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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 9, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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just fuggit fuc— mn fu— ‘ii‘iiiw ii‘ul‘ei service, just after 11:303m the queen will make her service, just after 11:30am the queen will make her wait to victoria embankment gardens, where the memorial is situated overlooking the thames. the iraq afghanistan memorial and she will unveil it, that £1 million memorial that has been created by paul day with two stones to represent iraq and afghanistan. and a bronze disc linking them. in civilian and in the gulf region, in iraq and afghanistan, we commit ourselves to work —— for all those members of the military and
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civilians. that all people may live together in freedom, justice and peace. we pray for all, who in bereavement, disability and pain, continued to suffer the consequences of fighting and terror. and we remember, with thanksgiving and sorrow, those whose lives, in wars and conflictss past and present, have been given and taken away. there is a time for everything. and
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the season for every activity under heaven. a time to be born, and the time to die. a time to plant, and the time to operate. —— uproot. i time to kill and a time to heal. a time to kill and a time to heal. a time to kill and a time to heal. a time to tear down and the time to build. itime time to tear down and the time to build. i time to weep and a time to laugh. a time to mourn, and a time to dance. a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them. i time to embrace and a time to refrain. a
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time to search and a time to give up. atime time to search and a time to give up. a time to keep and a time the throwaway. a time to tear and a time to mend. a time to keep silent and a time to speak. a time to love and a time to speak. a time to love and a time to speak. a time to love and a time to hate. a time for war and a time to hate. a time for war and a time for peace. prince harry there, reading from the book of ecclesiastes, and know the chaplain general, doctor david coulter, with players. chaplain general, doctor david coulter, with prayers.
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let us pray. ever loving god, we remember those whom you have gathered from the storm of war into the piece of your presence. may that same piece, our fears the piece of your presence. may that same piece, ourfears —— may that same piece, ourfears —— may that same peace calm oui’ same piece, ourfears —— may that same peace calm ourfears, and bring harmony to the nations throughjesus christ our lord. amen. as i imagine what you are doing, i feel you by my side, like the morning when you left me. i wish i'd never cried.
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side, like the morning when you left me. iwish i'd never cried. foryour shoulders were heavy with guilt, and lots of sadness too. last words echoed inside my head of "i'll be coming home to you." and there you kiss left mine, until some distant day, to be your last, you promised, that you shall never go away. so i sit here looking out on the field is so green, sit here looking out on the field is so green, whilst you have only desert, and views you have only seen. but rest assured, i am with you. deep inside your heart. i will always be your strength and angel, you knew that from the start. the gate you through your dark days and help you with your thoughts —— to
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guide you through your dark days. and have the loving memories that never can be bought. you're with me every second. i hope you feel that too. because when i go to bed at night or i feel is you. though i wa ke night or i feel is you. though i wake up in the morning and see the empty space, a and returns —— a smile soon returns, as a photo i have in place. just upon your pillow, and there i say hello. for i know you'll feel that coming and feel our loving grow. that was a ploy written by hannah
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carpenter who wrote that for of one while he served in afghanistan —— that was a poem. no we will hear the metropolitan police quire, singing nearer my god to thee. # nearer, my god, to thee, nearer to thee # e'en though it be a cross that raiseth me, # nearer, my god, to thee
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# though like the wanderer, the sun gone down, # darkness be over me, my rest a stone; # yet in my dreams i'd be # nearer, my god, to thee # nearer, my god, to thee, nearer to thee! # there let the way
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appear, steps unto heaven # all that thou sendest me, in mercy given # angels to beckon me # nearer, my god, to thee # nearer, my god, to thee, nearer to thee! # then, with my waking thoughts bright with thy praise, 7
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# out of my stony griefs bethel i'll raise; 7 # so by my woes to be? # nearer, my god, to thee # nearer, my god, to thee, nearer to thee! 7 # or if, onjoyful wing cleaving the sky, 7 # or if, onjoyful wing cleaving the sky # sun, moon, and stars forgot, upward i fly
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# still all my song shall be, 7 nearer, my god, to thee nearer, my god, to thee, nearer to thee! #. that was the metropolitan police quire, and know a that was the metropolitan police quire, and knowa reading by victoria whittaker who works by the ministry of defence as a civilian and was deployed to afghanistan in
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2014 and whose father was deployed. he went up the mountain, and after he sat down his disciples came to him, and then he began to speak. he taught them, saying blair said by the poor in spirit because theirs is the poor in spirit because theirs is the kingdom in spirit —— saying blessed are the poor in spirit. blizzard are the merciful for they shall receive mercy. bless it are the pure at heart because they shall see god. blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness sake,
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for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. blessed are you when people to all kinds of evil against you and my account. rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven. for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you... victoria whittaker, a civilian working with the ministry of defence, representing the civilians who are remembered here as well. let us who are remembered here as well. let us prey to the lord. we pray for the leaders of the nations, that you will guide them in the ways of freedom, justice and truth. lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer. we pray for those who bear arms and a half of the nation, that they may have
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discipline and discernment, courage and compassion. lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer. we pray for all civilians who have served in conflict. we give thanks for their courage, skill and commitment. conflict. we give thanks for their courage, skilland commitment. lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer. we pray for our enemies and those who wish us harm, that you may turn the hearts of all the —— the kindness and friendship. lord, in your mercy, hear our prayer. we pray for the wounded and the captive, the grieving and the homeless, that in all their trials they may know your love and support. lord, in your
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mercy, hear our prayer. most holy god and father, hear our prayers for all who strive for peace and all who yearn forjustice, help us who today rememberthe yearn forjustice, help us who today remember the cost of war, to work for a better tomorrow, and as we commend to you lives lost in terror and conflict, bring us all in the end to the piece of your presence through end to the piece of your presence throuthesus christ, end to the piece of your presence through jesus christ, our end to the piece of your presence throuthesus christ, our lord. amen oui’ throuthesus christ, our lord. amen our father, who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. thy will be done, in earth as it is in heaven. give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses, as we
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forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us, and lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil, for thine is the kingdom and the glory forever and ever. the lord's prayer they are, and now the act of commitment. let us commit ourselves to responsible living and faithful service. will you strive for all that makes for peace. we will. will you seek to heal the wounds of war‘s we will. will you work for a just future for all humanity7 we will. merciful god, we offer to you the fears in us that have not yet been
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cast out by love. may we accept the hope you have placed in the hearts of all people and live lives of justice, courage and mercy, through jesus christ, our risen redeemer. amen. the act of remembrance started with the last post. last post bugle call the last post bugle call
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bagpipes play the lament their played by the
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paper, and now the bugles of the royal marines. —— played by the piper. to the living, grace, to the departed, rest. to the church, the queen, the commonwealth and all people, peace, unity and concord. and the us and all god's servants, life everlasting. and the blessing of god almighty, the father, the son and the holy spirit, come down upon you and remain with you always. amen. # god save our gracious queen. # long live our noble queen. # god save the queen.
