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tv   Witness  BBC News  February 4, 2017 1:30pm-2:00pm GMT

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weather watchers combining to give us weather watchers combining to give use weather watchers combining to give us a view across the british isles. a variety, as you can see. cloud and rain across south—eastern quarter, rain across south—eastern quarter, rain gradually moving away. showers beginning to encroach into the west of wales and south—west of england, and that big area of low pressure still dominates across the north—western quarter of scotland. as you have not been mentioned so far, you aren't free pretty decent afternoon. this band of showers works from west to east. either side, skies are clear, allowing mist and fog to form and temperatures to dip away. which out —— watch out for ice this thing on sunday. sunday not as cheery, leaden skies to start, this and fog. showers tend to fizzle, more coming into the west to finish your day. top temperature, disappointing 8—9. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines at 13.31. president trant has angrily rejected
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aus president trant has angrily rejected a us court ruling which has temporarily lifted a ban on travellers from seven mainly muslim countries. church robot's decision, effective immediately, puts a halt to president tramp‘s unconstitutional and unlawful executive order. the executive order establishes a process to develop new vetting and mechanisms to ensure those coming into america love and support our people. labour has pledged to close the public funding gap between the south and the north of england, saying it wants major rail improvements in northern england. the ministry ofjustice says it's "urgently" investigating claims that security workers were paid by offenders to deliberately fit electronic ankle tags too loosely so they could be removed. french authorities say they believe the man who tried to attack the louvre museum in paris yesterday is a 29—year—old egyptian man. now on bbc news.
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witness. tanya beckett introduces us to five extraordinary moments in history. hello, and welcome to witness with me, tanya beckett. i'm at the british library in london for the first time this year to bring you five more unique glimspses into history. this week we meet the widow of boris
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yeltsin, the astronaut who survived an accident in space and the seek who survived during the partition of india. we start in north—eastern kenny, the site of the largest refugee camp in the world. witness has been speaking to someone who grew up there, her family were among the first to arrive back in the 19905 the first to arrive back in the 1990s as thousands fled the civil war in somalia. you don't know what life holds for you. we've been in mogadishu, in a big city, a good life, and we end up in a refugee camp. in mogadishu there were militia groups everywhere. we were scared. they were scattered everywhere like things you can't imagine. we were attacked by militia
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groups, ithink imagine. we were attacked by militia groups, i think there were about ten. they killed one of my uncles. they shot my father in his left leg and from the back and went out from the side. we fled mogadishu in the beginning of 1982. we travelled to the border of kenya. my father could not walk so we had a donkey cart. we we re not walk so we had a donkey cart. we were trying to cross the border. bearin were trying to cross the border. bear in mind that you can be caught by the bandits at any time, if they caught you that was the end of your life. if you were caught by the soldiers from kenya that would be the end of your life also! so the means of survival people means of survival was 50—50. people come to kenya to look for means of survival but we never expected that
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we would go to a refugee camp. at the beginning we ended up here, you have a small hut covered by plastic. the environment is so harsh. it was nasty, the soil was not fertile, you could not grow anything. in three yea rs could not grow anything. in three years there might be no rain. it's so years there might be no rain. it's so hot, sometimes it can reach up to 42, 50, degrees. when we arrived in the camps that are gangs will come at night and take away what you have. it wasn't safe at the beginning but things become cool as time goes by. it's like a city now. the big city. we thought we could
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have stayed there two years or one year, we never thought we would stay there 25 years. we could not travel from there to other parts of kenya and we could not go back to somalia. i got my education and got a scholarship to university. 2a years in kenyan. they were saying the other day what they want is to close the camps and take away the somali people living there, back to somalia. it is the largest refugee camp in the world and no kenya wants to close it down. will they be forced to leave? many have never
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been anywhere else. where will i go back to? we are caught in between. zamzam, talking to - in kenya. zamzam, talking to witness in kenya. witness is michael foale, astronaut who had one of the nasa astronaut who had one of the most frightening of experiences in space. in 1997 he was on russia's me a space station when a cargo vessel crashed into it. mir was a space station built by the russians. your impression when you opened the hatch and went into mirfor the impression when you opened the hatch and went into mir for the first time was to — twofold. and smart like an oily garage, maybe a little must because we didn't have mould on the mir. the other impression is clutter. —— it smelt like an oily
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garage. like going into the oesophagus of a throat. after six weeks on the station i had been doing my experiments, i was happy, i get up onjune 26, the commander and the flight engineer had been using radio control equipment to fly a cargo ship called progress that weighs about seven tonnes into the mir station, using a tv looking at the station. as i looked at the tv screen i could see that the orientation was wrong for a proper docking to take place. sasha, the flight docking to take place. sasha, the flight engineer, says to me, michael! he saw the spacecraft which wasjoined on to michael! he saw the spacecraft which was joined on to the end of the station which was at that point our lifeboat but i understood, because of the emergency in which he said it, he meant, go there to save your of the emergency in which he said
