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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 8, 2017 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the chancellor prepares for his first budget, with an upbeat message on the economy. there is expected to be extra money for social care, but there will be few other giveaways. all this week i have been hearing from different generations about what they want from the budget. today we are talking to the post—war baby boomers and beyond so i am at a retirement village in bournville. good morning, it is wednesday 8 march. also this morning: lord heseltine is sacked as a government advisor after rebelling in a vote over brexit. could our televisions be spying on us? claims that the cia have developed new technology to eavesdrop on conversations.
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in sport: more pressure on arsene wenger, as arsenal are humiliated in the champions league. they are thrashed 5—1 by bayern munich in the last 16, 10—2 on aggregate. the last of the dambusters. we return to germany with the only surviving member of the air crews that carried out one of the second world war‘s most daring raids. and carol has the weather. thank you, good morning. the weather has a 3—way split across the country. windy conditions and showers in the north, dry and bright in the central swathes of the uk and in the central swathes of the uk and in the south, mild, cloudy and damp. i will have more details about 15 minutes. good morning. first, our main story: an upbeat assessment of the economy, but a warning that more austerity lies ahead — they are expected to be the key messages when the chancellor, philip hammond, delivers first budget later today. he will stress that the government won't shirk difficult decisions
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to deal with the deficit. but he is expected to find extra money for social care in england, and to help soften the impact of changes to business rates. here is our political correspondent eleanor garnier. here's the man in westminster as spreadsheet fill. the cautious treasury chief in charge of the numbers. so is the chancellor does his sons, what has he got to consider? well, the big issue that is dominating its brexit, as the uk prepares to leave the eu, esther hammond says he is focused on keeping the economy resilient, with a warning this is no time for spending sprees. even so, there will be cash for new free schools and money to shake up vocational and technical training for 16 to 18 —year—olds. but the chancellor is under pressure to spend more on public services. with claims of social care is in crisis and repeated calls for more money for
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the nhs. plus, pleased to help soften the blow for small firms hit a change in business rates. mr hammond might have chucked out his predecessor's timetable for dealing with the deficit, but both he and the prime minister still believe balancing the books is the only way to ensure a stable economy that is growing. and eleanor is in downing street this morning. i suppose you won't know if there are any surprises, but might there be? i don't think farewell. if you are expecting any fireworks, you are probably going to be disappointed. i am told, though, this will an up its speech. the chancellor will save the economy has proved to be resilient, but he will also admit that many families are feeling the pinch. i think what is going to become clear later is that austerity has not gone away. there are still cuts to come, many with very human consequences,
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and also with racks at around the corner we should expect the chancellor to keep back some of that spending power, not commit it all 110w spending power, not commit it all now while the future looks so uncertain —— brexit. he wants to in his own words have enough fuel in the tank is the uk leads the eu. labour is pressing the government to spend more on the nhs and social ca re spend more on the nhs and social care and all the signs are that the chancellor will find more money for social care across england and a bit of extra cash to soften the impact of extra cash to soften the impact of those changes to business rates. but despite economic forecast looking like they are going to be up, this is not going to be a giveaway budget. someone has a good parking space, right outside! two parking space, right outside! two parking spaces! i am strategically placed in this very small gap between the two cars. it gets busy on budget day in downing street. do we know whose cars they are?
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on budget day in downing street. do we know whose cars they are ?|i on budget day in downing street. do we know whose cars they are? i think very important people's cars. i'm glad they left just very important people's cars. i'm glad they leftjust enough space for you. and we will be chatting to steph about the budget in around 20 minutes' time. she has been looking at what different generations want from the chancellor. today she is at a retirement village in birmingham. lord heseltine has been sacked as a government adviser after rebelling in a vote over brexit. the government suffered a second defeat in the house of lords, as peers backed calls for a meaningful parliamentary vote on the final terms of withdrawal. ministers say they will seek to overturn the move when the bill returns to the commons. here is our political correspondent chris mason. many of your lordships... many of your lordships. .. just like ken clarke in the commons, lord heseltine was determined to remain vociferously pro—european after the referendum, just as before. vociferously pro—european after the referendum, just as beforem ensures that parliament has the critical role in determining the future that we will bequeath to generations of young people, and i
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urge your lordships to support the amendment. but hours later, he learned he had been fired from five government advisory roles. this is not myjudgement. this is the prime minister exercising her perfectly legitimate right to get rid of the opposition in any way she thinks appropriate. and i respect that right, whether it is the wise thing to do asa right, whether it is the wise thing to do as a matter for her, not for me. his sacking illustrates downing street's determination to pointedly press ahead with brexit. next week the bill heads down the corridor, act to the commons. will conservative rebels there be up for a fight? i will continue to believe that that is the right thing to do, for there to be a vote in both houses, deal or no deal. and if i have to vote against my government again, iwill do have to vote against my government again, i will do it. we have
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discussed, deliberated and scrutinised both of these issues before, at length, and we still declined to accept the amendments that have been passed in the house of lords. we have had no new arguments, they have come up with no new ideas so i expect the house of commons to pass the bill unamended. whatever happens next week, the prime minister does remain on course to be able to begin brexit negotiations before the end of this month. we shall be speaking to lord heseltine on the programme after 8am this morning. a former head of the cia has said an apparent leak of thousands of the agency's files is incredibly damaging. the documents, which have been published by the website wikileaks, appear to reveal attempts to hack into electronic devices to gather intelligence. one file suggests the cia and m15 had discovered how to record conversations using a microphone in a samsung smart tv, even when it appeared to be turned off. the cia has refused to comment on the documents' authenticity, but the agency's former director michael hayden said
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he was very concerned. this seems to be an incredibly damaging leak in terms of the tactics, techniques, procedures and tools that were used by the central intelligence agency to conduct legitimate foreign intelligence. in other words, it has made my country and my country's friends less safe. police searching for missing raf gunner corrie mckeague are probing whether a bin lorry is linked to his disappearance. the vehicle was spotted near where the 23—year—old was last seen, and carried a much heavier load than first thought. a search of a landfill site in cambridgeshire is under way. mr mckeague was last seen on a night out on 2a september. a british backpacker who was allegedly held captive for weeks and subjected to repeated sexual assaults has been released from hospital in australia. the 22—year—old woman is being comforted by herfamily, after being found on sunday.
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a 22—year—old australian man has been charged with a number of offences, and has been remanded in custody. the number of women getting top jobs at sporting bodies is declining, according to a report out today. the women in sport study found just under half of organisations have failed to meet new government guidelines calling for senior positions to be 30% female. katie gornall reports. the profile of women playing sport has never been higher. but step off the pitch and into the boardroom, and progress is more limited. today the charity women in sport released an audit of 68 national governing bodies receiving public money. they found that nearly half didn't meet the new target of 30% gendered diversity on their boards, including those in football, cricket, rugby
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and cycling. nine had no women at all in senior leadership roles, while one organisation, the british taekwondo council, has no women in any leadership position. public investment in sport, in any sports organisation, is dependent on organisations reaching the standards of the code. so anybody who isn't able to reach them or doesn't have an adequate plan to do so won't attract public investment. the fa has long been criticised for failing to move with the times. faced with having millions of pounds of funding cuts, this week it proposed reforms to appoint more women to its board. england hockey also needs to diversify, although their ceo told me they will have no problem meeting the new government target. we will over time as board members leave look at recruiting people that still meet the skill set, but enable us to meet the skill set, but enable us to meet the skill set, but enable us to meet the recommendations within the guidelines. many sports have reaped the benefits of public investment. now they are being told to better
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reflect the people who fund them. we should say happy international women's day. we are speaking to gillian anderson, i am really happy about that, particular yacht this day. a hunt is under way in france for poachers who broke into a zoo near paris and shot dead a white rhino, before sawing off and stealing one of its horns. french police say the body of the four—year—old animal, called vince, was found yesterday morning. a rhino horn can fetch around £40,000 on the black market. it is believed to be the first time poachers have killed an animal in a european zoo. we will be speaking to somebody about that later. chocolate bars like kit kat, yorkie and aero will contain 10% less sugar by next year. that is according to their manufacturer, nestle, who say sugar will be replaced with higher quantities of existing ingredients, or other, non—artificial ingredients.
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they say it could have a significant impact on public health. when residents in a town in canada went to fill the cattle, they got a bit of a surprise. the water was pink. really pink, notjust a little bit pink. it happened because of a side—effect of a common water treatment chemical, apparently. in a statement, the mayor of the town says there is no risk to public health. i wonder if you gave children pink water, whether they might be more likely to think that is great, i want to drink it? it is like when you put dye and potatoes, and things like that. i remember doing an interview a few years ago... are your ears all right?|j will try and sort it out. have you got voices in your head?” will try and sort it out. have you got voices in your head? i did an interview at a water treatment
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works, a great interview, and the quy works, a great interview, and the guy said to me, if it is brown, get out of town. that is the rules for water. that might make sense, and the same might go for yellow. jessica, i am sorry. very distracted today! i have some sport for you. can we move away from the pink water? it is not great news for arsenal. you said they had very little chance yesterday. arsenal. you said they had very little chance yesterdaylj arsenal. you said they had very little chance yesterday. i did. it was embarrassing, wasn't it? little chance yesterday. i did. it was embarrassing, wasn't mm little chance yesterday. i did. it was embarrassing, wasn't it? it was. they spoke about the referee trying to ta ke they spoke about the referee trying to take away from the fact that his tea m to take away from the fact that his team was humiliated in the champions league. arsenal suffered humiliation in the champions league. they were knocked out in the last—16 stage again, after being thrashed 5—1 at home to bayern munich, 10—2 on aggregate. arturo vidal grabbed the fourth and fifth goals for the german champions, completing the heaviest defeat at the emirates stadium. it is the seventh season in a row that arsenal have exited the competition at this stage.