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# send her victorious # happy and glorious # long to reign over us # god save the queen. and that concludes this service of dedication here at horse guards parade, in memory of those who served and fought in the various conflicts since 1990, the golf
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campaign, in iraq, and the campaign in afghanistan as well, and notjust the service service men and women who served in iraq and afghanistan, but also the civilians. aid workers and workers involved in reconstruction after the wa i’s involved in reconstruction after the wars in iraq and afghanistan. from here the queen and the duke of edinburgh will now make the short journey to victoria embankment gardens, which is where we will see the queen unveil the iraq afghanistan memorial, which has been created at the cost of £1 million. £1 million donated by members of the public, a permanent memorial to servicemen and women of iraq and
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afghanistan and the civilians there too. and it is two monuments, two separate stones that represent iraq and afghanistan, linked by a brass disc, which represents both the troops and the civilians who took pa rt troops and the civilians who took part in the iraq and afghanistan conflicts. i am joined part in the iraq and afghanistan conflicts. iam joined here part in the iraq and afghanistan conflicts. i am joined here at horse guards parade, as we watch the end of the service of dedication, by lieutenant colonel cliff of the royal marines, who served in these conflicts. what do this service mean to you, lieutenant colonel? it was the final stop on a really important chapter in many people's lives, and
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for me it was really memorable and a wonderful occasion to come here. the brits do pagea ntry wonderful occasion to come here. the brits do pageantry really well and i think today we are dead ourselves. beautiful day for it as well. so far, so good, as they say. but in a wider context, this attempt to remember the conflict we have seen, really in the last quarter of a century in iraq and afghanistan, and represent and remember notjust the service men and women like yourselves, but the civilians as well. is that important? of course, and asa well. is that important? of course, and as a reservist i have a foot in both camps. the civilians in those countries, and indeed the uk civilians who deployed to afghanistan and iraq as well.m civilians who deployed to afghanistan and iraq as well. it has been, both iraq and afghanistan, they have been at times politically controversial, obviously, but at the same time as a serviceman out there, did you always feel you had the country behind you in what you were doing, perhaps not with the politics
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of the war but... today is absolutely not about the politics but it is about remembering the men and women and sadly those, many of them, who did not come back. we a lwa ys them, who did not come back. we always felt we had the 100% support of the uk people. and 682 service men and women who lost their lives in those conflicts. yes, for me the assault into iraq was marked by them, the largest ever helicopter assault into the peninsula. the helicopter in front of mine crashed, killing all the occupants, and that was really a stark reminder that this was absolutely not a game, it was a very real occasion. to have lost people you served with, friends7 lost people you served with, friends? absolutely. everyone here has had their own lives marked to some extent, and as we mentioned earlier i am carrying a cross that oui’ earlier i am carrying a cross that ourchaplain, earlier i am carrying a cross that our chaplain, the chaplain of the fleet, gave me before we went in, andi fleet, gave me before we went in, and i have held it with me ever
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since as i was lucky enough to come back. we are hearing from the military bands now, representing the three services, the army, the navy and the royal air force as well. this is very much all three services represented here? that is right, of course. those bands have a very real wartime role as well. our own band deployed alongside us in afghanistan, iraq, everywhere we go, andi afghanistan, iraq, everywhere we go, and i am happy to save are my guilty pleasure. i have loved the royal marines band every time i have heard them, they always stir something in me, but lovely to see the other services alongside, as you say. this drumhead service, as it is known, an ancient british military tradition we re ancient british military tradition were really in the field you can stack comes together and make a makeshift altar on the battlefield to have a religious service. you can, and it is something that has continued over many hundreds of
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yea rs. continued over many hundreds of years. you do not see a lot of drums in afghanistan and iraq but it is lovely to see today. for you and all the other people who served in iraq and afghanistan, is this an important point you think where the nation stops and remembers everything that has been done in those two countries? everything that has been done in those two countries7|j everything that has been done in those two countries? i think so. i think it is, as you say, an important point, a full stop, to a degree. that as a nation, and globally, we move forward. and of course you look back with pride on what you did but at times must have been very difficult? it was extraordinary and bits of it were so very much like training, and it is reassuring that the training is so realistic, but as we went down to the peninsula, the united states exchange officer was down beside us on his knees praying and i remember thinking, that doesn't happen at dartmoor when you are in training. we are about to see the memorial
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unveiled on victoria embankment gardens. it is a memorial that will be there for future generations. yes, i mean it is something that the uk has always done very well. we have had memorials for every conflict, which have lasted and stood the test of time. i have no doubt that future generations will look on that as we do on the other memorials. yes, and a chance really for all—time, for people to come and remember what happened in those conflicts of iraq and afghanistan. it is interesting, i was speaking to paul day who has created this structure, and on it we will see both troops, helping with a medical evacuation in afghanistan i think, but also civilian aid workers, working in schools and so on. absolutely. they helped reconstruct a school and
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that was one of the first bits of reconstruction efforts that happened and continued with some fantastic work by many civilian workers to took personal risk in order to deliver the aid to those countries. did you feel, obviously, there is the fighting and so on, but then after that, there is the reconstruction and it is trying to rebuild these countries and put them back together? that's more complex than the fighting as you say. i suspect we will see that reconstruction effort continue for many years to come. well, for the moment lieutenant colonel cliff owe dare, thank you. we're going to see the unveiling of the memorial, the iraq—afghanistan memorial in a moment. as we were saying, this is a £1 million memorial that's been created right on the banks of the river thames.
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river thames. it isa river thames. it is a memorial that really belongs to the public because the public contributed. paul day who created it has created the battle of britain memorial and the sculpture outside st pancras london station of the man and woman kissing and embracing. so this is, we werejust and woman kissing and embracing. so this is, we were just talking to and woman kissing and embracing. so this is, we werejust talking to him earlier on, this is a remarkable structure that you're about to see the queen unveil and i think we can see her just making the queen unveil and i think we can see herjust making her way to that memorial structure that she is about to unveil, but it is two monoliths, linked, the two of them representing iraq and afghanistan and representing the services you were hearing of servicemen and women and civilians and these two stones
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linked by a bronze disc and on the huge bronze disc really we see civilians, humanitarian workers, aid workers, but also troops. who took pa rt workers, but also troops. who took part in those campaigns. the queen and the duke of edinburgh meeting people who served in both the military and a civilian capacity in iraq and afghanistan over the last quarter of a century and the queen will be presented with a pose bya queen will be presented with a pose by a two—year—old boy and that is alfie lunn the son of a military couple, sergeant mark lunn and
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corporal michelle lunn, both in the armed forces who both served in the iraq and afghanistan campaigns and alfie, their two—year—old son will present her majesty the queen the queen with a posy in a moment and then she will unveil the memorial which is what today is all about, remembering all those, the hundreds of thousands who served in iraq and afghanistan and i'm also joined of thousands who served in iraq and afghanistan and i'm alsojoined here now by tommy ross, captain in the royal marine reserves who has served for many, many years, not only in afghanistan, and iraq, but in kosovo and northern ireland. a guest here of the royal british legion. thank you for being with us tommy, as we're just watching the queen and the duke of edinburgh, what are your thoughts on this remarkable memorial and there it is, it is just
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thoughts on this remarkable memorial and there it is, it isjust coming into view now. we haven't really been able to see it before now. we've heard all about it. but what are your thoughts representing the conflicts that you fought in? are your thoughts representing the conflicts that you fought in7|j think it is so important. i mean i have lost many, many friends and quite a few friends, but i think it is the overall commitment that we've given, sacrifices and support to these operations and to the people of afghanistan and iraq. and as we have been saying, this is notjust a tribute to the military, people like yourselves, but also the civilians who've work in these conflict zones either during the conflict or indeed afterwards helping to rebuild these countries. yes, i mean today's battles, the operations we're involved in, it is across the whole spectrum, we need troops on the ground to do the job as such in a battlefield area, but also we need
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the full support, the full support we give to our society. we need in those theatres as well. and we have the, we're going to hear the blessing now. let us pray that this place be always a place of peace, where troubles can be shared and laid down, fears recede, and memories treasured. amen. to the gory of god and in honour of the commitment and duty of all those both civilian and military whose service is commemorated here. i dedicate this memorial in the name of the father, sa of the son and of the holy spirit. amen.
