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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 3, 2017 9:00am-11:00am GMT

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hello, it's friday, it's 9 o'clock, i'm joanna gosling, welcome to the programme. our top story today — toddler poppi worthington was let down by detectives investigating her death according to a damning report. we'll have the details. the investigator found evidence that there had been an unstructured investigation, essentially it was not fit for purpose. also today, we'll hear from a man who spent 2a years in one of louisiana's most dangerous prisons after being wrongly convicted of killing a british tourist. the system didn't destroy me, didn't destroyed my kids. we're moving on. and that don't make it right. because it's totally wrong, it's an injustice. wheel of the full interview. —— we will have. buying medicines online is a risky business according to a health watchdog. we'll hear how drugs are sometimes being sold without enough checks. hello. welcome to the programme, we're live until ”am this morning.
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the number of people on controversial zero hours contracts has reached a record high of 910,000. we would love to hear from you if you are on one or if —— or if you are an employer that uses them. perhaps you would rather have a permanentjob, perhaps you would rather have a permanent job, perhaps the flexibility suits you. you can get in touch with us. text will be charged at the standard network rate. our top story today. the police watchdog has published a critical report into how the cumbria force handled the death of 13—month—old poppi worthington five years ago. she was found seriously injured at her home. the independent police complaints commission says officers failed to adequately investigate whether she had been abused. its commissioner, carl gumsley, has described it as "not fit for purpose". the investigator found evidence that there had been an unstructured investigation, that essentially was not fit for purpose. we found concerns in relation to the way that the scene where poppi had been was managed, concerns in relation to exhibits,
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and whether exhibits, or potential exhibits, had been seized and stored. concerns as to how the entire investigation had been operated, and whether it had been placed on to a case management system, which didn't appear to be the case. concerns that it was run effectively through e—mail. concerns that no investigative action seems to have been taken in relation to allegations that poppi may have been abused, outside whether that actually caused or may have caused her death. cumbria police says it accepts the report's criticism "unreservedly". i'm very clear that the additional investigation into poppi worthington‘s death fell well short of what poppi's family could have expected and, indeed, should have expected. i would like to give a heartfelt apology to poppi's family for the inadequacies in cumbria constabulary's initial investigation.
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our correspondent sangita myska is here. we have heard some of the headline conclusions, fill in a bit more detail about the report. it took the ipcc two years to investigate and reach these conclusions and as a result the report is extremely far reaching. we have heard some of the outlined in that clip but others include crucially, to properly protect co py‘s include crucially, to properly protect copy‘s home as a crime scene and asa protect copy‘s home as a crime scene and as a result it meant the nappy she was wearing on the day she died went missing home. this could be a crucial piece of evidence and it was a huge loss to the investigation and it could not be found. they went on to say that during the process of the investigation decisions about which police officers made decisions and why they were made and what the police policy was in the investigations were not noted down
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and asa investigations were not noted down and as a result, junior officers, and as a result, junior officers, and there were a number of them, but they were left out of the loop of the investigation. there were other criticisms during this report's conclusions and they were that abuse claims early on were not properly investigated and finally, importantly, that incorrect information was sent to the coroner. the figure has been pointed at the dad by the coroner but what has been done to investigate those claims? this has become a competitive situation. according to the report, there was enough information around to arrest poppy's father ready much on the day that the police were called in. a family court did was ask in 2014, two years after her death, to go on a fact—finding mission and they concluded that mr worthington probably sexually assaulted her before her death. i
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ought to say that he was arrested eight months after poppi died but was released without charge and throughout mr worthington has vigorously denied any claims of wrongdoing against him. thank you. let's catch up with the latest news. rebecca jones is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the days news. theresa may will make it clear that keeping scotland in the uk is a "personal priority" when she addresses the scottish conservative party conference in glasgow this morning. she has met nicola sturgeon several times since the brexit boat. mrjin maintains she has a cast mandate to hold a second ballot —— mrs sturgeon maintains. but mrs may has told the bbc that scottish voters do not want another independence vote. i think, in 2014, the people of scotland voted to stay within the united kingdom. it was described by the snp as a "once in a generation" vote that took place at that time.
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i don't think people want a referendum today. to me, to me politics isn't a game. to me, politics is about people's lives. it's about delivering for people on the issues that really matter to them, on a day—to—day basis, and i can't help but feel that the snp has tunnel vision about independence. actually, i think what people want is for the snp government to get on with dealing with the issues they want to see addressed, on a day—to—day basis. 0ur scotland correspondent, lorna gordon, is in glasgow. how important is mrs may's speech going to be? it is a very important speech to her supporters here in glasgow later. there has been ramping up of the rhetoric surrounding independence over the last few weeks and in particular i think over the last few days. interesting in that interview yesterday that she would not make clear if she would give permission
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for a second independence referendum to be called but she did say that the question was not whether there could be a second referendum or whether —— but whether there should be one of the cheating a twin track approach, addressing on the one hand as she sees it at this issue of independence and also what she sees as the problem in the way the snp is governing here in scotland. you heard her comments and i think they will be repeated later, a strong attack on the snp‘s record in government on areas like health and education, and she will argue they should focus on their dayjob, saying they have a tunnel vision on theissue saying they have a tunnel vision on the issue of independence. of course all this has come about as a result of the brexit boat and nicola sturgeon‘s government in edinburgh says they are willing to seek compromise and consensus at every turn —— brexit vote. but they are being met by a brick wall of tory intransigence and if there is to be another referendum, the the fault
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lies with the conservative government in london that is taking scotla nd government in london that is taking scotland out of the eu against it will all stop nicola sturgeon has said she believes another referendum on independence is highly likely, indeed all but inevitable and increasingly the question here and the speculation here seems to be turning not to the question of whether there will be a second referendum but when nicola sturgeon might call for it and the speculation that it might happen within the next few weeks. thank you. the us attorney general is removing himself from an fbi investigation into claims russia meddled in november's presidential election. jeff sessions has been under pressure to stand aside after it emerged he met the russian ambassador during the course of the campaign. president trump insisted that mr sessions is an honest man but said he could have been more accurate when questioned about his meetings with russian diplomats. websites that sell prescription
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medicines can seem a tempting alternative to visiting a gp, especially if you're having problems getting a suitable doctor's appointment. but there's a warning these online services are putting patients at risk. that's according to the health regulator in england, the care quality commission. andy moore reports. more than 40 companies offer online prescriptions in england, but today the cqc says they could be putting patients at risk. it suspended the registration of this online company back in december, partially as a result of a bbc investigation which looked at its sale of antibiotics. the company said it has made many changes to its processes and systems, that will eventually satisfy the regulators. get better — get treated.com. but the cqc is worried more widely about the safety of online services. they say there is a risk of people being prescribed unsuitable medication, the treatment causing complications to existing health conditions, and a lack of monitoring of follow—ups for patients.
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we have now looked at 11 providers, two of which have been published today, and we are quite shocked about what we've found. and indeed, in those other providers, we've also found some really serious problems, and those reports will be published over the next few weeks. for the first time, the cqc has published a clear set of standards for online doctors. they must verify patients match their photo id, such as through a skype check. they must get a comprehensive medical history, and seek permission to contact a patient‘s gp. there will be a thorough inspection of all companies by the end of the year, but in the meantime, the official advice is to be very careful before you buy from an online doctor or pharmacy. the number of people on
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controversial zero hours contracts have reached a record high and is close to hitting 1 million. new figures based on analysis of office for national statistics data revealed that 110,000 more people we re revealed that 110,000 more people were on contracts that do not guaranteed work in 2016 compared to the same period in 2015. sir bruce forsyth has spent five nights in intensive care after developing a severe chest infection. the veteran entertainer, who's 89, was taken to hospital on sunday after falling ill. sir bruce underwent surgery in 2015 after he suffered two aneurysms, which were discovered when tests were carried out following a fall at his surrey home. a union has warned a potential disaster was narrowly avoided when "at least" one commuter train came within seconds of smashing into tonnes of rubble blocking tracks near a major station. debris was left strewn across four lines outside liverpool's main
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lime street station when a wall collapsed in deep cuttings at rush—hour on tuesday. hundreds of passengers were trapped on trains stuck in tunnels outside the hub which handles more than 15 million passenger journeys each year. the two accountants responsible for the wrong film being announced as winner of best picture at the oscars have been given bodyguards, following reports that they have received death threats on social media. they have been told they will not be employed to do the oscars job again, after they muddled up the envelopes naming the winners. that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30am. thank you, we want to hear from you if you are on a zero hours contract 01’ if you are on a zero hours contract or if you are a company that uses them for people that work for you. they'd have said, i have been on zero hours contracts for five years,
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working for a private amulets serve as it was a choice i make at the decks ability suits my lifestyle. i understand is might not suit everybody. matt says, this is a country fixated on cheap labour and business getting the maximum out of workers for the bare minimum. thank you for those, keep them coming in. let's get some sport and hugh woozencroft is at the bbc sport's centre this morning. you got the blue shirt memo as well! let's talk about football because there were ruled changes announced in golf this week and are looking also football. good morning. it is that when when it comes to respect, football has an image problem, especially competitive likes of cricket and rugby. the perception is that in those sports, players are more measured and speak to referees and officials with a certain level of decorum but in football it is deemed to be different with players more than happy to hurl abuse at officials. the worry is that the
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behaviour spills over to fans, sunday league players and even kids football and for a long time change was needed needed with rules brought in at the start of this season that urged referees to punish intolerable behaviour by players more strongly. the international football association board are looking to change the dynamic by enhancing the role of captain the team can play. the measures may stop players crowding around referees with only the skipper having the authority to talk to officials of the major incidents on the pitch. the former premier league referee david ellery is their technical director. we see in other sports sometimes the captain has a greater responsibility, if you look at cricket, the captain of the england tea m cricket, the captain of the england team is almost more important during the match than the coach. we would not want to move in that direction but suddenly we believe the captain could play a much stronger role and we would move in this direction, not least by players and coaches who say to use captain is more and we are responding to that. we take the view
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that what does football want and we have to respond to that and football wa nts have to respond to that and football wants better behaviour and better image of the the annual meeting will propose a series of changes including sin—bins. so there could be some interesting and much—needed changes on the way for football. 0n interesting and much—needed changes on the way for football. on to tennis, a win for andy murray in dubai but he didn't do it the easy way. we know he is a very hard worker but you can't say he likes to make things easy for himself. the longest tie—break since 1991. it took an incredible 31 minutes, the tie—break alone, and as murray had lost the first set he managed to save seven, yes seven match points
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to snatch victory from kohlschreiber. murray then powered to victory, needing just 30 minutes. he said will will never play a tie—break like that again. he move ops to face the frenchman. but djokovic was beaten by nick turkish yobs at the mexican open. 25 aces for the 21—year—old in that one, it could be a turning point for him. a talented youngster, if frustrated in most of his games. after the football reforms, we will discuss a proposed ref re—strike, including a referee from my league. we will see about that. thank you very much. we will talk to a couple of refs, the 18—year—old who has called the strike and another who was abused on the pitch. robertjones was only 19 years old when he was arrested for the notorious killing of a british tourist, julie stott, as well as three robberies and a brutal rape.
