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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 4, 2017 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and jon kay. victory for the democratic unionists, but only by a single seat in northern ireland's assembly elections. sinn fein were the night's big winners with a significant surge of support, as they closed the gap on the dup. good morning. it's saturday, march 4th. we'll be live in belfast in the next few minutes. also ahead: mercedes recalls 75,000 cars in the uk because of a risk of them catching fire. sweeping away the small print — the chancellor promises a crackdown on consumer rip—offs. the uk could quit the eu without paying a penny. a house of lords report says the government isn't legally obliged to contribute to the cost of brexit. good morning.
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in sport: a century from captain morgan sets up england for victory in the first one—day international against west indies. how do make sure your children get a good night's sleep? a panorama investigation finds a big rise in the number of youngsters being diagnosed with sleep disorders. and how do we make sure that we get a good night's sweet, more importantly? and sarah has the weather. good morning. it is an unsettled, showery weekend. most of us would see sunshine on saturday or sunday. i will have a full forecast for you in about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story. the democratic unionist party has been narrowly returned as the biggest party in elections for the northern ireland assembly. but the result means they're now just one seat ahead of sinn fein, having entered the election ten ahead. the dup emerged with 28 seats, and sinn fein with 27. the parties now have three weeks to establish a government. this report from our ireland correspondent chris buckler contains flash photography.
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if walking out of government was a gamble for sinn fein it has paid off. they increased their share of the vote and narrow the gap between them and their old coalition partners, the dup. but the result leaves major questions about the future of power—sharing in northern ireland. i said consistently throughout the campaign sinn fein are not throughout the campaign sinn fein a re not interested throughout the campaign sinn fein are not interested in going back to the status quo. the dup have to fundamentally change their ways and be true to the principles of power—sharing. be true to the principles of power-sharing. sinn fein had called for the dup leader arlene foster to step aside as first minister during a public enquiry into a botched green energy scheme. when she refused sinn fein left the coalition government forcing herfrom refused sinn fein left the coalition government forcing her from office. now there is work to be done and work to quickly mend the
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relationship which had been frayed by the discord of this election. but it was a more stormont‘s opposition parties that suffered most in this election. i shall make my statement and leave the stage. the leader of the ulster union is mike nesbitt stood down because of their poor performance. it will now be up to the leaders of sinn fein and the dup to draw battlelines in the inevitable negotiations to try to form a government. joining us from belfast newsroom is our correspondent gillian hargreaves. just put this result in context for us. just put this result in context for us. well what happens now is the assembly members arrive at stormont on monday morning for what is described as a reception date and then the hard work begins because sinn fein and the democratic unionist party have to find a way forward to negotiate so they can work together to run northern
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ireland's affairs once more. they cannot agree on fundamental things like, should the uk have exeter the eu, or should it have stayed? —— exited. there is an irish language bill that sinn fein is keen on and the dup is not. they have three weeks to sort this out. if they cannot agree a way forward by 27 march of the secretary of state in the westminster government on the james brokenshire, has three options, he can either give them more time to talk, if he thinks that is worthwhile, he could call more elections to see if there can be a further political settlement, all he could decide to impose direct rule from westminster. so i suspect if they cannot agree we won't see much ofa they cannot agree we won't see much of a way forward until the other side of easter. so, would you say this is a good or a bad result for the dup? it is difficult for them, isn't it, at one stage they were
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surging ahead. the difference between them and sinn fein for voter share is 0.2%, absolutely tiny, so the party has to ask questions about why it didn't get the vote out, why it wasn't appealing to voters in the numbers sinn fein was able to do. sinn fein has surged ahead and pulled a blinder in this election. it has increased its share of the vote by 4%. it has increased its share of the vote by 496. thank you. companies who automatically sign up customers for subscription services without their knowledge face a government crackdown in next week's budget. the government will announce plans to help people avoid so—called "subscription tra ps" by being notified before a payment is taken. joe lynam reports. hands up how many of us have genuinely read through all of the small print at the end of a contract before we signed with a pen or online? citizens advice says two
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thirds of us skim through without reading it all. and after a free trial at the gym or some credit checking services, many of us end up unwittingly committing to paying subscriptions for months, which are tricky to get out of. now the government is consulting on ways to avoid these subscription traps by ensuring consumers are notified clearly a nd ensuring consumers are notified clearly and in good time when a payment is about to be taken. the plans also include making the fine print of terms and conditions a lot shorter, larger and clearer. and the government might also give the competition and markets authority extra powers to prosecute rogue companies. people losing hundreds of pounds as a result of these subscription traps. what tends to happen is people sign up in good faith for a free trial or a one—off discount only to then find as a result of incredibly complex terms and conditions that they and not having money taken out of their account without their knowledge for things that they neither want nor need and i think it is a good decision for the government to act.
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evenif decision for the government to act. even if proposals are brought into law, consumers still need to be more proactive. read contracts and study your bank statements, is the message from consumer advocates everywhere. britain wouldn't be legally obliged to pay a final budget contribution to the eu after brexit. that's according to a group of cross—party peers. but the house of lords study suggests a payment may be politically necessary to reach an agreement on the uk's withdrawal. downing street has described the report as a "significant contribution." if you are going to walk away with not a penny to be paid over, then essentially you are closing the door. and it seems to me that that would be the nuclear option. so i don't think, and there is nothing i have heard from the government that implies to me that they are wanting to trigger the nuclear option, but it is as big as that. reports from france suggest the owner of peugeot and citroen has reached an agreement to buy vauxhall.