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may this memorial commemorate the lives and service of all who took pa rt lives and service of all who took part in the operations in iraq and afghanistan. as we acknowledge their sacrifice and dedication. may it remind us and all who pass by of the bravery, commitment, and selflessness of those who served. may it remain inspiration to us and all who follow to do our duty with courage and integrity in the service of god and all human kind through jesus christ our lord. amen. go forth into the world in peace. be of good courage. hold fast that which is good. render to no one evil for
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evil, strengthen the faint—hearted, support the weak, help the afflicted. honour everyone. love and serve the lord. rejoicing in the power of the holy spirit. and the blessing of god almighty, the father, the son and the holy spirit, be among you and remain with you always. amen. well, that was the prayer of dedication at the memorial, the iraq—afg hanistan dedication at the memorial, the iraq—afghanistan memorial led by the bishop of lambeth the right reverend nigel stock and there you can see this extraordinary memorial that's been created by paul day and the two halves, the two stone monoliths representing iraq and afghanistan
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and linked by that bronze disc, that huge bronze medallion and i'm not sure if you can see the detail on that bronze disc, but it's on one side paul day who created was explaining to me earlier, on one side, it is an engraving of troops, there you can see, troops who were just evacuating a medical casualty from the battlefield in afghanistan asa from the battlefield in afghanistan as a helicopter comes in and on the other side, just round the other side of the monument from where the queen is now, is the civilian effort in iraq and afghanistan represented by humanitarian workers giving out aid supplies, workers in schools and also the political workers who try to liase with the government and the
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politician in iraq and afghanistan and the queen and the duke of edinburghjust being and the queen and the duke of edinburgh just being shown there this iraq—afg hanistan edinburgh just being shown there this iraq—afghanistan memorial that is going to be there on the banks of the thames at victoria embankment gardens alongside other memorials to other conflict, but there for future generations to see depicted what was donein generations to see depicted what was done in this long period, this intense period of military conflict that the united kingdom has been involved with ever since 1990, the invasion by saddam hussein of kuwait and the subsequent campaign to liberate kuwait, but interest then the gulf campaign and the iraq campaign campaign and the afghanistan campaign and not ending until 2015 with the withdrawal of the last british troops from afghanistan. and paul day there, who
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has created this, explaining what he was trying to create with this memorial. he said it was, when i talked to him earlier, it was an attempt to show gratitude of the british people to those who served in iraq and afghanistan and also the civilians who have been out there as well. so hundreds of thousands of people really represented there and of course those who fell, the 682 servicemen and women who lost their lives in iraq and afghanistan as well. well, captain tommy roberts watching this, you must be filled with immense pride watching this service of dedication at horse guards, but now the queen unveiling this monument which will be there for all time on the banks of the thames for people to come and remember7 thames for people to come and remember? that's the important. it isa remember? that's the important. it is a mark. it is a mark where eve ryo ne is a mark. it is a mark where everyone from like, you know, the quys everyone from like, you know, the
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guys who were working right at the front line all the way back to people who support through charities, ngos and the likes of the british legion. it's something we can look to and we can remember those. it is very sombre today, but also a celebration of those that did make the ultimate sacrifice. and you have known many people in the services who have lost their lives during these conflicts7 services who have lost their lives during these conflicts? yes, personally and when they did pay the sacrifice, i was very close to them as well and i buried a few fellow royal marines and it's extremely sad, but they will always be fresh in our memories. and 2500 people here, obviously not everybody can be represented, not all the families of those who have served or lost their lives can be represented. yes, i mean, ifully lives can be represented. yes, i mean, i fully understand that and because i'm a royal marine, we come from every corner of both the united kingdom and the world in a lot of
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respects, so there are a lot of people that can't make it here, but at least there is something, if they do come here, they can mark and visit and pay their respects as well. both iraq and afghanistan were politically controversial at the time. did you always feel as a service man out there, that you have people back at home rooting for you whatever they thought about the rights and the wrongs of the conflict7 rights and the wrongs of the conflict? yeah, definitely. as a services man, it is important to have the support from your family, but the community. it is not a political thing. you're doing your duty and you're doing yourjob, but the thing i remember is that the people of afghanistan and iraq, when we did the operations, the people i met on the ground are incredibly strong and resilient people and when i looked them in the eye i could say and remember that we did, we brought, you know, the times when we we re brought, you know, the times when we
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were deployed, i had smiles and people, we were bringing a lot more than an invasion, i mean, in iraq, people seen us as we than an invasion, i mean, in iraq, people seen us as we were than an invasion, i mean, in iraq, people seen us as we were lin raters ina lot people seen us as we were lin raters in a lot of ways as soon as we arrived. well, thank you very much indeed for being with us, tommy roberts. we're just looking indeed for being with us, tommy roberts. we'rejust looking now as we see the queen and the duke of edinburgh having unveiled that memorial to all those, hundreds of thousands and that is the little boy that i was talking to you about earlier on. he isjust two that i was talking to you about earlier on. he is just two years old, alfie lunn. he's presenting her majesty the queen with a posy and alfie is the son of a military couple who found love really with the conflicts in iraq and afghanistan. sergeant mark
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lunn, his father, and corporal michelle lunn and they met in the rivals which they were both assigned to, 4 rivals and their son there —— rifles, their son there, alfie who presented the queen with a posy, a representative, if you like of the many british service families who have contributed so much and the queen carrying that posy that she has just been given by little alfie ona has just been given by little alfie on a sunny has just been given by little alfie on a sunny day actually. a beautiful day where she has unveiled that memorial to remember those who made so memorial to remember those who made so many contributions in iraq and afghanistan and i'm joined now by
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lieutenant colonel tom, conservative mpfor lieutenant colonel tom, conservative mp for tunbridge, but served in iraq and afghanistan. what are your thoughts on today with this wonderful service of dedication, we have seen and now the unveiling of this memorial7 have seen and now the unveiling of this memorial? well, it is hugely moving. it's about 14 years ago that i served in the invasion of iraq and about 12 years ago that i was first sent to afghanistan and spent many yea rs sent to afghanistan and spent many years there. and it's a huge reminder of the number of friends that we all made out there and in fa ct i that we all made out there and in fact ijust that we all made out there and in fact i just bumped that we all made out there and in fact ijust bumped in half a dozen of the guys i served with, it is a nice reunion, but it is also very moving because we all lost one or two friends who haven't come back and so, this is an opportunity to remember them and to have a memorial that speaks of the sacrifice that oui’ that speaks of the sacrifice that our country that speaks of the sacrifice that our cou ntry co nsta ntly that speaks of the sacrifice that our country constantly has to make in order to keep ourselves free and safe. a prolonged period that this is representing, almost a quarter of a isn'try of conflict, that britain has been pretty much permanently engaged with since 1990 in iraq and
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afg hanistan7 engaged with since 1990 in iraq and afghanistan? when that first invasion of iraq, sorry of kuwait, happened and i ended up serving in iraq and afghanistan and i'm not alone, but it is amazing how it shaped a generation of soldiers, sailors and airmen and how it shaped oui’ sailors and airmen and how it shaped our armed forces. we're more capable and more combat ready today than we have been and part is done to that experience. today, as we have been saying really, very much about civilians as well as the military, not just the civilians as well as the military, notjust the military, who took part in those campaigns7 notjust the military, who took part in those campaigns? well, that's right. the number of civilians who now serve alongside our armed forces as diplomats, as aid workers, as mod civilians is huge because the reality is the modern warfare isn't about destroying the enemy in the world first world war sense, it is about influencing the population to make sure we achieve the results without fighting and that means hearts and minds as we hear and that
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means building up civil government and that means setting up civil communities institutions and the firstjob i did in afghanistan was helping set—up the national security council and the second was creating the first civilian administration in helmand province since the communist collapsed 20 years earlier. i appreciate the effort that civilians have made, it's huge. and doing all sorts of different work in knees countries from aid distribution, to you know, getting schools up and running, political work as well... yes. well, absolutely ben. what i found fascinating was i spend a year with the new governor of helmand trying to establish the first non—warlord administration in 2006 and 2007. we were building schools, roads and trying to get markets going again that hadn't been operating for ages and a lot of the stuff we were doing was trying to get companies to roll out mobile phone technology and echoes with my problems in kent today, but it's,
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these things, these civilian infrastructure projects that make such a difference. they dissuade people from fighting and they tie people from fighting and they tie people into the economy and they make a huge difference to the capability of the british forces and then to roll out and to take the fight to the enemy rather than to be tied up with trying to deliver projects that are much better delivered by diplomats. iraq and afghanistan were controversial. we see people were behind the troops when they went to fight there and behind the civilians when they were serving there, but they were divisive7 serving there, but they were divisive? well, they were divisive, as you rightly identify, but today is not a day about that division, todayis is not a day about that division, today is a day when we remember those who served and so many will be here today, but so many will be watching from home and remembering family and friends who went and todayis family and friends who went and today is a day for that kind of unity, the unity that brings the nation together and reminds us that whichever part of our island you're from, one of my great friends died,
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i went to his funeral in scotland, i served with one of the bravest men is an ulsterman. the number of people who have come together in our armed forces in a very, very strong symbol of unity is extraordinary and that's what this day is about. we have been seeing the drumhead dismantled and ta ken have been seeing the drumhead dismantled and taken away. the drumhead service, it is an old hilltry concept, isn't it, where you stack the drums together to make an altar in the middle of a battlefield and have a religious service and that's what has been replicated here at horse guards parade in front of the queen? well, that's rightment we used to do drumhead services, i remember them in vividly in afghanistan. we used to do them when somebody was killed and they were very often done before the body was loaded on to a plane to take it home and they were always incredibly moving as in the silence of the afg ha n moving as in the silence of the afghan desert, the formality, a little bit of pomp, if you like, was altogether, not in the glorious uniforms you see here today, but in
