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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 4, 2017 8:00am-9:00am GMT

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thank you for all your comments this week. please share with us your opinions on bbc news and current affairs. we may feature them on the programme or you can even appear in person. you can call or e—mail us. you can post your thoughts on twitter and do have a look at our website where you can search for and watch previous discussions. that's all from us. we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello this is breakfast. victory for the democratic unionists, but only by a single seat in northern ireland's snap elections. sinn fein were the big winners with a significant surge of support, as they closed the gap on the dup. good morning.
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it's saturday 4th march. we'll be live in belfast in the next few minutes. also ahead: mercedes recalls 75 thousand cars in the uk because of a risk of them catching fire. sweeping away the small print. the chancellor promises a crackdown on consumer rip—offs. could the uk quit the eu without paying a penny? a house of lords report says the government isn't legally obliged to contribute to the cost of brexit. in sport, a century from captain eoin morgan sets up england for victory, in the first one—day international against west indies. and: how do make sure your children get a good night's sleep? a panorama investigation finds a big rise in the number of youngsters being diagnosed with sleep disorders. and we have sarah with the saturday weather. good morning. it's an u nsettled, weather. good morning. it's an unsettled, showery weekend and some of us will see some sunshine. see you ina of us will see some sunshine. see you in a few minutes. good morning.
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first, our main story. the democratic unionist party narrowly remains the largest party in northern ireland after a snap election. but the result means they're nowjust one seat ahead of sinn fein — having entered the election 10 ahead. the dup emerged with 28 seats, and sinn fein with 27. the parties now have three weeks to establish a government. this report, from our ireland correspondent chris buckler, contains flash photography. if walking out of government was a gamble for sinn fein, it's paid off. they increased their share of the vote and narrow the gap between them and their own coalition partners, the dup. but the result leaves major questions about the future of power—sharing in northern ireland. i said consistently throughout the campaign that sinn fein are not interested in going back to the status quo. that remains the position. the dup need to fundamentally
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change their ways and be true to the principles of power—sharing if they want to go back into the institutions. sinn fein had called for the dup leader, arlene foster, to step aside as first minister during a public enquiry into a botched green energy scheme. when she refused, sinn fein left the coalition government, forcing powerfrom office. there is work to be done and work to quickly mend the relationship which has been frayed by the discord of this election. but it was opposition parties that suffered most in this election. i shall make my statement and leave the stage. the leader of the ulster unionists, mike nesbitt, stood down because of their poor performance. it will now be up to the leaders of sinn fein and the dup to draw battle lines in the inevitable negotiations to try
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and form a government. chris butler, bbc news, belfast. the uk may be able to leave the european union without paying a penny. that's the view of constitution experts in the house of lords today. our political correspondent ellie pricejoins us now from our london newsroom. ellie, it's been reported that the eu might demand a so—called "divorce bill" of billions of pounds. what do peers say about that? if brexit is a divorce, then we are talking about the alimony. we are talking about the alimony. we are talking about the eu budget, some of the parts of that that britain has signed for. who is going to pay britain's contribution, contribution to staff pensions and so on. £52 billion, but estimates vary how much that will would end up being. but what this report suggests today is that there is no legal obligation for the british government to pay anything when whaley. but, and it a big but, there is if we want to
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continue a relationship with the eu, and a theresa may has made it plain that she wants to have a good trading deal with the eu, the report today suggests that britain needs to have some kind of decent deal sorted with the eu to sort out those ongoing relationships, and it's that political calculation that theresa may will take into account. mercedes—benz is to recall around one million cars because they're at risk of catching fire. it's because of a fault found within newer models which can cause them to overheat on starting. it's thought around 75,000 cars in the uk could be affected, but mercedes says the risk to customers is small. the models at fault include some a, b, c, and e—class cars as well as mercedes' cla, gla and glc vehicles. anyone who's bought a car between 2015 and 2017 could be affected.
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mercedes say they're aware of 51 fires so far, but that no deaths or injuries had been recorded. it's thought owners will be contacted later this year. reports from france suggest the owner of peugeot and citroen has reached an agreement to buy vauxhall. the deal has been subject to three weeks of talks, but there are concerns about what it could mean for the thousands of vauxhall employees in the uk. andy moore reports. vauxhall builds the vivaro van at luton. around 70,000 rolled off the production line last year. and at elsemere port about 120,000 vauxhall astras are built every year. as well as those employed directly by gm, thousands more work in the supply chain. there are also 15,000 people in the pension scheme, one of the uk's largest.