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he had no previous convictions, and by the time of his trial, another man had already been convicted ofjulie's murder. but still robert was to spend the next 24 years of his life locked up in some of louisiana's most dangerous prisons for crimes that he didn't commit. after a long campaign forjustice, he was released in 2015 but he was still on parole and facing a retrial. now, finally all charges against him have been dropped and his name cleared. yesterday i spoke to robert and his lawyers richard davis and emily maw. thank you all very much forjoining us. i know, robert, you've got your lawyer richard alongside you. we'll speak to richard and also emboli in a little while to hear we'll speak to richard and also emily in a little while to hear exactly what they are covered in terms of the legal process. but for you, robert, what did you think when you were first
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arrested, and you knew that you had absolutely nothing to do with the crime? well, initially i thought it was a prank, some type ofjoke, because i knew i was careless and. because i knew i was innocent and i didn't do anything, so, i mean, it had to be some type of prank. i didn't do it. and when you ask the people that were there, in my house, in my residence, where i was arrested from, i mean, what else could i have done? you know? were there many people around you who believed in you, who knew you were innocent? being charged with those horrific crimes, that wasn't my character as a person, but, individually, you know, my family, as well as my friends, they knew i was innocent. when you went to jail, what state of mind were you in? were you determined to fight? there's no way in the world i can stay in prison for something i didn't do. so... fighting it to that extent,
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you know, it never came to the equation, because i still, you know, had a sense of hope, thinking that, you know, these charges would be dropped and i would be free. when you went to jail, you could barely read, during yourtime injail you passed your high school diploma and you studied law so that you could become your own advocate. when you had that focus and that reason to study, you then find yourself a natural student? yes, i mean, i had no luxury to quit. i was sentenced to life in prison, and life in louisiana is, like, life without parole or suspended sentence, you know, i was sent there to die. i had no luxury to quit. i mean, i had to, you know, i was compelled, because i wanted to be free. i stayed on the fact that i knew the truth, i was innocent, and justice will prevail,
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i did not have a lot of choice. you armed yourself with the knowledge of the legal system. you knew you were innocent. but in terms of actually producing evidence and knowing how to go about doing that, how did you start to do that, what was the starting point for you in terms of proving your innocence? as a prisoner then, not a prisoner now, as a prisoner then... there is very limited resources in the system. you take a lot of resources into proceedings... i mean, there were legal proceedings, post—conviction, in a sense. so, i mean, i did my very best in my position. i mean, i wrote to district attorneys. i wrote to attorneys. i wrote everybody, you know? i researched as much
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as i could research. i did the best i could do with the tools i had at that time. when you said just then, i'm not a prisoner now, and you smiled, and you looked utterlyjoyful, and it made me smile, i'm sure it makes everybody around you smile when we see the joy you feel at being able to say that. do you ever get used to it? oh, yes, yes i do. let's bring in your lawyers, because these were the two people you got in touch with at the innocence project in new orleans. and what they went on to discover was mind blowing in terms of the miscarriage ofjustice you had been a victim of. and the fact you had been framed for crimes you did not commit, as we said. richard, when you first became aware of robert's story, how quickly did you realise he was an innocent man?
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in this case it was very quick. you didn't have to delve very deep into the case to see that someone else owned the car used in the crime, someone else was found with the victim's jewellery, and no evidence was presented at robert's trial, but showed these two men knew each other. if robert was guilty, how do you explain that this other person owned the car used in the crime, and how do you explain that this other person was found with the jewellery stolen during the crime? while the prosecutor argued the two men were connected, there was actually no evidence of this, so, that, to ask, of this, so, that, to us, was quickly a very big red flag that we have an innocent man here. and emily, that is an extraordinary thing, isn't it, that even before robert actually went to trial, another man, lesterjones, had been convicted and was already injailfor these crimes, but unpicking what had happened and the cover—up took some time.
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tell us what you found about how the cover—up had happened, who knew what and when? robert's case presents every single thing that can go wrong in a criminal case in an overcrowded courthouse, in a place that looks up courthouse, in a place that locks up more young black men than any other place per capita in the world. the judge, the court system failed robert, the district attorney's office failed robert, and his lawyer failed robert. and whether some of those failings were deliberate, sorry, whether they were a product of an overburdened system, or whether when you get down to it there is certainly some deliberate misconduct on part of the state, knowing that they had prosecuted another man for this, and charging robert with it anyway. those are the kinds of questions that are going to be answered over the next couple of years in professional liability issues with some of the lawyers who were involved. because it did emerge that actually one of the prosecutors knew at a very early stage that lester jones, the man
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who was convicted, and who had initially said that he knew robert, but then later retracted that, said he had it beaten out of him. it emerged one of the prosecutors knew at a very early stage that that sworn statement had been withdrawn. that's right. one of the most amazing things about robert's case is that he tried to get back into court when he realised that the person who he didn't know, who he was accused of committing a bunch of crimes with, when he realised that this man, lesterjones, had told police and prosecutors i don't know who robert is, i've never met him, was told to say it but i wasn't going to come to court to say that because it wasn't true. robert tried to present that to the courts. and for 12 years prosecutors argued that there is no such evidence that any conversation like that took place. the prosecutors didn't know anything about lester jones. recounting his police statements.
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ultimately said they didn't about robertjones. and all the while in their files they have a memo corroborating that exact conversation. and they fought and fought and fought to keep robertjones in prison for eight years. they fought successfully to keep robertjones convicted on the basis he was making up some statement from lesterjones, although in their file they had evidence of that statement. that crucial statement. because if lesterjones didn't know robert jones, there was absolutely no way robert could have committed those crimes. robert, you came out of prison at the age of 44. you will, of course, be a very different man from the one who went in. during the years that you were injail you had three children who grew up without you being able to be there as a father. you can never get back the experiences that you would have had during that part of your life. how do you come to terms with that? well, it's heartbreaking in a sense.
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but, i mean, it's wrong, it's heartbreaking. i mean, there's nothing you can basically do about that. that is time you can't get back. but the thing is, you know, i prepared myself throughout my experience. this is the move forward. not trying to make the years up, butjust continue on with the years we do have left, and just build on that, continue on, and move forward. 0pposed to having all of this resentment and being angry, and, you know, no, so, i mean i can have a beautiful relationship with my children and my grandkids now. i mean, in spite of the injustice that was done to me and what was set out to be done to me in a sense
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of destroying me and making me some kind of monster and destroyed my kids' lives, that didn't happen. that didn't happen. i've got beautiful kids, i've got beautiful grandkids. they are doing well. statistically wise, like i always say, you know, the system kind of set it up in a sense, saying that once a parent, especially a black male father, goes to prison. inaudible but that didn't happen. so, i mean, i'm ok with that, you know, and that's one thing that i used to communicate with my kids about it. the fact that, you know i want them to move forward, and try to do something with themselves. and they have. they really did well. that makes me proud. because i'm free now, i'm nota monster, i'm a better person in the sense
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of understanding, you know, what's going on in my society, opposed to when i came and when i went to prison. i was a young, confused boy, didn't understand what was going on, but now i do. my kids have done well. the system didn't destroy me, it didn't destroy my kids, we're moving on, and that don't make it right, because what happened was wrong, it was an injustice. so, yes. has anyone ever said sorry to you? no. which is pathetic. would it make a difference if anybody did, would you like somebody to? i think that would be... human dignity. it would be respectful in one sense, however, i mean, it doesn't, it doesn't remove the stain, you know? it doesn't remove the stain.