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desert uniform, the drumhead would be assembled and the pa dray would say words and it was essential for keeping the morale of the forces together, losing friends just because you're in the articled forces doesn't make it easier, it is still difficult to get up and conduct the missions that you have to do. we can see bands representing all three services, the army, the royal navy and the raf as well. this is very much all services, of course, represented here, all the british military as well as the civilians who've ta ken british military as well as the civilians who've taken part in these conflicts 7 civilians who've taken part in these conflicts? that's right, ben. what is also nice to see is the police are here because they are often ignored, but policemen from northern ireland, from the united kingdom, from all over the united kingdom, served also in afghanistan in the british embassy drug team, in helping to set—up the afghan police force. the police were as instrumental in creating the rule of
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law and the environment as we wanted to see as the military. we're seeing tony blair, the former prime minister is here, as well as the royal family. extraordinary presence of many, many royals, many politicians, the current prime minister, former prime ministers, the foreign secretary, and so on. well, i think that speaks of the importance that people place on it. i'm not here as a politician, i'm here as a veteran. it is nice to see prince harry here. he's not here as a member of the royal family, he's here because he served, we're grateful, having people from all walks of life is what makes them stronger. there isn't a military class, every creed and class is represented. we are the symbol of the union that makes us stronger. and prince harry, who you mngsed there, the reading, of course, he was in afghanistan, serving alongside other british troops? we served at the same time, but i can't
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say we ever met, but he served twice, of course, he was once an air controller and the second time an apache pilot. the range of different skills that various people brought to the service of our country in places like iraq and afghanistan, is one of the reasons that the armed forces makes such an important contribution not just forces makes such an important contribution notjust to our combat capability as a nation, but also to oui’ peace capability as a nation, but also to our peace building capability and to oui’ our peace building capability and to our creation as a nation at home because, of course, the building of civilian society, the ethos that we embody in the armed forces is reflected through many different youth groups and many different elements of our own nation is one of the reasons why11th november, remembrance sunday is the national day. so just to conclude and sum-up really, it has been a day really of remembering two conflicts and hundreds of thousands of british people who have taken part, civilian
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and military. it's exactly right and the contributions of notjust soldiers and notjust sailers and not just soldiers and notjust sailers and notjust airmen, but civilians, doctors and policemen and indeed, from your own profession, ben, many journalists were out there, as well and together, we're all part of an effort to try and build a better future and yes, of course, there are problems and of course, there are difficulties in these countries, but the improvements are really principle. thank you for being with us principle. thank you for being with us and sharing your thoughts with us. many thanks for being with us. well, we're seeing there one of the bands, the military bands, playing at the end of this remarkable
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service of dedication here on horse guards parade. the queen and the duke of edinburgh are here to witness the drumhead service to remember all those who fought in iraq and afghanistan including the 682 who lost their lives, but also the civilians involved in rebuilding those countries and in distributing aid and working with the civilian populations of both iraq and afghanistan. and the queen then going from here, from horse guards parade to victoria embankment gardens to unveil that memorial on the banks of the thames that will be there for future generations to see what was done in the name of this country in iraq and afghanistan and now a look at the weather with ben rich. good morning. sunny skies there in
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central london and in fact many parts of the country enjoying sunshine. this picture is from one of our weather watchers in suffolk. beautiful blue skies. that isn't the case everywhere. down to the far south—west, this is how it looks in cornwall earlier. grey skies and patchy fog. some dense fog and as you can patchy fog. some dense fog and as you can see patchy fog. some dense fog and as you can see from the satellite picture the murky conditions really unrelenting here. similar across the channel islands. at the other end of the country, across the northern isles, one or two showers and a blustery wind. this between, plenty of sunshine to be had. a nice day to get out and about. this is 3pm. ten celsius in glasgow in the sunshine. easily up to ten or 11 celsius in northern ireland. a little bit of patchy cloud here and there. it is already 15 celsius close to london. i wouldn't be surprised if it got to 16 celsius and maybe 17 celsius here this afternoon. a decent day for wales, but always that cloud and
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mist playing cornwall and into the channel islands as well. this evening and tonight, the cloudy, murky drizzly weather will begin to spill its way northwards and eastwards again. ahead of it, a good pa rt eastwards again. ahead of it, a good part of scotland, eastern england, it will get chilly under clear skies, there could be a touch of frost. two celsius in aberdeen, three in norwich celsius, but out west, spots of drizzle and the murky conditions, it will be milderment tomorrow, some early sunshine for eastern scotland and eastern england, but it won't last long because the cloud and the patchy drizzle will be moving in. north devon and north wales, anywhere to the north of high ground could see a few breaks in the cloud and that could push temperatures up to 14 or 15 celsius. in the weekend, some changes ahead. it is a mixed story, we will see some bands of rain with dry weather and sunshine in between, but by the end of the weekend, we start to bring in more of a westerly wind and that will introduce slightly, slightly, cooler air. wind and that will introduce slightly, slightly, coolerair. so we can sum it—up like this. there
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will be sunny spells, but rain at times and gradually, slowly, but surely, it will turn cooler. let's put detail on that. saturday likely to see a band of very patchy rain sinking southwards and eastwards. not much rain into the far south—east, mild for the time being. on sunday something cooler and fresher spilling in from the west. bands of rain, some sunshine and highs of nine celsius to 13 celsius. this is bbc news, and these are the top stories developing at midday: the chancellor comes under fire for his planned changes to national insurance contributions for the self—employed. he says he'll listen to mp5 who have voiced concern. the health secretary says it is essential a&e departments in england meet their targets for waiting times no extra money has input into the health service. —— now that extra
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money has been put in. an australian man alleged to have posed as justin bieber online is charged with more than 900 child sex offences. made this memorial commemorates the lives and services of all who took pa rt lives and services of all who took part in the operations in iraq and afghanistan. i'll be reporting live from horse guards parade, where the queen has been attending a service in honour of all those who served in iraq and afghanistan and has unveiled a memorial in their memory. good afternoon. it's thursday, the 9th of march. i am anita mcveigh. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the chancellor philip hammond says he'll listen to backbenchers' concerns about planned changes to national insurance contributions for the self—employed.
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the move, announced in yesterday's budget, will mean many people who work for themselves paying an average of £240 a year more. some conservative mps argue it breaks a manifesto pledge. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell says labour will oppose the move. live to westminster and our assistant political editor norman smith. when the chancellor says he will listen to disgruntled backbenchers, how hard listen to disgruntled backbenchers, how ha rd exactly listen to disgruntled backbenchers, how hard exactly if you're listening7 how hard exactly if you're listening? he will have to listen very ha rd listening? he will have to listen very hard because there is no doubt of the pressure he is now under, though privately treasury sources say he is now "bullish" about his ability to push through this policy on national insurance contributions, partly because they think they did not sell it very well yesterday and they think once they get over the
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fairness argument, in other words it is just fairness argument, in other words it isjust simply fairness argument, in other words it is just simply a case of equalising the tax burden, between those who work for a boss and those who work for themselves, they might be able to make a betterfist for themselves, they might be able to make a better fist of trying to sell this policy. but be under no doubt they are under huge pressure because many tory mps frankly take the view this as an attack on people they should be seeking to encourage, in other words those who go out, start a business, grow a company, ta ke start a business, grow a company, take a risk. more than that, that it isa take a risk. more than that, that it is a breach of the conservative pa rty‘s is a breach of the conservative party's election is a breach of the conservative pa rty‘s election manifesto. significantly, philip hammond will not be able to escape a parliamentary vote on this issue, because the implement these changes there has to be legislation, which means there has to be a vote, albeit this morning mr hammond was sending divide. we regard this issue as dealt with. we dealt with that in 2015. what we are doing is
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addressing a basic unfairness in the current system. benefits available to the self—employed have significantly improved. they have full access to the state pension now, which is worth £1800 per year on average to a self—employed person. as we go forward, with our negotiations with the european union, we need to make this country strong and fit and ready for the future. in labour ranks there is an interesting discussion going on. the front bench are opposed to these changes, but some actually welcomed what philip hammond is doing because they think he is i running out a flaw in the tax system. they also think the changes are progressive and fairand they think the changes are progressive and fair and they question why a self—employed consultant, for example, earning £50,000, should ta ke example, earning £50,000, should take less tax than someone who just happens to work for a boss, although the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell stressed this morning he would work with any tory rebels to try to
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defeat this move. what i did yesterday was address a basic continuing unfairness —— we'll get support wherever we can on this issue. why? i represent a constituency where there are a large number of self—employed, and i tell you, at the moment they're on the edge. they're on the edge because of this dip in consumer spending and what's happening in the economy at the moment. this is not a time to be penalising them. we want a fair system — let's plan that fair system so those employed and self—employed are treated fairly, but also let's end this bogus self—employment that has exploited so many people. now, one of the reasons i think why the treasury are digging in here, it is not just bull—headedness the treasury are digging in here, it is notjust bull—headedness and not wanting to back down in the face of a threat of revolt, but it is this difference in the system, that it could cost them heavily, billions of pounds. philip hammond said yesterday for instance he believes it has already cost the treasury £5 billion this year alone, and a real concern is that as we move into an
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increasingly sort of digital economy, more and more people will t economy, more and more people will opt to go it alone and work for themselves, and therefore the potential losses for the treasury are even greater. one other interesting argument the treasury seem interesting argument the treasury seem to be deploying is, that they are saying to tory mps, ok, you want to billion pounds more for social care, well, where do you think the money will come from if we do not press ahead with a change to national insurance? so we are beginning to get a bit of treasury fightback in the threat of this revolt over the national insurance contributions. overall does the treasury feel pretty confident it can weather this storm from its own backbenchers all girl —— or elsewhere because it failed in a pretty u nassa ila ble elsewhere because it failed in a pretty unassailable position? well, i think the treasury will always talk a good game 24 hours after a budget. they will not run up the white flag after the chancellor has sat down, so no surprise at the moment they are talking tough. i
