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tv   BBC News  BBC News  February 19, 2017 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

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the battle for mosul. they are only a couple of comet is over that way and they know that these men are coming. the assault has started. we will have the latest to liberate people. but will it be enough to keep staff in problem jails? you look at what's happening last night in sweden. sweden — who would believe this? last night in sweden. sweden! last night in sweden. after president trump appears to speak of a security incident that never happened, sweden asks the united states for an explanation. sweden asks the united states and angelina jolie talks exclusively to us about her new film — set in cambodia — and her separation from brad pitt. set in cambodia — it was a very difficult time, and... set in cambodia — and we are a family, and we will always be a family, and we will get through this time, and hopefully be a stronger family for it. and hopefully be
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good evening. iraqi security forces have been pushing forward today in a major offensive aimed at taking full control of their second largest city — mosul — from so—called islamic state. the city was seized more than two years ago as is moved into northern and western iraq. years ago as is moved the offensive to remove them began last october, with iraqi troops securing the eastern part of mosul last month. the eastern part but the western half of the city is home to around three quarters of a million civilians, and stiff resistance from is fighters is expected. and stiff resistance our middle east correspondent, quentin sommerville, and cameraman nik millard, are the only television journalists on the frontline with iraqi forces.
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are the only television journalists they sent this report. are the only television journalists just after sunrise, iraq began what it hopes is its last major battle against the so—called islamic state. thousands of men and hundreds of armoured vehicles in a line of attack that spread for miles. of armoured vehicles in a line the iraqi army are starting their assault on western mosul. they've breached their own defences. their assault on western mosul. armoured vehicles are lining up, getting ready for the islamic state. they are only a couple of kilometres over that way, and they know these men are coming. of kilometres over that way, they are dug in, and the assault in western mosul has started. leading the attack, iraq's emergency response division, police special forces. emergency response division, some of these men were surrounded by is two years ago. theyjust escaped with their lives. by is two years ago.
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today, they threw everything they had at is. gunfire everything they had at is. we are now above the village which is their main target. they're laying down fire, which is their main target. and they're about to call in some artillery strikes. but in some artillery strikes. first, the mortars. the captain tells me there are three is fighters in a yellow building down there, and car bombs. is fighters in a yellow building we're targeting them now. is fighters in a yellow building —— they're targeting them now. is fighters in a yellow building car bomb explosion just gone off. is fighters in a yellow building
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the men were trying to take it out. is fighters in a yellow building seems like they managed to hit it. is fighters in a yellow building they had set up a whole bunch of rifles, but as you can see here, they're getting ready with another rpg just in case. it seems like they got it. with another rpg just in case. there were four car bombs in total, but soon government forces were inside. but soon government they killed 13 is fighters and sustained only one casualty. translation: we are very glad to have liberated this area. we have killed lots of ies, and we will soon get civilians back to their homes. —— is. we will continue to push forward and follow is to the border. here, there were no white flags and no black is flags. for the first time in years, the iraqi flag flew above this village. this village is small, but it's important, it's
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the gateway to mosul proper and the city's airport. as and the city's airport. we discovered, holmes had i fortresses. as we discovered, holmes had become fortresses. here, is weapons. and hidden inside a house, away from surveillance aircraft, another car bomb disguised as an ambulance. the bomb disguised as an ambulance. the bomb inside was still live. in the street, though, a critical advantage — though were no civilians. in west mosul there are three quarters of a million people and thousands of is vitals. —— fighters. it took them in just six hours to take this village, their target. they made good progress but with overwhelming force. beyond here is another town and another village. that town overlooks mosul airport and the city itself. from here on in, though, the
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going would be nearly so fast. this was a victory two years in the making. but it's more than that. these troops, once humiliated by is, today celebrated, a moment of redemption for them and for iraq. quentin somerville, bbc news, on mosul‘s southern front. well, the wider fight against so—called islamic state, and the security of the region has been discussed today at a major security conference in munich, and our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, is there. what lyse doucet, is there. sense that you get of the wi fight? what sense that you get of the wider fight? everyone here, including british officials, warned the iraqi administration that the fight was not just military. who administration that the fight was notjust military. who is going to run mosul once is is defeated there? you have various groups on the