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in a sense, no. it would be respectful, to a degree, like i said, because that's human dignity, but, obviously we are not dealing with humans, i guess. enjoy the rest of your life. good luck with everything. thank you very much forjoining us. robert and his lawyers richard davis and emily maw talking to me yesterday. if you want to watch our discussion again it's on our programme page — bbc.co.uk/victoria. still to come... "not fit for purpose" — the highly critical report by the police watchdog into how the cumbria force handled the death of 13—month—old poppi worthington five years ago. and as counting gets underway in northern ireland's assembly election vote, we'll hear from young voters born after the peace deal known as the good friday agreement. here's rebecca in the bbc newsroom with a summary of todays news.
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police who investigated the sudden death of a baby in cumbria have been criticised as "unstructured and disorganised." 13—month—old poppi worthington collapsed at her home in barrow—in—furness in december 2012 — but the independent police complaints commission found that the investigation into her death was "not fit for purpose". we will have more reaction to that story in a few minutes. theresa may will make it clear that keeping scotland in the uk is a "personal priority" when she addresses the scottish conservative party conference in glasgow this morning. mrs may has met scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon several times since the brexit vote. mrs sturgeon maintains that she has a "cast iron mandate" to hold a second ballot — after scotland overwhelmingly voted to remain in the eu. the us attorney general is removing himself from an fbi investigation into claims russia meddled
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in november's presidential election. jeff sessions has been under pressure to stand aside after it emerged he met the russian ambassador during the course of the campaign. president trump insisted that mr sessions is an honest man but said he could have been more accurate when questioned about his meetings with russian diplomats. websites that sell prescription medicines can seem a tempting alternative to visiting a gp, especially if you're having problems getting a suitable doctor's appointment. but there's a warning these online services are putting patients at risk. that's according to the health regulator in england, sir bruce forsyth has spent five nights in intensive care after developing a severe chest infection. the veteran entertainer, who's 89, was taken to hospital on sunday after falling ill. sir bruce underwent surgery in 2015 after he suffered two aneurysms, which were discovered when tests were carried out following a fall at his surrey home. that's a summary of
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the latest bbc news. more at 10.00am. here's hugh now with the sports headlines. good morning, that could be big changes on the way for football come especially around discipline. ifab, the international football association board, could enhance the role of the captain to stop players from surrounding referees. at the start of this is an new rules were brought in designed to punish players who abused officials more harshly. today aston villa's leandro bacuna has harshly. today aston villa's leandro bacu na has been harshly. today aston villa's leandro bacuna has been given a six match ban for another edition with an assistant referee last weekend. andy murray saved seven match point in 831 minute second set tie—break before beating philipp kohlschreiber. —— a 31 minute second set tie—break. and castleford kept
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up set tie—break. and castleford kept up their 100% start to the season, brushing aside leads. back with more just after ten o'clock. thank you. the sad face of poppi worthington, a 13—month—girl who died from serious injuries in hospital in december 2012 with a family court judge finding she had probably been sexually assaulted by her father shortly before her death. he's consistently denied any wrongdoing and has never been charged. now a report by the police watchdog has said senior detectives in cumbria investigating the death of the toddler were "unstructu red and disorganised" the independent police complaints commission also said police did not adequately investigate whether poppi had been abused, despite concerns raised by a hospital doctor. it also said witness accounts were not taken until after poppi's parents were arrested more than eight months after her death and the incident wasn't recorded as a crime until then. a second inquest into the death of poppi worthington is to take place in may. the local mp for barrow
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is john woodcock. he said he is appalled by the report's findings. and apologies for the poor camera quality. we've known that the failings were terrible for some time but seeing them set out in black and white is truly, truly shocking. i mean, we get confirmation in this report, not only was there a pathologist‘s report which suggested that poppi had been harmed before her death. not only should proper procedure, basic procedure should have been followed, but there was also intelligence pertinent to the father, a man who the family courtjudgment said it was probable that he had actually sexually abused poppi before her death, and yet nothing was done. it is vital now that the police, it is good they have apologised again, but they need to be able to show and be scrutinised that the safeguards they say they have put in place to ensure that this cannot happen again. how do you explain how
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all of that happened ? there was, i mean, there was gross, catastrophic incompetence at individual level and i'm going to be pressing the home secretary and the prime minister, who was home secretary at the time, to be changing the rules so people cannot either retire, as happened in this case, or actually be given another job after being found guilty of incompetence. but there was simplyjust not the system which allowed the work of individual officers on such an important case to be properly checked and that is as shocking as the individual failures. the police say they have put that right but we need to be really vigilant to ensure that has happened because of course, poppi is now unlikely to ever receive justice, if it is true, as the family court judgment thought, that it was her father who was responsible for her death, he will never be brought tojustice. he will be allowed to be free and that is devastating
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for the individuals who knew her and for our whole community in barrow. he obviously denies any involvement but as you say, a coroner did suggest exactly what you are saying. just picking up on what you were talking about, officers retiring, because in this case, the two officers had been able to retire, they both have their full pensions, it is a situation that happens over and again. what do you think should happen? i'm going to be asking the government, the home secretary and the prime minister, who was responsible for this at the time, to change the rules finally so that this all—too—common practice of officers escaping justice by retiring is brought to an end. but what is most disturbing is that one of these officers, she has now subsequently retired,
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amanda sadler, but she was found guilty of incompetence but although she was demoted, she carried on with a job in the force. someone whose failings have been that catastrophic and that serious in terms of consequence should never be allowed to stay in the police force. it sends a terrible message and that needs to be brought to an end by the government. i then spoke to the cumbria police and crime commissioner, peter mccall, and asked if he could account for what had gone wrong. frankly i can't explain, well, i can explain, i know what happened and what failed to happen. there is no excusing or covering up for this. it was an abject failure at the time on the behalf of those who were first
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on scene and the subsequent investigation. it was a complete mistake and there is no dressing that up. which is why come quite rightly, the chief constable has absolutely accepted in full the criticism which has appropriately been levelled by the ipcc. is that enough? nobody in the police force loses out as a result of this, the tee officers who were heavily criticised our both retired and on pensions —— the tee officers. criticised our both retired and on pensions -- the tee officers. that is not quite true. 0ne pensions -- the tee officers. that is not quite true. one of the officers retired in advance of disciplinary process and i'm very pleased to say that actually legislation has changed since then and that could happen again in future. i welcome that very strongly. the other officer who was
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also alleged to have conducted gross misconduct was disciplined, reduced in rank, and has subsequently left the force. in both cases, the professional reputation of both of those officers has had a very severe knock. while that in no way in my view is justice knock. while that in no way in my view isjustice in knock. while that in no way in my view is justice in this case for p°pph view is justice in this case for poppi, i don't think it is quite true to say that they have got off scot—free. true to say that they have got off scot-free. it can never be made up to herfamily. scot-free. it can never be made up to her family. what scot-free. it can never be made up to herfamily. what do scot-free. it can never be made up to her family. what do you say to them? of course not. the tragedy here is that, because of those failings, we cannot deliverjustice to poppi and i think that is a source of deep regret for us all. and quite rightly we make a full and
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frank apology to the family. nothing will bring poppi back. and it is quite important to make the point that the failings of the co nsta bula ry that the failings of the constabulary of course occurred after the death of poppi and it is important to draw that distinction. what do you mean? it is very easy to think that the failings of the co nsta bula ry think that the failings of the constabulary failed to prevent her death and i don't think that is in question at all. nobody is saying thatis question at all. nobody is saying that is what the police force should have been poor, but if somebody else's job, but the have been poor, but if somebody else'sjob, but thejob have been poor, but if somebody else's job, but the job of the police is to investigate when something happened and that did not happen here. absolutely and it was a com plete happen here. absolutely and it was a complete failure, no question about it and nobody is trying to press that up in any other way. that was peter mccall, the police and crime commissioners for cumbria. coming up... a warning for patients in england about the risk of getting medication online. it might be an easy way to get
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something if you need it but there are concerns are being discussed on it today and we will have the details. and a couple of comments on the interview with robertjones we played a while ago, the man who was jailed at the age of 19 for a crime he did not commit. he was inside for 24 years before it was uncovered quite what had happened to him and the fact that he had effectively been framed for the crime. we heard from him. mandy says, what a cracking blog, i hope we have the best light and enjoys every second of it. gordon says, enjoy your freedom, i looked across the pond but i'm sorry. it was remarkable to see the absolute joy that he exudes in spite of everything he has been through, the resilience he showed an nabli is a free man. —— now he is.
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votes are being counted in northern ireland following the collapse of the power—sharing executive in january. it's the second election to be held in ten months. 0ur correspondent annita mcveigh is in belfast. tell us why we are where we are ten months after the last election. good morning from belfast. ten months since the last time voters were asked to go to the polls and in that time the relationship between the two main parties in northern ireland's devolved government, the unionist dup and republican sinn fein, that relationship really deteriorated, culminating in the row over a botched renewable heating scheme set to cost the taxpayer around half £1 billion, and in january that row led to the collapse of the power—sharing assembly. if you think being asked to go to the polls for the second time in less than a year would put voters off,
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you would be wrong. last time round the turnout was around 55%, just less, but this time, although we do not have an official figure yet, we are hearing anecdotally of high turnout in some constituencies, more than 70% or 80%, almost 90% i saw being suggested in one constituency this morning. that really is quite an incredible and interesting way to start this counting process. we can look now at what has been going on with chris butler. stormont's power—sharing government collapsed injanuary power—sharing government collapsed in january forcing this election. the dup and sinn fein fell out over a range of issues including the financial scandal surrounding what is known as the rhi, the renewable heat incentive, a botched scheme which was at one stage projected to cost the taxpayer around half £1 billion. it has been a bitter
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campaign and it has felt more divisive than the last election held less tha n divisive than the last election held less than a year ago. we can see those result in a virtual assembly chamber. the dup returned as the biggest party with 38 of the 108 assembly members while sinn fein was in second place with 28 seats. the opposition parties, the sdlp, the 0ster unionists and the alliance will all be hoping to their share of the votes after the coalition fell apartand the votes after the coalition fell apart and that is true for the smaller parties but some politicians will definitely lose their seats because the number of members is being reduced from 108 down to just 90. and another number to watch, the size of the dup in the last assembly gave the party what is known as a petition of concern. in effect that isa petition of concern. in effect that is a veto to prevent any legislation they don't like. for example, they usedit they don't like. for example, they used it to block a vote in favour of the introduction of same—sex marriage which is still illegal in northern ireland. they need to hold onto 30 seats to keep that veto.