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guess it depends how determined tory mps are in particular to have a fight. bear in mind the government will already be going through a pretty difficult time with brexit. the question is do they really want to cause even more difficulties for the government on the critical issue of tax and the economy? the danger for of tax and the economy? the danger foer of tax and the economy? the danger for mr hammond is this. if you look at george osborne's plate when he sought to press ahead with changes to tax credits, again and move which many tories were not happy about because they felt it hit the so—called strivers, people who were not well paid but went out to get a job, and in the end he had to back down. where we are at the moment, it is fairto down. where we are at the moment, it is fair to say mr hammond is under massive pressure, but he is obviously clearly reluctant to back down. he will try to tough it out and we might get some sort of a review which could mitigate against some of the damage being done. i think i am being joined by graham richard, the conservative mp. you are supportive of the chancellor's
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stands, i believe. the understand why many of your colleagues are concerned? of course there are concerns because nobody wants to see anybody paying more tax and for people who are self employed the changes coming in will look like a tax increase, but of course it is very important that the 85% of people paying class one contributions, nothing changes for them at all, and i do think if you're going to fund social care effectively and put in an extra £2 billion, you have to find that money from somewhere and have to do it in as their away as possible. lets cut to the chase and be clear. it is a breach of the tory party manifesto. would it be simpler, if the government wants to sell this message, if they put their hands up and said, we have broken it but there are reasons. you could argue that. i think we are splitting hairs one way or the other, you're moving people from one class to another. i think it is fair to say to people working in our hospitals, you are
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paying more in national insurance than someone who is self—employed and creating a company and that does not feel very fair to them so, yes, we will be asking a bit more from people who are making profits of more than £32,000 a year, and that will be a slight increase, but what we have to do to balance that is make sure the issue of maternity leave, and also for me, pensions, that we resolve those at the same thing, so that the benefits equal, if you like, the changes on the national insurance. many of your collea g u es national insurance. many of your colleagues are saying the difference is that people who go out and start a business are taking a risk, and at the moment they do not enjoy the same benefit entitlement, so therefore, yes, they do deserve a bit of leeway with national insurance? they do enjoy some of the same benefits, to be fair, because we made changes to the state pension that were incredibly good for the
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self—employed, but it is true that maternity and also paternity leave is an issue and the chancellor said he will look at that later this year. there is also an auto enrolment review. at the moment it is quite difficult for the self—employed to be part of that because who would pay the employers' contribution so there will be a review of that and because the changes to national insurance do not comment until 2017—18, there is time to sort out the other side of the balance sheet before the national insurance changes coming. what do you say to the argument that in principle the conservatives should wa nt to principle the conservatives should want to encourage, even if there is an element of unfairness, they should want to encourage self—employed people because that is the bedrock of economic growth? self—employed people because that is the bedrock of economic growth7|j the bedrock of economic growth?” think it is hugely important. i call them gloucester—preneurs in gloucestershire because they are hugely important to the community and theirfamily and hugely important to the community and their family and so on but if we are going to find more money for social care we have to balance that and it is only fair that the most
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successful self—employed make a fair and reasonable contribution to the cost of that as well. is what you're saying in effect that if these changes do not go through there is a question of the additional cash announced yesterday for care? well, or if the changes were not to go through clearly your fiscal position will not be as good, and we all respect the fact the chancellor has made some pretty tough decisions, and very sensible steady as she goes budget, good for the country living within our means, reassuring our creditors so interest rates do not go creditors so interest rates do not 9° up creditors so interest rates do not go up and all the rest of it, so i think this is part of a balanced budget and, you know, there will be some pain in 2018—19 for some entrepreneurs, but i think they can live with it. we know there will have to be a vote because it will have to be a vote because it will have to be a vote because it will have to go through with the legislation. given the reason may dash theresa may ‘s week narrow majority how likely will it be that they can get it through?”
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majority how likely will it be that they can get it through? i think it isa they can get it through? i think it is a question for the whips rather than me but i think they can support this because it is a question for people working in public services and employed by companies paying significantly more in national insurance at the moment. thank you very much for your time at the moment. a long way to go but we're getting a sense of some of the argument there. interesting there, saying that if you want to end the changes to national insurance contributions you have to think about the knock—on implications possibly for social care. norman, thank you very much. let's get some more reaction to this story. the government planned changes to national insurance contributions from the self—employed. joining me is forced on bell, chairman of the resolution foundation. —— thorston bell. and also andy chamberlain
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is from the association of independent professionals and the self—employed, and hejoins me live from central london. firstly to you, thorston, what is your view on it? it is about big tax incentives, individuals having a big incentives, individuals having a big incentive to be self—employed. someone that costs a firm £100,000 to employ would pay £7,000 left tax every year if they are self—employed rather than an employee, and that gap cannot stay. andy chamberlain, the perspective you are coming on, i assume you will not agree with that? we do not think it is the right thing to do. we feel the self—employed are the engine of the uk economy, that they enable their businesses they work for to be more innovative and ultimately create more jobs, and to single them out in the way they have done here for a tax hike, it feels unfair and doesn't give them the credit they deserve. thorston, let'sjust look
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at that point and he is making. he is saying the self—employed, the people who start their own businesses, they are the drivers of economic growth and that the actions of the chancellor in making these changes to national insurance contributions are going to deter that. he has a point, hasn't he?” am all for encouraging people to set up am all for encouraging people to set up their own businesses and grow our country but let's look at what is happening to supplement today. only 1196 happening to supplement today. only 11% of the self—employed today, what you might have called the traditional entrepreneurs employing other people and the growing firms, most of these people nowadays are either working at the top end in contractor work, either working at the top end in contractorwork, management, either working at the top end in contractor work, management, and we are seeing too many people and too many young men in particular being put into low—grade self—employment work. what other people just call work. what other people just call work. it is not clear the tax system should be encouraging either of those things. why is an accountant
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sitting next to unemployed a ccou nta nt sitting next to unemployed accountant doing almost exactly the samejob at accountant doing almost exactly the same job at paying accountant doing almost exactly the samejob at paying £7,000 less into the exchequer? that kind of incentive is in the end bad for the tax base and i do not think it is there the people. can you break down who you think will be affected by these national insurance changes? these changes will principally affect the top half of self—employed workers because there are two changes here. all self employed people are actually been given a tax break next april with the scrapping of what is called class 2, national insurance payments, everyone will get that. those earning over £8,000 or so get that. those earning over £8,000 or so will also have to pay 2% higher national insurance on their earnings, and where those two han solo is around £16,000. people earning more than that will take slightly more —— where those two cancel each other out is around £16,000. and day, and it is one of your colleagues on twitter this morning saying that it seems as
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though the additional risks the self—employed cake are not understood or valued by the chancellor but thorston bell is arguing many of the self—employed are not the risk—takers that one might imagine. tell us about the people you represent.” might imagine. tell us about the people you represent. i would agree with thorston that there is a concern around that lower end and there are some vulnerable workers in this population now of self—employed, and that is certainly a concern. and the changes announced yesterday may actually benefit some of those lower paid people, but anyone earning over £16,000 will see anyone earning over £16,000 will see a tax hike, and we would see you're still fairly low paid if you're in that bracket, so we are just a bit concerned that it will make life harder for some of the hardest working people in our economy. harder for some of the hardest working people in our economym there any way you can push back on this? we know and number of conservative backbenchers have already raised their concerns with the chancellor. yes, we will be making very strong representations to the government on this issue and
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we are already talking to quite a few mps to see, feeding our thoughts into them and they are giving us their thoughts, and it into them and they are giving us theirthoughts, and it is into them and they are giving us their thoughts, and it is clear there is a concern around this policy and we will do everything we can to help inform that argument. andy chamberlain from the the association of independent professionals and the self—employed, and thorston bell from the resolution foundation, thank you very much for your time today. and you can send us your questions about the budget and how it affects you — we'll put them to two personal finance experts at half past three this afternoon. you can text 61124, email askthis@bbc. co. uk and tweet using the hashtag bbcaskthis. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: that is our top story. the chancellor comes under fire for is planned changes to the national insurance contributions for the
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self—employed. the health secretary says it is essential a&e departments in england meet their targets for waiting times now that extra money has been put into the health service. and the queen has unveiled a new war memorial in central london to honour the british personnel who served in iraq and afghanistan. and in sport: let's cross over to will perry at the bbc sport centre. i suspect you may be discussing a certain match. yes, but later on. we will start with the rugby because benny vunipola is set to make his first appearance of the six nations after being named for england in their match against scotland on saturday. he is recovering from a knee ligament damage and played 72 minutes for saracens last week in. nathan hughes will continue at number eight with him on the bench. jonathanjoseph number eight with him on the bench. jonathan joseph and jack nowell on the wing, due to take on scotland, who will name their side at 1230
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this afternoon. arsenal's manager arsene wenger says he will consider the opinion of fans when he decides on his future at the club although it is not the most important factor. speaking to the media this morning he said he had not yet made up his mind and certainly had not told the players of his plans. unrest is growing amongst supporters following a dismal run in the premier league and that 10—2 thumping by bayern munich in the champions league.” have worked very hard for 20 years to make our fans have worked very hard for 20 years to make ourfans happy and when we lose games i understand they are not, and i don't want tojudge lose games i understand they are not, and i don't want to judge that. iam not not, and i don't want to judge that. i am not capable as well of doing my daily work with complete commitment after that. i have said many times you have to accept different opinions. many have already labelled it the greatest sporting comeback of all time. it's certainly the biggest