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they have already been told that they will be no worse off under the new deal. the good news is that the psa group, which owns peugeot and citroen, has promised not to cut anyjobs in the uk before 2020, and the future after that is uncertain. psa's boss carlo tavares has already had talks on the phone with the pm theresa may. there were reassuring words but no promises were made. vauxhall is set to become the second—biggest carmaker after vw. french government has a 14% in this and there are fears french jobs will come ahead of british and german ones. the unite secretary, len mccluskey, has been involved in talks with the psa bosses. he called vauxhall a jewel within the crown of gm's european business. last autumn, the government did
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a deal to keep nissan in sunderland. the company was promised free access to european markets whatever happened after brexit. psa may well seek similar assurances. companies that use confusing small print to mislead customers face a crackdown in next week's budget. the chancellor will announce plans to help people avoid so—called "subscription traps" by making sure customers are notified before a payment is taken. joe lynam reports. hands up how many of us have genuinely read through all of the small print at the end of a contract before we signed with a pen or online? citizens advice says two thirds of us skim through without reading it all. and after a free trial at the gym or some credit checking services, many of us end up unwittingly committing to paying subscriptions for months, which are tricky to get out of. now the government is consulting on ways to avoid these subscription traps by ensuring consumers are notified clearly and in good time when a payment is about to be taken. the plans also include making the fine print of terms
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and conditions a lot shorter, larger and clearer. and the government might also give the competition and markets authority extra powers to prosecute rogue companies. people losing hundreds of pounds as a result of these subscription traps. what tends to happen is people sign up in good faith for a free trial or a one—off discount only to then find as a result of incredibly complex terms and conditions that they end up having money taken out of their account without their knowledge for things that they neither want nor need. i think it's a really good decision for the government to act on this. even if proposals are brought into law, consumers still need to be more proactive. read contracts and study your bank statements is the message from consumer advocates everywhere. sir bruce forsyth has reportedly returned home,
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after spending five nights in intensive care.the 89—year—old was being treated for a severe chest infection. in a statement released by his agent, sir bruce said he wanted to "say a special thank you to all the nhs doctors, nurses and staff" for their "kindness and ca re". if you are feeling delicate after a pub crawl last night then be grateful that he didn't do this pub crawl. grateful that you didn't do this pub crawl. it's got to be the world's longest pub crawl. one group of friends has visited 20—thousand boozers over three decades. it started back in wales in 1984. since then, the group's co—founder pete hill has
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knocked back 46,632 pints. along the way, mr hill's collected tens of thousands of pounds for charity by asking for a £1 donation from each landlord. the president of sinn fein, gerry adams, has hailed the success of his party in the northern ireland elections, saying people had voted for an end to "the old status quo". with all the votes counted, sinn fein have ended up with 27 seats, just one behind the democratic unionists. 0ur correspondent, annita mcveigh, joins us from belfast‘s city hall. sinn fein, undoubtedly the big winners in this day after the elections. those votes came in a ci’oss elections. those votes came in a cross 90 seats in 18 constituencies.
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let's look at the contrast, with ten months ago, in the elections in may last year, in that election the dup had a ten seat majority over sinn fein. now, although the dup is still the largest party, that majority has been reduced to just one seat. we will talk now to the professor of british and irish politics at the university of liverpool. let's look at the breakdown of the vote and where it went right and wrong for the various parties. beginning with the various parties. beginning with the sinn fein politicians he really got their vote out. it's a stunning victory for them, even the biggest optimist the sinn fein didn't predict this. they were told by the dup that this was an election that the northern irish didn't want or need, but it appears that this was
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not the case. sinn fein said that the election was all about equality, but what they didn't expect was to be almost equal with the dup, which really changes the dynamics of northern ireland volatility. turnout for the election was up by 10% and yet they lost a significant number of seats. they were all- powerful yet they lost a significant number of seats. they were all-powerful and this is disastrous for them. it does raise the issue now of arlene foster's future as the dup leader. she could turn round and say, we other largest party with the most votes, but the sinn fein, the position of arlene foster is non—negotiable. they want her removed while an enquiry goes on into the heating incentive scheme that caused this election in the first place. mike nesbitt resigned
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even though his political party numbers went up slightly, but arlene foster is refusing to step down.“ it difficult for the dup to argue about getting rid of arlene foster? yes. they won't want sinn fein to dictate who leads their party. it isn't easily resolved. there is no clear successoi’ anyway isn't easily resolved. there is no clear successor anyway to arlene foster, though we are potentially looking at a nightmare scenario that could be another election, which would prove what? 0r could be another election, which would prove what? or you could be looking at direct rule. but this is ata time looking at direct rule. but this is at a time when northern ireland really needs a government who can look at brexit. let's discuss what