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the deal has been subject to three weeks of talks, but there are concerns about what it could mean for the thousands of vauxhall employees in the uk. andy moore reports. vauxhall builds the vivaro van at luton, 70,000 rolled off the line last year, and that this port, 120,000 vauxhall citroen are built every year. 120,000 vauxhall citroen are built every yea r. as 120,000 vauxhall citroen are built every year. as well as those employed directly by gm, thousands more work in the supply chain. there are also 15,000 people in the pension scheme at one of the uk's largest. they have already been told that will be no worse off under the new deal. the good news is that the psa group which owns peugeot and citroen has promised not to cut any jobs in the uk before 2020 and the future after that is uncertain. psa's was carlo has had talked till my talks with theresa may. there
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we re my talks with theresa may. there were no promises made. fossil is set to become the second—biggest carmaker after vw. there are three fears french jobs will come ahead of english ones. len mccluskey has been involved in talks with the psa bosses. he called vauxhall a jewel within the crown of gm's european business. last autumn the government did a deal to keep missing in sunderland. the company was promised free access to european markets whatever happened after brexit —— nissan. psa may well seek similar assurances. mercedes—benz is to recall around one—million cars because they're at risk of catching fire. it's because of a fault found within newer models which can cause them to overheat on starting. it's thought around 75,000 cars in the uk could be affected but mercedes says the risk to customers is small. the models at fault include some a, b, c, and e—class cars
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as well as mercedes‘ cla, gla and glc vehicles. anyone who's bought a car between 2015 and 2017 could be affected but mercedes says the risk to customers is small. mercedes say they're aware of 51 fires so far, but that no deaths or injuries had been recorded. it's thought owners will be contacted later this year. sir bruce forsyth has reportedly returned home after spending five nights in intensive care. the 89—year—old was being treated for a severe chest infection. in a statement released by his agent, sir bruce said he wanted to "say a special thank you to all the nhs doctors, nurses and staff" for their "kindness and ca re". it's got to be the world's longest pub crawl — one group of friends has visited 20,000 boozers over three decades. it started back in wales in 1984.
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since then, the group's co—founder pete hill has knocked back 46,632 pints. he is the one just under the table. (laughter).. along the way, mr hill's collected tens of thousands of pounds for charity by asking for a £1 donation from each landlord. well done to him. the landlords would be pleased about that as well. shall we look at what is going on in the papers this morning? the front of the times has a story we were talking about, whether britain will have to pay to leave the eu. they say that the house of lords committee is saying britain wouldn't have to pay an x at sea. theresa may it says it will reject a demand for
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£50 billion —— exit fee. it says it will reject a demand for £50 billion -- exit fee. and on the front of the daily telegraph, another picture of emma watson at the world premiere of beauty and the beast, starring as belle, and the lead story about the small print, this is to do with the chancellor philip hammond announcing legislation next week in the budget designed to eliminate confusing jargon used in terms and conditions so you don't get sucked into signing up so you don't get sucked into signing up to so you don't get sucked into signing uptoa so you don't get sucked into signing up to a subscription deal that you didn't want. and the sun's front page have a story saying thatjohn terry and his wife have been left shaken after a robbery at their home and it is suggesting that maybe the raid happened after the former england and chelsea skipper put pictures on his instagram account showing that he was away on holiday skiing. i am just showing that he was away on holiday skiing. i amjust going showing that he was away on holiday skiing. i am just going to take you inside for a picture in the morning, because you have to start saturday morning with an animal picture, and look at this seal, it has been given
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a little cuddly toys sealed and they have become good friends, a little lookalike toy —— seal. kind zookeepers gave the seal as a gift and it has been a flipping huge success. see what they did? look at that smile. they are cute pictures. it is hard to know which is which. it is hard to know which is which. it is hard to know which is which. it is not. well, you have taken off your glasses. that is the problem. it's a problem parents tackle every night up and down the country — how to make sure your children get a good night's sleep? a panorama investigation has found a big rise in the number of youngsters being admitted to hospital with sleep disorders. but getting into a good routine can be tough, as parents of toddler elise found out. feel the pain, feel the pain, and
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why are we so bad at getting ourselves to sleep, why are we so bad at getting our children to sleep? it is going to be shown at around 8:30pm. we would love to hear from you. any tips as well. we would love to hear them. especially at 6:15am ona love to hear them. especially at 6:15am on a saturday morning. here is sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. things are looking pretty unsettled through the weekend. a changeable thing. today many of us will have some spells of sunshine around but not everywhere. for some areas it will be raining for a good part of the day. this was the scene taken yesterday in which he, some shower clouds, and similar
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scenes were many of us as he, some shower clouds, and similar scenes were many of us as well. we have low pressure in charge, some heavy rain at the moment further south, in southern france towards the alps, heavy snowfall on the way but for the uk that low pressure is fairly slow—moving so the weather not changing in a hurry. a lot of wet weather across scotland and northern ireland, there is some hill snow and rain for lower levels, combined with quite a brisk easterly wind as well. in northern ireland the heaviest rain will push to the north, this is 9am, but further heavy showers and as we move across england and wales a lot of dry weather. the far east could see some rainfor weather. the far east could see some rain for the likes of norfolk and kent and western parts of england, for devon, cornwall and parts of wales, some heavy showers and gale force gusts at times. elsewhere across england and wales things are looking predominantly dry and there will be some milky sunshine with high cloud, all in all pretty u nsettled high cloud, all in all pretty unsettled day towards the north and west the country. this is where we will see those heavy showers rolling
