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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 10, 2017 11:00am-1:00pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11am: headteachers in england say a funding crisis is forcing them to increase class sizes and cut courses. british telecom agrees to turn its broadband operation openreach into a separate company following pressure from the telecoms regulator ofcom. openreach will have to work to the interests of all consumers, better broadband, but secondly the decisions it takes for the company in terms of investments again have to work for the interests all country. a leading brexit negotiator raises hopes over eu citizenship rights as european leaders meet for the last eu summit before the divorce negotiations are expected to begin. labour claims the government is in "disarray" after theresa may announced a delay to controversial national insurance legislation outlined in wednesday's budget. also: a warning from mp's over the future of the palace of westminster. politicians say the palace is in danger of suffering "catastrophic failure" unless plans
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for a major renovation programme are approved. and british cycling admits not paying sufficient care and attention to the wellbeing of its athletes. good morning. it's friday 10th march. welcome to bbc newsroom live. schools in england are being forced to cut gcse and a—level courses in an effort to balance the books, according to a head teachers' union. the association of school and college leaders has warned budget pressures causing them to cancel things like school trips. this recent data from the department
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for education shows a dramatic rise in the number of secondary school children in england being taught in classes with 36 or more pupils. our education correspondent gillian hargreaves reports. peter woodman at the weald school might be a head teacher but he still likes to work at the chalk face, partly because he enjoys it but partly because it saves money for the school. the only reason we can survive is we are carrying forward money from last year. and if the government stick to their pledges over the next five years, with the cash flow and budgets, we will be making cuts to something like 70,000 every year, year on year. peter is one of dozens of heads in south—east england who wrote to parents yesterday informing them of the impact of cuts. in a poll of more than 1,000 members of the ascl union almost
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three—quarters said they had to make cuts to gcse or vocational courses in the past 12 months. the most common subjects to have been removed were design and technology, performing arts, music and german. parents also have their concerns. i think really important parts of education will be cut. class sizes will increase and i think they are probably already at capacity, teachers' jobs will become even harder. i think it's a real concern. i think the worry is itjust places more and more pressure on the teaching staff so actually it is them that are going to have to end up working longer, harder to make this work. on average, heads said that the largest class size was now 33 pupils however the government said official statistics showed the average secondary class size has fallen over the past decade to just 20 pupils and that £40 billion is being spent on schools this year.
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the highest cash figure ever. you can follow all the latest on that story on the live page on the bbc news app. there are links to related items. later we will be talking to the head ofa later we will be talking to the head of a multi—academy trust about the situation facing the schools he is in charge of. 0fcom has announced that bt has agreed to its requirements for the legal separation from 0penreach, the biggest reform in its history. in november, 0fcom ordered bt to separate from its 0penreach division, which runs the uk's broadband infrastructure. today's announcement means 0penreach will become a distinct company with a legal purpose to serve all of its customers equally. the key issue does open reach make
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its decisions to invest in a way thatis its decisions to invest in a way that is good for the whole of the country? it is not be only reform we are making to broadband. we will be setting tougher rules so that engineers turn up on time to fix your broadband but also if things do go wrong for the first time there will be automatic compensation so you get a cheque in the post if open reach does not deliver. despite coming under extreme pressure by 0fcom to make the split with 0penreach, bt‘s chief executive has welcomed the decision. i think this is a very significant decision. what we have agreed to do is legally incorporate 0penreach as a wholly owned subsidiary within the bt group but it will have an independent chairman, an independent board and it will be, within its articles of association, it will be enshrined to serve all customers equally. after months of scandal, south korean president park geun—hye
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has been removed from office over corruption allegations. the constitutional court has upheld pa rliament‘s vote to impeach her and she could now face prosecution after being stripped of her immunity. her opponents have taken to the streets to celebrate, but there's been anger among her supporters and police say two people have been killed. 0ur correspondent stephen evans reports from seoul. the moment a president was ousted. the head of south korea's highest court says president park committed a grave breach of the law. it was against the constitution and the trust of the people. outside the court pro—park protesters clashed with police. two died, one apparently by falling from the top of the bus he had climbed onto. the central allegation is that the country's biggest companies paid money to the president's best friend in return for favours.