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is quite a theoretical point about the balance of power, because if we don't have that functioning assembly in northern ireland, up until now the dup had eight petition of concern, and ability to veto proposals from sinn fein because of their difference in seat numbers, but that is out the window now? they will need a traditional unionist voice and also the dup voice. a simple assembly vote otherwise will be taken, not across a community basis, so if they vote to legalise same—sex marriage that would go ahead. the sinn fein agenda is now very much back in play. that ability to veto by the dup was the cause
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initially of the breakdown between the dup and sinn fein, because sinn fein felt that the dup were vetoing many of their proposals, including irish language. in your educated opinion, how long do you think it could be before we see a functioning assembly in stormont? six to nine months minimum. and it will take six to nine months because there will be this political hiatus. it won't easily be resolved. the other thing is who is going to check these negotiations, because james broke and she is not necessarily seen as a neutral broker in that. well, the
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votes were counted into the wee small hours and that was when the last few counts were finished at 3am. we don't expect to hear much from the politicians today, but come monday, they will be back in stormont to continue those negotiations. how long is a piece of string? we know that in northern ireland, negotiations can become very protracted indeed and it is being conducted in a very difficult climb it. you are watching brea kfast. the dup has remained northern ireland's largest party in the assembly election, but only by a single seat ahead of sinn fein. 75,000 mercedez—benz cars in the uk are to be recalled
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because there's a risk they could catch fire. it's they could catch fire. been a cold, blustery it's been a cold, blustery day. it's they could catch fire. been a cold, blustery it's been a cold, blustery day. we it's they could catch fire. been a cold, blustery it's been a cold, blustery day. we will it's they could catch fire. been a cold, blustery it's been a cold, blustery day. we will get it's they could catch fire. been a cold, blustery it's been a cold, blustery day. we will get the it's they could catch fire. been a cold, blustery it's been a cold, blustery day. we will get the weather it's they could catch fire. been a cold, blustery it's been a cold, blustery day. we will get the weather now. it's they could catch fire. been a cold, blustery it's been a cold, blustery day. we will get the weather now. there it's they could catch fire. been a cold, blustery it's been a cold, blustery day. we will get the weather now. there are blue skies, sunshine, but equally, low pressure not far—away. 0utbreaks of rain and heavy showers. we are seeing this weather front which is draped across parts of scotland which will bring quite persistent rain and hill snow across northern parts of scotland through the day. we are seeing a brisk, easterly wind which is making you feel bitterly cold across central scotland. scattered heavy showers across westerly parts of england and wales, but a lot of england and wales also looking largely dry. some rain in
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the far east that should clear away. at two awards the south—west of england and west and wales, those showers are quite heavy with blustery, gale force winds. in the sunshine, we will see temperatures up to 12 celsius. at further into the north and west, some heavy showers. here are you premiership matches. heavy showers in liverpool. largely dry it in manchester. through the course of tonight. another weather front working into the south—west, so through sunday, this band of brisk winds, heavy rain, working its way westerly, with heavy downpours. a
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wet, windy day across england and wales. scotland and northern ireland still seems showers but certainly improved picture compared to today. your weekly forecast, a hint of things settling down as we look towards the middle of next week. thank you, sarah. we've followed their story from the very start. the four mums who made history by rowing across the atlantic ocean and into the record books. they're known as the yorkshire rows and now their extraordinary tale has been made into a book. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been catching up with them. they were the four ordinary mums who had had an extraordinary dream. and now, to match their place in the record books, a book launch of their very own. let's recap, shall we? this was the moment they set
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a world record, the moment they conquered an ocean. and what a journey it had been. yorkshire rows had laughed and danced their way across the atlantic, or so we thought. you never told us at the time, but there had been a huge row on board the boat. was that us? well, i had been rowing nonstop for two hours. yes — mike bushell! it is all coming out now. they haven't stopped,
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from the moment the oars went down. they have had invitations to the palace, mixed with royalty, they have mixed with celebrity, they have become celebrity. the documentary about you is winning international film competitions, i hear. yes, yes. so you went to munich. yes, we did. i went to new york, we got a standing ovation. i went to leeds. their story has spread from yorkshire around the world, as has their inspiration, which is why we have arranged a surprise visit for them. do a little turn. these ladies have been inspired to do exactly the same row, after seeing them on breakfast. when i saw them i thought, those ladies lookjust like me, and if they can do it,