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in. still quite mild in the south towards ten to 12 degrees, but it will feel cooler further north. looking at a football games, largely dry in manchester and leicester but liverpool has a greater chance of some of those heavy showers rolling in. as we look through into the second half of the weekend we have that low pressure with a saturday night into sunday, a quieter spell of weather for a night into sunday, a quieter spell of weatherfor a time night into sunday, a quieter spell of weather for a time but then we see this weather front heading in from the west. through the day tomorrow that will bring a spell of wet weather across much of england and wales, drifting its way further eastwards. the drier day tomorrow across parts of scotland, a return to sunnier and milder conditions here. still some showers around across scotland and northern ireland and temperatures around seven to 11 degrees or so. looking ahead into the new working week, then, it is still fairly unsettled to start things off. temperatures rather cool but i think we should see some dry weather as we look towards the middle of the week. some dry weather sounds good for an hour, brilliant.
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three words you want to hear. we will be back with a summary of the news at 6:30am. now it is time for the film review, with jane hill and mark kermode. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases, as ever, is mark kermode. hello, mark — what's in store? so a very mixed bag — we have logan, a superhero movie that isn't really a superhero movie. viceroy‘s house, a very handsome period drama from gurinder chadha. and certain women, the latest low—key offering from kelly reichardt. so wolverine, back with us. yeah, although in a way that kind of missells it. so this is basically a superhero movie that isn't about superheroes — it's about ageing, and it's about arthritis, and it's about growing old, and losing your memory. wow, i am already surprised!
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yeah, it is an x—men movie for people who prefer westerns to comic book adaptations. set in a not—too—distant future in which huthackman's titular character, wolverine obviously, is making a living as a limo driver. he is looking wretched, drinks, has bloodshot eyes, and he spends his time looking after patrick stewart's charles xavier, who now has what is descibed as a degenerative brain disease in the most dangerous brain in the world. they are living off the grid, trying to stay under the radar, keep themselves to themselves — or at least that is what they're trying to do. here's a clip. hey, carl, it looks like mr munson hired some muscle. looks that way. he's a friend of mine. friend with a big mouth. i hear that a lot. then you probably hear this too. rifle cocked. more than i'd like. now, the interesting thing
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about the film is often with the superhero comic book franchises, you know exactly where you are. this is such a different beast — the plot involves a young girl who logan finds himself having to take care of, although initially he doesn't want to. he is forced to do so by circumstances. the real themes of the film are violence and redemption — as i said there is a big western theme. it refers again and again to shane, and i'm thinking of movies like clint eastwood's unforgiven. there is a line that recurs time and time again, "there is no living with the killing." some of the violence does involve a young child, it is bloody and brutal and genuinely properly shocking. like deadpool — this is a 15 certificate — it is not a film for kids. but unlike deadpool, it is played completely straight — it is not played for goofy laughs. it is played as a film about what happens when you get old, when you are looking back and trying to make sense of your life, when you are trying to find some kind of redemption in a world which is fundamentally broken. as i said, when you talk about those things, the western theme keeps coming back.
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yes, there are action themes, there is violence, quite surprising violence... and you know me — that is the bit that puts me off, to be honest. but it has context and meaning, and most importantly it has pain — when it happens it feels painful, it doesn't just feel exciting. it feels like there is genuine pain. and when you think that we have seen so many of these kind of movies in which entire cities are just sort of merrily wiped out and you don't feel anything at all — in this you do. no one was more surprised than me. it is directed by james mangold, obviously, and i think it's a really fine piece of work that stands on its own, and you don't have to have seen or loved the other films to get it and understand it. you should give it a go, because i think it's really interesting. 0k. the next one i want to like, because i really like gurinder chadha's work, as a rule. yes, and i do like it — it is a very handsome period drama which blends personal history and politics. it's the story of the partition of india in 1947, so what you have is hugh bonneville and gillian
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anderson as lord and lady mountbatten. he has been sent there is the last viceroy to oversee the peaceful transfer of power. the story is told through the prism of the people who are working in the household, so whilst upstairs you have dignitaries and politicians arguing about the fate of nations, downstairs you have all these different characters whose fates seem to reflect those of the larger environment. there's a romeo and juliet romance at the heart of it, which i have to say was the one false move — itjust never really gelled for me. what i think does work, chadha was very clear that she wanted to make a populist drama, that would work for a mainstream multiplex audience, that would address a very difficult and complex subject and do so in a way that was comprehensible, accessible, and also entertaining, and to her great credit i think she has done that. i know that some people have complained that the film perhaps plays to the gallery, it is too simple, broad strokes characters, but i think that she has understood what the audience needs, and i think she has managed to tell a complicated story in a way which is accessible. obviously it is a particular
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take on that story, but i was surprisingly charmed as well, because it is also a movie that has that wry cheeky wit, which are a lot of her stuff does, even among these complex historical events which are so complex, and often so brutal. certain women — i don't know much about it, but quite a cast. it is great — kelly reichardt, of course, the director, gave us meek‘s cutoff and wendy and lucy — so essentially this is a triptych of tales by maile meloy, and they are put together in one film, and the stories intertwine, but only slightly. in one of them, laura dern is a lawyer who has a client who has an old case he keeps coming back to, and she can't move on from it. in another, michelle williams is attempting to build a dream house while her life and marriage is falling apart. in the third, kristen stewart and lily gladstone are a teacher and a rancher respectively who strike up an unlikely friendship. here is a clip. i took this job before i finished law school. i wanted anyjob — i was afraid of my loans coming through.