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ground. without a power—sharing agreement now, mosul will be plunged into another wave of violence and extremism. there are questions too about what happens in syria, where is is in control of rack up. we heard calls here for american special forces to go in on the ground. others say that will just inflame tensions. one un official to me that if president trump has an america first policy, it has to be rack up first. there are is gun men holed up there, in front of their computers, plotting 911— style attacks. here in munich, a lot of talk about accelerating the fight against is, but a lot of worry that the right strategies are not in place. lee's doucet, thank you. the prison officers association has dismissed government plans to increase the pay of some of its members as a sticking plaster that will not fix the broken system. of its members as a sticking plaster thousands of officers atjails in london and the south—east of england will be offered a rise of between £3000 and £5000. ministers say it will boost recruitment and retention,
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but the union says all its members face the same risks and the policy will be divisive. face the same risks here's our home affairs correspondent, june kelly. this is how many officers it takes to contain one violent prisoner. every working day, staff are battling simply to keep control. the £12 million in extra pay announced today is aimed at bringing in new recruits and paying some existing staff more. recruits and paying some existing here in wandsworth jail in south london, officers will benefit. london, officers will the offer is limited to prisons in the capital and the south—east, a divisive move, according to the prison officers association. according to the prison officers we're going to welcome additional money for our members, of course we are, but we don't think this goes far enough to solving the prison crisis. the we believe it needs to be a national issue. the offer is for standard grade three prison officers, not for more senior supervisors or specialists. each will receive a pay hike of at least £3000. a pay hike of at least
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for new recruits, their pay package will be increased by £5,000, the sweetener to bring people in. will be increased by £5,000, the panorama programme recently went undercover at northumberland jail, and it showed inmates high on drugs. undercover at northumberland jail, staff constantly having to search for banned substances. there is no more money for officers here in today's announcement. for officers here in one needed medical treatment for a seizure because he'd inhaled the synthetic drug spice. the justice secretary liz truss has already announced plans to significantly boost officer numbers. it's not something you can sort out in weeks or months. can sort out in weeks it takes time to recruit people, to bring those people on. but i'm absolutely determined to deal with that. but prison reform campaigners, including those who have been inside, say there has to be more focused on retaining experienced hands. to be more focused on retaining there is a peculiar invisible chemistry of
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where a mutual respect between experienced prison officers who know how to keep difficult prisoners under control from inexperienced officers who don't quite understand that you don't need to take out your truncheon necessarily to sort out a fight between two prisoners. a eventually, the plan is for 2500 extra officers in england and wales. but they won't all be in place until 2018. june kelly, bbc news. in place until 2018. president trump has made a strong defence of his first four weeks in office, saying a new spirit of optimism is sweeping the united states. saying a new spirit of optimism addressing thousands of supporters in florida, he repeated pledges to create jobs and improve the nation's security. but he also appeared to refer to an incident in sweden when none had taken place. to an incident in sweden the swedish government has asked for an explanation. from florida, our correspondent laura bicker reports. this
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laura bicker reports. is a us holiday weekend to celebrate this is a us holiday weekend to celebrate past presidents, but in new york and elsewhere, some decided to hold protests about the new one. it has been a tough first month for donald trump. he took time to step into the sunshine state and hold a rally with supporters. this is more firm, more familiar ground. the president of the united states... he promised to get more work done, including releasing a new immigration order this week to replace his controversial travel ban, but some of his reasoning caused more controversy. you look at what's happening last night in sweden. sweden! who would believe this? sweden. they took in large numbers, they're having problems like they never thought possible. the swedish embassy in the us asked foran the swedish embassy in the us asked for an explanation. there have been no terror attacks there this week. the white house said he was referring to reports of rising
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crime, which he may have seen on fox news. it is the kind of distraction from his message that mr trump blames on the media. from his message that mr trump blames on the medial from his message that mr trump blames on the media. i also want to speak to you without the filter of the fake news. cheering they have become a big part of the problem. they are part of the corrupt system. president trump accused major us networks of being an enemy of the people. one senior republican says that lessons need to be learned from history. if you want to preserve democracy as we know it, you have to have a free and many times adversarial press and without it, i'm afraid that we would lose so much of our individual liberties over time. that's how dictators get started. but the president's chief of staff says the media is co nsta ntly of staff says the media is constantly making up news. talking about russian spies, about the