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then there is no reason why i shouldn't do it. these are the ladies who are going to take our record. so it was yorkshire rows passed the baton to the atlantic ladies. is it time for them to put up their feet? not on your nelly. niki and i are doing a six—day ultramarathon across the sahara desert. are you crazy? no, just got to dream big. got to dream big. nothing can stop them. go yorkshire. you just want to be in, don't you? i love we've now got yorkshire rows,
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the next generation forjayne to follow. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. nazir afzal is a former cps prosecutor. thank you forjoining us. he's here to tell us what's caught his eye in the papers this morning. i've chosen a story in the telegraph about the drink—drive limit, and drivers. in this, the local government association are saying that the limit is too high. in scotland, the limit is half than what is in england and wales, and it's been a 25% reduction in the number of deaths due to drink—driving. and the lga are calling for the same thing in england and wales. it's an area
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where there is a real tension, because you got the pub and club industry saying it would damage their trade. you've got policing and victims who are saying it's essential you should protect people. they could be fewer deaths from drink—driving if you were to reduce the limit. and that's clearly a strong case they are making. as a prosecutor, there's often the argument that zero tolerance won't quite work. because a christmas cake peacekeeper you over to check with the with food, . .. there peacekeeper you over to check with the with food,... there is a clip doing the rounds of nigel farage
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room noise and food. -- being knighted. 0n russian tv, he was party to this little extra paid where a young woman, knighted him, and shih said then, my mother says you hate foreigners. and he said to her, the monarchy should be impartial. we see a lot of satire, but we're now seeing it in newspapers, in terms of what you are meant to believe, or not believe.
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this idea of honours. we shouldn't be talking about it openly. it should be recognising great success, great achievement. mirror are looking forward at a march two save the nhs. it's hard to predict numbers. but clearly, this is a big concern in politics at the moment. they anticipate 100,000 people marching in aid for the nhs. we are ina very marching in aid for the nhs. we are in a very different place. the nhs is 70 years old, and we are getting older. the population is likely to keep going up. can the nhs sustain, can it be sustained with current funding? the idea of the march is to keep highlighting this, because it's more complicated than simply putting money in. we know that medication
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costs money. things are having an impact on the health service, something we are so proud of, but we need to recognise it is facing challenges. earlier, we had and marie riley who was telling us that the kind of innovation they are doing in hospital. jarman paralysis, getting them out of their pyjamas into normal closed improved mental health. hospital had to get an eviction orderfor a patient health. hospital had to get an eviction order for a patient who health. hospital had to get an eviction orderfor a patient who had been there for two years. so, it's a tough time but we value the nhs more than. thank you very much for talking to us. we will be talking again to anne marie riley about that
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pyjama paralysis campaign. boxing pundit steve bunce is going to be with us to talk about this boxing match. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and steph mcgovern. coming up before nine, sarah will have your full weekend weather forecast. but, first, a summary of this morning's main news. the democratic unionist party narrowly remains the largest party in northern ireland after a snap election. the result means they're nowjust one seat ahead of sinn fein, which increased its share of the vote. the parties now have three weeks to establish a government.
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companies that use confusing small print to mislead customers face a crackdown in next week's budget. plans include making sure consumers are notified before a payment is taken and simplifying small print. citizens advice says two thirds of people skim through terms and conditions without reading them, meaning they get caught in a "subscription trap" — not realising they may have to pay for a service after a free trial has ended. the uk may be able to leave the european union without paying a penny — that's the view of a house of lords committee. its report says britain would not be legally obliged to pay a so—called "divorce bill" of billions of pounds. however, they say it might be politically necessary to make some kind of payment. it's been reported that a brexit bill could amount to billions of pounds. reports from france suggest the owner of peugeot and citroen has reached an agreement to buy
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vauxhall. the deal has been subject to three weeks of talks between general motors and the psa group. the new owners have reportedly promised there'll be no uk job cuts before 2020. schools in england are to get a share of £215 million to improve facilities for pupils with special educational needs and disabilities. ministers say the money can be spent on specialised classrooms and resources, but not on general day—to—day school budgets. it comes as many local councils complain of a crisis in school funding. 0ne teaching union has described the new money as just a drop in the ocean, but the government insists it will make a difference. sir bruce forsyth has reportedly returned home, after spending five nights in intensive care. the 89—year—old was being treated for a severe chest infection. in a statement released by his agent, sir bruce said
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he wanted to "say a special thank you to all the nhs doctors, nurses and staff" for their "kindness and ca re". we wish him well. 50 years after they made the original mary poppins withjulie andrews, disney are making a... what is it? a new look? they have released a photo of the new look mary poppins. there she is, same old bag, same old code. a new actress, notjulie andrews but emily blunt playing the dancing nanny and donning the famous navy coat and patterned carpet bag for the sequel, mary poppins returns, due to be released on christmas day next year, so released on christmas day next year, so that is all you are going to see for now! ages away. i know you are a mary poppins fanta dock