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england's women also struggled against german opponents. they lost 1—0 to germany in their final shebelieves cup match in washington. team sky have admitted mistakes were made around the delivery of a medical package to sir bradley wiggins, but deny breaking anti—doping rules. the team have been unable to provide records to back up the claim wiggins was given a legal decongestant at a race in france in 2011. and billy vunipola is expected to start for england against scotland in the six nations on saturday, after three months out with a knee ligament injury. he is included in the 24—man training squad. good to see billy back in the squad. thank you very much, hang around for
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a look at the papers in a moment. looks glorious. for some it will be, but not for all of us. today we have rain in the south, some of it will be heavy with some drizzle, sunshine in the north but in the far north it is also showery with stronger winds. you can see this cloud streaming across our shores this morning, some is rain bearing cloud courtesy of a weather front that will continue to go south through the day. at times rain on it will rejuvenate. at the other end of the country, tightly squeezed isobars, pretty windy at the moment across the western isles and here too we have wintry showers. a lot of dry weather. but nippy at the moment. the same in northern ireland, afair moment. the same in northern ireland, a fair bit of cloud, the same in northern england and the odd shower coming out of that. our weather front, through the midlands,
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east anglia, wales and southern counties. it is producing rain and some drizzle, and i as i mentioned through the day, as it drifts further east and south, you will find it will wax and wane. behind it, lovely bright skies across northern england, northern ireland, sunshine in parts of scotland and through the day the strong winds will move up in the direction of the northern isles, so later on the wind is really picking up, gusting to gales, even locally severe gales. —— winds. maybe 12 or 13 in northern england. through the evening and overnight, this front is slow to clear but it eventually does, taking rain into the channel islands. blustery winds through the english channel, where it will turn around and take another swipe tomorrow at the south—west. behind it, still quite mild but as we go further north, we still have the showers,
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still quite windy and we could see a widespread frost in parts of scotla nd widespread frost in parts of scotland on the other side of the rain in northern england and east anglia, something to bear in mind for tomorrow morning. talking of tomorrow morning, here's our weather in the channel islands, taking a punt at cornwall for a time and as we move north of that, a lot of dry weather. a fair bit of sunshine after the nippy start, brightening up after the nippy start, brightening up in the south, tomorrow to the north of london, we could get 15 or 16. as we go further north, look at stornoway, ten, not bad at all! there's the weather front on thursday, again moving up the western side of the uk, taking some of its rain with it. the squeeze in isobars, windy to the west but other than that, on friday, we hang on to milder colours, yellow and amber. by the time we get to the end of the week, things will be going down a touch. here's the rain on friday,
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brighter skies to the south—east. thank you very much, carol. simulator. carol, i want to ask you about what you do with your spaghetti bolognese. to eat it you mean? yes. i keep it in the cupboard. do you add anything to it, there's a debate about what mary berry has done, white wine and cream.|j about what mary berry has done, white wine and cream. ijust boil it normally! i'm in the back room slowly when it comes to cooking. what do you do with the actual source? ina what do you do with the actual source? in a can? i'm not delia smith or mary berry! i'm with you! thank you very much indeed! masterchef? never ever get carol kirkwood on masterchef! she has a lot to learn! bless you, carol! the reason why we are talking about thatis the reason why we are talking about that is the front page of many of
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the papers this morning, mary barely. it has gone down quite well with italians. —— mary berry. this is the main story on the daily mail and i'll be speaking to michael heseltine later on the programme. vince the rhino in france, he was killed and his task was sawn off with a chainsaw. it was a horrendous story. we will talk about that later and the daily telegraph previewing the budget. they were halfway through the second horn when they we re through the second horn when they were rumbled. a story about george michael on the daily mirror, and another story we aren't talking about this morning, m15 bugging smart tvs, news from america about wikileaks smart tvs, news from america about wikilea ks and the smart tvs, news from america about wikileaks and the potential for them to hack into your tv even though it is turned off to listen to conversations and even use the webcam. if you're a conspiracy
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theorist, it's your worst nightmare. it's like your phone turning on when we've said different words. that was ona we've said different words. that was on a north korea story as well! the front page of the times, that story again, british intelligence helped a p pa re ntly again, british intelligence helped apparently to hack tvs and phones. another picture of vince and zoos are stepping up security after poachers killed this captive rhino to re m ove poachers killed this captive rhino to remove his horn. jessica, what have you got, is it all linger out? that's the first story in the sun, wenger out after their humiliating defeat to bayern munich —— all wenger out. 10—2 on aggregate. fans in the stadium last night were holding up wenger out signs. in the stadium last night were holding up wenger out signslj thought you were going to say crying, but no. there were definitely tears. in the times, this is arsenal's worst defeat in europe
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in 53 seasons. i did mentionjust i'iow in 53 seasons. i did mentionjust now that believe vunipola is back for england after some months out with an injury —— billy vunipola. this is perhaps how we found out he might be back in the squad, we have pictures in the guardian of a whiteboard we think written by eddie jones, the head coach, and he has kind of given it away, can you see his name written in the training squad? looks like he is going to be starting. i remember nick faldo and the ryder cup pairings and he said it was going to be a sandwich list. look at this picture, taken by a photographer, this is in sydney as it is going across sydney harbour. the weather you can see is pretty grim, a wall of water, how has that photographer managed to not hold on for dear life and managed to steady himself to take the picture, amazing. the boat was ok and
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eve ryo ne amazing. the boat was ok and everyone was fine, which is the good news. we talked about mary berry, she has people upset for putting cream and white wine in her bolognese. as a masterchef finalist, how do you feel about that? i'm going to try it, you have to try these things. i do put in lee perrins, there are other things available. i put relish in. we all add other little bits. what about you? i put red wine in. i don't eat meat. i.e. the use corn —— i either use quorn. 0r meat. i.e. the use corn —— i either use quorn. or i meat. i.e. the use corn —— i either use quorn. 0r ijust use vegetables. or you could do what carol does and just boil it! this week in the run—up to today's budget, we've been looking at what different generations want from the chancellor. steph‘s been meeting young people in scotland, and families in yorkshire. today she's with baby boomers in birmingham. good morning. good morning to you
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and good morning, everyone and welcome to bournville gardens, a retirement village near birmingham and there's about 300 residents living here, a mix of different accommodation you can get, we've got some of the residents up early this morning that we will talk to later but there a mix of one or two bedroom apartments that can be rented or bought, it costs from £35 a week to £135 and that depends on your circumstances. they have a gym here, and of it suite, a barand a lounge, a village hall, a hairdressers overhear. it is all about making later life more co mforta ble about making later life more comfortable for people —— over here. i will be asking about what they wa nt i will be asking about what they want from the budget but also tim muffet has been out with a walking clu b muffet has been out with a walking club in north norfolk to meet some retirees and find out what they think. the walkers are welcome walking club
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of cromer, open to all ages, but today's group are all baby boomers, plus hillary's granddaughter, gabrielle. you're a lucky generation, aren't you? free education, cheap housing. we were very lucky and it is a strain on younger people nowadays that don't have those facilities that we had so readily i guess! i really enjoyed being a baby boomer. i think i was very lucky to be one! i'm grateful for so many things throughout my life. the access to education that i had, the ability to get a training and a vocation to get a job, the ease at which as a young man i could move from one job to another. by the time of the next general election, more than a third of the population of north norfolk will be aged over 65, it's one ofjust two regions in the uk where that's the case. compared to other generations, baby
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boomers are very likely to vote. politicians very keen to keep them happy. the baby boomers born between 1946 happy. the baby boomers born between 19116 and happy. the baby boomers born between 1946 and 1965 are nearing the end of their careers and approaching retirement. on the surface it looks like they've done quite well in recent yea rs like they've done quite well in recent years with things like the triple lock protecting the state pension, but the big concern for this group is social care. even for the wealthy it can wipe out their assets and for both rich and poor, the system is creaking. so, despite the system is creaking. so, despite the views and fresh air of cromer, there are clouds on the horizon. the general things that council supply are all being cut and that obviously includes care for the older league. people in cromer have to think very carefully about preparing for retirement —— elderly. carefully about preparing for retirement -- elderly. in this budget i would like more money spent on healthcare and elderly care and to pay for this money can be taken from defence. you need to look after
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the younger ones to prepare them for when they're older. in this year's budget i'd like to see more money spent on informal education and to achieve this i'd like to see cuts in benefits but blew in this budget i'd like to see more money spent on preparing our youth, our young people for the future. and in the budget i'd like to see less spent on the military. hillary organises walks across norfolk. for her, exercise is the best investment.” think it's important they spend their money on ways to keep people active. i think we should spend more on promoting physical education certainly in youngsters and less on the arts where i think it's not quite so important. soon we'll know if another ba by quite so important. soon we'll know if another baby boomer, the chancellor, philip hammond, agrees. tim muffet, bbc news, cromer. so, we will be finding out the a nswe i’s so, we will be finding out the a nswers to so, we will be finding out the answers to some of their questions and looking at those issues with
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experts later in the programme and we will talk to the residents we have here as well. wrong, one of the guys, have here as well. wrong, one of the guys, has told me he has to be in the gym in five so i have to get a move on “— the gym in five so i have to get a move on —— wrong. let's have a look around at the cafe, we have the pool as well with the darts. this is the village hall where they put on different productions, a certainly very busy place. and there is the allotment. lots going on and i will be here through the morning talking to the residents and experts about what we might hear today in the budget. presumably all having a nice tea right now! thank you very much, steph. lots to look forward to! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza ahmar. a gang have been found guilty of carrying out more than 100 crimes including of stealing high—end cars worth more than three million. two of the group of eight seen here, were caught on camera as they stopped at mcdonald's,
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in a crime spree between 2015 and last year. they broke into people's homes in east london and essex at night, stealing their car keys before making off with cars including range rovers and bmws. they will be sentenced at southwark crown court next month. the mayor is seeking new powers to restrict the amount of pollution from the capital's construction sites. it's thought that they're responsible for around 7% of the capital's emissions of nitrogen oxides as well as a big contributor to other dangerous diesel pollution. city hall wants more powers to encourage similar low—pollution technology. the artistic director of the southbank centre has been shortlisted for the veuve cliquot social purpose award, which recognises businesswomen with a social conscience. jude kelly took over at the arts venue in 2005, and founded the women of the world festival, which celebrates the achievement of women and girls. let's have a look at the travel situation now.
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minor the travel situation now. delays on the overground relating minor delays on the overground relating to what is going on on the trains. problems on greater anglia, stansted express and on the london overground. that's because one of the two londonbound lines between hackney downs and bethnal green is closed because of a problem with the track. that's caused quite a few cancellations. it could be closed all day. on the roads, in lewisham, gas works repairs on the a20 has been causing long delays the last few days. and that continues this morning. crystal palace park road remains shut near penge west station... that's because of that fuel spillage on monday night... but it should reopen later this morning. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. a mild start this morning, many places with damp conditions. we do have some outbreaks of rain. sunlight, drizzly, patchy rain but
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some heavy bursts of mixed in as well. a little bit breezy as we had through the afternoon, the maximum temperature, though, getting up to 12 or 13. overnight it is a drier picture. we still have a bit of a breeze so that will help prevent any mist and fog. you may still get a bit of murk overnight in this cloud. the minimum temperature, though, barely budging, not dropping down to far at all, a very mild night, between ten and 11. tomorrow morning, it is going to be another mild start. an improving day tomorrow, more in the way of sunny spells, a dry day, still quite breezy and a bit of cloud around but in the sunshine you're going to feel that warmth. the maximum getting up to 15. it is going to stay rather u nsettled to 15. it is going to stay rather unsettled through friday onwards, some outbreaks of rain, rather damp, rather drizzly. temperatures staying reasonably mild and an unsettled weekend on the cards, there is a lot of cloud around, it is going to be fairly breezy with one or two outbreaks of rain.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. hello this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. it is 6:30am on wednesday 8 march. coming up on breakfast today: we are with britain's only surviving dambuster, as he revisits the scene of his finest hour. jonnyjohnson is calling for bomber command to be awarded a campaign medal. it is international women's day, but we will be hearing how some of the uk's biggest sports still don't have enough women in charge. we will be live at lord's cricket ground to find out why. it was a role made famous by helen mirren. nowjane tennison is back on our screens, as prime suspect goes back in time. we will meet the star of a prequel, based in 1973. all that still to come. but now a summary of this morning's main news: the chancellor, philip hammond, will use his first budget later today to deliver an upbeat assessment of britain's economic prospects, but he will acknowledge that more austerity lies ahead. he will stress that the government
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won't shirk difficult decisions to deal with the deficit. but he is expected to find extra money for social care in england, and to help soften the impact of changes to business rates. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in downing street this morning. eleanor, can we expect any big surprises in this budget? i don't think there are going to be any big surprises or last minute fireworks. in fact, any big surprises or last minute fireworks. infact, if any big surprises or last minute fireworks. in fact, if that is what you are looking out for i think you will be disappointed. having said that, i think this will be quite an up that, i think this will be quite an up his speech. the chancellor i am told will talk about the economy being resilient, that it has stood up being resilient, that it has stood up after the referendum, but he is also going to admit that many families are facing the pinch and i think what is going to become clear later when the chancellor gives the budget is that austerity has not gone away. the budget is still very
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tight, and there are still cuts to come and with brexit on the horizon as well we shouldn't expect the chancellor to make all his spending commitments now. he is going to hold something back so that, in his words, he has got enough gas in the tank as britain leads the eu. labour is putting pressure on the government to spend more on the nhs and social care and i think all the signs are that the chancellor will find a bit of extra money for social ca re a cross find a bit of extra money for social care across england, but also to soften the impact of those business rate changes. despite the economic forecast looking up, i don't think this is going to be a giveaway budget. and we will be chatting to steph about the budget in around 20 minutes' time. she has been looking at what different generations want from the chancellor. today, she is at a retirement village in birmingham. lord heseltine has been sacked as a government adviser after rebelling over the legislation that will allow theresa may to begin the process of leaving the eu.
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ministers suffered a second defeat on the bill in the house of lords yesterday, but they will seek to overturn the amendments in the commons. a former head of the cia has said an apparent leak of thousands of the agency's files is incredibly damaging. the documents, which have been published by the website wikileaks, appear to reveal attempts to hack into electronic devices to gather intelligence. one file suggests the cia and m15 had discovered how to record conversations using a microphone in a samsung smart tv, even when it appeared to be turned off. the cia has refused to comment on the documents' authenticity, but the agency's former director michael hayden said he was very concerned. this seems to be an incredibly damaging leak, in terms of the tactics, techniques, procedures and tools that were used by the central intelligence agency to conduct legitimate foreign intelligence. in other words, it's made my country, and my country's
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friends, less safe. police searching for missing raf gunner corrie mckeague are investigating whether a bin lorry is linked to his disappearance. the vehicle was spotted near where the 23—year—old was last seen, and carried a much heavier load than first thought. a search of a landfill site in cambridgeshire is under way. mr mckeague was last seen on a night out on 24 september. chocolate bars like kit kat, yorkie and aero will contain 10% less sugar by next year. that is according to their manufacturer, nestle, who say sugar will be replaced with higher quantities of existing ingredients, or other, non—artificial ingredients. they say it could have a significant impact on public health. visitors on a tour of the white house were given a surprise when president trump turned up to greet them. in the first tour of the white house since his inauguration, he gestured for the children in the crowd to come over for a photograph. he posed with one boy under a portrait of his election rival,
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hillary clinton. i can't quite see whether borchardt is... there you go. —— where the portrait is. i think he has his own camera crew behind him, we are seeing the other side of things. i am sure you can find that video somewhere if you would like to see it. there was a lot of cheering, wasn't there? and in all the sport on international women's day, it is the top man at arsenal in trouble. yes, arsenal again thrashed by bayern munich in the champions league. and some fans were holding up league. and some fans were holding
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up arsene wenger out science. he is not doing well at the moment. -- out signs. arsenal were humiliated in the champions league. they suffered a 5—1 thrashing at home to bayern munich, losing 10—2 on aggregate, and exiting the competition at the last—16 stage again. patrick gearey reports. arsene wenger, you are killing the club. once they sang arsene wenger's name in happy voices. now the future of the manager is a matter for direct action, rather than just discussion. arsene wenger out went the chart. arsenal out the predictions. they were four goals down from the first leg. why not have a go? could they squeeze back into this? hope died with the referee. first bayern munich penalty and then a yellow card co ntroversially and then a yellow card controversially changed to read. his night was over, and so also was arsenal's. lewandowski started to fade to bayern munich grey. robben
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2-1. fade to bayern munich grey. robben 2—1. costa 3—1. in boxing day would call a match, instead vidal was creative. a recurring nightmare, vidal again, 10—2 on aggregate, 5—1 on the night. an unwanted history for their manager, and the most uncertain future. the referee, i think, was very, very powerfulfour bayern tonight. at the moment in the game where lewandowski, not only was it not a penalty, he was offside. and it was not a penalty, on top of that he gives us a red card. that kill is completely. overall i must say to bayern can be a good side, but tonight they can as well say thank you to the decisions of the referee in the second half. in last night's other champions league game, real madrid came from behind to beat napoli 3—1 on the night, 6—2 over two legs, to reach the quarter—finals.