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so top business leaders now face awkward questions which may yet put them behind bars. the police have been out in force because feelings run so high. families are split on the issue. there will be a general election in 60 days. one of the consequences of that may be a move to the left. if the government here moved to the left, there would a different attitude towards north korea, probably more cooperative. every saturday night for three months, there have been huge demonstrations against president park. but what pushed her from office was a constitutional court finding her guilty of crime in a country which has only been a democracy for 30 years. this is the scene live in south
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korea, opponents separating the decision to uphold parliament's vote to impeach her. she could face prosecution after being stripped of her immunity. equally there have been protests in support of her as well, but here we have opponents of president park celebrating heart being posted from office. the lead brexit negotiator for the european parliament says he wants to ensure that british people can retain the benefits of eu citizenship after the uk leaves the union. in an interview with radio 4's today programme, guy verhofstadt described brexit as a tragedy for both the uk and the eu and said he hoped to convince leaders to allow britons
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to keep a number of rights, so long as they were applied for on an individual basis. his comments come as european leaders meet in brussels for the last eu summit before the brexit negotiations are expected to begin. 0ur political correspondent ben wright is in brussels for us. how h ow exa ctly how exactly would this work, these individual rights that guy verhofstadt is talking about, and would it affect the timetable for brexit? it is interesting. we are just getting a sense of the sort of ideas floating around the head of the brexit negotiations. guy verhofstadt is not a formal negotiator but he is a senior belgian mep and he will be an intermediary between the european parliament, which will be very important, it has a vote at the end and they could vote against the
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brexit deal. he is a player around brussels and he has flooded the suggestion which others have made before now there could be some sort of arrangement for uk citizens who wa nt of arrangement for uk citizens who want some of the benefits of eu membership such as free movement for instance, there could be some way of creating a system that people could buy into if they chose to after brexit, perhaps a ten multi—entry eu visa, writes to buy property, we do not know, he was not very specific. the european commission is the institution that really matters and they are primarily focused on much more pressing questions like how britain is going to pay its departure bell, how it is going to order its financial commitments over the coming years as well as beginning talks about the post brexit issues. guy verhofstadt is
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probably low down on the priority list. is he will collide in an idea that has a lot of currency amongst negotiators or is this more of a personal thought from him, because he has been talking about various british citizens writing letters to him expressing their desire to remain in the eu, to retain the rights of eu citizenship? yes. it is true that what the eu is concerned about is working out, dust of the uk government are, the right eu citizens will have to currently in the uk and vice versa of british citizens in the eu. guy verhofstadt is perhaps the ultra—federalist, a passionate believer about all things european union. no surprise he argues and says he has been lobbied by brits who are very concerned about brexit and want some benefits of eu membership to continue. he has a particular pitch in this fight and
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it is an unsurprising statement from somebody like guy verhofstadt. behind me in one of the european council building meeting rooms the remaining 27 sitting down to discuss and map the future the european union without theresa may who left last night after talks. even though technically brexit divorce talks have not begun and cannot start until theresa may has triggered article 50 of the lisbon treaty which she says she will do by the end of march it is clear the separation has already started, britain is not in the room as the eu meets today to discuss its future. thank you. labour has accused the government of being in ‘disarray‘ after the prime minister said controversial tax rises for self—employed workers would not be put into legislation until the autumn. theresa may said the changes to national insurance, announced in the budget, were necessary and fair but said
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on the measures later this year. theresa may defended the plans to increase national insurance contributions for some self—employed workers. she said the measures would ensure the tax system was fair, narrowing the gap between what employed and self—employed people paid. the shift towards self—employment is eroding the tax base. it is making it harder to afford the public services on which ordinary working families depend. this goes some way towards fixing that. despite being announced in this week's budget, mps will not vote on the changes until the autumn as separate legislation is required. critics accuse the prime minister of a deliberate delay so the government could soften the proposals and stave off a potential rebellion from tory backbenchers who have expressed opposition. but mrs may stood firm saying