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iama poppins fanta dock i am a massive fan of the original. i can't think of anything where the remake is as good as the original. beauty and the beast is about to come out. but i don't think they've made a picture movie of that. the remake of the jungle made a picture movie of that. the remake of thejungle book made a picture movie of that. the remake of the jungle book was made a picture movie of that. the remake of thejungle book was good. maybe you are right! we have been talking about eoin morgan and talking about whether he deserved a place in the side. but here he is doing really well. england beat west indies by 45 runs in the first one—day international in antigua. and captain eoin morgan was inspirational, hitting a century as england set their hosts a victory target of 297. chris woakes and liam plunkett did the damage in the reply, taking four wickets apiece. so england are 1—0 up
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in the three match series, with the second game tomorrow at the same ground. andy murray said it wasn't the best match — but victory over lucas pouille took him through to the final of the dubai championships. murray admitted his legs were a bit tired after his quarterfinal against philipp kohlschriber, which included a tie—break of over half an hour — but he beat pouille in straight sets and he'll face fernando verdasco in today's final. some big wins this week, so it will be a tricky match, because he is a leftie and he goes for his shots. he has a lot of power, a lot of talent in his hands, so i'll try, you know, try to dictate as many points as i can, because when he's on the baseline moving the ball around it is very tough. british athlete andrew pozzi has won the first major title of his career, taking gold in the 60—metres hurdles at the european indoor championships in belgrade. pozzi has been hit by a series of injuries, so this was a real milestone for him. it means everything. it has been a
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long, hard road i wasn't all that sure i would get to the level i needed to be at so with grit and determination, i am over the moon. it really is great. laura muir has promised to bring her "a game", as she chases a european double. she won her heat in the 1500—metres to make today's final — and she also goes in the 3,000 metres final tomorrow. a big day of football. premier league football is back after the league cup final last weekend. full schedule. i keep getting that word wrong every week you come and sit on the sofa! dan walker is here! good morning. you were nearly there with the type but didn't quite make it! i thought i would go for something a bit different. good job
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lam not something a bit different. good job i am not in my pyjamas! suited and booted and ready to go by midday when football focus hits the screens. when football focus hits the screens. we have a lot to talk about. liverpool versus arsenal is the standout fixture this weekend. it has been an interesting year for jurgen klopp because they have only won two games, jurgen klopp because they have only won two games, one jurgen klopp because they have only won two games, one in the cup, one in the league, lost heavily to a rejuvenated leicester last time out. we are going to talk about all sort of things and i am going to play you a clip ofjurgen klopp. seven months m, a clip ofjurgen klopp. seven months in, how much time do you give yourself to be successful? that is the problem. it is not that i will decide only about this but i am very, very positive about how much timel very, very positive about how much time i can get for whatever. i have no idea about it but i am in closed talks, if your quest to meet him at direction, with our ownership, so we are all fine but of course we know we need to deliver, we need to show
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development, but we will, no doubt. a really interesting interview with juliette berrington and jurgen klopp. very interesting. 0nly juliette berrington and jurgen klopp. very interesting. only two points on the road all season for burnley. we have two players now playing the same team who are schoolmates. they are really good friends and it is lovely to see them together, laughing like a bunch of goons at the same time as being premier league footballers. we have hugo lloris, a lovely piece on 0liver burke, a scottish international who now plays in germany. if you ever want to look into an interesting story, which has caused quite a furore in germany, only eight years old and have had four five promotions and only eight years old and have had fourfive promotions and in only eight years old and have had four five promotions and in the bundesliga so loads of money from red bull have gone into this team and they are now pushing at the very top of german football so fans are not particularly happy there have been protests about the way they
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have done their business but they are have done their business but they a re successful. have done their business but they are successful. we also have danny murphy on the programme, dion dublin, john moxon live at leicester and we have david gower doing premier league predictions in the power hour. what a lot of names. thanks so much for coming in. in rugby union's premiership, exeter moved to within one point of the leaders wasps with a big win over leicester. it was pretty wet at welford road but the chiefs managed a bonus—point victory — 34—15 the score. they haven't lost now since the end of october. in last night's other game, northampton beat sale 32—12. 0spreys have moved to the top of the pro 12 table with a narrow victory at edinburgh. josh matavesi touched down for the only try of the game, as 0spreys ran out 13—9 winners. that's five defeats in a row for edinburgh. there were also wins for ulster and connacht. in superleague, a late, disputed penalty try gave wakefield trinity victory over st helens.