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in champions league history. barcelona overturned a 4—0 deficit against paris st germain with a 6—1 win in the most dramatic fashion at the camp nou. barcelona were 3—0 up before edininson cavani pulled one back to make it 3—1, so barca still needed three goals, neymar scored this free kick in the 88th minute. luis suarez then won a penalty which neymar converted in the 91st minute. before sergi roberto won it for barcelona with 95 minutes on the clock and they go through to the quarter—finals for the 10th year in a row. and heather watson and johanna konta will play each other for the first time on the wta tour, when they meet in the second round of the event at indian wells in california. konta was already through when watson came from a set down to beat the american nicole gibbs. konta will be the strong favourite — at number 11 in the world, she's way ahead of watson, who dropped to 108th this week. that is all the sport. we will have
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more from you in the next hour. thank you very much. theresa may is in brussels this lunchtime for what's expected to be her last eu summit before she triggers article 50. our deputy political editor jon pienaar is in brussels. jon, very symbolic in that sense. this particular summit for theresa may and the uk. can you tell us what she will be doing there? the eu leaders, including theresa may, arrived over the next hour or so. they will be speaking about migration, picking up from where they left off at that informal summit in malta. they will talk about russia, about the balkans, about russia, about the balkans, about security. for good measure theresa may may get sucked into a local difficulty, a bit of a feud going on between the president of the eu council donald tusk and his own polish government who are trying to drag him out of that seat, they are bitter opponents. it looks like this effort to get donald tusk out and stop serving a second term will fail but theresa may may have to get involved in some of that. she clearly would not want to because
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she will not want to upset too many people. the french and germans would keep him where he was, along with many other leaders, but in the matter of course does not want to upset the poles, or anyone else either. she needs friends with brexit coming up, not enemies. and we have heard from angela merkel and others again, reiterating the thought that proper substantive discussions on what happens next on the brexit process cannot begin until article 50 has actually been triggered? yes, they are pretty adamant about all of that, which leaves britain looking to raise informal talks with individual members of the european union justice take out the ground for the coming talks that finally kicked off when article 50 get the process going and we start heading towards the eu exit. it will be a tortuous process , the eu exit. it will be a tortuous process, two yea rs the eu exit. it will be a tortuous process, two years or so, and there is no sign or any of knowing how that will end up, which adds to the enormous uncertainty hovering over brexit and the future of the british economy and those uncertainties are in many ways quite strong enough as
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it stands. jon, thank you very much. more from jon waiter from brussels. the queen has unveiled a memorial in london in honour of all those from the uk who served in iraq and afghanistan between 1990 and 2015. the monument — on the banks of the thames — is dedicated to civilians as well as servicemen and women. before the unveiling, a special service took place in horse guards parade. let's go live to ben brown has been following events for us yes, anita, here at horse guards parade it was a service attended by the queen, the duke of edinburgh, members of the royalfamily, the duke of edinburgh, members of the royal family, the prime duke of edinburgh, members of the royalfamily, the prime minister, former primer ministers, and others, all year to remember the service of service men and women and also civilians in iraq and afghanistan over the last quarter of a century, through 1990, the gulf campaign,
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iraq, through to the last withdrawal of british troops from afghanistan in 2015, is almost a quarter of a century of continuous military service, and a memorial that has been unveiled at victoria embankment gardens, that million pound memorial funded by individual contributions from members of the public, that is remembering the service of both the military and civilians, aid workers, people involved in reconstruction in both iraq and afghanistan. let's talk to a couple of people who are here at the service, here at horse guards parade, melanie waters, chief executive of the charity that helps vetera ns, executive of the charity that helps veterans, help for heroes, veterans with injuries, and sue warner who was a nurse at the military hospital in camp bastion. you have been helped by help that he was. what have they done for you? they have been absolutely amazing. —— help the
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heroes. it has been an absolute honour to work with fellow veterans and other people too. they are very poignant to me, especially for helping with recovery, recovery in sport. i have had this great honour and privilege to participate in 2015 in the warrior games, then last year in the warrior games, then last year in the invictus games, and i really think help for heroes isjust such a wonderful place to be and the staff are just very helpful and supportive, and i think prince harry's invictus games, particularly with the slogan he uses, we are the captain of ourships with the slogan he uses, we are the captain of our ships and the masters of our destiny, and that is so important. of course prince harry was here doing a reading the data with other royals. melanie waters,
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help for heroes helped so many vetera ns help for heroes helped so many veterans from iraq and afghanistan, doesn't it? some people with really terrible life changing injuries? yes, we help about 20,000 people a year. we help them with their recovery, as you heard sue speak about, which is about moving forward and rebuilding your life, and that could be through sport, it could be through education, it could be through education, it could be through developing your career. it could actually be just helping to manage your sleep, very simple things that help you move forward and develop your life after you have beenin and develop your life after you have been in the services. and briefly, an important day—to—day to remember the veterans of afghanistan and iraq? —— day today. the veterans of afghanistan and iraq? -- day today. absolutely, so important we mark the dedication of our brave men and women in the forces, and also civilians who worked alongside them, and we also like to think about the families back at home supporting them. it is very important for us to think about
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it. three quarters of a million people served during that time and a third of those worked on more than one operational tour, and many were medically discharged, so we do remember those, we medically discharged, so we do rememberthose, we remember medically discharged, so we do remember those, we remember those who paid the ultimate sacrifice. good to speak to you both. melanie and sue, many thanks for being with us. as we say, the queen has now unveiled that memorial which will be there on the banks of the thames, at victoria embankment gardens, for future generations to see that war memorial in memory of all those who served in iraq and afghanistan. ben brown at horse guards parade for us, thank you very much. more now on the news the chancellor is coming under fire for is planned changes to national insurance contributions for the self—employed and of course that includes from within the party itself. let speak no to the conservative backbencher stephen mcpartland who joined us from his constituency in stevenage. good afternoon to you. you clearly feel this is a breach of the conservative ma nifesto this is a breach of the conservative manifesto pledge?”
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this is a breach of the conservative manifesto pledge? i think it possibly could be so we will try to ensure it doesn't happen. we will go up ensure it doesn't happen. we will go up there and deliver for these families who have taken that risk to set up small businesses, many of which employ apprentices and are the backbone of our economy. we will ensure this changes stop. how precisely will you do that? we already have the back channels open. we are ready to discuss and get this, a number of other conservatives mps within the party, andi conservatives mps within the party, and i believe he will be able to see sense and do a u—turn and do it quickly, philip hammond committee is a great chancellor. to you think there is any political leveraging there is any political leveraging the situation, vis—a—vis the government wanting unity on the brexit and article 50 of it? —— do you think that there is any political leveraging. no, as conservatives, we look at this separately, and my problem with this is very simply it sends the wrong message out to those families who have gone out and taken the risk and set upa have gone out and taken the risk and set up a small business and employ those apprentices cook so we —— so
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we have to support them. we have done it over the last seven years and we have to keep doing that and give them every opportunity to succeed in life. what about those well—paid professionals. we heard from the resolution foundation short while ago seeing many of these individuals are not necessarily in the position of taking a huge amount of risk. why should they pay less in national insurance contributions than paye employs? and number of reasons. people speak about them not having paternity or maternity pay, paid leave, things like that, but the other thing is most of those people self employed or not in that position. most of them are just getting by and a lot orjust those ordinary working families who have actually gone out there and taken the risk of setting up that small businesses and a lot employ apprentices and are at the backbone of our economy. a lot of those jobs have come forward as a result in the last seven years and that is through these people out there employing
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others. you speak about the risk element. but do you not fundamentally agree with the chancellor that this is equalising the tax burden? well, i mean there are tonight ways to equalise at tax burden, one is to raise taxes and the other is to lower it. you could lower national insurance for other people, they could do a whole variety of things. a lot could possibly be done. the actual amount of money available is only £144 million, almost nothing in the bigger scheme of things. the local authorities in my area waste more than that over the next year, local economic partnerships over the country have lost £3.5 billion over the last three or four so in terms of actual amount of money it is not significant when it comes to the government but it sends the wrong message. obviously feel strongly about this. are you prepared to create trouble for the government, of which your part, if necessary, to the changes? i never create trouble. i always negotiate with my collea g u es i always negotiate with my colleagues and try to get them to understand how i feel and how i
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represent people in my community and a lot of those colleagues will agree with me. when we get the tax credit changes we got the message across and they very clearly listened to that message and made the changes so, you know, myjob in politics is to represent my constituents and many of those are those small entrepreneurs who have just started their own business so from my point of view i am doing my ownjob, not causing trouble in my party but ensuring my party sticks true to its word and remains the party for people who want to go out there and get on in life. it is beautiful out there. blue skies. a few fluffy clouds. it is not the case everywhere. we have got gloomy weather. the best of the weather is across england and wales, northern ireland, scotland, apart from this far, far south—western tip of cornwall. here, it is actually, grey, misty, drizzly and murky, not
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a pretty picture, but the majority of the country enjoying a stunning day. temperatures might get up to 17 celsius in london. for most of us, fresher, we're talking about 11 to 14 celsius. tonight, the cloud rolls in off the atlantic. western areas will be mild, damp and cloudy. eastern areas will turn chilly. from norwich to edinburgh, a nippy morning and tomorrow, not like today, tomorrow the cloud keeps on rolling in, off the atlantic. there will be a few breaks in the cloud, but because of this cloud, the temperatures will be quite a bit lower and the summary for the weekend, you know, it is a mixed one. rain at times, but hopefully a few glimmers of sunshine and relatively mild. this is bbc newsroom live.