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england women's didn't have much joy against german opponents, either. they lost 1—0 to germany in the shebelieves cup, anja mittag with the goal for the european champions, in the final match in washington. france won the invitational tournament. the first half we were a bit disappointed with ourselves. i think we set out to do what we'd done, and the second half i think we got to grips with the game, and that was much more the england that we want to be. i think we put germany on the back foot and i think in the end it came down to fine margins, and germany took their chance when they got it, and we didn't, u nfortu nately. team sky have admitted mistakes were made around the delivery of a medical package to sir bradley wiggins, but deny breaking anti—doping rules. the team have been unable to provide records to back up the claim wiggins was given a legal decongestant at a race in france in 2011. team sky say they take full responsibility for the failures.
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there is a boost for england ahead of their six nations game against scotland. billy vunipola will feature, after being confirmed in the matchday squad. the number eight returned from injury for saracens at the weekend. he has been included in a 24—man training party to prepare for the calcutta cup. england are looking for their 18th win in a row on saturday, against a scotland side captained byjohn barclay, with greig laidlaw out injured. and finally, eddie the eagle has gone back to the ski—jump, where he made his name. here he is in calgary, where his rose to fame in the 1988 winter olympics. he looks exactly the same. don't expect too much, though. his furthest jump was around 24 metres. that is not even half the distance he jumped 29 years ago. what do you think of this technique?
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in all fairness, it is terrifying, isn't it? and he is 30 years older than he was back then.” isn't it? and he is 30 years older than he was back then. i give him props for even attempting to fly off a steep slope like that. nice to see the eagle back on our television. the death of a white rhino at the hand of poachers in a paris zoo has left many conservationists in shock, as the hunt for its killer continues. vince, a four year old rhino, was shot and had one his horns hacked off, in what is believed to be the first such incident in europe. joining us from amsterdam is david williams—mitchell from the european association of zoos and aquaria. thank you very much for your time this morning. i know that this zoo is one of your members. what can you tell us about the investigation so
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far? what do you know? what we know so far is that the animal was shot the night before last, when intruders managed to break in through secure panels and through secure doors into the zoo, into the house where the rhinos were kept, and was shot three times in the head. they took one of the horns from the animal, but had to leave the other one behind, which the police believe means that they were either disturbed or their equipment malfunctioned. we know that they obviously had a plan for what they wa nted obviously had a plan for what they wanted to do, because they brought a chainsaw with them to cut that worn off, as well. i know this is the first time we have had an attack like this at a zoo in europe. is this something that your zoo is planned for, expecting to happen, or is this a bit of a game changer? no, imean, is this a bit of a game changer? no, i mean, obviously all of our members
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are aware of the threat of poaching, primarily because of the threat that is happening in africa and in the indian subcontinent. we all know how much rhino horn is worth, so obviously security measures for all rhino holders across a network is very high. and we still hear stories, as you say, about the demands for the horn of a rhino, the fa ct demands for the horn of a rhino, the fact that it can fetch thousands of pounds. why is it so special? is it still used for medicinal reasons in the far east? it is. i think it is mystifying, really, that this myth that it has any kind of medical effectiveness continues. it is made of the same substance that makes up your fingernails, of the same substance that makes up yourfingernails, so it has absolutely no scientifically backed findings which say that it has medical effectiveness, which makes ita medical effectiveness, which makes it a doubly senseless crime. it is shocking that an animal of this size and of this level of endangerment should be shot to essentially
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provide a product which does nothing. it seems that the poachers are willing to put themselves in danger, even going into the rhino enclosure to get this horn. do you think some of the zoos you look after and others as well will be increasing security in the light of what we have seen? well, like i said to you before, the security is already pretty high. we do take the threat extremely seriously. having said that, there is only so much you can do when you have armed gangs breaking into a zoo. if they are willing to be in an enclosure with a two ton animal and have the ability to shoot it and remove its horn, there is really only so much you can do. thank you very much for talking to us. and the pictures that you see, it is pretty grim, isn't it? carol has all the details, what's occurring? temperature wise we have a real variety, where we have a lot
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of cloud and rain, temperatures in hereford, cardiff and birmingham between ten and 12. yesterday the maximum in the south—western quarter was nine, overnight it actually went up. under clearer skies as we go northwards, with variable amounts of cloud, that temperature gets lower the further north you travel. —1 here. what we have today is some rain in the south, at times it will be heavy, at times drizzly and some sunshine in the north. overnight the first set of fronts have gone through, bringing some rain, the second front, the cold front, is going southwards and bringing some rain across southern areas, albeit fairly patchy. at the other end of the country it is windy, windy in the country it is windy, windy in the western isles, showers packing m, the western isles, showers packing in, falling as snow in the hills but for much of the rest of scotland, some sunshine. not a bad start and not as windy in northern ireland with some sunshine and variable cloud and the clouds breaking up to
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allow sunshine in northern england and north wales. here right across the south of wales and southern england we have our weather front and that is what is producing the rain. as we go through today that will drift further east and also south and in doing so what it will do is be heavy at times, it will pep up do is be heavy at times, it will pep up and then it will tend to lose some of its intensity. it will also be quite breezy across the south, a lot of low cloud around and general murk. temperatures up to 13 or 14 in london but not feeling particularly pleasant. as you go further north, northern england, northern ireland, a beautiful day, a lot of sunshine, temperatures could be higher than 12 or13, temperatures could be higher than 12 or 13, but more showers in northern scotla nd or 13, but more showers in northern scotland and through the day the strongest winds will move through the north—west highlands, into the north—west of scotland and into the northern isles. through the evening and overnight we have the showers that could be windy, meanwhile in the south the weather front drifts
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into the english channel. breezy with it and eventually we'll see some of the rain getting into the channel islands. mild in the south, colder in the north. as we head on through thursday itself, this weather front still very much in through thursday itself, this weatherfront still very much in in the english channel will start to pivot and take a swipe at cornwall. quite a bit of cloud associated with this, even so it will break up and someone this, even so it will break up and someone said to the north of london it could get to 16 tomorrow. north of that weather front in scotland, northern ireland, much of england and wales, a fine and dry day and feeling quite pleasant in the light winds. temperatures above where they should be at this stage in march. thanks very much. see you in half an hour or so. steph‘s been playing the generation game this week in the run—up to today's budget. today, herfocus is baby boomers, that's those born between the end of the second world war and the early ‘60s. she is at a retirement home. good
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morning. this is a retirement home with a village, it is very posh! abysses bournville gardens, i'm at the bar, too early for drinks but not for breakfast, some have come down to get their gardens. —— i'm at bournville gardens. there are one and 2—bedroom apartments really here but the point is making later life more comfortable. we have gathered some of them to have a chat about what they would like to hear from the chancellor. we have elaine, one of the early risers. good morning. good morning. what would you like to hear from the chancellor? i'm not sure i will hear anything positive from the chancellor because he hasn't got enough muggy to throw around, he will have to rob peter to pay paul, but i want to see him concentrating on social care so we don't get all the hospitals clogged up don't get all the hospitals clogged up with beds that are being used... there's not enough care in the home.
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there's not enough care in the home. there's not enough care in the home. there's no money. more importantly, with my grandchildren, i would like to see them on the housing ladder at some point and at the moment i can't see how that could happen. with the ca re area of see how that could happen. with the care area of things, that is something which... does it worry you? it does slightly, but for other people, we are fine here because we have saved and made sure that we have saved and made sure that we have got opportunities in our old age to look after ourselves. a lot of people don't have those opportunities. you're quite lucky. very lucky in fact. i will let you finish your bacon butty, thank you. ican finish your bacon butty, thank you. i can see you messing around in the background, i will see you in the gym shortly and putting you through your paces! their terrible! i have some guests here, marion, who has written a book about dealing with later life and we heard about elaine talking about social care and concern about her grandchildren,
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give us the wider picture on the concerns that elderly people have in later life? elaine is right, the key thing and the serious issue is social care, that is in a dire strait and i suspect philip hammond will announce some kind of measures but what we need is not kind of some sticking plaster, we need social ca re sticking plaster, we need social care on a sustainable basis because it isa care on a sustainable basis because it is a really important thing. you have to separate that from other concerns older people have. that is the really serious one. elaine mention her grandchildren and housing, we have come to a moment where there's a certain amount of resentment in the wider population about some of the universal benefits older people have. we have to look at those pensioner perks and think about them really seriously. a lot of them were introduced for no rhyme or reason, like the winter fuel
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allowa nce, or reason, like the winter fuel allowance, some of these things have got to be means tested. when you say think about them you think may be cut back on some of them because older people are getting too much? the thing is, some older people are tremendously wealthy and some older people aren't. you have to make sure those who aren't wealthy have got a good life. but the fact is, if you're a millionaire you get a winter fuel payment and your tv licence if you're over 75, you have to look at these things and the thing i would like to see philip hammond look at is inheritance tax. george osborne in 2015 massively increased the exemption for inheritance tax so if you're married or in inheritance tax so if you're married orina inheritance tax so if you're married or in a civil partnership and you pass on your main home to your children you get £1 million exemption from inheritance tax, which bumps up the price of housing. it's also colossally unfair for people, so you have a massive divide between people who inherit a lot and
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people who don't. as i say, you're bumping up housing prices and that's not good for everyone so you bring down the threshold for inheritance tax and you let people bequeathed money, but you don't give them this colossal amount, which is so damaging and it causes resentment. social care is the key one, we have to have money for that. marion, thank you for that. we will talk to an economist later in the programme as well about how this might work. if you have any thoughts then get in touch, some of the things marion was saying might be controversial so let me know your thoughts. i'm going to the gym with these guys, don't you look at me like that, just finish your bacon butty is! i think they might give you a run for your wife the! —— butties. see you in the gym later, steph! the story of the dambusters is one of the most famous tales of the second world war.
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but you might not know that bomber command have never been awarded a campaign medal. now britain's last surviving dambuster is calling for his unit to be recognised. george ‘johnny‘ johnson who served with 617 squadron feels that veterans have been overlooked. in a special report, the journalist and broadcaster michael buerk has taken johnny back to germany, to the spot where he dropped his bomb. johnniejohnson may johnnie johnson may be johnniejohnson may be looking at the present but he's seen the past. he's back three quarters of a century to aiming at night, an almost impossible mission, death and glory. it was a thrilling experience on the no other way to describe it. asa on the no other way to describe it. as a young man he was part of raf bomber command, part of the sustained legal campaign against the nazis' war machine that all but destroyed many of germany's it is. johnny flew on 50 missions ——
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germany's it is. this is a huge lake held back by the grades zorko dam. —— germany's it is. it's a tourist resort these days, out of season, quiet, peaceful —— germany's cities. 70 years ago it was the target for the most famous bombing raid in history. the mission involved dropping specially invented bombs designed to differ destroy the three targets, captured in the 1950s film the dambusters. as a bomb aim, johnnyjohnson of the job was to hit these all per down. —— aimer. johnnyjohnson of the job was to hit these all per down. -- aimer. our briefing was to fly across the dam to drop the bomb as near as possible to drop the bomb as near as possible to the centre of the dam. it was something we haven't practised at all in training, that type of attack, so it was practice, practice, practice here until we got
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it right and that was the only way you could do it —— hadn't. it right and that was the only way you could do it -- hadn't. fritz, then 14, was hiding in a tunnel under the dam that night. translation: the doors inside the dam burst open and there was an enormous gush of wind. all the children were screaming. it was chaos. johnny‘s bomb was spot—on, but not enough to breach these all per. but the other dambusters luke braid holes in the other dams. historians said bomber command's role in the second world war remains controversial to this date.” role in the second world war remains controversial to this date. i do think the reluctance to issue a bomber command medal at this stage does reflect how controversial it is and the possible upset it could cause in germany if they do,
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decorating these people that destroyed our parents‘ cities. johnny was awarded a distinguished flying medal, he feels bomber command have never been properly rewarded with a campaign medal. three years ago they were given a class butjohnny says it was a snub. disgusted is the best way i can describe it. i feel there's disgusted is the best way i can describe it. ifeel there's been no attempt to recognise the sacrifice those people made. history now. now is to old men by the side of a lake where they both nearly died long ago. —— two old men. adversaries then, friends now until the end of their days. michael burke, bbc news. nice to have michael burke on the programme. amazing men! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will be back at 7am with the
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latest headlines. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza ahmar. the family of a four—year—old boy from luton are desperately trying to prevent their son from living his life under uv lights. ismail ali has an incredibly rare liver disease called a crigler—najjar, otherwise known as lifetime jaundice. this means he has to sit on a bit lit by photo—therapy lights for 20 hours a day. his parents want to raise enough money to pay for a full time carer. a gang have been found guilty of carrying out more than 100 crimes including of stealing high—end cars worth more than £3 million. two of the group of eight seen here, were caught on camera as they stopped at mcdonald's, in a crime spree between 2015 and last year. they broke into people's homes in east london and essex at night, stealing their car keys before making off with cars including range rovers and bmws.
