Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 7, 2017 7:45pm-8:00pm GMT

7:45 pm
they are genuine with the league of course a major embarrassment to the central intelligence agency. i have been speaking to an expert in military intelligence analysis research at the city university of london and i began by asking him whether he thought the documents we re whether he thought the documents were genuine. probably. they look very professional in the way that they have been developed and the titles of them would give me the impression that they were being developed by a secure agency. this is from the cia centre for cyber intelligence. how on earth could it have been hacked, was it hacked?” doubt it. because the cia systems are probably some of the best protected in the world. if you think about the amount that has been leaked, all the software will be in files all over their own systems. so to be able to hack in and find the
7:46 pm
files, assemble the files, download the files, before the cia systems have identified a penetration, is very unlikely. my view is that this is an insider and what they have done is they have been entrusted, they have collected the information together and loaded it onto a flash drive and they could remove that whenever they wished. that is my view, if it did come from there, thatis view, if it did come from there, that is how they would have got it out. so, and inside jobjust like every snowdon? exactly. we have to trust our workers and if we then start to put in so many checks that the workers can be viewed in everything they do, then we fall foul of the human rights. we can only put in a certain amount of security checks and a certain amount of vetting. the cia would have certainly vetted anyone, this was probably a contractor. this is the cia centre for cyber intelligence
7:47 pm
where this information seems to have come from. so, in these thousands of pages of documents, are details of how the cia actually spy effectively using computers themselves.” how the cia actually spy effectively using computers themselves. i think that the public here would probably expect us to be able to wage information warfare and we are being attacked from all over the world at the moment and we have to respond. so you would think that the public would think is very delinquent if we did not produce the software. they are protecting the nation, protecting the people, protecting the infrastructure, so yes they will have this and they will use it. move to require councils in england is to identify whether they have spare capacity to house unaccompanied child refugees has been rejected by mps. unaccompanied child refugees has been rejected by mp5. the conservative heidi alam said
7:48 pm
ministers had not consulted properly with local authorities when opting to close the resettlement scheme this month but mps voted against her amendment by 287—267. let's talk now to lord dubs who is standing in westminster. thank you forjoining us. westminster. thank you forjoining us. one suspects your disappointment in this, it must be quite deep.” us. one suspects your disappointment in this, it must be quite deep. i am disappointed. i had hoped that the amendment would pass. the government have made all sorts of excuses for stopping the scheme, the main one being that local authorities could not take any more children. i have talked to lots of local authority leaders and i have learned from others and quite a lot of local authorities in england and scotland are willing to take more children. it is not a very honest excuse on the part of the government. you say it is an excuse, what is the real reason you believe for them not wanting to do this? i do not know.
7:49 pm
normally, i try and understand what the government will try to do and evenif the government will try to do and even if i do not agree with them i try to understand what is going on but i do not. none of the reasons stand up to scrutiny. they are losing a lot of goodwill for the sake of not giving safety and homes to maybe two or 3000 children, it is a small number and you look like a mean country because of it. you say mean, but the government would argue that it mean, but the government would argue thatitis mean, but the government would argue that it is doing as much as any nation to help syrian refugees, that it is investing a lot of money in camps in the region to help resettle people, while the war rages. you cannot deny that the british government is involved, quite deeply in trying to deal with the situation. i agree that the british government is a major donor for supporting the camps and that is good. we are taking a small number of people, 20,000 overfive years,
7:50 pm
plus a few thousand more from the region, but that is not very many when you think of the million that they brought in in germany and the numbers in sweden and austria. we are talking about unaccompanied child refugees, some of them i have seen child refugees, some of them i have seenin child refugees, some of them i have seen in france and in camps in greece in january, seen in france and in camps in greece injanuary, bitterly cold, these are children who are not protected, they are vulnerable, they could be lured into criminality, prostitution, they could be trafficked, all i have ever argued is that britain should take its share of these vulnerable young people. and my amendment was intended to do that and the government have renate dunnett and they have suddenly said, 350, that is it. thank you forjoining us. the government has suffered another defeat in the house of lords over the process of leaving the european union. peers have voted for an amendment to the brexit bill which calls for parliament to be given a meaningful vote on a final deal. our
7:51 pm
chief political correspondent is at west minister. over to you. downing street insists that the prime minister is still on track to trigger article 50 to get those formal negotiations going, by the end of this month, but the lords have tried and succeeded for the second time now to make changes to this quite sure that bill and i am joined now by their leader of the liberal democrats to discuss it further. the minister said we had promised to give parliament a boat, you do not need this amendment.” promised to give parliament a boat, you do not need this amendment. i am not entirely sure that the british people necessarily trust the government to deliver on what they said they would do and of course what they have hinted at, or indeed said they would do is give members of parliament a vote on whether or not we accept the deal.