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the tax rise was necessary in light of the country's changing workforce and the timing would allow mps to consider the measures in the round. a paper detailing the full effect of the national insurance changes will be published in the summer followed by the results of a review into wider employment practices. alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. 0ur political correspondent iain watson is in westminsterfor us. where is this disagreement going? it has been pushed down the road towards the autumn. tell us what is happening behind the scenes. towards the autumn. tell us what is happening behind the scenesm towards the autumn. tell us what is happening behind the scenes. it has been delayed. the government have said we did not say we would publish this legislation so let us not formally call it a delay but theresa may has bought herself some time by not having a parliamentary vote until the autumn, crucially after a review into working practices will be published at low and it is likely
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to recommend that self—employed people get more of the rights and benefits of the conventionally employed. the government be then be able to argue that people will get more value for money from their national insurance increase. 0ne more value for money from their national insurance increase. one of the ideas doing the rounds behind—the—scenes behind potential conservative rebels is to argue the government to be radical in the autumn and have a split between the genuinely self—employed at those who spend a lot of time working for one employer, for example people who are couriers who want full employment rights. the government can say yes to that but that they will have to pay the full level of tax and national insurance in return. if they are able to do that and make that kind of split then people who are genuinely self—employed like hairdressers and plumbers perhaps can be given some kind of relief from the national agendas increase. at the moment conservative backbenchers are trying to put some pressure on the chancellor to rethink given that there are several months to look at this again. i was
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speaking to the chairman of the education committee in the commons who said many of his constituents we re who said many of his constituents were concerned about this. he liked the idea of giving the self—employed more rights but felt possibly the implementation of the whole tax reform measure may have to be delayed as well. if we are expecting people to be active in the economic syste m people to be active in the economic system as entrepreneurs taking risks we have to demonstrate that we are aware of that and willing to mitigate some of those risks, so thatis mitigate some of those risks, so that is an important point. the wider question about taxation is we have got to increase tax take in order to pay for the things we might wa nt order to pay for the things we might want to pay for my education clearly being one of them. and also the risk we may confront on leaving the european union. it is important we have a tax system that works fairly and efficiently in terms of getting the money in. is it a package that says value for money, getting more
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of the rights that employed dominic self—employed people would get, or would some colleagues be holding out for a rethink on the implementation of the timescale on the tax rise itself? we think on the implementation is probably the most likely outcome. we are going to have to get some tax so we have to recognise that would be bold enough to stick with the overall direction of travel but make sure it is more comfortable with those who are travelling. neal carmichael saying he wants a more comfortable journey for those facing the prospect of those hurtling towards a national insurance increase. the official line from labour is they want to see that things stopped, it is a breach of the conservatives' manifesto. a former shadow treasury minister for
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labour said to some extent if you are offering people greater rights if they are self—employed then that may well be a price worth paying. if they are self—employed then that may well be a price worth payingm is true that with a flat rate pension that over time people who are self—employed will start to benefit from a pension they did not previously get but when you look at other benefits like maternity and paternity leave and pay, sickness and disability benefits, out of work benefits, you do not have the same sort of access if you are self employed so with the chancellor wants to look at those whole range of benefits then that would be something that we could support and get behind will stop at the moment we do not have anything like those guarantees. we just know that the self—employed are going to have to pay higher national insurance without getting those benefits that many of the rest of us take for granted. plenty of suggestions for the chancellor about what to do to soften the blow, about additional rights and benefits he could give to