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they will be sentenced at southwark crown court next month. one of the most important fossils in the world is leaving the natural history museum for the first time in more than 150 years. the remains of a bird—like dinosaur are considered priceless because the creature represents an evolutionary transition from dinosaurs to birds let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. minor delays on the overground relating to what is going on on the trains. that's because one of the two london—bound lines between hackney downs and bethnal green is closed because of a problem with the track. that's caused quite a few cancellations. it could be closed all day. on the roads, in lewisham, gas works repairs on the a20 has been causing long delays the last few days. and that continues this morning. crystal palace park road remains shut near penge west station. that's because of that fuel spillage on monday night. but it should reopen later this morning.
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let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a mild start this morning. many places starting the day in double figures. but with these mild figures come some rather grey and damp conditions as well. we do have some outbreaks of rain. some light, drizzly, patchy rain but some heavy bursts of rain mixed in as well. a little bit breezy as we had through the afternoon, the maximum temperature, though, getting up to 12 or 13. overnight it is a drier picture. we still have a bit of a breeze so that will help prevent any mist and fog. you may still get a bit of murk overnight in this cloud. the minimum temperature, though, barely budging, not dropping down too far at all, a very mild night, between ten and 11. tomorrow morning, it is going to be another mild start. an improving day tomorrow, more in the way of sunny spells, a dry day, still quite breezy and a bit of cloud around but in the sunshine you're going to feel that warmth. the maximum getting up to 15.
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it is going to stay rather unsettled through friday onwards, some outbreaks of rain, rather damp, rather drizzly. temperatures staying reasonably mild and an unsettled weekend on the cards, there is a lot of cloud around, it is going to be fairly breezy with one or two outbreaks of rain. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the chancellor prepares for his first budget, with an upbeat message on the economy. there is expected to be extra money for social care, but there will be few other giveaways. all this week i have been talking to different generations about what they would like to see from the budget. today i am talking to the post—war baby budget. today i am talking to the post—war ba by boomers. budget. today i am talking to the post—war baby boomers. and we are
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here at the bournville retirement village. good morning, it is wednesday 8 march. also this morning: lord heseltine is sacked as a government advisor after rebelling in a vote over brexit. could our televisions be spying on us? claims that the cia have developed new technology to eavesdrop on conversations. in sport: arsene wenger questions the referee, as his arsenal side are humiliated in the champions league. they are thrashed 5—1 by bayern munich in the last 16, 10—2 on aggregate. the last of the dambusters. we return to germany with the only surviving member of the air crews that carried out one of the second world war‘s most daring raids. and carol has the weather. good morning. we have got a 3—way
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split in the weather today. in the north, showery and windy. through the central swathes of the country, although it is cloudy with some drizzle, it will brighten up and you will see some sunshine. in the south, cloudy, with rain at times and drizzle, but it will be mild. good morning. first, our main story: an upbeat assessment of the economy, but a warning that more austerity lies ahead — they are expected to be the key messages when the chancellor, philip hammond, delivers first budget later today. he will stress that the government won't shirk difficult decisions to deal with the deficit, but he is expected to find extra money for social care in england, and to help soften the impact of changes to business rates. here is our political correspondent eleanor garnier. he is the man known in westminster as spreadsheet phil, the cautious treasury chief in charge of the numbers. so, as the chancellor does his sums, what has he got to consider? well, the big issue that is dominating is brexit. as the uk prepares to leave the eu, mr hammond says he is focused on keeping the economy resilient,
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with a warning this is no time for spending sprees. even so, there will be cash for new free schools, and money to shake up vocational and technical training for 16— to 18—year—olds. but the chancellor is under pressure to spend more on public services, with claims social care is in crisis, and repeated calls for more money for the nhs. plus, pleas to help soften the blow for small firms hit by a change in business rates. mr hammond might have chucked out his predecessor's timetable for dealing with the deficit, but both he and the prime minister still believe balancing the books is the only way to ensure a stable economy that is growing. and eleanor is in downing street this morning. what are we expecting from the
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chancellor today, when he comes out of number11? do chancellor today, when he comes out of number 11? do you think it will bea of number 11? do you think it will be a budget of surprises, or as we said that, do we know much of what will be inside? i don't think there are going to be any surprises, and if you are looking for fireworks this afternoon, i think you will be disappointed. having said that, i am told it is going to be in a big speech. the chancellor will say that the economy has proved to be resilient but he will also admit that there are many families who are feeling the pinch. and i think what we are going to learn later today is that posterity is here to stay. it hasn't gone away. —— austerity. there are still cuts to come which will have human consequences and with brexit just around will have human consequences and with brexitjust around the corner we shouldn't expect the chancellor to make lots of spending commit and is now. he is going to want to keep some of that spending back with the uncertain future ahead —— commitments now. labour is pressuring the government to spend more on the nhs and social care and
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all the signs are that the chancellor has found some extra money for social care across england, and also some extra cash to help soften the blow of those changes to business rates. so yes, the economic forecast might be looking up, but i don't think this is going to be a giveaway budget. looking up, but i don't think this is going to be a giveaway budgetm just for clarity, before we let you 90, just for clarity, before we let you go, i know you are important but have they allowed you to park your motor right outside number 11? well, this is the car i came to work in, andi this is the car i came to work in, and i have another car here that i am going to be going home end. i am squeezed between the cars in downing street. it is so busy on budget day, it is chock—a—block around here. street. it is so busy on budget day, it is chock-a-block around here. and just in case you think she was being serious, she was of course joking. i can see the e—mails flooding in about dbc wagers! quite right, they are not her cars. —— bbc wages.
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and we will be chatting to steph about the budget in around 20 minutes' time. she has been looking at what different generations want from the chancellor. today she is at a retirement village in birmingham. lord heseltine has been sacked as a government adviser after rebelling in a vote over brexit. the government suffered a second defeat in the house of lords, as peers backed calls for a meaningful parliamentary vote on the final terms of withdrawal. ministers say they will seek to overturn the move when the bill returns to the commons. here is our political correspondent chris mason. many of your lordships... just like ken clarke in the commons, lord heseltine was determined to remain vociferously pro—european after the referendum, just as before. it ensures that parliament has the critical role in determining the future that we will bequeath to generations of young people, and i urge your lordships to support the amendment. but, hours later, he learned he had been fired from five government advisory roles. this is not myjudgement. this is the prime minister exercising her perfectly legitimate
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right to get rid of opposition in any way she thinks appropriate, and i respect that right. whether it's the right — wise thing to do is a matter for her, not for me. his sacking illustrates downing street's determination to pointedly press ahead with brexit. next week the bill heads down the corridor, back to the commons. will conservative rebels there be up for a fight? i will continue to believe that that is the right thing to do, for there to be a vote in both houses, deal or no deal, and if i have to vote against my government again, i will do it. we have discussed, deliberated and scrutinised both of these issues before, at length, and we still declined to accept the amendments that have been passed in the house of lords. we've heard no new arguments, they've come up with no new ideas, so i expect the house of commons
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to pass the bill unamended. whatever happens next week, the prime minister does remain on course to be able to begin brexit negotiations before the end of this month. and we will be talking to lord heseltine after 8:00am. a former head of the cia has said an apparent leak of thousands of the agency's files is incredibly damaging. the documents, which have been published by the website wikileaks, appear to reveal attempts to hack into electronic devices to gather intelligence. one file suggests the cia and m15 had discovered how to record conversations using a microphone in a samsung smart tv, even when it appeared to be turned off. the cia has refused to comment on the documents' authenticity, but the agency's former director michael hayden said he was very concerned. this seems to be an incredibly damaging leak, in terms of the tactics, techniques, procedures and tools that were used by the central intelligence agency
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to conduct legitimate foreign intelligence. in other words, it's made my country, and my country's friends, less safe. we will talk about that about 8:40am on breakfast, a bit more information for you. police searching for missing raf gunner corrie mckeague are investigating whether a bin lorry is linked to his disappearance. the vehicle was spotted near where the 23—year—old was last seen, and carried a much heavier load than first thought. a search of a landfill site in cambridgeshire is under way. mr mckeague was last seen on a night out on 24 september. a british backpacker who was allegedly held captive for weeks, and subjected to repeated sexual assaults, has been released from hospital in australia. the 22—year—old woman is being comforted by herfamily, after being found on sunday. a 22—year—old australian man has been charged with a number of offences, and has been remanded in custody. the number of women getting top jobs at sporting bodies is declining,
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according to a report out today. the women in sport study found just under half of organisations have failed to meet new government guidelines calling for senior positions to be 30% female. katie gornall reports. the profile of women playing sport has never been higher. but step off the pitch and into the boardroom, and progress is more limited. today, the charity women in sport released an audit of 68 national governing bodies receiving public money. they found that nearly half didn't meet the new target of 30% gender diversity on their boards, including those in football, cricket, rugby and cycling. nine had no women at all in senior leadership roles, while one organisation, the british taekwondo council, has no women in any leadership position. public investment in sport, in any sports organisation, is dependent on organisations reaching the standards of the code. so anybody who isn't able to reach
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them, or doesn't have an adequate plan to do so, won't attract public investment. the fa has long been criticised for failing to move with the times. faced with having millions of pounds of funding cut, this week it proposed reforms to appoint more women to its board. england hockey also needs to diversify, although their ceo told me they will have no problem meeting the new government target. we will, over time, as board members leave, look at recruiting people that still meet the skill set, but enable us to meet the recommendations within the guidelines. many sports have reaped the benefits of public investment. now, they are being told to better reflect the people who fund them. a hunt is under way in france for poachers who broke into a zoo near paris and shot dead a white rhino, before sawing off and stealing one of its horns. french police say the body of the four—year—old animal, called vince, was found yesterday morning. a rhino horn can fetch around
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£40,000 on the black market. it is believed to be the first time poachers have killed an animal in a european zoo. chocolate bars like kit kat, yorkie and aero will contain 10% less sugar by next year. that is according to their manufacturer, nestle, who say sugar will be replaced with higher quantities of existing ingredients or other, non—artificial ingredients. they say it could have a significant impact on public health. if you are about to brush your teeth, you won't want to see this. when residents in a town in canada went to fill the kettle, they got a bit of a surprise — pink water. it started coming out of the taps on monday. it happened because of a side effect of a common water—treatment chemical. in a statement, the mayor of onoway, in alberta, said there is no risk to public health.