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intelligence community, about how me and steve bannon don't like each other and what is kelly and doingall of this total garbage, unsourced stuff. donald trump help this rally to revive his message, but it's also a reminder — there is work to do. president trump seems far more co mforta ble president trump seems far more comfortable at the campaign podium than he does in the oval office right now. he seems to feed from the energy of this crowd, but he doesn't need to win friends here in florida, he needs them in capitol hill. if he is to get his agenda through congress. he also needs to find a new national security adviser after his first choice resigned and the second turns down the job. he's holding interviews today. the rally will have helped donald trump reconnect with his voting base, but now it's time to get on with governing. laura becker, bbc news, florida. the american—owned food and beverage firm, kraft heinz, has "amicably agreed" to withdraw its proposal for a takeover of britain's third largest company, unilever. third largest company, unilever had turned down
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its approach, describing it as having "no merit, strategic or financial," but it was thought the us giant would return with a higher offer. as would return with a higher offer. our business correspondent, joe lynam, is here. joe, what happened to stop this takeover? this to stop this takeover? is an extraordinary u—turn. within this is an extraordinary u—turn. within hours of this bid being submitted, they are walking away. it would have been one of the biggest corporate takeovers, bringing together global brands. but it is not to be. i understand the two bosses spoke over the weekend and became patently clear that kraft heinz would have to launch a hostile takeover, which would have been very expensive. i think the seven and a half thousand unilever staff will be glad tonight. there were fears over cutting costs and jobs. thank you. over the last two weeks we've been reporting in our health check
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series on the growing pressures on hospitals. those pressures are also intensifying in general practice, with the latest figures showing a slight fall over 12 months in the number of gp posts in england. it's getting harder to fill gp vacancies, and doctors are seeing a growing caseload of more complex conditions. our health editor, hugh pym, explains. three doctors and three stories illustrating the pressures on gps. more patients with difficult conditions, finances not keeping up, and a job that they say is increasingly stressful. this used to be a surgery in the west midlands, but it is now boarded up. in the west midlands, the gps running it couldn't make the sums add up. couldn't make the sums a high workload needed more staff, which increased costs. they had to cut their own pay, so they decided to hand in the keys. own pay, so they this was one of the hardest decisions i've ever had to make. the hardest decisions i went into medicine to look after people and help people, and to be in a position where you feel like you can't do thatjob, it's not something i ever wanted to do.
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but at the end of the day, i've got to do what's right for me and what's safe to do. i've got to do what's right for local patients have had to move to nearby surgeries. had to move to nearby gps accept they are relatively well—paid, but some now feel it's no longer worth running a practice. we hope that in due course we'll be able to accommodate trainees... it's hardly traditional for a medicaljob advert, but this doctor has taken to social media to advertise a gp vacancy which has been unfilled for nearly a year. to advertise a gp vacancy which has he says other local practices have the same problem, and in their part of rural essex, his concern is for patient care. of rural essex, his concern is for we're now four gps down from the 12 we ought to have. if you have more than about 2000 patients per gp, access to general practice becomes difficult. patients per gp, access to general people can't get the appointments that they need, and the burden on the gps that remain becomes very difficult to manage. that remain becomes very open wide for me... that remain becomes very many gps are now
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part—time, like this doctor in sussex. part—time, like this she says she works several more hours each week than she's paid for, seeing or phoning more than a0 patients a day. i'm just wondering if i'd be able to discuss... the cases are getting more complex and more challenging. more complex and more the problem that happens when we're working at pressure is that you never have that time and space to sit and think, what do i need to do? time and space to sit and think, i need to read through the note, read through the letters from the hospital, read through what i know about these medications. read through what i know about these but often, you just don't have the time or space to do that, because the moment you've finished with one patient, the door opens and the next one comes in. finished with one patient, the door some might say you're a highly paid professional, that there are others who work very hard in the public sector, that you just have to get on with it. if this was an easyjob that was so highly paid that anyone wanted to do it, then why do a third of gp surgeries currently have unfilled vacancies? nhs england says more of the budget is being shifted to gp care. ministers say some surgeries aren't opening for long enough each day, but this gp feels they're working all the hours they possibly can.