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a fantastic finish from mason caton—brown helped wakefield on their way but they were trailing 12—10 when the video referee awarded a penalty try that was converted, giving wakefield victory by 16 points to 12. wigan beat leigh 20 points to nil in last night's other game. rory mcilroy‘s lack of competitive golf this season seems to have helped rather than hindered him. he hasn't played a tournament since january but he's two shots clear at the halfway stage of the world golf championship in mexico city. mcilory could reclaim the world number one spot if he wins here, and a second round of 65 — including this eagle — has set him up very nicely for the challenge. after all the talk, some of it not too pleasant, finally it's fight night. tony bellew and david haye will go head to head tonight — you can follow it on bbc 5 live from ten o'clock. bellew, the world cruiserweight champion, is fighting for the first time as a heavyweight. and he was nearly a stone lighter than haye on the scales. he is prepared and ready to perform
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for the two—round fight. he should never be that weight. he has manufactured heavyweight. he is not really a heavyweight right now. not in a million years. aesthetically there he looks fantastic. when you get close to him he is trembling. he is trembling. and he isjust... he doesn't... he is not as confident and he does not believe the things he is saying. i look at him, he is actually trembling. i was hoping he would look a little bit more physically impressive. you know, some type of remnants of abdominal muscles or some sort, but he looked very smooth, he didn't look good in my opinion, so it doesn't bode well for him. you know, i have knocked out guys a lot bigger, stronger and more athletic than him, so i don't see what he can do other than just get smashed. steve bunce is a boxing journalist and joins us now
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from our newsroom in london. playing those clips and listening to what the boxers had to say, fairly tame language this time but they have had some things to say about each other, there have been threats of stepping into the ring. did it go too far? the boxing board of control have said they will be looking at the comments. what do you make of it? it started in october when tony bellew defended his title against a man he dubbed david haye's nightclub buddy, bj flores. after the fight, he leapt buddy, bj flores. after the fight, he lea pt from buddy, bj flores. after the fight, he leapt from the ring, breaking one of the british boxing board of control rules, and david haye was challenged. they have a press conference at the dorchester hotel in central london and david haye managed to hit tony bellew, breaking several of the british boxing board of control rules and then they started swearing. it was like a swearing competition. i've never
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seen swearing competition. i've never seen two adult men and standards where so much. if you had a meter, they would have broken it did they are broken dozens of the rules and monday morning, when this fight is over and the dust has settled and 21,000 firms have gone home, the pairof 21,000 firms have gone home, the pair of them will be summoned to the british boxing board of control offices in cardiff. they want of their pockets find. i think there will be fined as much as £300,000 each, it has been that serious. we arejust taking each, it has been that serious. we are just taking a look pictures of the incident you talked about. berry/ photography coming up. —— there is flash photography. what did you make of it when bellewjumped out of the ring to challenge david haye? that this is all an act? they are haye? that this is all an act? they a re really haye? that this is all an act? they are really good friends? they've never been close friends but they have over the last seven or eight
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yea rs have over the last seven or eight years nodded and shaken hands and worked side—by—side for sky tv. the pairof worked side—by—side for sky tv. the pair of them have worked for us here at radio 5 live, not on the same night but on different nights, and they have praised each other‘s performances. david belle vue would say david haye is a great fighter. david haye would say tony bellew had an enormous heart and was a great fighter. it was pantomime. it broke rules but it was pantomime. tony bellew is a fantastic salesman and admits that. he said last week to us at radio 5 live, i'm going to send my kids to do by because i don't wa nt my kids to do by because i don't want them to see what i become next week when i sell despite. when i finished selling this fight, the whole world want to watch it. somewhere between dumping out of the ring and the last few days, something really nasty happened, there was a transformation in david haye, who feels aggrieved at what bellew said and bellew feels rightly
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aggrieved at some of the very personal stuff that david haye has aimed at him. it is genuine. at the end of the fight, they will not shake hands or cuddle up breaks plenty of boxing's rules. what about the fight itself, away from all this hype and selling? what will we see in the ring? does bellew have what it takes to step up from cruiserweight and take on david haye at heavyweight? he certainly does, if he can survive the first minute. he needs to make it past the first three orfour he needs to make it past the first three or four rounds to make it a great fight it up it will be phenomenal, notjust because of the animosity but because of the difference in the way they fight and the fact you know bellew has to survive and david haye has to get to him quick, certainly by the end of the fourth round and that's what makes it so intriguing. it isjust a pity we've crossed and blurred so many lines and upset so many people. these two guys are terrific boxers and have been terrific family men
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and have been terrific family men and unfortunately, and i have to say this, they haven't really sold this fight the same way but i'm on brea kfast tv fight the same way but i'm on breakfast tv talking about it and i've been covering this for 30 years andi i've been covering this for 30 years and i think you've only have me in here twice, one of which was to talk about a dead muhammad ali. that's how big it has become. we will definitely be having you back! who do you think we will see winter night? i think david haye wins inside the first two rounds. we may be talking about that with you tomorrow. you can see commentary on tonight's fight on bbc radio 5 live. that was amazing, wasn't it? should we book for tomorrow now? he was talking about tony bellew and david haye selling this fight but i think he sold it! it is so theatrical! that is all part of it. sarah has the weather.