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i think ithinki i think i would be cheered up with my water came out pink. you would be slightly concerned, although if you chuck one of those bath bombs... but you wouldn't necessarily drink it, would you? no, you have made a very good point. the uk is facing the most momentous peace time decision of our time. those were the words of lord heseltine yesterday, as he backed a demand for a parliamentary vote on the final brexit deal to be written into law. we will speak to him about that a little later in the programme. hours later, he learnt he had been fired from the five government advisory roles he held. he was one of 13 conservatives who voted against their party, as the house of lords inflicted a second defeat on the government. former lords leader lord strathclyde, who voted with the government last night, joins us now from our westminster studio. good morning to you. thank you very much forjoining us. this now goes back to the commons. what are your thoughts about what seems to be happening? things being sent to the
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lords and back to the commons, is at undermining the process?” lords and back to the commons, is at undermining the process? i think undermining the process? i think under our bicameral system, in other words having two houses to look at these things, the house of lords is entirely within its right to the centre—back amendments. whether it was wise to do so is another matter andi was wise to do so is another matter and i advise my colleagues in the house of lords not to vote down the government legislation. but as you rightly pointed out, this now goes back to the house of commons, and when the house of commons has dealt with it, and i'm assume end they will send back these amendments, then with that singed, i hope the house of lords, an unelected house where the government does not have a majority, will at that stage backed down and that the prime minister signed this section 50 document and we've can start the very serious negotiations with the european union. is it in some ways than a case of flexing their muscles? because if you say they are likely to back down... you say hope, how likely is it? at this stage none of us can tell
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andi at this stage none of us can tell and i think much of it will depend on the tone of the debate in the commons when the government puts its case again to the commons. the lord's will be listening very carefully to that and to the way public opinion is turning. remember, the authority for this doesn't come from the government or the commons, it comes from the people in the referendum last year. i think the house of lords would be wise not to put itself against the will of the people as expressed in last year, andi people as expressed in last year, and i hope that's what will happen. there are conservatives who rebelled and some of them have been sacked, including lord heseltine. is that extreme or the right thing for the prime minister to be doing? michael heseltine is a major political figure and he's dominated the politics of this country over many yea rs. politics of this country over many years. i don't suppose he will particularly missed the role. the government has a responsibility to maintaina government has a responsibility to maintain a sense of discipline. ——
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miss. michael heseltine has been a very firm critic of the european policy, he very much opposes what happened in the referendum and the government have decided that there's a cost attached to that and so he's been removed as an adviser. as michael has all—time himself has said, recognises the government have said, recognises the government have said they are able to do that, it's up said they are able to do that, it's up to them and they've minded the right decision —— michael heseltine. looking forward, do you think what is going on is going to delay? -- they've made. do you think it will be delayed? last night in the house of lords there was an important vote when the labour party and the conservative party overwhelmingly came together against a lib dem amendment to try to stop the bill, that was hugely defeated. that's a signal there is now some reality in the lord's about what's going to happen. i don't think that will be
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delayed, i think it will become law next week and i think the prime minister will be able to carry on in the way she's always intended. lord strathclyde, thank you for your time on breakfast. we are speaking to lord heseltine as well a bit later for his opinion about what's happened and his sacking effectively from the roles he had. that will be at around 8:30 a.m., loads of big interviews coming your way between now and 8:15am. time to get the weather with carol and the daffodils are out. they are, and the daffodils are out. they are, and the daffodils are out. they are, and the rest! it is lovely, spring is certainly here but temperature wise, not doing too badly, look at these at the moment. yesterday the maximum is in parts of the south—western quarter were eight or nine, of the night they went up. —— maximums. belfast into edinburgh and also balmoral, the temperatures are lower. we have some cloud around but
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also clear skies. briefly what the forecast is for this morning is rain in the south, sunshine in the north, that doesn't tell the whole story. we all saw some rain overnight as the weather front pushed into the north sea but you can see another front very much with us, moving down to the south and that's what's producing milder conditions, also the cloud and rain. we have showers and windy conditions in scotland, very windy in the western isles at the moment, some showers falling as snow in the hills and also a lot of thunder and lightning this morning in the north—west. sunny skies developing across northern england and north wales. for east anglia, into the midlands, through south wales and southern counties, it is mild but it is cloudy, some drizzle or you've got some rain. through the day this system will slowly sinks out and move a bit further east and what you'll find is the rain will wax and wane, if you don't have the rain the chances are it will be
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great and you could see some drizzle. in northern england or northern ireland today, parts of scotla nd northern ireland today, parts of scotland away from the showers, a beautiful day with sunshine. 11, 12, 13 or 14 beautiful day with sunshine. 11, 12, 13 or14 in beautiful day with sunshine. 11, 12, 13 or 14 in the north. not feeling as special because of the cloud and also rain stoppage as we head through the evening and overnight our weather front drifts through the english channel, windy around it, that will later get into the channel islands. behind it the cloud will break here and there, more showers in the north and west and some of those will be wintry. cooler in the north, milder once again in the south. these temperatures ten and 11 are our overnight low list temperatures, we would expect to see that by date and even by day in the south that would be a good temperature for this stage in march —— lowest temperature for this stage in march — — lowest tem peratu res temperature for this stage in march —— lowest temperatures —— by the day. the cloud associated with that in the south will break up tomorrow, so tomorrow for the bulk of the uk,
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bar some showers in the far north, another beautiful day. largely dry, another beautiful day. largely dry, afair bit another beautiful day. largely dry, a fair bit of sunshine, temperatures in the north, seven to ten. as we go south, 11 to 15, but somewhere to the north of london could get to 16, 61 in old muggy. for march, when you consider the average is ten, that is pretty good. i do like it warmer. thank you, carol! all this week we've been looking at what different generations want from the chancellor and the budget this lunchtime. steph‘s been busy, she's been in scotland talking to young people, and yesterday was making sausages with families in yorkshire. today she's with babyboomers at a retirement village in birmingham. good morning, steph. good morning and good morning, everybody, welcome to bournville gardens, i'm in the residence area now but look over the side, you can see where we are. —— residents. this is a retirement
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village with 300 residents, we have been chatting to some of them this morning and we will through the morning, there a hairdressers, there's a village hall where they put on events, a gym, it suite, a well—being centre, a landscape garden out the back and a greenhouse where they can tend to the plants and fruit and veg. it is certainly a busy place, but the whole point is to make in later life have more independence and more community. the rent is something like £135 a week but if you're on benefits it can go down to £35 a week. it's about bringing people with different backgrounds together but all of those in later life, the post—war baby boomers and beyond and that's who we are focused on today, talking to them about what they want to hear from the chancellor. tim muffet went
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to see some of them at a walking clu b to see some of them at a walking club in north norfolk. the walkers are welcome walking club of cromer, open to all ages, but today's group are all baby boomers, plus hillary's granddaughter, gabrielle. you're a lucky generation, aren't you? free education, cheap housing. yes, we were very lucky and it is a strain on younger people nowadays that don't have those facilities that we had so readily i guess! i really enjoyed being a baby boomer. i think i was very lucky to be one! i'm grateful for so many things throughout my life. the access to education that i had, the ability to get a training and a vocation to get a job, the ease at which as a young man i could move from one job to another. by the time of the next general election, more than a third of the population of north norfolk will be aged over 65, it's one ofjust two regions in the uk where that's the case. compared to other generations, baby boomers are very
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likely to vote. politicians very keen to keep them happy. the baby boomers born between 1946 and 1965 are nearing the end of their careers and approaching retirement. on the surface, it looks like they've done quite well in recent years with things like the triple lock protecting the state pension. but the big concern for this group is social care. even for the wealthy it can wipe out their assets and for both rich and poor, the system is creaking. so, despite the views and fresh air of cromer, there are clouds on the horizon. the general things that council supply are all being cut and that obviously includes care for the elderly. people in cromer have to think very carefully about preparing for retirement. in this budget i would like more money spent on healthcare and elderly care and to pay for this money can be taken from defence. you need to look after the younger
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ones to prepare them for when they're older. in this year's budget i'd like to see more money spent on informal education and to achieve this i'd like to see cuts in benefits. in this budget i'd like to see more money spent on preparing our youth, our young people for the future. and in the budget i'd like to see less spent on the military. hillary organises walks across norfolk. for her, exercise is the best investment. i think it's important they spend their money on ways of keeping people active. i think we should spend more on promoting physical education certainly in youngsters and less on the arts where i think it's not quite so important. soon we'll know if another baby boomer, the chancellor, philip hammond, agrees. tim muffet, bbc news, cromer. so there we go, some of the thoughts
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of the baby boomers in north norfolk. we've managed to get them in the gym, elaine and tom here, i talked to them earlier, gym kit on, already on the machines. we will talk to experts here and more of the residents about what they want to hear from the chancellor, lots of different views, some concerned about social care and the money going into that, that is something they will need in later life. also about their grandchildren and what will happen to them. so a real mixed bag and we will talk to them later in the programme here. they're not even out of breath, look at tom, he is going for it, and watching himself on tv! i am impressed they obviously watch... i don't know how to describe that breakfast programme on the television but i think it is excellent, steph! see you later! you're watching yourself to make sure you're in the best position. arms, legs, slide, i can never remember! a manifesto for women everywhere.
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author and actor gillian anderson will be joining us to talk about the book which she says is a road map for the life she wishes she'd had. she will be here later to talk to us all about that on international women's day. and with the journalist who she wrote it with. both of them will be on the sofa with us. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza ahmar. the family of a four—year—old boy from luton are desperately trying to prevent their son from living his life under uv lights. ismail ali has an incredibly rare liver disease called a crigler—najjar, otherwise known as lifetime jaundice, an incredibly rare liver disease. this means he has to sit on a bit lit by photo—therapy lights for 20 hours a day. his parents want to raise enough money to pay for a full time carer. one of the most important fossils in the world is leaving
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the natural history museum for the first time in more than 150 years. the archae—optrix, or the so—called first bird, will become part of a touring exhibition in japan. it's thought this is what the bird—like dinosaur looked like. the fossil is considered priceless as it represents an evolutionary transition from dinosaurs to birds. a gang have been found guilty of carrying out more than 100 crimes including of stealing high—end cars worth more than £3 million. two of the group of eight seen here, were caught on camera as they stopped at mcdonald's, in a crime spree between 2015 and last year. they broke into people's homes in east london and essex at night, stealing their car keys before making off with cars including range rovers and bmws. they will be sentenced at southwark crown court next month. the artistic director of the southbank centre has been shortlisted for the veuve cliquot social purpose award, which recognises businesswomen with a social conscience. jude kelly took over at the arts venue in 2005, and founded the women of the world festival, which celebrates the achievement of women and girls. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning.
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but on the trains there are problems on greater anglia, sta nsted express a nd on the london overground. that's because one of the two london—bound lines between hackney downs and bethnal green is closed because of a problem with the track. on the roads, in lewisham, gas works repairs on the a20 has been causing long delays the last few days. and that continues this morning. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a mild start this morning. many places starting the day in double figures. but with these mild figures come some rather grey and damp conditions as well. we do have some outbreaks of rain. some light, drizzly, patchy rain but some heavy bursts of rain mixed in as well. a little bit breezy as we had through the afternoon, the maximum temperature, though, getting up to 12 or 13. overnight it is a drier picture. we still have a bit of a breeze so that will help prevent any mist and fog. you may still get a bit of murk overnight in this cloud. the minimum temperature, though, barely budging, not dropping down too far at all, a very mild night,
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between ten and 11. tomorrow morning, it is going to be another mild start. an improving day tomorrow, more in the way of sunny spells, a dry day, still quite breezy and a bit of cloud around but in the sunshine you're going to feel that warmth. the maximum getting up to 15. it is going to stay rather unsettled through friday onwards, some outbreaks of rain, rather damp, rather drizzly. temperatures staying reasonably mild and an unsettled weekend on the cards, there is a lot of cloud around, it is going to be fairly breezy with one or two outbreaks of rain. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the chancellor, philip hammond, will use his first budget later
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today to deliver an upbeat assessment of britain's economic prospects, but he will acknowledge that more austerity lies ahead. he will stress that the government won't shirk difficult decisions to deal with the deficit, but he is expected to find extra money for social care in england, and to help soften the impact of changes to business rates. our political correspondent eleanor garnier is in downing street this morning. eleanor, can we expect any big surprises in this budget? here is the door of number 11. there isa here is the door of number 11. there is a cabinet meeting, and one of our cabinet crew there as well, checking his hair. there will be a meeting at about 8am, a cabinet meeting, and there is the waiting world's media. they have now moved the cars which we re they have now moved the cars which were there earlier this morning. we will have more from their later and throughout the day on bbc news as well. lord heseltine has been sacked as a government adviser, after rebelling over the legislation that will allow theresa may to begin the process of leaving the eu.
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ministers suffered a second defeat on the bill in the house of lords yesterday, but they will seek to overturn the amendments in the commons. former lords leader lord strathclyde said the bill could be passed as early as next week. the labour party and the conservative party overwhelmingly came together to stop the bill in its tracks, which was hugely defeated. i think that is a signal that there are some reality and the house of lords about what will happen. i don't think the bill will happen. i don't think the bill will be delayed. i think it will become law next week and i think the prime minister will be able to carry on in the way that she has always intended. a former head of the cia has said an apparent leak of thousands of the agency's files is incredibly damaging. the documents, which have been published by the website wikileaks, appear to reveal attempts to hack into electronic devices to gather intelligence. one file suggests the cia and m15 had discovered how to record
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conversations using a microphone in a samsung smart tv, even when it appeared to be turned off. the cia has refused to comment on the documents' authenticity, but the agency's former director michael hayden said he was very concerned. this seems to be an incredibly damaging leak, in terms of the tactics, techniques, procedures and tools that were used by the central intelligence agency to conduct legitimate foreign intelligence. in other words, it's made my country, and my country's friends, less safe. police searching for missing raf gunner corrie mckeague are investigating whether a bin lorry is linked to his disappearance. the vehicle was spotted near where the 23—year—old was last seen, and carried a much heavier load than first thought. a search of a landfill site in cambridgeshire is under way. mr mckeague was last seen on a night out on 24 september.
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chocolate bars like kit kat, yorkie and aero will contain 10% less sugar by next year. that is according to their manufacturer, nestle, who say sugar will be replaced with higher quantities of existing ingredients, or other, non—artificial ingredients. they say it could have a significant impact on public health. i wonder if they will taste any different? i am sure it will, but i wonder if people will notice.” different? i am sure it will, but i wonder if people will notice. i have been wondering of chocolates have been wondering of chocolates have been getting smaller, it is probably my hand getting bigger.m been getting smaller, it is probably my hand getting bigger. it is unlikely your hands are getting bigger. i mean since i was a child! visitors on a tour of the white house were given a surprise when president trump turned up to greet them. beneath a portrait of election rival hillary clinton, president trump asked for children in the crowd to come over for a photograph with him.