7:52 pm
however bad it might be or accept no deal whatsoever. it is about having a choice between playing russian roulette with five barrels rather than for and that is why it is right for the lords to push for democracy. that is the irony, if the house of lords is voting for more scrutiny, more democracy, than the supposedly elected house that is doing its best to keep parliament out of this. surely theresa may will try and get the best deal that she possibly can. she is not going to come back here with one that she does not think will work. what other option is there? you want parliament to say that we will stay in the eu?” there? you want parliament to say that we will stay in the eu? i do not doubt her desire to get a good deal. i doubt their ability to get one. if you have triggered article 50 at this point, you basically have jumped out of the plane without a parachute on your back. if the parachute on your back. if the parachute does not appear from somewhere, you will go splat at some point and it is a poor negotiating tactic but that is the one she has chosen. in the end there will be a deal, the return to parliament and the british people, at some point in
7:53 pm
the british people, at some point in the future. it isjust a question of who signs that off, should be politicians or the people and we believe it should be the british people who get to decide the final deal. as the minister said, what happens parliament were to say no? are you suggesting that parliament could vote to say, actually we do not want a deal, we want to stay in the eu? my view is that neither parliament nor the courts nor anything other than the body of the british people can change the direction of this country in terms of whether we are or are not leaving the eu parliament should be able to say the deal is unacceptable because it is notjust a case of whether she wants the best deal, what counts is the best deal? something like 90% of the best deal? something like 90% of the british people if you believe the british people if you believe the polling on this believe that being in the single market is a good thing and therefore a majority of those who voted leave wanted to stay in the single market and she is not even bidding for that. it seems
7:54 pm
right that parliament should be able to say to the government, at the point that the deal is returned, that we do not like it, go back, negotiate something better because we are leaving the european union, it should be to something that is the better for our country. how hard are you prepared to dig in your heels? ye have more peers than mps, are you prepared to keep going on this? it sounds like labour will not prolong the agony. the great shame is that we have a conservative government taking us off the cliff edge of a ha rd taking us off the cliff edge of a hard brexit that was not on the ballot paper and hand—in—hand with them is the labour party. the liberal democrats will continue to have the courage of our convictions and say that leaving the single market was never on the ballot paper whether people meant it or not. the british people have given the government mandate to leave the european union but what theresa has doneis european union but what theresa has done is trusting that. in the end, the only people who have the right to sign off on this is not the politicians, it should be the people through a referendum on the terms of a deal. we will set by that news arab members in both houses of parliament to try and deliver on that. thank you. all eyes will turn to the house of commons. i have spoken to three conservatives this evening who have not yet said what they are preparing to do on that
7:55 pm
vote, some of them are still minded to vote against the government and we will have to see if that rebellion grows, but they are looking for more assurances from the government and they do not understand by the government cannot accept the amendment if it has promised and wants to stick to its pledge of giving parliament a vote at the end of this process. thank you. a coroner has confirmed that the singer george michael died of natural causes. the 53—year—old was found dead at his home in oxfordshire on christmas day. the coroner said that the singer was suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy with myocarditis and a fatty liver. there is for now no need for an inquest. let us talk now to my guess from the british heart foundation. good evening, thank you for being with us. just explain to us, if you could, cardiomyopathy, what is it? it is the condition where the heart's main chamber, the main ventricle becomes enlarged and wig, asa main ventricle becomes enlarged and wig, as a consequence, patience will often present with heart failure like some gems, shortness of breath, but they can also get rhythm
7:56 pm
disturbances as a consequence. myocarditis. it is due to an inflammation of the heart, where the heart muscle becomes inflamed, it can cause scarring as one heart muscle becomes inflamed, it can cause scarring as one of the consequences. he had medical problems in the past, we know he had pneumonia and only just problems in the past, we know he had pneumonia and onlyjust managed to survive by all accounts. what could have caused dilated cardiomyopathy with myocarditis? the commonest cause would be post viral and could be related to the infection. we also know that heavy alcohol consumption can bea know that heavy alcohol consumption can be a cause along with an inherited cause and it is possible that he may have had a pre—disposition because of the gene abnormality but the commonest causes would be viral, alcohol and genetic. genetics as well. a fatty liver, the coroner also said. what other general causes of that usually?
7:57 pm
usually that this lifestyle related, alcohol may be a factor, but usually what you eat and exercise, all of these things, most importantly exercise, all of these things, most im porta ntly lifestyle contributes to changes in the liver that we see and it is usually the condition were more than about five or 10% of the liver becomes replaced by fat tissue. could any of this have been prevented ? tissue. could any of this have been prevented? it tissue. could any of this have been prevented ? it is tissue. could any of this have been prevented? it is difficult to know andi prevented? it is difficult to know and i do not have access to the details of the patient. usually with this condition, if patients present with symptoms like shortness of breath, then a lot of technology and test now can pick it up early and there is very good and effective treatment for it. it is about recognising the symptoms early and intervening. it is good to talk to you. thank you forjoining us. we have a full hour of news coming up but first time for a look at the weather. hello, a spell of rain
7:58 pm
pushing east over all parts, breezy with that as well, gales developing in the north of scotland, notjust rain, some snow over england, but especially scotland. a lot of that rain will clear later in the night but it is still there in the morning, across parts of england, the midlands and temperatures are bit up and down but it is going to be milder than it was last night. strong to gale—force winds in scotla nd strong to gale—force winds in scotland tomorrow with plenty of showers, some heavy, not many for the central belt of scotland, sunny spells here and may be dry and sunny for northern ireland. the midlands will see dry and sunny weather but south of that, in wales and the south of that, in wales and the south of that, in wales and the south of england, cloudy with outbreaks of rain. a bit milder, thatis outbreaks of rain. a bit milder, that is a theme as the week goes on, temperatures wildly into double figures. a fine and dry day for many of us on thursday, but on friday, although it is still miles, it will be cloudier. this is bbc news — i'm clive myrie.
7:59 pm
the headlines at 8pm. the government suffers its second defeat in a week in the house of lords over brexit. peers want a bigger say for parliament on any final deal. this is exactly what theresa may said she wanted to do and all the house of lords has been doing tonight is debating that and putting it on paper. i'm disappointed but i expect it will be overturned in the house of commons. money for new grammar schools in england is expected to be
8:00 pm
announced in tomorrow's budget. the cia refuses to comment as the website wikileaks publishes what it claims is evidence the agency uses a wide range of computer hacking tools. also in the next hour — the illegal trade in rhino horn takes a dramatic turn, with a raid on a zoo in paris. poachers broke into the wildlife park and shot dead rhino vince,

27 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on