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i didn't know where belfry was. i guess i was thinking about belgrave, which is a lot closer. so stupid. then i got a realjob. and they are letting me do this because they think it is funny. the pass is icy — it takes me four hours to get here, it is going to take me four hours to get back. i have to work in the morning. now, you can tell from that, the tone of the film seems to be... remember that famous quote — waiting for godot was a play in which nothing happens twice? you could say that this is a film in which nothing happens three times. but it is in the nothing—happening an awful lot is happening. and a lot of it is to do with, as you saw in that, one character is talking and another
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character is looking. but it is the looks which are actually saying more than the dialogue, and what i like about this, kelly reichardt is a film—maker who works on mood, long shots, you believe in these characters absolutely, and the story is not evident immediately — you have to give it time, let it settle. it is a film i want to see again. the performances are fantastically naturalistic — you do believe in the characters, sometimes to the point where you think, i am going to stay with them for a while, even though i am not entirely sure where the narrative thread is going. over the course of the drama, it does have a cumulative affect, but so much of it is to do with the tone of the atmosphere, you know, the way in which people look at each other, the environment in which they find themselves, the isolation, and the way in which they do or do not relate to the other characters around them and the landscape. that is a very hard sell, because you are not going to put that on a movie poster — a film about the way you may or may not relate to the people and the landscape around you! but it is a film that
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you have to meet halfway. but she is a superb director, and they are great performances. it sounds absolutely intriguing to me, and that put it on my list, for sure. good. and can there be any doubt about film of the week? no — moonlight is the best thing in cinemas at the moment, the best thing i have seen in a very long time. it won the best picture 0scar, and the remarkable thing — when was the last time that the best film of the year actually won the oscar for best film of the year? finally, it happened! it is so brilliant that it did — i think barryjenkins has done a brilliantjob, a coming—of—age story, a triptych, three periods in the same character's life, played by three different actors. each one chaptered according to the name of the character. it is about a tough life, but it has got immense beauty, a wonderful soundtrack. it looks fabulous, you really believe in the characters, it is tactile, sensuous and strange and adventurous, and everything that you want a movie to be. and everything about it kind of says, this is great, there's no way this will win big at the awards — and it did, and it is such a brilliant thing.
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i am so pleased for barryjenkins. he is still a very young director, and you don't realise that, in movie terms, it was made on a very small budget. absolutely tiny, and again it is one of those demonstrations that it is not about your resources — it is about passion, commitment and talent. this is a low—budget movie, when you compare what it is up against, and it is really wonderful. you talk about passion and it commitment — that takes us to our dvd. ken loach. i, daniel blake, and this was overlooked by the academy, and it is a great shame that it was, because it was unbelievably powerful — directed by ken loach, wonderful script, great performances by davejohns and hayley squires, and a story which basically has a message, the message being that bureaucracy and bureaucratic inefficiency can be used as a tool of repression. that doesn't sound like it will make for great drama, but it does — it is about characters that you know and like and care about, and it has got a sequence that has been referred to many times — the food bank sequence — that i think is one of the most
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perfect pieces of film—making, understated film—making. the cameras stay a long way away from the character, they watch the action play out in real time, and it is so powerful. so moving. it really is. it is notjust that it has a message, the way in which tells the story is powerful. i thinkjust as a piece of film—making, it is really brilliant. i, daniel blake is out on dvd — if you don't want to go to the cinema this week, stay at home and watch that, and possibly sob! it is a good week in all its variety. a quick reminder before we go that you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/film. and you can find all our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. and that is it for this week. thanks for watching. see you next time. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and steph mcgovern. coming up before 7am, sarah will have your full weekend weather forecast.