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one boy did go overfor a snap with the president. it was the first tour of the white house since the inauguration. just to go back to the big hands thing. your ears do grow throughout your life. i know that. i know that your life. i know that. i know that your hands don't, and your nose. all thoughts i did not want to have at this time in the morning. they are the thoughts people want to have at this time. we are talking arsenal, because arsenal fans are not having a good morning and did not have a good night. they have woken up feeling a bit sorry for themselves, and arsene wenger is a man under pressure. he was under pressure before that big match with bayern munich, but there has certainly been fuel added to the fire. arsenal were humiliated in the champions league. they suffered a 5—1 thrashing at home to bayern munich, losing 10—2 on aggregate, and exiting the competition at the last—16 stage again.
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patrick gearey reports. # arsene wenger, you are killing the club. once, they sang arsene wenger's name in happy voices. now, the future of the manager is a matter for direct action, rather than just discussion. "wenger out" went the chant. "arsenal out," the predictions. they were four goals down from the first leg. why not have a go? could they squeeze back into this? hope died with the referee. first a bayern munich penalty, and then a yellow card controversially changed to read. laurent koscielny‘s night was over, and so too was arsenal's. robert lewandowski started the fade to bayern—grey. arjen robben — 2—1. douglas costa — 3—1. in boxing, they would call the match. instead, arturo vidal was creative. a recurring nightmare, vidal again. 10—2 on aggregate, 5—1 on the night. an unwanted history for their manager,
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and the most uncertain future. the referee, i think, was very, very powerful for bayern tonight. at the moment in the game where lewandowski, not only was it not a penalty, he was offside. and it was not a penalty. on top of that, he gives us a red card. that killed us completely. overall i must say that bayern can be a good side, but tonight they can as well say thank you to the decisions of the referee, in the second half. england women's didn't have much joy against german opponents, either. they lost 1—0 to germany in the shebelieves cup, anja mittag with the goal for the european champions, in the final match in washington. france won the invitational tournament. the first half, we were a bit disappointed with ourselves. i think we set out to do what we'd done, and the second half i think we got to grips with the game, and that was much more the england
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that we want to be. i think we put germany on the back foot, and i think in the end it came down to fine margins. and germany took their chance when they got it, and we didn't, unfortunately. team sky have admitted mistakes were made around the delivery of a medical package to sir bradley wiggins, but deny breaking anti—doping rules. the team have been unable to provide records to back up the claim wiggins was given a legal decongestant at a race in france in 2011. team sky say they take full responsibility for the failures. there is a boost for england ahead of their six nations game against scotland. billy vunipola will feature, after being confirmed in the matchday squad. the number eight returned from injury for saracens at the weekend. he has been included in a 24—man training party to prepare for the calcutta cup. england are looking for their 18th win in a row on saturday, against a scotland side captained byjohn barclay, with greig laidlaw out injured. there is always the expectations in
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the group. but we don't put any undue pressure on ourselves. we just kind of feel like the expectation from england, they have gone how many games unbeaten? we have one 26 nations, so we feel there is not as much pressure. we have played some good stuff, which may be axed only gives us a bit of pressure but within the group certainly we will not get carried away. and finally, eddie the eagle has gone back to the ski—jump, where he made his name. ido i do very well, i am showing my age. i was just about vaughan. i do very well, i am showing my age. i wasjust about vaughan. stop it. here he is in calgary, where his rose to fame in the 1988 winter olympics. it was over rather quickly, wasn't it? he didn't do as well as perhaps we would have liked. the crowd
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seemed to have enjoyed, laughing and cheering. do you know what he said after he finished the jump? he was absolutely relieved.” after he finished the jump? he was absolutely relieved. i bet. iwould have been happy with five or six metres. it is an exciting time for women playing sport, with world cup tournaments in women's cricket and women's football looming. but higher up in the boardroom, it is a different story, as some of the largest and most highly funded sports don't have enough women at the top. a report from women in sport found that nearly half of the 68 national governing bodies had missed the target of boards being 30% female. nine have no women in a senior leadership role, excluding the ceo, and one organisation has no women at all in any leadership position. but some sports do seem to be on track. 90% of people who make up the england netball board are women. with us now is former arsenal and england footballer rachel yankey, and from lord's is clare connor, the ecb's director of women's cricket.
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and i saw you hoping that trophy moments ago. how important... let's talk about that, first of all.” moments ago. how important... let's talk about that, first of all. i got told off for touching it. it has probably got security guards. that is what normally happens when there is what normally happens when there isa is what normally happens when there is a trophy around. i have jinxed it. how important is it for you that there is a step change in what is going on in sport governing boards? yes, it is hugely important. you know, primarily because sports have got to be representative in their leadership of the people and the participants that they are trying to attract the game. so, you know, it is really important for girls and women to see that a sport that they might want to play and progress in, whether it is on the pitch or off the pitch, is very open and accessible to them. and it is also important simply because the fact
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that lords will make better business decisions, better balanced decisions, better balanced decisions, if those boards are diverse. you are obviously still playing at the moment, you are training at the moment, they are talking about women feeling that there is a path which is possible. if you wanted to go into a governing body, beyond coaching, is that something which you have thought about and which you think would be open to you? it is not something i have thought about, but yes, obviously with the changes i think that boards need to be more diverse andi that boards need to be more diverse and i think get more women. at other people, it needs to be different age groups, different ethnic and. you know, to make the board so diverse that you can get better decisions.” wonder about perception of women playing sport. because i know when you were a youngster you actually had to shave your head so people wouldn't question you. so, it is out there already. people didn't question you as a female footballer.
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do you think that perception has changed now? is a more positive for women? i think it is changing. changed now? is a more positive for women? ithink it is changing. i still think there is the perception that women don't know enough about it. some women still see it as a man's game and things like this, having women on boards, in higher management positions, will help. we have talked a lot in the past about the rooney rule in america, the encouragement of minority candidates in the interview process. do you think that is important in these top—level discussions, to have more women in the role? does there need to be this cultural change?” definitely do. i think it is a cultural shift that is needed and i think lots of sports are gearing up for that now. i think this has reached a fairly critical time, and i think it is about fostering your own talent as a sport, but it is also very much about recruiting, the way you recruit. sport historically,
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as we know, is a mail domain. so the talent pipeline isn't necessarily flush with women who are clamouring to be in these roles. so it is up to sports to actively recruit, be proactive in their recruitment strategies, and find ways of attracting very capable, talented women into those roles. you are trying to go into coaching now, aren't you? how do you feel about that? is it important that young women like you are going for that sort of thing? yes, i think so. i have always coached, i have mainly coached children but now i am going into more elite coaching where i am working on getting my hours done for mya working on getting my hours done for my a license, working with men's teams and there hasn't been any problem with me coaching the men's teams. i wanted to ask you as well, we said you were hoping the world cup. how important is it, notjust from a women's perspective but for sport in general, that we are hosting the world cup here?”
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sport in general, that we are hosting the world cup here? i think the opportunity to host the world cup in any sport is a difficult time. it is something that all the athletes, all the players aspire to bea athletes, all the players aspire to be a part of. as administrators it isa be a part of. as administrators it is a huge opportunity for us to promote our game to as many people as possible. we will be taking the tournament around the country, starting with england's opening game in derby on or beforejune. to have that opportunity to take our team and the sport in the trophy around the country, to try to inspire girls to pick up bats and balls for the first time is a wonderful opportunity. almost a once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. we haven't had the world cup in this country for 24 years, so a huge amount has obviously changed since that time, and we're really looking forward to making the of that opportunity. rachel, you saw the women in action last night, tough match, lost 1—0 to germany, were you disappointed with the way they played and how big will
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it be with the euros in the summer? i don't think it's a big defeat at all to be honest! if you look at it, the german players are in season, as are the french players, but the english aren't. as a preparation for the euros, losing narrowly one goal to france and germany isn't bad at all. no panicking yet! no, not yet! no arsenal levelsjust all. no panicking yet! no, not yet! no arsenal levels just yet! all. no panicking yet! no, not yet! no arsenal levelsjust yet! thank you both very much indeed. don't touch that trophy yet!” you both very much indeed. don't touch that trophy yet! i swear i saw it wobbling! let's catch up with the weather and carol. good morning, for some it is a mild start and especially in the south where we have rain, cloud and drizzle. further north a fair bit of cloud around but that will break and we will see some sunshine. a good dose of rain overnight courtesy of this weather front, which dose of rain overnight courtesy of this weatherfront, which has moved away, but you can see this one connected with it, a cold front,
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still in the south and that is producing the cloud, also the rain, low cloud at times, murky conditions, the rain waxing and waning through the day and if you don't have that the chances are you will have drizzle but as we go further north, the cloud will break up further north, the cloud will break up in northern england, northern ireland and parts of scotland, where we will see sunshine. windy this morning in the western isles and through the day the strong winds and showers will go to the western isles, some heavy and thundery with hail. in northern ireland, drizzle first thing that will clear for sunshine. in northern england, beautiful, highs of ten or 12. through east anglia, the midlands, wales south that's where we have the weather front pushing south and east. it will start to brighten up later on in north wales, it will feel mild. through the evening and overnight, there's our weather front sinking to the english channel, blustery winds around it and behind it we will have some cloud but some breaks, and a package of showers in
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the northern half of the country, wintry on the tops of hills and mountains. here it will be colder but a mild start tomorrow. these temperatures of tens and 11 overnight, the overnight lows, more reminiscent of what we would expect for maximum is in march at this stage, the average in the south is around ten. our weather front in the south will bring rain to the channel islands, it will take a swipe at cornwall, where you will see cloud and a damp conditions. a lot of cloud in southern england and south wales to start, but that will break up. for most of us, bar a few showers in the north, a dry and fine day with a lot of sunshine. in the sunshine temperatures could get as high as 16 in the north of london, but we're in pretty good shape temperature wise as we go up and down the land. on thursday, here's our weather front, it pivots and comes back across our shores,
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especially in the west and north on friday, and the squeeze in isobars tells you it will be quite windy in the west. high pressure clinging on by the skin of its teeth to the east. eastern area is faring best with sunshine, bickmore cloud, windier conditions to the north —— bit more —— areas. seven, eight, nine in the north and double figures for much of the rest of the uk. and the temperature over the weekend willdip and the temperature over the weekend will dip and then come up against quite we will be ready for the dip. thank you very much, carol. ——, again. we will be ready for the dip. steph‘s been playing the generation game this week, in the run—up to today's budget. today, herfocus is baby boomers, that's those born between the end of the second world war and the early ‘60s. steph is at a retirement village in birmingham we will play heads and tails at the
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end. do your bit and then i will ask you heads and tails at the end and we will flip the coin. good morning and good morning, everyone. tom is working hard, what are we on? you're going for miles, keep going, he's a fan of carol kirkwood, isn't everyone! i'm here at bournville gardens, we are talking to the post—war baby gardens, we are talking to the post—war ba by boomers gardens, we are talking to the post—war baby boomers today to find out their thoughts about what they wa nt to out their thoughts about what they want to hear from the chancellor. elaine has been planking... you can rest easy, bless her, she's been doing a plank for ages and i'm going to have a chat with ron, i know you've got some thoughts about what you've got some thoughts about what you would like to hear from the chancellor, what would you like him to say? we're least likely to have any problems with the chancellor, we are a privileged few but what i would like the most is... we've all got cash balances by selling our other houses and the interest rates are so poor other houses and the interest rates are so poor that we don't get any return on the credit balances in our
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accounts. that's one of my main worry is. and car licence fees are likely to go up and we depend on our cars, but the buses are quite handy here, i have no complaints —— main worries. what about interest rates and cartax? worries. what about interest rates and car tax? yes, that's my main concern, and car tax? yes, that's my main concern, we are the privileged few here, though, we're the people that should be asked for budget changes. it's there to say you had a decent career? i was ajunior it's there to say you had a decent career? i was a junior clerk in 1964 ata bank career? i was a junior clerk in 1964 at a bank and i finished in south america. a former cricket player as well? i played professional cricket, i made more money on saturday playing cricket than i did for the re st of playing cricket than i did for the rest of the week in the bank for nine orten rest of the week in the bank for nine or ten years. lovely to talk to you, i know people don't like revealing their age, how old are you? 89. i'm going to leave you to
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your weights. i'm not faking this, i'm doing it on my own!” your weights. i'm not faking this, i'm doing it on my own! i never thought you were faking! really interesting to be here. this is a retirement village all about giving people like ron and other people hear their independence, lots of facilities here, 300 residents live here. one and 2—bedroom apartments. we have a couple of experts we can chat to but come here and have a look. it is nice here! we have angela from age uk and elizabeth is from the university of warwick. we we re from the university of warwick. we were hearing ron talk about savings for older people and they don't get money for their savings and he was talking about his car and how important that is, thank the wider picture of the things older people are worried about. half of all older people exist mainly living on the state pension of around £7,000 a year. they really don't have much wriggle room in their finances. when you think about things like the