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even when all of the votes are counted, there will need to be a deal between the parties to give this assembly up and running again and most people are predicting that those negotiations could be difficult. those negotiations could be very difficult. sinn fein‘s leader here has already said that she won't go backin has already said that she won't go back in to a power—sharing relationship with the dup, former first minister arlene foster until an inquiry into that botched renewable heating initiative has been completed. so on the face of it, that would seem to put a pretty insurmountable obstacle in the way. nonetheless, come monday, after the votes have been counted and the seats have been won or lost, those m las seats have been won or lost, those mlas who have been re—elected or elected for the first time will go to stormont and then, there is a
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period of three weeks, taking us to 27th march. that the point the parties are supposed to elect a new first minister, and deputy first minister, of course as you will know the assembly is set up really, to reflect the main political groupings in northern ireland, both republican, nationalist and unionist, loyalist, so if they can't elect the first minister and deputy firm, what happens next? the northern ireland secretary could in theory call another election, would there really be an an title for a third election in such a short time frame? he could suspend the assembly again, he could impose direct rule, but that would require new legislation at westminster, and certainly there is no suggestion that the government in westminster has any appetite for direct rule, it has any appetite for direct rule, it has enough on its hands with the brexit process, finally and most likely there could be some sort of
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call it a fudge, call it breathing space, call it what you will, an extended period in which westminster hopes the politicians here in northern ireland can work out some sort of deal that means they get back to governing northern ireland directly. as we wait for the votes to be counted, we want to hear from the good friday generation, those northern irelander's not born when the peace agreement was signed nearly 19 years ago. what do they think about the country's political climate and how optimistic are they for the future? we have a group of students from hazlewood college. ben malcolmson is 18, so could vote yesterday in the election. 17—year—old claudia marshall couldn't vote yesterday but would love to see parties other than the democratic unionist party and sinn fein in power. rachel fitzsimons and fran collins are both 17—years—old, catholic, and want to see religion separated from politics. thank you'll very much forjoining us. how did you feel then, ben as you voted in this second election in
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ten months? i felt great, as my first time voting i felt like i could make a change with my vote. i felt great, i felt optimistic, could make a change with my vote. i felt great, ifelt optimistic, it could make a change with my vote. i felt great, i felt optimistic, it is uncertain with our government at the moment, but i felt as my duty to vote and get my opinion out there. were you, are you aware of the shadow of the past, the fact that the system there is obviously designed to, it was designed as a way forward from the history, and you were born after the agreement was reached. how conscious are you of all of that in i feel like after the agreement, ifeel, i think of all of that in i feel like after the agreement, i feel, i think we look forward and be optimistic about the future. times are uncertain especially in stormont. i feel like people dwell on the past a lot. i feel we need an optimistic future to progress, i feel like our generation, my generation as a whole needs to find their feet and look
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forward to the future. claudia, i said that you want religion and politics to be completely separated. how do you see what is happening there? i do agree with that and with ben that we are a country that is very behind, a country that lives in the past a lot. we need to look to the past a lot. we need to look to the future and focus more on the future and stop delling on the past as much as we are. i do agree that religion needs to be separated from politics because it wouldn't be happening anywhere else really. do you understand why it is as it is? yes, likei you understand why it is as it is? yes, like i do understand, and i don't think that we should forget the past but i do think that we need to start moving forward with ideas and just, there has been so much arguing andjust... and just, there has been so much arguing and just... unnecessary
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obstacle in our way that could be removed if we knorr got some of the things and moved on with what we are trying to do in this country. how do you esee it rachel i feel the same. religion should be separate from politics, we need to move forward, we need people in power who don't knows can on religion or who focus oi'i knows can on religion or who focus on religion but everyone's religion. as we have said, you are the post good friday generation, do you have conversations with your parents about this and other people who obviously, you know, previous generations who lived through who, very well understand why the system is as it is? yes. well i feel like older generations have a lot more history and they have grown up and experienced much more than any engeneration has. but i feel it's a
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conversation to have. ifeel like engeneration has. but i feel it's a conversation to have. i feel like a lot of young people don't talk about politics because it is something their parents or grandparents say forget about it, ignore it because it is all scrap in a way. i feel like our generation needs to find its own feet. i feel like a lot of the older generation trickle down to our generation, we need to find our own fate and think for yourselves instead of listening to older ones but take their experience to make a better society for us. claudeia ben said, a lot of your generation don't talk about politics but you three seem to be very sort of engages and —— engaged and switched on about politics, how would you say your generation regards politics, and the history there? i agree. ithink generation regards politics, and the history there? i agree. i think a lot of people our age may not talk about politics but maybe some of the
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older generation think none of our generation we really care, and we are all, like focussing on ourself, andl are all, like focussing on ourself, and i don't think that is particularly true. i am focussed on what is happening in my country. i am focusseded on the political standing. it's a conversation i have with my mum most nights, she is very involved with the election, she couldn't wait to get out and vote. my mum and dad both voted. i really encourage younger generation and people my age and maybe younger to go out and talk about politics, because this is our future we are talking about. i go to an integrated school. we all accept each other, thatis school. we all accept each other, that is how it should be, that is how we need to start moving on, we need to come together and just make a change. and i said that you are an atheist, was that a decision taken because of the past there or is that
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just not a factor for you? it's a decision that i don't think religion really needs to rule my life, necessarily. i wouldn't call myself as much an atheist. ijust say i don't have no particular religion. i don't have no particular religion. i don't want one, i see it causing a lot of problems, i never really grew up lot of problems, i never really grew up addsa lot of problems, i never really grew up adds a religious person, my mum is catholic and my dad is protestant so we came is catholic and my dad is protestant so we came from a mixed family any way, and if we wanted to have a religion my parents were for it, they wanted us to make our own decision this is the decision i came to. it is is really great to talk to you all. thank you. ben, claudia and rachel. coming up the extreme extremist some amateur referees are subjected to on the pitch. thousands of amateur referees are planning a
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strike in protest. patients could be at risk of harm when buying medication on the internet warns the care quality commission. the health care watchdog, has, for the first time, published a clear set of guidelines for online companies in england offering doctor services. this follows the publication of two inspection reports which found that two online providers failed to deliver safe care and potentially put patients at risk. in our salford studio this morning is journalist and locum gp dr faye kirkland, who investigated some of these companies. tell us first of all, how many people are using them, because it can be difficult to get a gp‘s appointment, it is very tempting to go online and short circuit the system ? go online and short circuit the system? it is an interesting question, the short answer is the ca re question, the short answer is the care quality commission doesn't know, a lot of providers are private so they don't have to feedback on how many patients are using them. 0ne companies they inspected say theyissued
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0ne companies they inspected say they issued more than 3,000 prescriptions, with one doctor working for them. the care quality commission say it is a booming industry. so issues have been flagged up by the care quality commission, what are the concerns? the main concerns that relate to the two sites they inspected fall into a number of category, they felt the sites were inadequately identifying the patients going online. they would fill in an online questionnaire and passed on the a doctor. they said did they provide a good enough history of the medical concerns so were the appropriate? did the patients understand the risk and benefits? ispoke did the patients understand the risk and benefits? i spoke to a professor about my investigation, which i did for 5 live about this topic last important. we just started to look at the remote consulting doctors
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online prescribing, it helped us prioritise and we brought forward a numberof prioritise and we brought forward a number of inspections so we had now looked at 11 providers, two of which have been published today, and we are quite shocked about what we found. indeed in those other providers we have also found serious problems and those reports will be published ore the next few weeks. how do you sigh the people going online and getting prescriptions, what would your concerns be? they don't know what they are get, are they getting the same quality of care. they are working like family doctors but online, the doctors should be giving the same care as face to face online. that could be difficult. doctors need to think
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about if their care is truly adequate. i think the gmc will look at this further. we know that the ca re at this further. we know that the care quality commission has issued guidance for patients, it is hard for them to know if the site is offering quality care, they need to look at the site and see where it is registered. is it registered with the care quality commission if it is in england. are they asking questions about their gp? if not patients need to use them with caution. the fact this has been looked at by the care quality commission. what does that indicate in terms of the oversight? they are taking it seriously. they are concerned about the two sites and there is 43 of them. they have insected another nine. they are planning to look at this by the end of testify year. they are doing it because of the concern, hopefully by the end of the year all the sites
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will havest will have been looked at. there are probably excellent ones but because they haven't been all inspected that is why the care quality commission is saying act with caution. let's get the latest weather update, with helen willetts. some flip—flopping with the weather this weekend. let us look. we have contrast in the weather today, some, ican contrast in the weather today, some, i can show you those, what a stunning morning in high land scotland. contrast this with many parts of england and wales under cloud and rain. this is essex a while ago. those pictures cross england and wales, really, the them for today, but for the weekend that rain flips northwards, we will hopefully see something brighter in the south, but there is rain on horizon. it is unsettled this weekend. this area of rain in the north has been giving cold weather,