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but first at 6:30am, a summary of this morning's main news. the democratic unionist party narrowly remains the largest party in northern ireland after a snap election. but the result means they're now just one seat ahead of sinn fein, having entered the election ten ahead. the dup emerged with 28 seats, and sinn fein with 27. the parties now have three weeks to establish a government. this report from our ireland correspondent chris buckler contains flash photography. if walking out of government was a gamble for sinn fein, it's paid off. they increased their share of the vote and narrowed the gap between them and their old coalition partners, the dup. but the result leaves major questions about the future of power—sharing in northern ireland. i said consistently throughout the campaign, sinn fein aren't
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interested in going back to the status quo. that remains the position. the dup have to fundamentally change their ways and be true to the principles of power—sharing if they want to go back into the institution. sinn fein had called for the dup leader, arlene foster, to step aside as first minister during a public enquiry into a botched green energy scheme. when she refused, sinn fein left the coalition government, forcing her from office. now there's work to be done and work to quickly mend the relationship, which had been frayed by the discord of this election. but it was some of stormont‘s opposition parties that suffered most in this election. i shall make my statement and leave the stage. the leader of the ulster unionists, mike nesbitt, stood down because of their poor performance. it will now be up to the leaders of sinn fein and the dup to draw battlelines in the inevitable negotiations to try to form a government. companies that use confusing small print to mislead customers face a crackdown in next week's budget.
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plans include making sure consumers are notified before a payment is taken and simplifying small print. citizens advice says two thirds of people skim through terms and conditions without reading them, meaning they get caught in a "subscription trap," not realising they may have to pay for a service after a free trial has ended. what tends to happen is people sign up in good faith for a free trial or a one—off discount only to then find as a result of incredibly complex terms and conditions that they end up having money taken out of their account without their knowledge for things that they neither want nor need. i think it is a good decision for the government to act. britain wouldn't be legally obliged to pay a final budget contribution to the eu after brexit. that's according to a group of cross—party peers. but the house of lords study suggests a payment may be politically necessary to reach an agreement on the uk's withdrawal.
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it's been reported the eu may demand a "divorce bill" of up to 52 billion pounds. downing street has described the report as a "significant contribution". reports from france suggest the owner of peugeot and citroen has reached an agreement to buy vauxhall. the deal has been subject to three weeks of talks between general motors and the psa group. the new owners have reportedly promised there'll be no ukjob cuts before 2020. schools in england are to get a share of £215 million to improve facilities for pupils with special educational needs and disabilities. ministers say the money can be spent on specialised classrooms and resources but not on general day—to—day school budgets. it comes as many local councils complain of a crisis in school funding. 0ne teaching union has described the new money as just a drop in the ocean but the government insists it will make a difference.
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i know of one head teacher who spoke to me who said just a small and mount of capital investment can have a huge impact. it could be putting a lift into the school, it could be putting a kitchen, enhancing specialism in the classroom, so these are really important parts of investing in those children who have every right to have a great education as any other. later we'll ask a special education needs charity how pupils may benefit from the money, and whether it goes far enough to address the challenges facing schools. that's at 7:10am. sir bruce forsyth has reportedly returned home, after spending five nights in intensive care. the 89—year—old was being treated for a severe chest infection. in a statement released by his agent, sir bruce said he wanted to "say a special thank you to all the nhs doctors, nurses and staff" for their "kindness and ca re". all the best to him, and other show biz news.
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disney has released the first photo of the new—look mary poppins. more than 50 years after julie andrews played the dancing nanny, emily blunt will be donning her navy coat and patterned carpet bag for the sequel, mary poppins returns, which is due to be released on christmas day next year. those are the main stories this morning. where is the umbrella? 0h, where is the umbrella? oh, there we go. that is such a good film, isn't it? it invites our interest. will you actually go and watch it, though? can there be any other? that isa though? can there be any other? that is a good point. i don't think i will go and watch it. mary poppins isjulie andrews and michael banks, the little boy with the pudding bowl haircut and... yeah. 0h, with the pudding bowl haircut and... yeah. oh, i wish we were at home watching it now, itjust makes you wa nt to watching it now, itjust makes you want to get under the duvet... talking about not getting enough
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sleep, come on, guys. we love as in ajob, sleep, come on, guys. we love as in a job, really. we're talking about cricket, and a great win in the west indies — wouldn't that be nice, a trip to the west indies to play a few one—daye rs. england beat west indies by 45 runs in the first one—day international in antigua. and captain eoin morgan was inspirational, hitting a century as england set their hosts a victory target of 297. chris woakes and liam plunkett did the damage in the reply, taking four wickets apiece. so, england are 1—0 up in the three match series, with the second game tomorrow at the same ground. andy murray said it wasn't the best match but victory over lucas pouille took him through to the final of the dubai championships. murray admitted his legs were a bit tired after his quarter—final against philipp kohlschriber, which included a tie—break of over half an hour, but he beat pouille in straight sets and he'll face fernando verdasco in today's final.