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the headlines: the chancellor has come under fire for his planned changes to national insurance contributions for the self—employed. he says he'll listen to mp5 who have voiced concern. the health secretary says it's essential that a and e departments in england hit their target for waiting times now that extra money has been put into the health service. an australian man alleged to have posed asjustin bieber online has been charged with more than 900 child sex offences. more than 20 of his victims are believed to be in the uk. the queen has unveiled a new war memorial in london to honour the british personnel who have served in iraq and afghanistan. the founder of the child migrants trust, margaret humphreys, has told the child abuse inquiry in london that the scheme under which thousands of children were sent abroad from britain, without their parents, as "the most catastrophic child abuse legacy within our living memory". perhaps you would tell us more about
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what margaret humphreys has been saying. it was she that brought to the world's attention in the 1980 that during the post—war decades thousands of children were sent abroad to australia, in particular, where they were treated extremely badly. physical, sexual abuse, conditions compared at one point during this inquiry to a labour camp. now, she has waited 30 years to give evidence to a british public inquiry about all this. and she described it today as the most catastrophic child abuse legacy within living memory. and she said that she had heard seven days worth of very daunting evidence from some of very daunting evidence from some of those former child migrants here at the inquiry. look what we've heard from child migrants over the last seven days. look at the violations that we've
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heard them talk about to us. kidnapping, sexual abuse in heard them talk about to us. kidnapping, sexualabuse in the uk, before they were sent, before they we re before they were sent, before they were sent. starting all over again in various institutions within the commonwealth, violent rapes, multiple perpetrators, paedophile rings, that's what we have heard. living in constant terror, can we imagine that as a child? living every day in constant terror. loss of identity. loss of family. separations of siblings. look, twins we re separations of siblings. look, twins were separated, brothers and sisters, separated when they arrived in australia. many child migrants have talked to me about how they live with the trauma of the screams, when brothers and sisters were separated. we've heard about slavery. slave labour camps we've heard. margaret humphreys talked during her
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work of the loss of identity, created by migrants being taken away from theirfamilies created by migrants being taken away from their families and created by migrants being taken away from theirfamilies and in created by migrants being taken away from their families and in some cases told falsely that they were orphans. the child migrants who have given evidence here have really told of the ongoing problems this has caused in their lives and one of them, who i spoke to yesterday after he had given evidence said what he wa nts he had given evidence said what he wants is for the government not only to apologise which it has done, but also to agree a proper come sensation scheme for former child mid—grants in their later years to have some comforts as they continue to deal with the effects of what has happened to them during their childhood. tom, thank you very much. tom symonds. a man accused of pretending to be justin bieber online, has been charged by australian police with more than 900 child sex offences, including rape. police believe he had around 150 victims and up
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to 20 are thought to be from the uk. anisa kadri reports. a42 a 42 law professor in brisbane is accused of sexually abusing children by pretending to be the star. he used social media to win the trust of bieberfans used social media to win the trust of bieber fans including used social media to win the trust of bieberfans including up to 20 in the uk and got them to send him explicit images. he was already facing charges of grooming children, but after police went through his computer, more than 900 new charges have been added. they include three of rape, five of indecent treatment of rape, five of indecent treatment of children and hundreds of making child exploitation material. justin bieber is touring australia and some of his teenage fans say they can understand why young people maybe tempted to speak with a fake celebrity online. sometimes maybe
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their excitement might get them, oh, wow, this is so amazing, i'm going to keep talking. queensland police say the arrest was made off tip yourselves from the us and german authorities and they are warning pa rents to authorities and they are warning parents to protect their children online and know what they are up to. it is my rules, it is my house. there is a lot out there. i want to be on top of it. the man is due in court next month. with me is vicki shotbolt, the founder of parentzone uk which works to keep children safer online. the accused has pretended to be the singer and the celebrityjustin bieber because he knows this is someone bieber because he knows this is someone who has millions of young fa ns someone who has millions of young fans around the world. absolutely. it is the most incredibly cynical, exploitation of children and young
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people, but the problem with these sorts of child abusers they are clever, they use manipulative techniques to groom children. children have been told the message gets across, one hopes it gets across, you don't talk to people online who you don't know in the real world , online who you don't know in the real world, but then if someone is purporting to be a celebrity maybe those thoughts go out the window? absolutely. those messages are starting to feel old—fashioned because children game online with people they don't know and children are chatting to people they don't necessarily know off line, online. it might be more useful for younger children, but as they get older, as you say, they are in contact with other people they don't know online? what we have got to start focussing on is making sure that children have the critical thinking skills to think is it realistic thatjustin bieber would be talking to me online? we have to get them to
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question things they see online, if it feels too good to be true, it probably is. what do we need to do to develop this in terms of public policy and advice for both parents and children? we need to be really careful to not to put more pressure on parents. this isn't anything that pa rents on parents. this isn't anything that parents did wrong. this is a criminal behaving in an appalling criminal behaving in an appalling criminal way, but we need families to make sure that they are asking the critical questions. we need critical thinking skills. we need to challenge what children are seeing online and actually make sure that we are engaging with children. we can't make children feel fearful about talking to adults because they will assume that adults will tell them off or take away devices, we have to be supporting them and engaged with them and part of their online lives. at a very basic level, the message, i suppose, online lives. at a very basic level, the message, isuppose, needs online lives. at a very basic level, the message, i suppose, needs to get across about how much information children give away and what the nature of the communication between themselves and another person online
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should be? yes, absolutely. i think one of the challenges for the digital age is how to you protect your privacy? you really shouldn't be putting information out there that in any way makes you vulnerable fo children that's a really, really important message. thank you very much. health secretaryjeremy hunt says it's essential that a and e departments in england hit their targets for waiting times now that extra money's gone into the nhs. 95% of patients should be dealt with within four hoursbut the the january figures show a new record low, with only 85% of people seen in that time. speaking at a conference organised by the reform think—tank, mr hunt said that reaching the target is critical for patient safety. if we are leaving people too long in
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a&e and departments and not getting the flow right, it is bad for patient safety and that's why it is essential that we get back to the 95% target. i'm personally not a great fan of targets and i'm certainly not a fan of having too many targets, but this one is critical for patient safety. that's why yesterday you saw the chancellor announcing a £2 billion short—term package for social care, it is not the end of the story because we recognise there are long—term issues that need fixing in terms of the sustainability of the system, but we do also recognise there are severe short—term pressures which are having a knock on effect on the nhs in terms of giving us fewer beds than we need to admit people from our emergency departments and not only that, but he also announced
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capitalfunding only that, but he also announced capital funding for the transformation programmes which are largely designed to help treat people outside hospitals more, so that we can relieve the pressure on our hospitals and to move towards prevention and not cure as the fundamental model for the nhs and you're going to be talking about that when you discuss stps later this morning. that's why a&e performance is critical to patient safety and not an either or. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has told the bbc that the "commonsense" time for a second independence referendum, would be autumn next year. a vote can only take place with the permission of the westminster government. but her remarks, to the bbc‘s political editor laura kuenssberg, are the clearest signal yet that the snp is planning to hold another vote, before the uk leaves the european union. in westminster, some politicians think you're bluffing about holding a referendum.