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foggy weather for some hills. north has been giving cold weather, foggy weatherfor some hills. there is just still the slightest risk of snow on the hills. the rain heads northwards but northern scotland fewer showers, plenty of sunshine, what a lovely day. so, for the south, let us start here. there will be heavy bursts of rain or showers round. the south and east may be lucky enough to dry up. we could see 13 or 14 but for most with the rain it feels chilly. it will be across northern ireland, and into southern scotla nd northern ireland, and into southern scotland grey, but north of that, as you can see, a respectable six or seven, then it changes, but through the evening and overnight the rain is heading in. notice still the risk of snow on the hills. elsewhere, we clear not northern ireland but for england and wales we clear some of the main rain but remain showery,
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mild, murky and grey over the hills, a breeze still broing tomorrow, look at the difference for scotland. shetland should do you 0k. for the bullet of scotland's, a damp day again here, england and wales does look better today, it is brighter. should be sunshine hopefully but again the risk of showers or longer spells at time so it is better than today. it is not drew. still slow—moving low pressure round on sunday. we could have disruptive snow this weekend. it is down to low pressures a cross snow this weekend. it is down to low pressures across our country again. your can see the low pressure has moved. we return to the rain for parts of england and wales, while scotla nd parts of england and wales, while scotland have a drier day. northern ireland hopefully as well but round this area there will be the ribs of u nsettled this area there will be the ribs of unsettled weather and beyond. at least it is relatively mild. that is
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how it is looks at the minute. hello it's friday it's 10 o'clock, i'm joanna gosling. theresa may accuses the snp of having tunnel vision over independence and says the country doesn't want another referendum. she is going to be speaking shortly. this is the scene at the scottish conservative's conference in glasgow, where the prime minister will be making a speech in a few minutes time — we'll bring you that live. also today. head—butted, spat at and verbally abused. this kind of treatment is why 2000 referees up and down the country will be on strike this weekend — to try and get the fa to do more to protect them on the pitch. and — the oven gloves are off as the bbc‘s new version of bake—off is revealed. here's rebecca in the bbc newsroom with a summary of today's news. theresa may will make it clear that keeping scotland in the uk is a "personal priority"
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when she addresses the scottish conservative party conference in glasgow this morning. mrs may has met scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, several times since the brexit vote. mrs sturgeon maintains that she has a "cast iron mandate" to hold a second ballot — after scotland overwhelmingly voted to remain in the eu. the us attorney general is removing himself from an fbi investigation into claims russia meddled in november's presidential election. jeff sessions has been under pressure to stand aside after it emerged he met the russian ambassador during the course of the campaign. president trump insisted that mr sessions is an honest man but said he could have been more accurate when questioned under oath about his meetings with russian diplomats. websites that sell prescription medicines can seem a tempting alternative to visiting a gp, especially if you're having problems getting a suitable doctor's appointment. but there's a warning these online services are putting patients at risk.
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that's according to the health regulator in england, the care quality commission. police who investigated the sudden death of a baby in cumbria have been heavily criticised. their handling of the case was described as unstructured and disorganised. 13—month—old poppi worthington collapsed at her home in barrow—in—furness in december 2012 but the independent police complaints commission found that the investigation into her death was "not fit for purpose". the number of people on controversial zero hours contracts has reached a record high and is close to hitting 1 million. new figures based on analysis of office for national statistics data revealed that 110,000 more people were on contracts that do not guaranteed work in 2016 compared to the same period in 2015. sir bruce forsyth has spent
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five nights in intensive care after developing a severe chest infection. the veteran entertainer, who's 89, was taken to hospital on sunday after falling ill. sir bruce underwent surgery in 2015 after he suffered two aneurysms, which were discovered when tests were carried out following a fall at his surrey home. the two accountants responsible for the wrong film being announced as winner of best picture at the oscars have been given bodyguards, following reports that they have received death threats on social media. they have been told they will not be employed to do the oscars job again, after they muddled up the envelopes naming the winners. the hollywood actor tom hanks has offered his support forjournalists at the white house, by buying them an espresso machine. he also sent a note, hinting at donald trump's feud with some media which the president accused of peddling "fake news" — urging them to "keep up
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the good fight for truth, justice and the american way. especially for the truth part". that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 10.30am. thank you, an unexpected present from tom hanks! a couple of comments on zero hours contracts, ralph says, they should be banned. as a former supervisor in the nhs i have seen the misery and uncertainty they have caused to workers lives. employers are not treating workers fairly or with respect with these contracts. chris says, i run a small company and my men operate on zero hours contracts. i would love to be able to employ them on normal contract but our work is very sporadic soap without them, we simply could not exist and we would all lose our jobs. it annoys me that the only publicity you hear on the subject is negative and assumes that the
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contract are exploited by unscrupulous bosses. of course, like any unscrupulous bosses. of course, like a ny syste m , unscrupulous bosses. of course, like any system, it can be abused and u nfortu nately any system, it can be abused and unfortunately there are those who will visit is a press pay but there must be many firms like ours which have zero hours contracts out of necessity so i strongly within the accusation that we are using them as accusation that we are using them as a method of low—paid and i can tell you that when we have worked, my men can earn a considerable sum each week. thank you for those. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use the hashtag victorialive. here's hugh now with the morning's sport. ca pta i ns captains could be given more was possibility in top—level football to encourage a better relationship between players and officials under new proposals from ifab, the international football association board, saying that captains would be the only players permitted to speak to referees about major incidents. they will discuss the possible changes at their annual meeting later. we see in other sports sometimes the captain have a greater
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responsibility. in cricket, the captain of the england team is almost more important during the match ban the coach. we would not wa nt to match ban the coach. we would not want to move in that direction but certainly we believe the captain could play a much stronger role and we would move in this direction, not least by players and coaches who say to use the captain is more so we are responding to that. we take a view, what does football want? we have to respond that and football wants better behaviour and better image of the game and the captains might play role in that area. that is all we have time for now. thank you. theresa may is addressing the scottish conservative party conference in glasgow. last may, you achieved our party's best ever result in a scottish parliament election, doubling the number of conservative msp is. you took second place in the scottish election for the first time in 25
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yea rs, election for the first time in 25 years, and you beat the scottish labour party for the first time in 60 years. applause every msp, candid and activists can ta ke every msp, candid and activists can take pride in that result. but there is one person without whom none of it would have been possible, the leader of the opposition in the scottish parliament, the msp for edinburgh central, your leader and my friend, ruth davidson. applause last year ruth had a clear and simple message. vote scottish conservative to sign a much needed light on the snp‘s record and to hold ministers to account. since last may, she and her team in holyrood have been doing just that and at westminster scotland has a
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strong and respected voice at the cabinet table in david mundell. applause i have worked alongside david for yea rs i have worked alongside david for years and have seen first hand what a champion he is for scotland for our party and our united kingdom. he may be one man but his hard work and determination have achieved far more for scotland than the noisy antics of all the snp mps combined. applause while others fail to hold the snp to account, ruth and david'sjob in doing so is ever more vital. because for too long, a feeble and incompetent scottish labour opposition did nothing to scrutinise the snp for their failures. opposition did nothing to scrutinise the snp for theirfailures. an snp government interested in only stoking up endless constitutional
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grievance and furthering their obsession with independence at the expense of scottish public services like the nhs and education, was given a free pass by labour. with roof now leading the charge, the snp's roof now leading the charge, the snp‘s holiday from democratic accountability has come to an end —— with ruth. applause take education. ruth and her formidable team of dreich have exposed the snp‘s mismanagement of scotland's schools. scottish schools, which once led the world in setting the highest standards of attainment are now outperformed in every category by schools in england, northern ireland, estonia and poland. education, fully devolved since 1999 and under the snp's devolved since 1999 and under the snp‘s stewardship for ten years. but standards have fallen all stop the
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attainment gap remains and scottish young people are losing out. 150,000 further education places cut by the nationalists, a cap on the number of scottish students who can enter higher education, fewer young people from the poorest backgrounds make it to university than in the rest of the uk. and just this week, we have learned the snp government has delayed its planned education bill. suchis delayed its planned education bill. such is their obsession with the single issue of independence. applause the snp‘s neglect and mismanagement of scottish education has been a scandal but sadly it does not stop there. the abysmal failure of their farm payment system, the replacement of stamp duty with a new tax which judges scottish home—buyers more but
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bring in less revenue than promised. starving a health service by refusing to match the spending increases on the nhs in england. the snp government demands that the powers for the scottish parliament but fails to pass powers onto local people in scotland's villages, towns and cities. they have scrapped the right to buy, denying ordinary working families a chance to their own home. they opposed our nuclear deterrent which keeps us all safe and on which tens of thousands of scottish jobs rely. the and on which tens of thousands of scottishjobs rely. the simple and on which tens of thousands of scottish jobs rely. the simple truth is their policies are not in the best interests of scotland but in the political interest of the snp. applause applause a party resolutely focused on just one thing, independence. forthem it is not about doing the right thing,
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the snp play politics as if it were a game. but politics is not a game. and the management of devolved public services in scotland is too important to be neglected. people in scotla nd important to be neglected. people in scotland deserve a first minister who is focused on their priorities, raising standards in education, taking care of the health service, reforming criminaljustice, helping the economy prosper, improving people's lives. instead they have an snp government obsessed with its own priority of independence, using the mechanisms of devolved government to further its political aims, and all the while neglecting and mismanaging public services in scotland. the snp have been allowed to get away with it for too long. applause but not any more. now in ruth