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i have had some big wins this week, so it will be a tricky match, because he is a leftie and he goes for his shots. he has a lot of power, a lot of talent in his hands, soi power, a lot of talent in his hands, so i would try, you know, try to dictate as many points as i can because when he is on the baseline moving the ball at it is very tough. after last weekend's league cup final, it's back to a full weekend of premier league fixtures. liverpool—arsenal at tea—time is the big one. and in the lunchtime kickoff, the winners of that league cup final, manchester united, take on struggling bournemouth, who've gone seven matches without a win in the league. we are excited by this game. i think we can only be positive and only look to the future in a positive way. certainly there is no other way to approach this game or any other game. we are as confident as we can be with a lot of fixtures. we know that a win is needed to fully feel good about ourselves and hopefully that's not far away. we know that liverpool players our
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style, which is one of these weekends that you know the sure that somebody is going to lose points, so we should win against bournemouth. but bournemouth is a very tricky team, very dangerous team. it's scottish cup quarter—final day, with rangers against hamilton academical in the 12:30pm kickoff and hibs versus ayr at 3pm. british athlete andrew pozzi has won the first major title of his career, taking gold in the 60—metres hurdles at the european indoor championships in belgrade. pozzi has been hit by a series of injuries but said that through the "toughest times and darkest days" he always believed he could win a major title. i knew it was tight. i thought i may have got it but i wasn't sure, so i didn't want to, you know, celebrate until i saw it. at no, i was over the moon. it was a scrappy ways but i had to work hard to get over the
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line but, you know, a win is a win, soiam line but, you know, a win is a win, so i am really happy. —— race. laura muir has promised to bring her a game, as she chases a european double. she won her heat in the 1500—metres to make today's final, and she also goes in the 3,000 metres final tomorrow, after pacing herself and finishing fifth in that heat. this morning it was quite difficult, obviously, we can't all qualify, there is no point wasting energy when you don't need to, and i looked at the times and i knew that i was safe, just came through with enough room to qualify. today i didn't want to finish outside the top two, so i did enough to qualify. in rugby union's premiership, exeter moved to within one point of the leaders wasps with a big win over leicester. it was pretty wet at welford road but the chiefs managed a bonus—point victory — 34—15 the score — they haven't lost now since the end of october. in last night's other game northampton beat sale 32—12. 0spreys have moved to the top of the pro 12 table with a narrow victory at edinburgh. josh matavesi touched down for the only try of the game, as 0spreys ran out 13—9 winners.
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that's five defeats in a row for edinburgh. there were also wins for ulster and connacht. in super league, wakefield trinity won for the first time in 12 matches. they beat st helens 16—12 — this great finish from mason kate—on—brown helped them on their way — it was given, and that was their first victory over the saints in five years. wigan beat leigh 20 points 2—0 in last night's other game. —— wigan beat leigh 20—0 in last night's other game. after all the talk, some of it not too pleasant, finally its fight night. tony bellew and david haye will go head to head tonight — the fight live on 5live from 10pm. bellew, the world cruiserweight champion, is fighting for the first time as a heavyweight. and he was nearly a stone lighter than haye on the scales. he is prepared and ready to perform for the two round fight. he should never be that weight. he has
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manufactured heavyweight. he is not really a heavyweight right now. not ina really a heavyweight right now. not in a million years. up there he looks fantastic. when you get close to him he is trembling. he is trembling. and he isjust... he doesn't. .. trembling. and he isjust... he doesn't... he is not as confident and he does not believe the things he is saying. i look at him, he is actually trembling. i was hoping he would look a little bit more physically impressive. you know, some type of remnants of abdominal muscles or some sort, but he looked very smooth, he didn't look good in my opinion, so it doesn't bode well for him. you know, i have knocked out guys and a lot bigger, stronger and more athletic than him, so i don't see what he can do other thanjust than him, so i don't see what he can do other than just get than him, so i don't see what he can do other thanjust get smashed. i tell you what, it will be so nice to have this fight over and done with so we don't have to listen to them talking nonsense any longer. they did about three or four press conferences and they have just been filed to each other. they don't look like they believe what they have
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been saying, either of them, do you think? i remember when haye called out bellew when he stood in the ring. andi out bellew when he stood in the ring. and i rememberthe out bellew when he stood in the ring. and i remember the rumour at the time that they are quite good friends. i don't know if it is true. there will be people in the world of boxing who are saying, nonsense, you don't know what you are talking about. that is the rumour. they have planned the fight for ages. they are actually good friends. it could all bea actually good friends. it could all be a complete act. it is all part of the theatre. well, we are not going to fall for it, we are not going to give them any airtime at all. not at all. laughter see you soon with the clips. absolutely. his works already adorn walls the world over, now the elusive graffiti artist banksy has gone a step further and opened a hotel next to israel's separation barrier in bethlehem which cuts through the occupied west bank. it's a hotel with a political message and is proving a controversial addition to the city's tourist itinerary as alex forsyth has been finding out. steeped in irony — an artist's take on the grand hotels of a bygone age.
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this one claims to have the worst view in the world. the concrete slabs of the barrier israel has built in and around the occupied west bank are just feet away. this hotel as much a political statement as a new business. inside, echoes of an english gentlemen's club. but the artwork is a sharp contrast. banksy‘s critical view of life under israeli occupation, designed to persuade visitors of the palestinians' plight. as you lay down in your bed and you will look at the wall and you will look at the paintings all around you, and you will see the agony and the images of what could be a different future. and i believe that's the best mobilisation message for people to get on their feet and act. the elusive artist has left his mark on the west bank before. there's even a shop selling his merchandise in bethlehem.