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working all the hours they possibly hugh pym, bbc news. working all the hours they possibly the hollywood actor—director angelina jolie says she hopes her new film about cambodia under the khmer rouge will help educate the world about the brutality of the regime. "first they killed my father" is based on the childhood experiences of cambodian human rights activist loung ung during the civil war. rights activist loung ung msjolie has also spoken for the first time about her highly publicised split from brad pit. for the first time about her highly she's been talking exclusively to our correspondent yalda hakim, whose report contains flash photography from the start. hollywood royalty meets cambodian royalty. the backdrop, an ancient temple. cambodian royalty. it's the biggest movie premiere this country has ever seen. the director, angelina jolie, says the film speaks to this nation's people. the film speaks to this nation's their actors, their language, their story. this war that happened
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a0 years ago, and what happened to these people, was not properly understood, and notjust for the world, but for the people of the country, i felt that i wanted them to be able to reflect on it in a way that they could absorb, so it's through the eyes of a child, and it's a lot about love. the khmer rouge, a radical communist movement, vowed to take the country back to year zero. movement, vowed to take millions were forced out of the cities in an attempt to create a rural utopia. of the cities in an attempt you could be killed for practising religion, showing emotions, or even wearing colour. for practising religion, showing infouryears, 2 million people died. speaking to people here, i get the sense that they don't want to remember the past, but they also can't forget it. there are 20,000 mass graves across this country, like these ones. across this country,
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a visual reminder of what this nation has been through. what this nation has been the haunting portraits of death — hundreds of images of those who were tortured at the notorious s21 prison. more than 12,000 people were killed here. in the end, only a handful survived. were killed here. 86—year—old chung mai is one of them. they beat me for 12 days and 12 nights, he tells me. and 12 nights, he tells i was so hungry, when i would see a cockroach, lizard or mouse, i would catch it and eat it. a cockroach, lizard or mouse, i if they caught me, they'd beat me up again. angelina jolie is keen to tell this story and focus on this country and its past. story and focus on this country and but it's been difficult to keep the spotlight off her own personal life. the spotlight off her own we know that an incident occurred which led to your separation. occurred which led to your we also know you haven't said anything about this. would you like to say something? anything about this.
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er... anything about this. only that... anything about this. i don't want to say very much about that. except to say that it was a very difficult time, and... and we are a family, and we will always be a family, and we will get through this time, and hopefully be a stronger family for it. and hopefully be but this moment is about cambodia and remembering the time when this ancient culture was almost wiped out. ancient culture was almost wiped a first look at tomorrow morning's papers is coming up on the bbc news channel. it's now time for the news wherever you are. good night. good evening.
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i'm asad ahmad. certain cars could be banned from london's roads in an effort to combat air pollution. from london's roads in an effort the mayor of london hasn't ruled the measure out, while in another effort to improve the air we breathe, an entrepreneur is using crowdfunding to set up thousands of new charging points for electric cars. thousands of new charging points sarah harris reports. thousands of new charging points just five days into 2017, and the capital had already breached its air pollution limits. and the capital had already funding over the next five years has been doubled by the mayor of london to try to tackle the problem. been doubled by the mayor of london green electric vehicles are part of radical plans to improve things, including how to charge them. of radical plans to improve things, hello this is bbc news i martine
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croxall. the woman at the centre of the landmark roe versus wade abortion case in us has died billy half a century after setting in traina half a century after setting in train a legal battle that was to create history. she was 22 when the pseudonym james rowe she took state of texas to court over its legislation outlawing abortion. her fight went all the way to the us supreme court where judges ruled that women had a constitutional right to terminate their pregnancies. mccorvey later became an anti—abortion campaigner and called the court case "the biggest mistake" of her life. she was known as jane roe, the unexpected hero of abortion rights in the united states. in 1969 aged 22, norma mccorvey wanted to end her pregnancy. abortion was illegal in the state where she lived, texas,
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so she sued using the namejane roe against the dallas country district attorney henry wade. her case reached the supreme court and became one of the most well—known cases in american legal history. roe versus wade. a landmark ruling by the court meant that it was no longer legal for an american state to outlaw abortion in the first three months of pregnancy. but by the time the case had been won four years later, mccorvey had already given birth. she gave her daughter up for adoption. in the early 1980s, mccorvey dropped her anonymity and campaigned for a woman's right to have an abortion. but in the 1990s she changed her position. you know i had started getting disillusioned with the pro—abortion movement back as far as 1991. i started working in abortion clinics, i started talking to the women before they would go in for abortions and after they would come out.