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davidson scotland has a fighter who will stand up to the snp establishment in the interests of the scottish people and provide a real alternative to the snp. but as well as taking on the snp for their failures in office, we have another importantjob. failures in office, we have another important job. when i failures in office, we have another importantjob. when i stood outside downing street on the day i became prime minister, i reminded people in the full title of our party is the conservative and unionist party. and that word unionist is very important to me. my first visit as prime minister was here to scotland. i wa nted minister was here to scotland. i wanted to make clear that strengthening and sustaining the bonds that unite us is a personal priority for me. i am confident about the future of our united kingdom and optimistic about what we can achieve together at the country will stop the fundamental strengths
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of our union will stop the fundamental strengths of ourunion and will stop the fundamental strengths of our union and the benefits it brings to all of its constituent parts are clear. but we all know that the snp will never stop twisting the truth and distorting reality in their effort to denigrate our united kingdom and further their obsession of independence. it is their single purpose in political life. and we need to be equally determined to ensure that the truth about our united kingdom is heard loudly and clearly. as we forge a new role for ourselves in the world, the strength and stability of our union will become ever more important. we must take this opportunity, to bring our united kingdom closer together, because the union which we care about is not simply a constitutional
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a rtefa ct. about is not simply a constitutional artefact. it is a union of people, affections and loyalties. it is characterised by sharing together as a country, the challenges which we all face, and freely pooling the resources we have to tackle them. the existence of the union rests on some simple but powerful principles. solidarity, unity, family. our united kingdom has evolved over time, and has a proud history. together, we form the world's greatest fa m ily together, we form the world's greatest family of nations. but the real story of our union, is not to be found in treaty or acts of parliament, it is written in our collective achievements both at home and in the world. together, we led the world into the industrial age. from the derbyshire dales to the south wales valleys and the workshops of clydeside. british industrialists inventors and
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workers, charted the course to modernity and made the united kingdom the world's engine room. the union eenabled the social scientific and economic developments which powered our collective achievement. bringing people and communities closer together, allowed new connections to be made. the steam engine, perfected in the 1790s by a partnership between an engineer from greenock, james watt and a manufacturer from, matthew bolton. the menai straits. collective achievement has been the story of our union ever since. penicillin discovered in 1928 by a scottish doctor alexander fleming, working in a london hospital, st mary's. the harry potter books, which have sold over 500 million copies, begun in a cafe in edinburgh by an authorfrom gloucestershire. that cooperation
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economic social and cultural, has been the bedrock our success as a union of nations and people. together, we make up the fifth largest economy in the world. despite accounting for less than 1 % of the world's population. together we fought against and defeated tyranny. 0urs we fought against and defeated tyranny. ours is not a marriage of convenience. 0r tyranny. ours is not a marriage of convenience. or a fair weather friendship, but a true and enduring union. tested in adversity and found to be true. true. and the great institutions we have built together, the pillars of our national life are the pillars of our national life are the result of common endeavour. the national health service. the bbc. 0ur armed forces, our parliamentary democracy, our constitution a monarchy, our commitment to rule of law, our respect for fundamental human right, all have been admired and imitated round the world. and all were crated here, as a
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consequence of our common life together. these achievements are the fruits of our union, they are the signs which signify its deep and fundamental strengths and we should never be shy of making that positive case for the union, because logic and facts are on our side. applause take the economic arguments one of driving forces be hinds the union reaction was the logic that greater economic security came from being united. not the trans yacht and shifting benefits of international alliance but the strength of being one people. those enduring economic strengths are obvious. 0ur wholly integrated domestic market for
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businesses means no barriers to trade with. that has been of immense value to firms here in scotland. the snp point out the importance of the european market to scottish businesses. and agree. it is important. that is why i am determined to get the best possible access to it, for scottish firms as iam for access to it, for scottish firms as i am for welsh, english and northern irish firm, but what the snp don't point out is that the uk domestic market is worth four times more to scottish firms. in fact the you've comes third, after the —— eu comes third after the rest of the uk and the rest of the world as a market for scottish goods. yet the snp proposed scottish independence which would wrench scotland out of its biggest market. they think independence is the answer to every question in every circumstances regard also of fact and reality. it
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simply does not add up, and we should never stop saying so. applause and the uk is notjust a market place. the financial stability of a strong shared currency and central bank underpins all sectors of the the economy across all four nations of the uk. the broad shoulders of the world's fifth largest economy provide security for businesses and workers alike. ten years ago, banks head quartered inned brud borough and london which employ tens of thousands of people and look after the savings of millions were rescued by the uk treasury. action that was only possible because of the size and strength of the british economy.
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in the oiland and strength of the british economy. in the oil and gas sector, a vital industry on the east coast from aberdeen to lowestoft. the shoulder of our economy have allowed the uk government to take unprecedented action following the decline in the oil price. public spending here in scotla nd oil price. public spending here in scotland has been protected, even as north sea tax receipts have dwindled to nothing. time and again the benefits of the union, of doing together collectively what will be impossible to do apart are clear. indeed the economic case for the union has never been stronger. there is no economic case for breaking up the you united kingdom, or of losening the ties that bind us together. but the economics are only pa rt together. but the economics are only part of the story. the national security of the union in a changing world has never been more important. the united kingdom has led the world in developing a strategy for
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preventing violent extremism and we are working with allies to take on and defeat the ideology of islamistic extremism. it is firmly in our national interest to defeat dyche that —— daesh. and in this task we are fortunate to draw on intelligence, provided by the finest security agencies in the world and the greatest armed forced anywhere. asa anywhere. as a permanent member of the un security council, we promote peace and security round the world and help to up hold the rules based order on which they rest. as a leading member of nato, and the foremost military power in western europe, we are a garage toe of the freedom and democracy of our euro partners. —— guarantor. it is because we take these international obligations seriously, that the
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united kingdom is one of the few countries to meet our nato target of spending 2% of national income on defence, and our un target to spend 0.7% of income on aid. the united kingdom is a responsible member of the international community and scotla nd the international community and scotland makes a huge contribution the uk's role. the department for international development has its main head quartered in east kill brid. from there work is can ordinated which saves lives round the world. leading international effo rts the world. leading international efforts to end the outrages of female genital mutilation, child marriage and violence against women and children. the second largest donor to the syrian crisis, helping millions of families access food, water, sanitation and shelter. tens of millions of children around the world, immunised against preventable disease and given access to a basic education. all work grich height
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here in scotland. in defence, scotla nd here in scotland. in defence, scotland is central to the united kingdom's capability. hmnv clyde is not only the home of the nuclear deterrent which keeps us safe in a changing world, by the end of 2020 it will be the home of the royal navy's submarines, a major investment in future of the west of scotland. this summer, the steel will begin to be cut on a new generation of royal navy frigates, right here in the clyde. applause 0ur our great scottish shipyards don't just have a proud past, they have a great future too. firms like ferguson marine which is marrying traditional shipbuilding skills with innovation in equipment and
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processes . innovation in equipment and processes. despite the scaremongering of the snp and their shameful attempts to use the jobs of workers as a political football, shipbuilding jobs in scotland will be sustained, thanks to uk government orders. applause these practical examples of the benefit of the united kingdom, reflect a deeper truth. the pooling and sharing of risks and resources, on the basis of need across the uk is the essence of our unity as a people. all of the practical benefits which flow from the union and which are hallmarks of out depend on that deep and essential community of interest which we all share. it has been shaped by‘d i don't think few and history. it has shone itself to be adaptable. devolution is an example of that. no—one can doubt our party's
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credentials on devolution. conservatives in government have taken through landmark pieces of legislation, to strengthen the devolution settlements: the scotland act 2016 implemented in full the legislative emlocations of the all party smith commission, making the scottish parliament one of the most powerful devolved legislatures in the world. the comparison between a united kingdom which has passed more powers down to it parts and a european union which has sought to centralise more power in brussels could not be clearer, the devolution of powers a cross could not be clearer, the devolution of powers across the united kingdom must not mean we become a loser and wea ker must not mean we become a loser and weaker union, we cannot alhour united kingdom to drift apart. for too long the attitude has been to devolve and forget. as prime minister of the united kingdom, i am just as concerned that young people
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in dundee get a good start in life and receive the education they need to reach their full potential as i am about young people in doncaster and dartford. the economic prosperity of the uk as a whole depends on young people in all pars of the uk, having the skills they need to reach their full potential. and people who have worked hard all their lives and made a contribution to society, are eeeveryone's concern. it goes back to the fundamental unity of the british people, which underwrites our economies tense as a united kingdom. we are all diminished when any part of the uk is held back, we all share in the success when we prosper, in government, that principle is called collective responsibility. we need to build a new collective responsibility across the united