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we have all sorts going on today. there is blue sky and sunshine, not everywhere, also heavy showers, longer spells of rain and some hill snow. low—pressure is the real driving force of the weather at the moment and that is bringing a weather front sitting across scotla nd weather front sitting across scotland during the day. some hill snow and windy weather. the worst of the rain clearing away from northern ireland to be scattered, heavy downpours. many western areas seeing heavy showers but for central and eastern areas, not a bad day. let's ta ke eastern areas, not a bad day. let's take a detailed look up three p. there is the rain across northern and north—eastern parts of scotland, and north—eastern parts of scotland, an improvement to the south—west of scotla nd an improvement to the south—west of scotland but heavy showers, still. central and eastern parts of england, after a bit of early rain, it clears up, so not a bad day with temperatures up to 12 in the sunnier spells but further west, heavy downpours across wales and the south—west of england, some
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thunderstorms possible as well as strong and gusty winds. windy, showery weather continues into this evening and overnight across western parts of the country. still some heavy rain to the far north of scotla nd heavy rain to the far north of scotland but elsewhere, a drier interlude moving through the overnight period but through the early hours of sunday, another band of rain approaching from the south—west. that is the weatherford you can see here. during sunday, it will head west to east across england and wales but meanwhile low— pressure england and wales but meanwhile low—pressure tends to clear away from scotland. for scotland, and improved day compared to today. showers for northern ireland but we will see the bulk of the rain pushing west to east across england and wales, followed by further heavy downpours heading into the south—west. plenty going on with the weather. temperatures in the north around seven, whereas further south it isa around seven, whereas further south it is a bit milder, ten or 11. a quick look ahead into the start of next week, still pretty unsettled with low—pressure coming in from the atla ntic with low—pressure coming in from the atlantic but there will be a hint of
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dry and bright weather and perhaps by tuesday a bit more sunshine. thank you. we could all do with more sleep. it is a problem that parents tackle every night up and down the country — how to make sure your kids get a good night's sleep. the figures are stark because a panorama investigation has found a big rise ofa number of investigation has found a big rise of a number of youngsters notjust not sleeping but being admitted to hospital with sleep disorders. but getting into a good routine can be tough, as the parents of toddler elise have been finding out. was that you last night? will it be you to my? stella has been in touch on facebook. she has nine children. how she has time to get on facebook, i'm not sure! she says the first and last of the nine a nightmare and from the age of nine months, would not go to sleep. she would be for two or three hours every evening. she there was no solution. she makes
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a point about kids being different because she has nine and has a similar happen with all of them but the first and the last were problematic. terry has been in touch from basingstoke and he says that to get his young grandsons is that he would read him a book and eventually he would be fast asleep and so would terry! even when you are watching that and see people yawn, you start to yawn! when you get to that stage where your children get to bed after you, that is a rite of passage! get in touch in the usual way. there is more on that with the figures from hospitals in panorama: sleepless britain at 8:30pm, just before bedtime, on monday on bbc one. tens of thousands of bank staff across the uk are to be given special training by the police to help spot fraud. it comes after a growing number of cases where people who are often elderly or vulnerable are duped by fraudsters into taking thousands of pounds out of their accounts over the counter. bbc radio 4's money box programme has been looking into this. presenter lesley curwen joins us now from our london newsroom.