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his provocative art — not always popular — does attract attention. when banksy‘s work first appeared here in the west bank and then in gaza, there was some concern he was depicting palestinians as downtrodden, and some criticism in that by painting on the wall he was somehow normalising it, even making a feature out of it. and from an israeli perspective, undermining something they see as essential to their security. the architects of the controversial separation barrier have always defended its existence. we had so many terror attacks from the west bank to israel from 2000—2006. and even these days, there is still terrorists, that are trying to cross from the west bank to israel and we have to stop them. but for critics the barrier is an infringement on freedom, a reason to protest, and now,
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an experience to pay for, with prices from tens, to hundreds of pounds a night, for a room with a view. alex forsyth, bbc news, bethlehem. here is sarah with a look at this morning's weather. and a gorgeous picture of whitby. i love whitby. good morning to you. as picture was taken yesterday. we have some big shower clouds, rainbows around as well and some similar scenes like this across parts of the country today. there are certainly more showers in the forecast, you won't be too surprised to hear that. the unsettled him to the weather continues through the weekend but don't write the weekend. most of us will see a bit of dry and bright weather either today or through tomorrow. this area of low pressure is in charge of our weather, sitting out towards western parts of the uk. quite a slow—moving area of low pressure, bringing spells of rain and hill snow across scotland and
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northern ireland. wet weather overnight across northern ireland. this band of hill snow still with us at 9am, brisk easterly winds for scotla nd at 9am, brisk easterly winds for scotland and northern ireland will see a return to showery weather as we go through the course of the day but a good deal of dry weather across much of england and wales. the far east seeing some spells of rain at times and towards the west you have these showers piling in. these showers towards western parts of england and wales could be really quite heavy, some thunderstorms and strong winds and extent as well. for the bulk of england and wales you can see the slice of dry weather through most of the country lasting through most of the country lasting through the day. some dry and bright weather but scotland will hold onto that rain as pushes its way further north through the course of the day and for northern ireland some heavy and for northern ireland some heavy and thundery showers, temperatures around seven to 12 degrees. in terms of our premier league football action, manchester and leicester should be largely dry but the liverpool versus arsenal we are seeing more showers rolling in from the west. low pressure stays with us overnight tonight and on into
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sunday, a lull in the weather for a time, it does quieten down and through the day tomorrow we will see this frontal system pushing west to east across much of england and wales, a spell of wet weather, then some sunshine, and further heavy showers rolling in towards the west. blustery as well but for central and northern parts of scotland will be a better day. more in the way of sunshine through the day. the u nsettled sunshine through the day. the unsettled theme continues as we look ahead into the new working week but we will start to some slightly drier and quieter weather in towards the middle part of the week. thank you very much, we will see you in a bit. we will be back with the headlines at 7:00am. now it is time for click, with spencer kelly. we are about to put a whole new spin on the world of mobiles. we are at the mobile world congress in barcelona — the big show devoted to phones,
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tablets and all things mobile. we're a bit behind schedule, but we're going to get there. although, if we look a bit distracted, it is because we are preparing for a rather audacious experiment. it is not that we are not interested in the floating displays, connected bus stops, flash cars, smart shoes, or robot drummers. it is just that we are about to bash out something a lot more complicated. last year, we filmed an entire programme in 360 degrees, allowing those watching in virtual reality to look around the fantastic locations simply by turning their heads or their phones in whichever direction they pleased. and that is the power of 360. you really feel like you have been teleported into the situation.
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not only that, but these days, we also have the ability to stream 360 live. so imagine that, the next time we send a robot to the moon, if it has a 360 camera on board, then we can all put on a pair of goggles and actually feel like we are there, too. and so that is what we are doing today, getting ready to go live in 360. not to the moon, admittedly, but to a place that is still a pretty strange landscape. so here we are in the massive mobile world congress. eight enormous halls of madness and noise, as everyone tries to launch their product with maximum pizzazz and maximum volume. but these days this event is not just about mobiles, of course. virtual reality is everywhere. since you can use a phone as a vr headset, many companies have opted to up the excitement by strapping people in and hurling them about.
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yes, folks, vr can be totally immersive, if you have your own 360 chair. and i don't even want to think what kind of experience this chap is having. but going live in 360 is less about the headset and more about the kind of camera equipment you can and cannot use. you are currently watching me through a nokia 0zo, which is a professional 360 camera with a professional pricetag to boot — about 45,000 us dollars, or 40,000 euros. but it is a beautiful looking thing. it has eight lenses all around the sphere, which means not only can you can see in all directions, but it can also shoot in 3—d because that combination of lenses allows it to process the stereoscopic view. what is really weird is it has this enormous battery pack at the back, which you think would be in shot, but actually this thing has a blind spot to about here.
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and what they so is theyjust get that almost—360 view and stretch it around like that. modern 360 cameras will stitch the scene together themselves in real time, automatically wrapping that weird, warped video into a sphere around your head, and that is what enables them to go live. now, if you wanted to stream the full 360 view from the 0zo, you are going to need some extract kit. two dedicated hardware boxes, and an internet upload speed of at least 30 megabits per second. and, at a trade show like this, we are not that lucky. i think we have to accept that it's early days. to get really high—quality, ideally stereoscopic video, so you really can look around and feel a sense of depth, and feel that you're there, is going to take a while. there are bandwidth problems, and just having the equipment that can transmit and that amount of data, so that when you look, the picture gets rendered according to exactly where you're looking.