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government asking people to think about saving for care places or planning for pensions, we have got to try to protect the incomes of elderly people to make sure they can spend when they need to on things like airand spend when they need to on things like air and incomes. elizabeth, you're an economist, one thing he said was he feels quite lucky because he feels like he has got money and he feels better off than other younger people. explained that difference, there are some young people who look at older people and think, they have nice homes and i can't even afford a house. that is very much the case. one thing is the triple lock on pensions which has enabled pensioner income to increase more so enabled pensioner income to increase more so than the working age population. with the triple what it is guaranteeing the income of pensioners rising. the king at the “ we see pensioners rising. the king at the —— we see little increase in the working age income. —— triple lock. that has reduced the disparity in the income gap. some people of
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working age are looking at pensioners and are potentially presenting the fact their incomes have increased. ithink presenting the fact their incomes have increased. i think we have to look at the wider picture in terms of the needs of pensioners, notjust in terms of healthcare and social care, but ensuring they have the community feel. a place like bournville is a fantastic environment for pensioners. but there's this resentment and we have to take the broader view of public finances as well in terms of if we do want to improve the incomes of the working age population, where is that money going to come from? public finances are still in a position so i can't see much room for manoeuvre for philip and today. perhaps something for social care, but i don't think we are going to see much of a giveaway in the budget -- philip see much of a giveaway in the budget —— philip hammond today. see much of a giveaway in the budget -- philip hammond today. as we heard elizabeth said, it is tight, it is
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ha rd to elizabeth said, it is tight, it is hard to give older people more? there's more disparity amongst any generation than there are between the generations and if you ask younger people what they would like to give money to, they would often say they would want to give it to older people because they feel they don't have the flexibility to change their situation. there are issues to do with housing and transfer of wealth but don't look to the poorest older people to fund the poorer younger people, look at the wealth of the entire nation and economy to see what you can fund. an and emergency cash injection for social ca re emergency cash injection for social care is what we would look for and thena care is what we would look for and then a longer term plan to fund social care is what we would want, because that's the most important thing for younger and older people “ an emergency cash thing for younger and older people —— an emergency cash injection. thanks very much. i will be here to talk to more of them later. let's have this coin toss, want to know if i'm buying your lunch or not. heads or tails? i'm going to go heads. luckily we have managed to find a
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stu nt luckily we have managed to find a stunt coin... it was broken. i'm going to let you use that one. already soiled. this is heads, it has got to be breakfast, this is heads, this is tails. steph has gone heads. let's get a good flow on. go on, son! this is going to end badly! tales, i will have a full english brea kfast tales, i will have a full english breakfast when you're ready! hang on, that was cheating, i could see it on the screen, you literally turned it over, you didn't flip it! i think you've got a point, steph! it is tails again! make that two brea kfasts! it is tails again! make that two breakfasts! i want an official enquiry! i'm looking forward to that! unlucky for her! double brea kfast. that! unlucky for her! double breakfast. lovely! still to come this morning on breakfast: could your tv by spying on you? reports claim m15 and the cia are working on ways to turn
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televisions and smart phones into bugging devices. a cyber security expert will tell us how likely it is. you mentioned this on your social media account earlier, lots of people have been saying that they are going to buy pyjamas now they think this might be happening. weird thought thinking you're naked watching this programme but thank you for sharing that information! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london news, i'm claudia—liza ahmar. children as young as 13 are being illegally sold knives in london. in an undercover operation by police and trading standards, 96 stores were caught breaking the law banning knife sales tojuveniles under 18. the head of the met‘s gang prevention unit, trident, said more work needs to be
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done in stopping knives reaching dangerous hands. transport for london has scrapped its standing—only escalators scheme. convention is for customers to stand on the right of escalators, allowing others to walk on the left. but despite six—month pilot at holborn to have all passengers stand, seeing peak time congestion reduced by up to 30%. tfl has said tehre are no plans to bring the scheme back. the family of a four—year—old boy from luton are desperately trying to prevent their son from living his life under uv lights. ismail ali has crigler—najjar, or lifetime jaundice, an incredibly rare liver disease. this means he has to sit under photo—thera py lights for 20 hours a day. his parents want to raise enough money to pay for a full time carer. one of the most important fossils in the world is leaving the natural history museum for the first time in more than 150 years. the archae—optrix, or the so—called first bird, will become part of a touring exhibition in japan. it's thought this is what the bird—like dinosaur looked like. the fossil is considered priceless as it represents an evolutionary transition from dinosaurs to birds. let's have a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service
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on the tube this morning. but on the trains there are problems on greater anglia, sta nsted express a nd on the london overground. that's because one of the two london—bound lines between hackney downs and bethnal green is closed because of a problem with the track. the m25 anticlockwise, two lanes closed just before j26 waltham abbey. queues most of the way from j28 brook street roundabout. let's have a check on the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a mild start this morning. many places starting the day in double figures. but with these mild figures come some rather grey and damp conditions as well. we do have some outbreaks of rain. some light, drizzly, patchy rain but some heavy bursts of rain mixed in as well. a little bit breezy as we had through the afternoon, the maximum temperature, though, getting up to 12 or 13. overnight it is a drier picture. we still have a bit of a breeze so that will help prevent any mist and fog.
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you may still get a bit of murk overnight in this cloud. the minimum temperature, though, barely budging, not dropping down too far at all, a very mild night, between ten and 11. tomorrow morning, it is going to be another mild start. an improving day tomorrow, more in the way of sunny spells, a dry day, still quite breezy and a bit of cloud around but in the sunshine you're going to feel that warmth. the maximum getting up to 15. it is going to stay rather unsettled through friday onwards, some outbreaks of rain, rather damp, rather drizzly. temperatures staying reasonably mild and an unsettled weekend on the cards, there is a lot of cloud around, it is going to be fairly breezy with one or two outbreaks of rain. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. the chancellor prepares for his first budget with an upbeat message on the economy. there's expected to be extra money for social care, but there'll be few other giveaways.
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all this week i have been talking to different generations about what they would like to hear from the budget today. today we're talking to the post—war baby boomers and beyond so i'm at a retirement village in bournville. good morning. it's wednesday, 8th march. also this morning, lord heseltine is sacked as a government advisor after rebelling in a vote over brexit. could our televisions be spying on us? claims that the cia have developed new technology to eavesdrop on conversations. in sport, fans again call for arsene wenger to leave arsenal as they are humiliated in the champions league. they were thrashed 5—1 by bayern munich in the last 16,10—2 on aggregate. the last of the dambusters. we return to germany with the only
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surviving member of the air crews that carried out one of the second world war‘s most daring raids. carol has the weather. thank you, dan. good morning. we've got a three—way split in the weather. in the north, it is windy and showery, but there will be sunshine between the showers. the central swathe of the country, a cloudy start, but the sunshine coming through. but in the south, it is fairly cloudy and we'll stay that way through the day with rain and drizzle, but here very mild. i'll have more in 15 minutes. thank you. good morning. first, our main story. an upbeat assessment of the economy but a warning that more austerity lies ahead, they are expected to be the key messages when the chancellor philip hammond delivers his first budget later today. he'll stress that the government won't shirk difficult decisions to deal with the deficit, but he is expected to find extra money for social care in england and to help soften the impact of changes to business rates. here's our political correspondent eleanor garnier.
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he's the man known in westminster as spreadsheet phil, the cautious treasury chief in charge of the numbers. so, as the chancellor does his sums, what's he got to consider? well, the big issue that's dominating is brexit. as the uk prepares to leave the eu, mr hammond says he's focussed on keeping the economy resilient with a warning this is no time for spending sprees. even so, there will be cash for new free schools and money to shake up vocational and technical training for 16 to 18—year—olds. but the chancellor's under pressure to spend more on public services with claims social care is in crisis and repeated calls for more money for the nhs plus pleas to help soften the blow for small firms hit by the change to business rates. mr hammond might have chucked out his predecessor's timetable for dealing with the deficit, but both he and the prime minister still believe balancing the books
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is the only way to ensure a stable economy that's growing. eleanor is in downing street. they have got a cabinet meeting at et moment. are we expecting anything, surprises, little bits of great news for people?” anything, surprises, little bits of great news for people? i don't think there are going to be any big surprises in this budget, lou. if you were hoping for fireworks, surprises in this budget, lou. if you were hoping forfireworks, i think you're probably going to be disappointed. the cabinet meeting has just started. we have seen the cabinet ministers trooping into downing street. they've gone into number ten. in fact, downing street. they've gone into numberten. infact, dr downing street. they've gone into number ten. in fact, dr fox, downing street. they've gone into numberten. infact, dr fox, liam fox the international trade secretary, one of those who has gone in in the last few minutes and he was asked by journalist in in the last few minutes and he was asked byjournalist here in number ten if this was going to be a brexit budget. we do know that this budget is going to be relatively upbeat. the chancellor will say that the economy has weathered well since the economy has weathered well since
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the referendum vote, but he will also admit that lots of families are really feeling the pinch. i think what we're going to learn later is austerity is still here. there are still cuts to come. the budget is still cuts to come. the budget is still tight and the chancellor wants to keep enough fuel in the tank as he said, as britain leaves the eu. so, despite economic forecasts looking up, we shouldn't expect this budget to be one of give aways. eleanor, thank you. in halfan in half an hour we will be speaking to lord heseltine who has been sacked. lord heseltine, has been sacked as a government adviser after rebelling in a vote over brexit. the government suffered a second defeat in the house of lords as peers backed calls for a "meaningful" parliamentary vote on the final terms of withdrawal. ministers say they'll seek to overturn the move when the bill returns to the commons. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. many of your lordships... just like ken clarke in the commons, lord heseltine was determined to remain vociferously pro—european after the referendum, just as before. it ensures that parliament has the critical role in determining the future that we will bequeath
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to generations of young people and i urge your lordships to support the amendment. but, hours later, he learned he had been fired from five government advisory roles. this is not myjudgement. this is the prime minister exercising her perfectly legitimate right to get rid of opposition in any way she thinks appropriate and i respect that right. whether it's the right, the wise thing to do is a matter for her, not for me. his sacking illustrates downing street's determination to pointedly press ahead with brexit. next week the bill heads down the corridor, back to the commons. will conservative rebels there be up for a fight? i will continue to believe that that is the right thing to do, for there to be a vote in both houses, deal or no deal and, if i have to vote against my government again,
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i will do it. we've discussed, deliberated and scrutinised both of these issues before, at length, and we still declined to accept the amendments that have been passed in the house of lords. we've heard no new arguments. they've come up with no new ideas so i expect the house of commons to pass the bill unamended. whatever happens next week, the prime minister does remain on course to be able to begin brexit negotiations before the end of this month. and we'll be talking to lord heseltine after 8.30am. there are claims that the cia and m15 have discovered how to secretly record conversations using a microphone in a smart tv. thousands of documents, published by the website wikileaks, appear to reveal attempts to hack into electronic devices to gather intelligence. the cia has refused to comment, but a former director has said the lead could be incredibly damaging. police searching for missing raf
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gunner corrie mckeague are investigating whether a bin lorry is linked to his disappearance. the vehicle was spotted near where the 23—year—old was last seen and carried a much heavier load than first thought. a search of a landfill site in cambridgeshire is underway. mr mckeague was last seen on a night out on 24th september. the number of women getting top jobs at sporting bodies is declining, according to a report out today. the women in sport study found just under half of organisations have failed to meet new government guidelines calling for senior positions to be 30% female. katie gornall reports. the profile of women playing sport has never been higher. but step off the pitch and into the boardroom, and progress is more limited. today, the charity women in sport released an audit of 68
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national governing bodies receiving public money. they found that nearly half didn't meet the new target of 30% gender diversity on their boards including those in football, cricket, rugby and cycling. nine had no women at all in senior leadership roles, while one organisation, the british tae kwon do council, has no women in any leadership position. public investment in sport, in any sports organisation, is dependent on organisations reaching the standards of the code. so anybody who isn't able to reach them, or doesn't have an adequate plan to do so, won't be able to attract public investment. the fa has long been criticised for failing to move with the times. faced with having millions of pounds of funding cut, this week it proposed reforms to appoint more women to its board. england hockey also needs to diversify, although their ceo told me they will have no problem meeting the new government target. we will, over time, as board members leave, look at recruiting people that
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still meet the skillset, but enable us to meet the recommendations within the guidelines. many sports have reaped the benefits of public investment. now, they are being told to better reflect the people who fund them. a hunt is under way in france for poachers who broke into a zoo near paris and shot dead a white rhino before sawing off and stealing one of its horns. french police say the body of the four—year—old animal, called vince, was found yesterday morning. a rhino horn can fetch around £40,000 on the black market. it's believed to be the first time poachers have killed an animal in a european zoo. chocolate bars like kit kat, yorkie and aero will contain 10% less sugar by next year. that's according to their manufacturer nestle, who say sugar will be replaced with higher quantities of existing ingredients or other non—artificial ingredients. they say it could have a significant impact on public health.