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good morning. can you tell us a bit about what type of fraud we are talking about? we are talking about the kind of fraud where people are duped into going into their bank branch to take out large amounts of cash over—the—counter to pay to the fraudsters. they're often older people. this could be any kind of scam, and investment scam, a romance scam. quite often, it is rogue traders who persuade people to hand over large amounts of cash. one case study that we had on money box recently was a couple in their 60s who took out a total of £100,000 from one bank branch. they went in 32 times over the course of eight weeks and at no point were they stopped all were the police called. all this money went to fraudsters. utters a shocking story. what are
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the police doing about it? together the police doing about it? together the police doing about it? together the police and the banks have come up the police and the banks have come up with something called the banking protocol mbeya training bank staff to look for specific signs that someone may have been victim to a fraudster. they can ring the police up fraudster. they can ring the police up and give a special password. the police who have been trained in this undertake that they will go to the bank branch or to the person's house immediately. shouldn't they be doing this already, looking out for spitzer persist behaviour?m this already, looking out for spitzer persist behaviour? it is a fair pointand spitzer persist behaviour? it is a fair point and one we put to a body that represents the banking industry in this area. they said this formalises the links between the police and the banks and means that when bank staff are worried, police can act straightaway. this was a trial so do you think it will be rolled out more extensively?m trial so do you think it will be rolled out more extensively? it is definitely going to be rolled up more extensively. i can give you a few brief figures. there were 16
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arrests just a mistrial in london and £1.4 million was stopped from going out of people's accounts so, yes, this will be rolled out across the country. and for those who might have vulnerable or elderly relatives who they are worried about, have you got advice for things to watch out for? i would watch out for people seeming more worried about life and their finances. if they've got a builder or a trader coming in, their finances. if they've got a builder ora trader coming in, check it out. don't just builder ora trader coming in, check it out. don'tjust assume that this trade is somebody who is reputable. find out about them, talk to your relative about it, make sure they're not being pressured, because this can bea not being pressured, because this can be a form of abuse if it goes on. thank you very much. that is leslie, the presenter of money box, which will be on radio 4 at midday. joe orton's plays shocked, amused and challenged the public‘s
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attitudes towards gay people, in a time when homosexuality was illegal. to mark 50 years since he was killed by his gay lover, orton's most famous play, what the butler saw, is being put on stage in his home town of leicester. our midlands correspondent sima kotecha went along to the rehearsals. i went to the ordinary sort of school that all children go to and then i didn't get the 11—plus, because i was rather dim at school, actually. well, i wasn't actually dim, but i didn't get the 11—plus, anyway. joe orton, speaking just days before he was murdered by his lover, kenneth halliwell. to some, the playwright is a gay icon who challenged attitudes through black humour and witty scripting. why's he wearing my uniform? he isn't a boy, he's a girl. why is she wearing my shoes? she isn't a girl, she's a boy. what the butler saw, for many, is one of his best plays. at the curve theatre in his hometown of leicester,
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actors rehearse a scene packed with sexual innuendo, one of orton's typical hallmarks. it is contentious. i mean, it is subversive. i mean, he is having a go at the way society is organised. his younger sister never knew he was gay when he was alive. of course, during that era, homosexuality was illegal and punishable by jail sentences. what are your thoughts around homosexuality in society today? we're not there yet, as they say. there are still cultures that are not accepting of being gay, which i think is very, very sad because, you know, we don't always choose who we're going to fall in love with. oh, this place is like a madhouse! doctor, you must help me. i keep seeing naked men! orton's critics sometimes describe him as confused and perverted but his discussion
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of taboos in 19605 britain is often praised. there is still so much inequality, so much injustice, when it comes to sexuality, gender identity, which is a massive theme within the play, women's equality, freedom generally, so it feels like it was ahead of its time then and it certainly is ahead of its time now. his family understand that not everybody is a fan of his work but they hope his central themes of equality and diversity are embraced by his audiences. i always hope that the world is more accepting of people who want to step outside of what we consider normal. sima kotecha, bbc news, leicester. still to come on breakfast...
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a bicycle, an ice rink and mike bushell. what could possibly go wrong? we'll be trackside as mike tries out one of scandinavia's most popular new sports — ice biking. stay with us — headlines are next. hello this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and jon kay. victory for the democratic unionists, but only by a single seat in northern ireland's snap elections. sinn fein were the big winners with a significant surge of support, as they closed the gap on the dup. good morning. it's saturday 4th march. we'll be live in belfast in the next few minutes. also ahead: mercedes recalls 75,000 cars in the uk because of a risk of them catching fire.
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sweeping away the small print. the chancellor promises a crackdown on consumer rip—offs. could the uk quit the eu without paying a penny? a house of lords report says the government isn't legally obliged to contribute to the cost of brexit. in sport, a century from captain eoin morgan sets up england for victory, in the first one—day international against west indies.
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