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kingdom, which united all layers of government, to works of #2i6ly together, to improve the lives of eve ryo ne together, to improve the lives of everyone in our country. as the government serving the whole united kingdom, formed in a parliament, drawn from the whole united kingdom, the uk government exercises a responsibility on behalf of the whole uk, that transcends party politics and encompasses or life. while strengthening the devolution settle m e nts while strengthening the devolution settlements and the devolved administrations across the uk, we must assert this fundamental responsibility on our part. so in those policy areas where we govern directly for the whole of the united kingdom we will look to the interests of the union, both the parts and the whole, in our policy making. and in policy areas where responsibilities are devolved we will look for ways to collaborate
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and work together to improve the outcomes for the modern industrial strategy which the uk is consulting on is the point. this truly uk wide strategy wrapped in a new approach to government, stepping up to a new active role that backs businesses and ensures people in all parts of the uk share in the benefits of economic success. scotland stand to benefit from this new approach, whether it is shipbuilding, oil and gas or food and whether it is shipbuilding, oil and gas orfood and drink whether it is shipbuilding, oil and gas or food and drink exports, scotla nd gas or food and drink exports, scotland has huge industrial potential. in those areas where the uk government holds the policy levers, we will use them wisely, to the benefit of scottish firms and workers. where the scottish government holds the levers in areas like skills and infrastructure, we will seek to work with them to ensure the best outcomes for scotland. at all times we will seek
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to strengthen and enhance the ties that bind us together. applause and i am determined to ensure that as we leave the eu, we do so as one united kingdom, which prospers outside the eu as one united kingdom. that means achieving a deal with the eu which works for all parts of the uk, england, scotland, wales and northern ireland, and for the united kingdom as a whole also and when the uk government begins negotiations with the eu on brexit, we will do so in the interests all parts of the uk and of the uk as a whole. that is what i mean by governing for the whole united kingdom. and as well as ensuring that we get the best possible deal from brexit, we also need to ensure that the united kingdom can operate
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as effectively as possible in the future. the uk devolution settle m e nts future. the uk devolution settlements were designed in 1998 without any thought of potential brexit, in areas like agriculture, fisheries and the environment the devolution settlement in effect devolved to the legislatures of edinburgh, cardiff and belfast the power to eu directives in these areas within a common eu framework. the essential common standards which underpin the operation of a single market were provided at the european level. as we bring powers and control back to the uk, we must ensure that the right powers sit at the right level to ensure our united kingdom can operate effectively and in the interests of all its citizens including people in scotland. we must also ensure that the uk which emerges from the eu is able to strike the best possible trade deals internationally. in short, we must
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avoid any unintended consequences for the coherence and integrity of a devolved united kingdom as a result of our leaving the eu. as i have made clear repeatedly, no decisions currently ta ken by made clear repeatedly, no decisions currently taken by the scottish parliament will be removed from them. while the snp propose that decision—making should remain in brussels, we will use the opportunity brexit to ensure that more decisions are devolved back into the hands of the scottish. applause 0uraim will be our aim will be to achieve the most effective arrangements to maintain and strengthen the united kingdom while also respecting the devolution settle m e nts while also respecting the devolution settlements and we will work constructively with the devolved administrations on that basis. but unlike any of the individual devolved administrations, the united
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kingdom parliament elected by the whole uk and the uk government serves the whole uk. that place is on as serves the whole uk. that place is onasa serves the whole uk. that place is on as a unique responsibility to preserve the integrity and future viability of the united kingdom, which we will not shirk. and i believe that the opportunities which brexit presents for all parts of the uk are real. take scotch whiskey. a truly great scottish and british industry, adding £5 billion to the uk economy annually, and now the largest net contributor to the uk's trade balance in goods. if directly supports tens of thousands ofjobs from farmers in the highlands to ceramics workers in stoke. after brexit its potential for growth in exports across the world is immense. india, our commonwealth partner, is one of the world's largest spirits markets. but within the eu, scotch
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whiskey faces a tariff of 150% for selling to india. and scotch whisky, the world's pre—eminent spirit, as just a 1% share of the indian market. i am determined that we should do better than that for our key industries. applause that's why i lead a major trade delegation to india last year and why i was delighted to take the scotch whisky association with me. purely for trading purposes! this underlines the potential which exists for scottish business at the uk embarks on a new global role and free trading nation and it is an opportunity we should seize as one strong united kingdom. it is in the
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interest of everyone in our country that we seize those opportunities and makea that we seize those opportunities and make a success of what lies ahead. because politics is not a game and government is not a platform for which to pursue constitutional obsessions. it is about taking the serious decisions to improve people's lives. a tunnel vision nationalism which focuses only on independence at any cost sells scotland short. applause yellow as unionists, our job as unionists, ourjob is clear. we know we are united together by a proud, shared history but we are also bound together by enduring common interests. the united kingdom we cherish is not a thing of the past but a union vital to our prosperity and security, today and
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in the future. the union i am determined to strengthen and sustain is one that works for working people across england, scotland, wales and northern ireland, uk to which eve ryo ne northern ireland, uk to which everyone can feel secure in. a union in which our national and local identities are recognised and respected but where our common bonds are strengthened. where different and diversity are celebrated but where those things we share our people, a unity of interests, al kellock and principles. this transcends politics and institutions, the constitution and the economy, it is about the values we share in ourfamily of the economy, it is about the values we share in our family of nations. 0ur polling and sharing of risks and resources , 0ur polling and sharing of risks and resources, our social and economic solidarity, social union is the glue which holds us together. but we should never forget that the people
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who benefit the most from solidarity across the united kingdom are not the strong and be successful but the poorest and most vulnerable in our society. applause we are four nations but at heart we are one people. that solidarity is the essence of our united kingdom and is the surest, —— or the surest safeguard of our future. let us live up safeguard of our future. let us live up to the high ideals and let us never stop making loudly and clearly the positive, optimistic and passionate case for our precious union of nations and of people. thank you. applause theresa may speaking at the scottish conservative conference talking about the importance of the union as
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we prepare to leave the eu. there will be more analysis of her speech on newsroom live from 11 o'clock including reaction from the snp. head—butted, spat at and verbally abused. my next guest — who referees amateur football matches — is not alone. this weekend, thousands of amateur referees are planning a strike in protest at the treatment they receive on the pitch. ryan hampson — who has organised the walk—out — says more than 2,000 people up and down the country will be taking part. we can speak to ryan hampson who organised the walk—out, and also martin cassidy, chief executive of the charity ref support, who does not think the strike is a good idea. tell us why you have organised this strike. it is because referees up and down the country are getting abused and assaulted on a regular basis. myself included. tell us what has happened to you.|j basis. myself included. tell us what has happened to you. i have been head—butted, punched and spat at.
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and who is doing that? it is players ona and who is doing that? it is players on a sunday league pitch. you are 18, how old are the players?m varies from 16 right the way through to 40 or50. varies from 16 right the way through to 40 or 50. give us some more specifics on these sorts of things. i was doing a match a few months ago and a player disagreed with one of my decisions and he has come up to me in my face and put his head towards mine and pushed me, pushed me flat on the chest. he didn't get banned for it. it is upsetting, it really is. you are organising the strike and is get this issue out there and people are talking about it but before this, what have you done to try to get this issue looked at? i have been and spoke to my cou nty at? i have been and spoke to my county fa, to several people, and i kept getting ignored and getting the
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door shut in my face and that is where the charity i am an ambassador for, they got involved, recari support uk and said we can help you out. —— referee. they are not for the strike but i am and we have got it going and there are over 2000 involved. today is a prime example. leandro bacu na, involved. today is a prime example. leandro bacuna, who barged into an assistant referee, has only been given a six—game ban by the fa and to me that is madness. martin cassidy is the chief executive of the charity, referee support so how much of a problem is it? it is becoming more common. the fa released some statement which said there were 111 cases of assault nationwide. we're not sure if that is overa yearor nationwide. we're not sure if that is over a year or a football season but if you dig into those figures, 52 weeks, that is over two per week
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and that in itself tells us this is on the increase and we have to do something about it. as ryan said, we are not in favour of the strike but we are in favour of doing something about the reasons for it. we have asked to change policies and processes, ask for banning orders, talking to mp5 and councillors to try to get changes for bringing stuff outside football, measures into bubble gum like banning orders. it is ridiculous to think you can streak on a pitch and you get banned from every football ground in great britain but if you are in a fight in the ground, you will get banned from every ground but if you had but the referee, you don't so we should bring in the same banning orders for when players commit violent as for when players commit violent as for when fans commit it. obviously you
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are concerned this is not being taken seriously are concerned this is not being ta ken seriously enough are concerned this is not being taken seriously enough so what is the way to focus attention if you don't support the strike? we're not support it but we support the reasons for it. how do you get change to actually happen? what was a wonderful progressive move was that the fa invited ryan to when the stadium and we went with him to represent him and give him some support and we talked about changes in policy and process. such as when the county fas received a written report from a referee who has been assaulted, that should immediately go to the police. at the moment, the onus is on the rhetoric and when you are from a background like ryan, a council estate in manchester, the ramifications are going to the police will last you a lifetime —— with the onus is on the police. we should take it away from the referee, the county fa should forward it to the police and it should go back the match officials and things can be sorted that way.