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when residents in a town in canada went to fill the kettle — they got a bit of a surprise — pink water! it started coming out of the taps on monday. it happened because of a side—effect of a common water treatment chemical. in a statement, the mayor of onoway in alberta said there's no risk to public health. i once did an interview with somebody at a water treatment works, the warning they gave is if it's brown, leave it down, but nothing about if it is pink! imight drink about if it is pink! i might drink more water if it was pink or blue, whatever! if you could give your younger self some advice, what would it be? our next guests asked themselves that very question and decided to write a book they describe as a "road map for life". gillian anderson and jennifer nadel aim to bring about change for women across the world and their new book, released for international women's
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day, contains nine principles for a more meaningful life. they're here now to tell us more. i think the water is about international women's day. it could be. it is directed very much at women, this, isn't it? why, you know, why women? why necessary in the 21st century to be talking so directly in some ways? well, we are women and that is our experience, but i also think that women feel a huge amount of pressure today. we're shown on billboards and in magazines how to behave, what to buy, how to act and how to behave, what to buy, how to actandi how to behave, what to buy, how to act and i think that we feel a huge amount of pressure. and the pressure, in the end, makes us feel slightly lost. the levels of depression and self esteem are sky rocketing and we feel paper thin in
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trying tojuggle our rocketing and we feel paper thin in trying to juggle our lives. do you think it is still the pressure of trying to be everything to everybody? is that still the concern? absolutely and we have to protend because we have to fit ourselves into a world that is designed predominantly around men. if you look at jobs, the world designed predominantly around men. if you look atjobs, the world of work is designed around a predominantly male workforce so we find ourselves fighting for equality, but we get 50% of a system that's designed for people who don't have primary caring responsibilities who aren't mothers and rather than fighting for 50% of a system that doesn't work we would like to see a new pardime, one doesn't work we would like to see a new par dime, one that's built around the reality of who we all are, men and women. we are all real, three—dimensional. are, men and women. we are all real, three-dimensional. you talk in the book about action. it can be in different ways. gillian, i'm interested when you fought against and made a difference, when you found out that you were paid half of what your costar was on the show and you talk about feeling very
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concerned about speaking out about it. well, it was something that happened at the beginning when i was new to the series and i had fight quite hard to get equal pay, but recently we did another six episodes and the initial offer was half of what my costar was making aye rememberfeeling what my costar was making aye remember feeling that at some point i would have to talk about it, you know, but was really, really nervous about it. i was afraid of speaking out. i was afraid of shaming the woman who was the head of the department at fox. so yeah, it became really important at some point to speak out about it. you talked about naming things about talking about spotting things, don't you? and talking about spotting things, don't you ? and talking talking about spotting things, don't you? and talking about things? well, one of the principles in the book is honesty and getting clear about the areas of our life that are not working and making space for ourselves and how do we practise self care? when we practise self
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ca re self care? when we practise self care it's possible for us to go into the world and be kinder and to feel like we can manage the lives that we're feeling we're buckling underneath. we have to be honest with the outer world about what it is to be women. it is extraordinary that after all these years of feminism, levels of grooming more is expecting of us in terms of how we look and the same is happening for men and there is this kind of arms race of, you know, airbrushing ourselves and it's crazy because that's not what really matters. what brings us happiness isn't how we look, it's how we feel on the inside and our level of connectedness with those which with we have relationships with. the book is for women. have you thought about what the reaction from men might be? i don't know whether you worry about that. i suppose there is one or two—ways that men can react, yes, it has been going on for too long. some men might be thinking, why are you trying to change the system? why are you going so far to try and pressurise us into feeling ways we
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don't need to feel? almost every man has said, what about me? we don't want this world either, it does not serve men or women and it is time for change. universal principles, you talk about kindness and greeting every other woman as a friend which is not necessarily something that happens? no, definitely not, we are so focused in a bubble of our families and we think we have certain value systems we carry out. once we get out into the world, we often all bow each other to the front of the line, so each other to the front of the line, so it is about practising kindness is notjust to so it is about practising kindness is not just to ourselves so it is about practising kindness is notjust to ourselves but so it is about practising kindness is not just to ourselves but the people we meet on the street. an interesting example, the picture of emma watson which was in the papers last week. she spoke out about how it is not about feminism, she was in vanity fair. it is not about feminism, she was in vanityfair. on it is not about feminism, she was in vanity fair. on that point, a lot of the criticism came from women. the
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way she was dressing. so many of us have internalised a misogynistic way of looking at ourselves and we are our harshest critics because we have to fit in and to look the way we need to look, this is a distraction from what matters yet again, a debate about what a woman is wearing and how she is looking, rather than who we really are. that is similar to what she said. we talked at the beginning about advice you would give to your former self, are there things... my former self! younger! yourself! are there things you think, i wish i had done differently? i was asked to write something talking to my 16—year—old self and so much was about how self obsessed i was, so many years of self obsession and focused on my body and being thinner and self—criticism. i guess part of my advise would be to lift one's head
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and is to look up and to see where we can be of service in the world and there are always people who are less fortunate and when we are of service, ultimately, we feel better about ourselves. if you wrote this bookin about ourselves. if you wrote this book in ten years' time, do you hope it would be completely different?” think change is incremental. and i think change is incremental. and i think it is ongoing and we are never going to get to a place in all our lives but we can start pushing for those changes now. jennifer, you had a job those changes now. jennifer, you had ajob similarto mine those changes now. jennifer, you had a job similar to mine and one day, you had enough, what was it that finally they do think, i need to change this? like many people, i was living in a when world. when i have got thejob, the living in a when world. when i have got the job, the children, living in a when world. when i have got thejob, the children, i will be 0k. got thejob, the children, i will be ok. i had the home, but i had the job and two beautiful children and i just could not go on. i looked at
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them in their highchairs and they said, we need you, that should be a moment of huge excitement, and i could not go, i had to stop, that was it. if familiar dilemma! thank you. thank you, both, great to see you. gillian and jennifer‘s book is called we: a manifesto for women everywhere. another international woman on the programme, carol with this morning's whether! it isa it is a mild start to the day depending on where you are because we have had cloud and rain across the south, temperatures in exeter and london, 11, 12, cardiff ten, birmingham ten. further north into scotla nd birmingham ten. further north into scotland and northern ireland, clearer skies, and the temperature is lower. today, put simply, rain in the south and sunshine in the north. it isa the south and sunshine in the north. it is a bit more complicated, we have a weather front pushing into the north sea and it gave us rain
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through the night. this weather front pushing steadily south, that is producing the cloud and the rain and through the day, the rain will come and go, the cloud remains, pushing east and south. if you don't have either of those, chances are you will have drizzle. north of that with the cloud, that will break, sunshine, and across northern scotland, the western isles very windy. thundery showers and hail, that will transfer northwards. eventually getting into the northern isles and leaving bright spells and sunny spells. a nice afternoon in northern ireland when the drizzle clears which it is doing now and across northern england, some sunshine. south of that, we have a weather front and thicker cloud and rain. north wales, you will brighten up rain. north wales, you will brighten upfor rain. north wales, you will brighten up for the afternoon. it will be mild in the south, 13, 14. through the evening and overnight, the
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weather front goes into the english channel, producing rain across the channel, producing rain across the channel islands as well, breezy here and minimum cloud behind it. showers packing in across scotland in particular and wintry on the tops of hills and mountains. it is cold in the north, mild in the south. temperatures of ten and 11, the overnight lowest temperatures we will see in the south in towns and cities. they are more representative of what we expect at our maximum daytime temperature in the south, round about 10 celsius. tomorrow, a weather front again hits cornwall. more cloud, that will break up through the day. for most of the uk tomorrow, showers in the north, light breezes, a lot of sunshine and it will feel very springlike. temperatures up to 15, possibly 16 to the north of london. a bit nippy in aberdeen at nine celsius and through thursday and into friday, this weather front drifts up the west coast, taking rain with that,
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squeezing the isobars, so it will be windy, but down the east coast with high—pressure hanging on, it will remain settled and dry with sunshine. sorry, dan, idid sunshine. sorry, dan, i did not mean to sound so rude to you! i would never ever consider you to be rude, don't worry, never apologise! absolutely right. in our book, you can never be rude, see you in half an hour. we had to say nice things about carol, she can hear! evenif carol, she can hear! even if she couldn't! i am joking! all this week, we've been looking at what different generations want from the chancellor and the budget this lunchtime. steph‘s been busy. she's been in scotland talking to young people, and yesterday, was making sausages with families in yorkshire. today, she's with baby boomers in birmingham. good morning. good morning. welcome good morning. welcome to good morning. welcome to bournville, good morning. welcome to bournville, welcome t| a good morning. welcome to bournville, a lot of carol fans here, good morning, everyone! mining! livelihood of this morning, best retirement village has around 300 residents who live here. we will
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talk to them today about their thoughts on what they would like to hear from the chancellor. keith is in charge of the pool table this morning and the team and starts going on as well, a lot going on this morning. every day, we have taught the generations about what they would like to hear. tim went to meet some of the post—war baby boomers and beyond at a walking club in norfolk. the walkers are welcome walking club of cromer, open to all ages, but today's group are all baby boomers, plus hilary's granddaughter, gabrielle. you're a lucky generation, aren't you? free education, cheap housing. yes, we were very lucky and it is a strain on younger people nowadays that don't have those facilities that we had so readily, i guess! i really enjoyed being a baby boomer. i think i was very lucky to be one! i'm grateful for so many things throughout my life. the access to education that i had,
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the ability to get a training and a vocation to get a job, the ease at which as a young man i could move from one job to another. by the time of the next general election, more than a third of the population of north norfolk will be aged over 65, it's one ofjust two regions in the uk where that's the case. compared to other generations, baby boomers are very likely to vote. politicians very keen to keep them happy. the baby boomers born between 1946 and 1965 are nearing the end of their careers and approaching retirement. on the surface, it looks like they've done quite well in recent years, with things like the triple lock protecting the state pension. but the big concern for this group is social care. even for the wealthy, it can wipe out their assets and for both rich and poor, the system is creaking. so, despite the views and fresh air of cromer, there are clouds on the horizon. the general things that councils
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supply are all being cut and that obviously includes care for the elderly. people are going to have to think very carefully about preparing for retirement. in this budget, i would like more money spent on healthcare and elderly care and, to pay for this, money can be taken from defence. you need to look after the younger ones to prepare them for when they're older. in this year's budget, i'd like to see more money spent on informal education and, to achieve this, i'd like to see cuts in benefits. in this budget, i'd like to see more money spent on preparing our youth, our young people, for the future. and in the budget, i'd like to see less spent on the military. hilary organises walks across norfolk. for her, exercise is the best investment. i think it's important they spend their money on ways of keeping people active.
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i think we should spend more on promoting physical education certainly in youngsters and less on the arts, where i think it's not quite so important. soon, we'll know if another baby boomer, the chancellor, philip hammond, agrees. tim muffet, bbc news, cromer. right. there we go, your shot, keith, finish the game. we will be talking, distracted, sorry, playing snooker with keith. i will be talking to the guys here about what they would like to hear from the chancellor, with experts to talk to because a lot of difference in terms of what people want. some similarities, a lot here talking about social care being gay concern and a what worried about their grandchildren and making sure they get onto the housing ladder. i'm
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going to have a go at playing darts now, can i have a shot? cheers. i am not very good, but in case you get hit in the face! 0h, hit in the face! oh, no! not bad. highfive! thank you very much, steph. see you later. news, travel and weather where you are. hello there. for most of us, it is going to be mild for the next few days. a few chilly spots across the north. but we have got a three—way
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split with the weather. southern areas holding on to the cloud and outbreaks of rain. tightly packed isobars across the northern half of scotla nd isobars across the northern half of scotland mean gales or severe gales. that's how it remains into the afternoon, the best of the brightness, northern ireland and northern england. most places making double figures, but it will be mild in the south with 12 to 14 celsius. it stays damp and cloudy across the south overnight. clear skies continue through central areas and it stays blustery. showers or longer spells of rain across scotland. so a few cold spots here, but elsewhere, it will be another mild night. so for thursday, again we have got showers to start the day across northern scotland. those tending to ease down. the winds falling lighterment a little bit of cloudy damp weather into the south—west. feeling mild or very mild across the south and the south east with highs
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of 14 or 15 celsius. so it is that ridge of high pressure which brings us that fine weather on thursday. it looks like a weather front is trying to encroach in from the west during friday. stronger winds as well, but it will be mild for the bulk of the country particularly southern and western areas. that said though for friday a cold start across north—east scotland for a while, but those mild south—westerlies will spread northwards to all areas. there will be outbreaks of rain across central and western areas. probably the best of the brightness again in the south east close to that area of high pressure and we could see 13 or 14 celsius. the weekend is unsettled. there will be rain at times, but sunshine here and there too. this is business live from bbc news with susannah streeter and sally bundock. feast or famine? it's budget day in the uk with the chancellor poised to deliver an "upbeat" speech, but how much money has he got to hand out and who will get it?
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live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 8th march. as the uk prepares to leave the european union, will the treasury provide a budget boost to cushion the blow? we'll speak to an expert for her predictions. also in the programme, crossing borders and crossing lines! chinese telecom giant zte has been handed a fine for violating sanctions in north korea. we'll be live in asia for the latest.
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