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and it was the same thing over and over. they all regretted it. politically roe versus wade has also remained divisive, but could it be overturned? the president, it's no secret he has made it very clear he is a pro—life president. donald trump has said that he thinks abortion should be largely banned. last month's executive order stopped federal money going to international groups which perform or provide information on abortions. the question now is could this presidency limit abortion at home as well? mccorvey was the face of both sides of the argument over abortion. the case she launched then condemned remains as polarising as ever. the papers are coming up in a few minutes but first let us look at the weather prospects. good evening, it has felt more springlike than winter this weekend because the temperatures have been
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well above average. the reason, the wind direction. that mild south—westerly continues on monday. but then you can see this meandering in the cold and the mild air through the rest of the week, so we will see a seesawing in our temperatures. quite chilly air coming in towards the end of the week, but the start of the week will see temperatures again like today, up into the teens. a little bit of sunshine, but if you did see the sunshine it felt quite pleasant during the day just gone, but the cloud has been piling in off the atlantic courtesy of a weather front which will bring some rain through the night, primarily to the north and the west. it is going to filter its way southwards and heavy rain will replace it back in the north—west later. so a lot of cloud will break the day on monday with hill fog and coastal fog, but not cold. in fact the temperatures overnight will be higher than the average february daytime temperatures. but we will have some fairly brisk winds to contend with as well in the north and we have already got fog in the english channel, the bristol channel, around the cardigan bay of wales and onto the irish sea. so very little brightness on offer first thing in the morning,
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in fact a lot of low cloud and some hill fog across the chilterns and through parts of the midlands, northern england and a gusty wind to go with it. the rain is already with us across scotland, moving into northern ireland, so the rain and the low cloud and the blustery wind to contend with, particularly east of the grampians and for the north east of england. roads like the a1 for example will have some rather gusty winds to contend with if you are travelling in that direction. through the day the cloud and the rain meanders into northern england and northern ireland and leaves brighter skies eventually for scotland, but slightly fresher air. but in the south we keep a lot of cloud, also in central and southern wales and the midlands and southern england. if it does come out, the sunshine will send those temperatures a little higher than those of today, so 16, possibly 17 degrees. and so the mild air is still with us through the course of monday. however, you can see that cold air starting to creep a little closer so that as we move into tuesday we have got something a little fresher, perhaps a touch of frost in the far north to start our tuesday.
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more rain and wind is gathering to the north—west later. not as much brightness or dry weather further south with that weak weather front around. later on in the week we will have some really blustery winds and it becomes a little less wild. more to follow on the web. hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment, first the headlines. iraqi forces have taken several villages to the south of mosul, hours after launching a major offensive to retake the western half of the city from so—called islamic state. thousands of prison officers in london and the south east of england are to get an instant pay increase of between £3,000 and £5,000. there have been concerns the service is understaffed. it takes time to recruit people, it takes time to bring those people on, but i'm absolutely determined to deal with that. donald trump causes confusion in sweden after apparently referring to a security incident in the country that hadn't happened. the american company kraft heinz
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withdraws its proposed takeover of marmite—maker unilever. the deal would have been one of the biggest in corporate history.
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