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it sounds like you are being listened to at quite a high level? yeah, listened, but no action has been taken yet. i have another meeting with the fa with the new respect officer, nathan french, who has not met a referee from grassroots level before. that is a good move but i'm just hoping it is more progressive and more positive than the last meeting because i did not get much out of it. i will not sit here and lie about it, we have got another meeting and hopefully this next one is important. we do wa nt this next one is important. we do want change, we want referees to be able to wear body cameras and on the 6th of march, the fa have the referees committee meeting and they will be bringing up the issue surrounding body cameras. they will be speaking more detail in march so when we have the meeting with the fa in manchester, hopefully were at more to say. we'll check in with you
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after that. thank you. first, the exclusive story of a young syrian who had to flee his home for being gay. sama — which is not his real name — travelled more than three thousand miles and across ten countries to escape death threats. the 17—year—old is now starting a new life in the uk and is facing the sorts of issues most teenagers in this country might take for granted. take a look. when i was child, and because am gay, and i keep secret, i heard my dad, sometimes he speaks with his friends, sometimes talk about gay, like kill him or put him injail. they can't imagine have gay in the world. and my dad, he hate me. and he told me, go out home, you are not my son. i took boat from turkey and i saw 54 people inside and children, like ten months, women. when i saw these people,
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i said, i don't want to go and he has a gun and he says, if i don't go, maybe he'd kill me. i walked a lot. between country and country and sleeping in street and jungle. ijust have a little bread and some dates. i left turkey to greece and greece to macedonia, serbia, hungary, austria, germany, france and the uk. i had interview for refugee to stay here and i told them i'm gay so i can't go back to syria because the war and because i'm gay but they don't believe me, like, they want to see my facebook, what i am watching. like a lot of question like, ifeel like horrible, like why are they asking me these questions.
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i went in cambridge. i saw mother's house. they told me, don't worry, you are safe here and i told i'm gay and they say, this isn't a problem. i'm cry. it's a really lovely family, i really love them. it is my first time here, to seem like a lot of gays, lesbian here and everybody is like crazy, dancing, drinking. i feel like a surprise for me. i've got friends in syria, my friend in my school but because he just say, i don't like isis, the next day they took him and they put him like in middle of street. they kill him. i miss everything in syria but when i saw the news,
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the pictures in my city, it's so hard. i'm really grateful about this nice family. sometimes i feel like i am now friends, family, great city, study, happy, safe. my life starts now. the number of people on controversial zero hours contracts has reached a record high. the figures now stands at 910,000 people on the zero hours contract that's110,000 more people on contracts that do not guarantee from the same time in 2015 to 2016. that's an increase of nearly 14% and 30% higher than 2014. to put it into prospective in 2005 — just 100,000 people were on a zero hours contract. let's discuss this now
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with conor d'arcy from the resolution foundation who's researched the long term future of zero hours contracts. kate bell who is head of economics and social affairs from the tuc union. and diane cawood who works on a zero hours contract for the nhs. she use to work full time but says that a zero hours contract gives her more flexibility. thank you forjoining us. connor, it's a record high, but at a slower growth in the —— number, tell us more about the overall picture. when we compare it to the last few months of 2015. that growth has been over 100,000. when we focussed on the last six months of 2016, that growth is slower, less than an extra 10,000 people. partly that is probably because of slower employment growth we have seen, but it, there is probably other things behind this, like employers deciding it isn't for them any more. kate, you are sorry, not kate, diane, you have on a zero
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hours contract and you don't like it i do. tell us why? it gives me a greater degree of flexibility. it am studying to be a nurse, it fits round my study, my partner is ill so ifi round my study, my partner is ill so if i need to drop down my hours i have the flexibility to do that, that said there are negative aspects, for example i don't get an average of my unsocial hours payments on annual leave, which the full—time people do. i don't get the same sick pay that full—time people do either, and if i found myself suspended i would get no money whereas somebody who is full—time would get their salary. ok, and kate bell you from the tuc, you don't like them? we do think there is some people for whom it works but for a huge number of people on the contracts they cause problem, like not knowing how many hours you will
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be working, problems like missing out on key rights that most people expect at work so the write to a written statement of terms and conditions, the right to sick pay you can miss out on some time, or the right to some key family friendly rights so the right to return to the same job after maternity leave or to request flexible learning. connor, you said about the possibly the reasons for why number of people going on zero hours contracts is slowing, in terms of predicting where it is going, it is difficult, but it has become a very publicised issue in terms of what the politicians are doing it is an area that is being looked at. the prime minister has in some of her first speeches raised this issue of insecurity at work, there is a similar number of people on agency contracts which can be insecure and
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lack basic rights so i think in the future, there is things that could be done, if you are on a zero —— zero hours contract long—term, i don't think it is extreme to say you should be given a fixed number of hours that reflect the number you have been working, i think is one of the directions we need to look down, keeping this discussion beyond just zero hours contract and across insecure work is important. we heard from diane who likes them. tree say says my experience is a different one. my partner has refusal of annual leave payment, there is no government monitoring on company, no checks on rules and regulations being properly followed. kate, in terms of what the government is going to be doing, to look at this, in the budget it is expected that the chancellor might outline plans for workers on score roar hours
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contracts for workers on score roar hours co ntra cts to for workers on score roar hours contracts to pay if same tax adds workers who are employed, do you think the government is looking at it the right way. we are glad they have said that. will that stop employers... the key is what changes employers... the key is what changes employer behaviour, as diane explains, sometimes flexibility can be good, we think it is employers driving this and pushing the costs on to workers and away from their cost, we think that is a simple step the government could take, it could guarantee it won't use zero hours contract in its supply chains, as connor set out we do think that people who are working regular hours should have a regular contract. then it is about what rights people on the more insecure types of work get, making sure that everyone has a day one right to protection from unfair dismissal. an written statement of your terms and conditions, and we do
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think the government needs to step up think the government needs to step up here, to tackle this huge right in zero hours contracts where we see nearly one million people on them today. thank you all very much. so big announcement, what do we think of the new concept and will it be able to compete with bake—off? frances taylor is the tv critic for the radio times and bake—off fan, and chetna makan, bake—off semi—finalist in 2014. the big family cooking somehow down will be going up against bake 0ff. what do we make of the new concept? thank you both very much forjoining us. so, frances, what do you think? i have to say, i am not too impressed which doesn't sound good. we don't know that much. the problem
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is the thing with bake 0ff we don't know that much. the problem is the thing with bake off it was so magical, because nobody sat down in a room and said let's create the biggest show on tell vicks. it was a happy accident. you don't sit down to create something that is not going to be a disaster. there wasn't a legacy behind it when it launched. it came on to bbc two and it was an underground hit and people found it and it grew, the problem is the bbc is saying this is going to be the new bake 0ff, put nadiya on, it is not going to have the same impact. let us talk to kept that, so het that, you were a bake 0ff semifinalist in 2014. there is going to bea semifinalist in 2014. there is going to be a huge amount of expectation round this new format, which is going to be focussed on family, of course by the title. what to you think about it? i think that it definitely cannot, and you know, i don't know what will happen once it
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is on air, right now, it doesn't look like it can be compared to bake off at all, because it has no kind of, other than there are four people, on the face of it, there are no other similar particularities to the bake 0ff, no other similar particularities to the bake off, so no other similar particularities to the bake 0ff, sol no other similar particularities to the bake off, so i don't know, but it might still be a really good show to watch. when you were on the bake off, to watch. when you were on the bake 0ff, obviously it was already a big deal. how much of a factor in its success do you think was the fact that as we were haring from frances, it started very quietly and it slowly builds. it is nice when you feel like you are in on something from the start and invest in it. there is not an expectation from the outset you will like it. yes, i totally agree with that fact, you know, people didn't know what, what they were going to be watching and they were going to be watching and the first two series were so slow to start off. but it was such a simple, a heart—warming programme, and like
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frances said there were no expectations and every year after year, people didn't know what to expect. expect. just people fell in love with the four, you know, mary, paul, mel and sue so the chemistry was paul, mel and sue so the chemistry was amazing, but this new format that has come out, there are four people, we don't know whether they will work together, because they haven't worked together before. we don't know, really whacks is going to happen. we will have to wait and see, thank you both very much. chetna and frances, we have a bit more time. so frances, tell me quickly what you think about the line up? it's a good line up. i would say that, but when we have so many cooking shows, the beauty of bake 0ff many cooking shows, the beauty of bake off is it brought something different, we have so many cooking shows, so, tojust commission another one, seems... not one round family. again with bake off when we got to know the individuals that was
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fantastic. this she it will be about 80 contestant so you won't get to know them. thank you very much for your company today. news room live coming up next. have a lovely weekend, i will see you soon. bye. let me show you this stunning tick chur sent in from high land scotland. high last night scotland have the best of the sunshine while for many areas it is blanket cloud and outbreaks of rain, in fact for northern ireland that rain could last until saturday midday, it looks bleak here, for england and waleses the rain is tracking northwards, we are seeing drier weather, heavy showers following on behind. it is mild, to the north we have had snow on the hills. it is chilly in
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scotland. 0vernight that rain tracks northwards, still a risk of snow, still fairly chilly and especially north of that across northern parts of highlands into shetland lands but further south it is relatively mild. better chance of seeing sunshine in england and wales but a very different day for the northern half of scotla nd different day for the northern half of scotland and still that rain round for northern ireland, although it is relatively mild air, and guess what, more rain on the way for sunday, this time for quails again, so the weather is flip—flopping this weekend. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at 11am... the prime minister tells scottish conservatives the snp has tunnel vision over independence.
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and is failing on public services. we should never be shy of making that a positive case for the union, because logic and facts are on our side. iam i am live in glasgow where the prime minister has been making the case for scotland to stay in the uk at the scottish conservative conference. "unstructured and disorganised" — the police force which investigated the sudden death of 13—month old poppi worthington come under heavy criticism. that is for failing to examine claims she was sexually abused by her father. dana trump insists that

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