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it, he n i ant, go there to save your of the emergency in which he said it, he n i float go there to save your of the emergency in which he said it, he n i float through to save your of the emergency in which he said it, he n i float through i o save your of the emergency in which he said it, he n i float through i feel le your of the emergency in which he said it, he n i float through i feel the our life. as i float through i feel the whole space station shudder and move around me. i am whole space station shudder and move around me. iam pretty sure whole space station shudder and move around me. i am pretty sure this may be my last breath because i am looking at the three millimetres thick aluminium walls, just waiting for them to part. klaxons go off when there is a pressure leak. then i felt my ears popping ulbisb meant 5; eggs leavin 7 ww.-- 5; sixes leavin the s-ace w that the air was leaving the space station and there was a whistling sound coming from the module. in 23 minutes, if we did nothing we would go unconscious. sasha comes to me and doesn't say a word, he feverishly starts to remove cables leading into the model. he looked around for a large hatch that could be put in place and we put it on and as it went on it sucked in. because the station had been hit by the
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progress we were now tumbling and rolling. at this point there was no electric power and the batteries are giving out. that was not a fan running, the carbon dioxide removal wasn't working, no oxygen regeneration and no communications with moscow or anyone else. it was a totally d ea d with moscow or anyone else. it was a totally dead station. this is not something you see in movies where it gets solved instantly by some brainy chap. it took about six hours. we used the spacecraft and fired the jet to stop the space station tumbling and rolling. and then, wonderfully, we came into sunlight after this. and all of a sudden the fa ns started after this. and all of a sudden the fans started to come on, and the lights came on, and i said, we have done it. however? however, for the
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next month the station was inoperable in the normal sense, it could sustain our lives and nothing else. when finally the shuttle came in october i was really quite happy to see them. and as we backed away from the mir station i looked at it and thought, i don't really mind if i don't ever see that again! nasa astronaut ' "’ ’ i don't ever see that again! nasa astronaut’ ' "’ ’ in december shocked 1999 boris yeltsin shocked russia and the worlds by announcing his resignation on new year's eve. he played a key role in bringing down the soviet union that later became a controversial figure. the soviet union that later became a controversialfigure. we the soviet union that later became a controversial figure. we went to moscow to meet his widow, naina in the heady days of 1990 and early
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1991 he was the adored leader of a protest movement not known since the bolshevik revolution. but they did not like what happened next, a crash course in communism. seems like this at one of moscow's charity canteens today are humiliating for most russians who remember the days when the soviet
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union itself gave aid to the third as.-- ,, 7& faced a i faced a rebellion from his own former power base, the russian parliament. his reply was too bombarded into submission. remarkably boris yeltsin clung on, remarkzhlv rnri: veltcin rlnnn an a- the and win remarkzhlv rnri: veltcin rlnnn an wiebflhe and wina to defeat the commonest and win a second term in office but there was a price to be paid. his health collapsed. i want to ask for your forgiveness because many of our dreams did not come to pass, because what had seemed simple turned out to be terribly translation: i ask forgiveness for
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not fulfilling some of the hopes of the people who believed that we could in one swoop, in one leap leap from the grave to tell terry and passed into the radiant, wealthy, civilised future. —— from naina yeltsina, - widow of you can watch yeltsin. remember, you can watch
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witness on the bbc news channel or catch up on all of our films along with 1000 radio programmes in our online archive. just go to the bbc website. in 2004 the environmental campaigner became the first african woman to win the nobel peace prize. she spent much of her life trying to protect the forests. we went to meet her daughter. my mother was often asked, when too afraid, you feel is, how could you do all these things. she said, i was afraid but what needed to be done was so compelling that she had to do it. she grew up surrounded by nature, surrounded by the beauty of nature. i remember her
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describing her mother as a farmer, growing the food that they ate and then she went to school, to university in the usa and came back and joined as a very young member of the academic staff. she was struck by the issues being presented by women who were like a mother. they we re women who were like a mother. they were talking about lack of fuel, lack of water and lack of nutritious food. and everything they described she felt was connected to the degradation of the landscape, so why not plant trees, she asked them. the women here tilled the lands that it's important that they know how to co nse rve it's important that they know how to conserve this soil. she founded the green belt movement in 1977 to help women plant trees and at the same time begin to understand how to heal the land themselves. it's 50 million trees now and counting. very quickly
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the green belt movement became about more than planting trees because we had a highly dictatorial government under 1—party system. land was being pa rcelled under 1—party system. land was being parcelled out to the friends of the administration of the days are protecting these spaces necessarily becomes political. —— the administration of the day, so protecting it became political. this was by far one of the scariest battles. people are showing anger because no one knew the extent to which the forest was destroyed. it was vicious. she got physically hurt, she was in hospital but she's survived, so whenever she survived she knew it was time to go back and finish the work of saving the park. we are in this forest, one of the most beautiful urban forests in the world and it is thanks to the green belt movement and the efforts of my mother at the time that saved it.