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i'm not and i never have been. i always think that sometimes kind of says more about them than it does about me because it suggests that there are politicians in westminster who think brexit and all of this is some kind of game. it's not a game, it's really, really serious and the implications for the uk are serious and the indications for scotland are serious. some of your colleagues talk about autumn 2018 as a likely date. within that window, as the outline of a uk deal becomes clear, and the uk exiting the eu i think would be the common sense time for scotland to have that choice if that is the road we choose to go down. just to be clear, you're not ruling out autumn 2018? i'm not ruling out anything, no. and you can see more of that interview in laura kuenssberg's documentary brexit: britain's biggest deal tonight on bbc two at 9pm. and it'll be available on the iplayer shortly afterwards. the german chancellor,
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angela merkel, has reiterated her stern criticism of the turkish president after he compared modern germany's behaviour to that of the nazi era. addressing parliament in berlin, mrs merkel said the comparisons would not be tolerated and had to stop. she called them depressing and misplaced. our correspondent jenny hill is in berlin. what we saw this morning was a classic angela merkel walking a diplomatic tightrope. she told turkey off. the president had likened the german authorities to nazis after they cancelled a number of rallies which were due to be held by his senior ministers, campaigning on behalf of him, ahead of a referendum due to be held in turkey next month. the president wants to change the way the country is governed and extend his powers. those rallies were cancelled. he is
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furious that this huge row has erupted. mrs merkel has to be careful, she wants to be tough on turkey partially because it is election year here, the majority of german polls don't trust the turkish prime minister. at the same time, she is seeking the release of a german newspaper who has been arrested and held in prison in turkey. mrs merkel was the main arc tct of that eu migrant deal between turkey and the eu by which turkey holds back asylum seekers in return for billions of euros. she doesn't wa nt for billions of euros. she doesn't want that to fall apart, but at the same time there is a suspicion not just here in germany, but elsewhere in europe, that he is seeking to provehicle these rows in order to appeal to perhaps more right—wing voters at home who can be persuaded to vote for him. one lawmaker here said this morning by engaging in the
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row, we're playing into his hands. he wants to campaign in turkey because there is a huge turkish community here, three million people. in effect, it is the fourth largest electoral district in turkey. he needs to appeal to the people living here in order to vote for him if he is to get his way and win the referendum next month. jenny, thank you very much. the artist sir howard hodgkin has died. he was awarded the turner rice in 198 and knighted in 1992. the artist has
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died at the age of 84. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the chancellor comes under fire for his planned changes to national insurance contributions for the self—employed. the health secretary says it's essential that a and e departments in england hit their target for waiting times now that extra money has been put into the health service. the queen has unveiled a new war memorial in london to honour the british personnel who have served in iraq and afghanistan. released material which was classified for more than 30 years show the home secretary wanted to discourage any form of inquiry into the actions of the police. david
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rhodes reports. campaigners say mrs thatcher's government ordered military—style planning in the days running up to the battle in the height of the miners‘ strike which resulted in baton beatings by the police. the release of home office files show no planning, but they make clear the government were in no mood to order an inquiry. the home secretary remained of the view that the government should not conduct any inquiry into the conduct of the police. for these miners, the tone of the document comes as no surprise. the suspicion is never going to go away. this was orchestrated right from ten downing street to defeat the miners and to use the police as a battering ram.” have concluded that there is no case... last october current home secretary amber rudd calls for an irqirry. the home office says there
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is nothing to gain from reviewing what happened over 30 years ago. but these former miners say they won‘t stop pressing for a full investigation. millions of people suffer from bulimia. up to 7% of women under 40 are affected. it began after she hit a rocky point whilst studying medicine in scotland. i've got eggs that were best before 8th december. she hards food until it is way past its use—by date. if there is a nuclear explosion i have enough for every
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single person! there is probably stuff in here that‘s been in here for years. do you have a fear of running out of food? is that part of it? yes, i have a definite fear of being hungry. despite having this stash, she only actually eats three ingredients which she weighs obher three scales without fail. these are very accurate and i have two just to check and then this is the back—up one. bulimia has taken over her life and torn it apart. it got to the point where the only thing in my life was the bulimia, the eating disorder and that was me from getting up to going to bed. so i had nothing else in my life so therefore, i can‘t socialise, so therefore, i can‘t socialise, so therefore, i can‘t socialise, so therefore, i didn‘t mix with people, so therefore, i didn‘t mix with people, so therefore i got depressed and it yus became an onward cycle that i just could not break. but there is new research which is providing some hope. it was conducted by maria for
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her doctorate. it is associated with impulse control. tell me how this works. i put this rubber headband on your head like this. and then these two electrodes would slide into the front and then i turn the stimulation on. you feel a tingling sensation when it starts. can you feel that? what‘s happening is a wea k feel that? what‘s happening is a weak current is being sent from this which is like a battery round in a circuit through your brain. yeah, i can feel it. it tingles. yeah. so this is designed to make me later on feel less impulsive? that's what we hoped would happen. these are the scales that we asked participants to complete. the technology gave participants less urge to binge and greater self control, but it is a long way from being prescrind as a treatment. it is important to remember that this trial is very early days in the research. it was
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just the single session, so we are only looking at the temporary tects of the brain stimulation, the next steps would be to carry out daily sessions to see whether this has long lasting effects from symptoms. what is encouraging is the brain stimulation has been effective in treating related conditions sup as depression, schizophrenia and substance abuse disorders. as a participant philippa found it worked for her. i came out and my brain thought differently. it was like something had been switched and it was back into being kind of how i remember it when i was early teenager and mid—teenager. and perhaps most importantly, the research has allowed her to believe that her future might be research has allowed her to believe that herfuture might be brighter than her past. when fire raged through a mansion 18
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yea rs when fire raged through a mansion 18 years the house was reduced to a shell. today it launched a campaign to find a designer who will take the challenge on. the fire burned all night and much of the next day. a masterpiece of the 1720s, devastated by an electrical fault. from the front it looks deceptively unscathed, but inside you can see the damage. the roof, floors and ceilings gone. much of its prized collection destroyed. and yet, experts say the structure of the building itself is sound. this was state—of—the—art in its
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time. built to the highest specification. this was a statement by the family. because of that, the building was so resilient and we think it is why it survived the fire. built to last even fires? this building isa fire. built to last even fires? this building is a survivor. a melted lamp, a precariously hanging fireplace, the national trust say the ground floor will be com pletely trust say the ground floor will be completely restored. this is what it used to look like. one of the most significant homes in britain. this is the marbblhall in clandon.
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the marblehall has been cleared. some of the debris was eight feet high. the temperatures could have exceeded 1300 degrees. the survival is remarkable. the salvage operation was painstaking. teams of archaeologists civil servanted through ash and debris for months. there was nothing like the first day of the archaeology when we weren‘t really expecting to find anything and we found this 13th stone ware duck inside the door and it was a great moment for us all. it gave us hope that we would find more precious things in the dbry. an architecture competition opens today for designers to come up with plans for designers to come up with plans for clandon, the trust wants to create a national exhibition space on the upper floors. we have huge
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collections across the national trust. we can create spaces that the trust doesn‘t have elsewhere. it will take five or six years, but the national trust is convinced clandon park will rise from the ashes. ina ashes. in a moment, we will have the news at one. first the weather. let‘s see what‘s in the forecast. for most of us, it is a good day. feeling nice out there. we‘ve got blue skies, just a few fluffy clouds, but the exception is in the far south—west of the uk. low grey skies, there is an old weather front sitting here, bringing murky conditions to places like penzance, st ives and most of cornwall overcast. a nice day, but there is a breeze out there. it does feel on the cool side, but anyway, out there. it does feel on the cool side, butanyway, here out there. it does feel on the cool side, but anyway, here is 3pm. scotla nd side, but anyway, here is 3pm. scotland is looking smashing. lots of sunshine. not bad for northern
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ireland either. some hazy sunshine here, but the best of the sun across most of england and down into the south east. temperatures could peak in one or two spots, 16 or 17 celsius by this stage. wherever you are, whatever the temperature, skies will be blue, it will be nice except that far south—western corner, the tip of cornwall overcast. tonight, where we would have had the clear skies during the day, tonight it is going to turn chilly, we are talking about a frost from eastern scotland, through yorkshire, east anglia, down into the south east. western areas cloud is streaming in off the atlantic. that means it will be mild and murky and that means tomorrow morning, mild and murky in the west, but a chilly start in the east. the day itself overall tomorrow, not like today, tomorrow it will be cloudy and the temperatures won‘t be as high as well. some of these eastern areas
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will stay chilly all day. the weekend, got a weather front heading our way. not a lot of rain, but there will be fresher atlantic air coming in. so a little bit of rain across the northern areas early on saturday. and then it turns sunny in scotla nd saturday. and then it turns sunny in scotland and northern ireland. the south will be cloudier, but still relatively mild. on sunday, you can see relatively mild. on sunday, you can see bands of rain crossing the country. so i think a better chance of catching rain and using the brolly on sunday. the weekend is looking mixed. there will be sunshine around for sure. but be prepared for a little bit of rain from time to time. the chancellor philip hammond defends raising taxes on the self—employed. mr hammond said the government was facing new spending challenges which it has to rise to. what i did yesterday was address the basic continuing unfairness in the current system, the benefits available
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to the self—employed have significantly improved. this is not the time to do it when consumer spending isjust this is not the time to do it when consumer spending is just dipping and at the front line are the effects of the sole traders, the self—employed. we‘ll be asking just how much political pressure the chancellor is now under. also this lunchtime. jeremy hunt says the nhs has to improve its performance now that social care is being given an extra £2 billion. feeling the squeeze. john lewis cuts its staff bonuses in the face of what it calls an "increasingly uncertain market." a university lecturer has been arrested in australia on child sex
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