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it's going to take a while to get it sorted, but we're starting there. we are going to be doing two lives in 360, testing two different cameras and this is no mean feat because as with last year's 360 show, we are coming to this before the manufacturers have made bespoke equipment. so, to get good pictures, good sound, and a decent bit of interaction with the audience, we are having to hack together various bits of kit, and hope no—one trips over any of it. my microphone goes into a transmitter, which goes into a receiver, which goes into a box, which plugs into another box, and then we've got, like, a half a mile of ethernet cable, which is going to a network access point, which is hidden in the garden. so that's good. the first 360 camera we are using is the 0rah 4i — four lenses which between them can shoot the 360 video in ultra—high—def 4k. although it is important to note
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that this is the resolution of the entire 360 shot. the viewer only sees a part of this as they look around the scene. at the moment, it's not showing us anything that we want. they're seeing us in london. it's a bit blurry, but we're going to get better. it was our very first attempt, so things were bumpy on the run—up and rather rough around the edges. we were supposed to go like —15 minutes ago. we're going live now. ahh. that said, it seemed to hang together, and viewers on our youtube 360 channel got to find out a bit more about a car that's planning to go at 1,000 miles per hour. there is three engines? yes, it has a gas turbine engine from the typhoon eurofighter. right. and it has two jets, effectively. rockets?
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rockets, effectively. and you need three of them. yes. to get to 1,000 mph. the gas turbine is for your below 800mph manoeuvres and then the rockets fire you up, give you the kick to over a thousand. now, streaming such a high—quality picture takes a lot of data, hence we had to use a fat, wired internet connection of about 10 megabits per second. but, for our second attempt, we went commando. the ricoh theta s is the camera we used to shoot the 360 helicopter scene from last year. it is a small hand—held stick with two fish—eye lenses. its full view is only 2k, the same as a normal high—def picture, so the part you see in virtual reality is much lower resolution but that does means it is possible to stream the video live over the mobile network, which is what we did, in style, with a drone. to give them a taste
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of what it is like to be so close to a drone, you might lose a limb. weird. very soon, ricoh is releasing the theta r which has a few upgrades, including more connectors, expandable storage, and it will do the stitching in the camera itself, rather than needing a computer to do all the grunt work. for now, though, we were pretty happy with our little experiment, and very soon there will almost certainly be more fully integrated kits, to let us go live in 360 with much less bother. when we went to up a glacier and to the large hadron collider to film those in 360, we used six gopros strapped together to film the entire scene. we then had to stitch that footage together manually, using a powerful computer and software, and many, many hours. well, since then, gopro has released the 0mni, which is a case in which six gopros fit. it has one remote start for all six cameras,
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which is good, and it also comes with a box that does all the stitching. and in a couple of months‘ time, gopro says it is going to release an update which allows you to do that live. and, if you want to create your own 360 videas, this tiny camera by lifi plugs into your android phone. the videos are not live, but the stitching is quick, and you can share it easily on your social networks. right, what else is hot at this year's mwc? here's stephen beckett with a round—up. stephen. incredibly, at a convention with some of the world's biggest phone manufacturers hawking their newest and shiniest devices, this is the phone that everyone is talking about. finnish start—up hmd global has resurrected a scintillating piece of nostalgia, with a reboot of its nokia 3310. do you remember that? hmd licensed the nokia phone brand at the end of 2016. the close to indestructible handset, with a seemingly infinite battery life, has been given a new lease of life,
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with modern curves, jazzy colours and, of course, a re—versioning of snake. blackberry has also gone back to basics with a new flagship phone — the key0ne. it has a physical gesture sensitive keyboard that hides a fingerprint scanner under the space bar. and that is not the only slice of nostalgia here at nwc. samsung is getting in on the action, too, with this classic norris pencil, although i would not sharpen this particular one because there is quite a lot of digital stuff in the end, to allow you to do things like this. google would much rather you talk to your devices though, rather than write to them. it has announced its personal assistant, google home, will finally be available for sale outside of the us, and by may, in the uk. and, in another new attempt to dominate the a! market, the company also said it will roll out its voice—activated digital assistant to all android phones running marshmallow and nougat. until now, it has only been available on goggle's own pixel line of phones.
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that is, apart from huawai and lenovo mobiles. those are set to use amazon's alexa instead. lenovo's upcoming moto z will get its assistance smarts through a snap—on back, which they're calling a moto mod. 0thers, though, are ditching customisation. lg launched its new flagship g6 phone without the modular capability of its previous models. the company say its customers do not fancy forking out for extra parts. the lg g6 also knocks the traditional aspect ratio out of the park — the screen is 18x9 — twice as tall as wide. smartphones have traditionally been 16x9. and that's it for the short cut of click at nwc in barcelona. the full version is available online now. and let us know what you think of our attempt at a 360—degree episode. do be kind. thank you for watching, see you soon. hello, this is breakfast, with steph mcgovern and jon kay.
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victory for the democratic unionists, but only by a single seat in northern ireland's assembly elections. sinn fein were the night's big winners with a significant surge of support, as they closed the gap on the dup. good morning. it's saturday, march 4th. we'll be live in belfast in the next few minutes. also ahead: mercedes recalls 75,000 cars in the uk because of a risk of them catching fire.
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