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but she was also humans rights activists, women's rights activist. i have no idea where these policemen are taking me now. i have nothing. to challenge the president and the party of the day, that was gutsy. and ecologist from kenny has become the first african woman to win the nobel peace prize. wangari maathai. .. she nobel peace prize. wangari maathai... she didn't nobel peace prize. wangari maathai. .. she didn't believe it was herfor a while. maybe maathai. .. she didn't believe it was her for a while. maybe she thought it was a mistake, i don't know, but it was a mistake, i don't know, but it was a mistake, i don't know, but it was one of the most amazing moments to see her enjoy the spotlight and the platform in a way she had never done before. i think the whole day she spent saying, i didn't know anyone was listening. my mother died on september 25 2011. she has left quite a legacy, i think. sidney for us as kenyans,
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women, africans, to believe in the power of one —— certainly fought us. that one woman from the highlands of kenya could be such a potent force for change remains one of the most inspiring things. the daughter of wangari maathai talking to witness in the forest. the last witness is the legendary indian runner, milkha singh. the commonwealth games in cardiff in1958, singh. the commonwealth games in cardiff in 1958, the flying sikh, as he was known, became the first indian to win a major gold medal in athletics. independence was proclaimed and
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celebrated but it had been obtained ata celebrated but it had been obtained at a terrible price and the price was the division of india, the partition. for a while the north of india ran with blood as hindus, muslims, and sikhs grimly slaughtered one another. commentator: away first time, going harder and that bend... —— going ha rd harder and that bend... —— going hard around that bend. and milkha singh of india!
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and its first, milkha singh! milkha singh, whose incredible story
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has been turned into a bollywood film called run milkha run. that is all from witness this month, will be backin all from witness this month, will be back in february with more stories from history told by the people who we re from history told by the people who were there. from me and the rest of the witness team, goodbye. you learn something every day, i did not know the commonwealth games had beenin not know the commonwealth games had been in cardiff, that was before my time, onlyjust! it was raining earlier in norfolk, further up the coast at whitby, what's that? you'll find out later. in the meantime there's a swathe of and find whether
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in between low pressure to the south—east, low pressure to the north—east of scotland, and a band of showers creeping ever further from the west across the british isles. there is some hill snow to be had, the eastern side of scotland escaping the worst of the conditions, northern ireland is certainly dry, shell was flirting with the antrim coast becoming more prevalent across parts of pembrokeshire, coming up to the south—west, some quite heavy, further eased, getting tied up with all that sort of stuff we showed you. overnight a little bit of hill snow across the heart of wales, the skies will be relatively clear, temperatures will dip as a consequence, mist and fog, and maybe a bit of ice first thing on the morning. sunday, more clad
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generally, probably at its thickest across western areas, a scattering of showers there. this is the rain from the south—east and east anglia today, being a bit more of a nuisance up towards whitby and north eastern coasts, might even get as far as eastern scotland, in between there is a swathe of bright weather, some cloud around, that is visual, dry weather as well, again not overly warm, between five and nine should cover it for many of us. into the start of the new week, a chilly might gainfrom the start of the new week, a chilly might gain from sunday into monday, a great veil of cloud will eventually present itself across western parts, notice the number of isa bars, an indication of strong winds, nothing exceptional, just a standard winter blow, generally speaking on monday, the further
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east, the drier it will be if you can be bothered to stand in it. i will see you later, bye bye. this is bbc news. the headlines at 2pm: president trump angrily rejects a us court ruling which temporarily lifts a ban on travellers from seven mainly—muslim countries. this decision effective immediately, effective now, puts a halt to president trump's unconstitutional and unlawful executive order. i signed and unlawful executive order. isigned an and unlawful executive order. i signed an executive order to help keep terrorists out of our country. labour say they would legislate to limit future price hikes by the energy companies. the government says it's urgently investigating claims that security workers in london were paid by offenders to fit electronic ankle tags loosely so they could be removed. also in the next hour, the rugby union's six nations begins this afternoon. ireland are away to scotland, while england aim for a fifteenth
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