she was struck by the issues that were being presented by women who were very much like her mother. lack of fuel, lack of water, lack of nutritious food. everything
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they described, she felt was connected to a degradation of the landscape and so why not plant trees? the women here till the land. it's important they know how to conserve this soil. she founded the movement in 1977 to help women plant trees and at the same time again to understand how to heal the land themselves. it is 50 million trout on “— themselves. it is 50 million trout on —— trees in now and counting. very quickly that green belt movement became more than about planting trees. we had a dictatorial government and a 1—party system. public land was being parcelled out to the public administration of the day. protecting these spaces necessarily becomes political. this was one of the scariest battles, by
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far. looma people are showing a lot of anger because nobody knew the extent to which the forest is actually destroyed. —— people are showing a lot of anger. it was vicious. she was physically hurt, she was in hospital, but she survived. whenever she survived, she knew it was time to go back and finish the work of saving the park. we are here in the forest. 0ne finish the work of saving the park. we are here in the forest. one of the most beautiful urban forests in the most beautiful urban forests in the world. it is thanks to the green belt movement and the efforts of my mother at the time that saved it. she also was a human right activist, a women's rights activists. she also was a human right activist, a women's rights activistslj she also was a human right activist, a women's rights activists. i have no idea where these policemen are taking me now. i have done nothing. to challenge the president and the party of the day, that was gutsy. and ecologist from africa has become the first woman to win the nobel peace prize. wangari maathai has...
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shejust didn't peace prize. wangari maathai has... she just didn't believe that it was her. for a while, she thought it was a mistake, i don't know. it was one of the most amazing moment to see her enjoy the spotlight and the platform in a way she had never had before. i think the whole day she sort of spent saying, "i didn't know anyone was listening." my mother died on september 25 2011. she has left quite a legacy, i think. suddenly for us as kenyon is, women, africans, to believe in the power of one. one woman from the highlands of tenure can be such a potent force of change. it remains one of the most inspiring things for me. wanjira maathai speaking in the forest. we
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now have the legendary indian runner milk are seen the flying seek as she is also known became the first indian to win a major gold medal in athletics. —— milkha singh. independence was proclaimed and celebrated but it came as a terrible price. the price was the division of india. fora price. the price was the division of india. for a while, price. the price was the division of india. fora while, the price. the price was the division of india. for a while, the north of india. for a while, the north of india ran with blood as hindus, muslims and sikhs slotted one
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another. —— slaughtered. men and women pass prince philip on the saluting base. commentator: milkha singh of india! it is first, milkha singh, second placed south africa. milkha singh whose incredible story
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has been told —— turned into a hollywood film called run, milkha, run. from me and the rest of the witness team, goodbye. hello, good morning. things are calming down a bit for this weekend. on friday, we had an area of low pressure bringing strong winds onto the south coast of england — gusts of 60 mph. big waves and rough seas. outbreaks of rain and even some snow over the hills. and here, earlier on in the night across parts of northern ireland. the wet weather is moving northwards up into scotland right now.
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clearer skies following on across england and wales. maybe northern ireland, too. meaning it will be chilly with the risk of icy patches. another area of low pressure on the scene on saturday. we will miss the worst about it but it could bring disruptive weather around the bay of biscay and into france. a lot of people travelling up for the six nations rugby. for the two matches on saturday, it looks like it's going to be generally fine. improving weather at murrayfield. it should be dry in london. a chance of rain first thing from the weather system that is bringing the wet and windy weather into france but away from the south—east corner of england, it could be a dry, chilly, bright start across england and wales. a few showers coming into the north—west corner of england. it should have dried off for much of northern ireland. a cold and wet picture north of the central belt. for scotland, rain and snow in the hills. one or two showers further south and developing later in the day in west wales and the far south—west of england. that area of low pressure takes the rain
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away from the extreme south—east of england and eventually that cloud breaks as well. for many parts of the uk, it will be dry with quite a bit of sunshine but a bit colder, temperatures seven or eight degrees. looking at the showers developing in the west and south—west. that develops into a more organised band of rain. again, there could be snow in the hills. either side of that, the winds are quite light, skies clearer. there could be frost and maybe some icy patches but also some patches of freezing fog as well. certainly not widespread but that will take a while to clear from parts of southern england and maybe northern ireland on sunday. a lot of that rain tends to peter out, leaving us with a few showers around across the northern part of the uk but further south, it could be dry. again, some sunshine coming through but a chillierfeel. 6—8 degrees. clear skies and light winds overnight and it could be quite a frosty start on monday morning. again, some patches of freezing fog which could take a little while to clear away.
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we have a bump of high pressure to start next week but looking out towards the west, signs of change again, stronger winds on the way. that will blow in outbreaks of rain off the atlantic and tend to lift the temperatures for a while. that's it. goodbye. hello. i'm kasia madera with bbc world news. our top stories: the us imposes new sanctions on iran following a recent ballistic missile test. iran promises to retaliate. a man who was shot and injured after trying to attack french security forces in paris has been identified as a 29—year—old egyptian. the united states has imposed new sanctions on iran to punish it for a recent ballistic missile test,
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and for what it calls tehran's continued support for terrorism. they will target twelve companies and thirteen individuals in iran and elsewhere.
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