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the self—employed. the difficulty is the self—employed. the difficulty is the more concessions he makes the less money he can bring into the treasury just as less money he can bring into the treasuryjust as britain is about to leave the eu, which we now the chancellor is very concerned about. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: head teachers in england say a funding crisis is forcing them to increase class sizes and cut courses. bt agrees to legally separate its broadband operation 0penreach into a separate but wholly owned entity, following pressure from the telecoms regulator. a european negotiator suggests that britons could be offered eu citizenship rights after brexit, as european leaders meet for the last time before divorce talks begin. and in sport: a leaked report claims british cycling's own review intojess varnish's claims of sexism against former technical director shane sutton was "sanitised". it's one of a number of serious criticisms seen in a draft copy of the independent report
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into the sport's governing body. 0wen farrell remains a doubt for england's six nations match against scotland tomorrow after missing training today. jose mourinho didn't like the pitch, but won't mind the result. henrikh mkhitaryan scored the away goal in a 1—1 draw at rostov in manchester united's first leg of their europa league last 16 tie. i'll be back with more on those stories at 11:30am. seven people have been injured in an attack at the main train station in the german city of dusseldorf. police say a man with a history of mental problems assaulted commuters with an axe before jumping off a nearby overpass. he's suffered serious injuries. caroline davies reports. crowds gather outside duesseldorf central station, in germany. it was cordoned off after a man with an axe attacked commuters. the random assault took placejust before 9pm. translation: as far as we know one
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attacker approached one person in the s—bahn — the s28 direction cars and hit him with something, apparently an axe. then there were two injured on the platform, platforms i3 and 14, and at the station hall. one person was seriously injured and had to be treated in hospital. in total, seven people were injured, one seriously, although none are in a life—threatening condition. the assailant, a 36—year—old man, described as being from the former yugoslavia, then jumped off a nearby overpass. he suffered serious injuries. the police have said that he had a history of mental problems. armed police patrolled the scene. and witnesses we spoke to said that they heard helicopters overhead. germany is on high alert for terror attacks. memories are still fresh of the lorry that drove into a christmas market, in berlin, in december. but the authorities have been clear not to describe this incident as terrorism.
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the man has been arrested and police are investigating, as the station and the city start returning to normal. caroline davies, bbc news. britain's aid programme in libya could be harming vulnerable migrants, according to a new report. the independent commission for aid impact said there was a risk that britain's support was leading to more migrants being detained and denied a right to asylum. here's our diplomatic correspondent james landale. last year some 180,000 migrants and refugees made the perilous crossing from libya to italy. almost 5000 died in the attempt. hundreds of thousands of others remained trapped in libya. britain's aid programme here is modest, about £9 million. but it supports the libyan coast guard and provides humanitarian support for migrants held in detention centres. but the independent commission on aid impact, which monitors uk aid
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spending, has concluded that uk aid could be causing unintentional harm. the watchdog says that while saving lives at sea is vital, there is a risk that supporting the coastguard means more migrants and refugees are returned to indiscriminate and indefinite detention. and when they are back in the detention centres, the commission says the refugees there are denied any chance of claiming asylum, something that is not recognised in libya. and they are also vulnerable to extortion and people trafficking by libyan officials. the international development department says it had considered the potential harm of any aid, but insisted it protected migrants' human rights and improved their conditions. it added that, since may 2015, british vessels had saved more than 13,000 lives in the mediterranean. mps are being encouraged to make a decision over the palace of westminster renovation, following concerns the building is
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at risk of "catastrophic failure". the government's spending watchdog says the longer mps mull over different options to repair the houses of parliament, the greater chance that public money will be wasted. the splendour of the palace of westminster hides a secret, the building is decaying. crumbling stonework, ageing electrics and asbestos. mps are warning major renovations need to be carried out urgently to avoid what they say could be a catastrophic failure. the commons public spending watchdog has been considering three options. keeping mps and peers in the building while work is carried out — this would cost £5.7 billion and take around 32 years. a partial move out, taking 11 years and costing £41; billion, or moving both houses out the palace entirely to allow six years of intensive repair costing around £3.5 billion. we're saying, get on with it.
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we need to make a decision. we are suggesting to fully decamp the house and do the work over a six year period and we need that decision made soon so they can work out the detail planning, costing and schedule, how we're going to move out and what we're going to do. mps could be housed nearby in what is currently the headquarters of the department of health. while qeii conference centre down the road could house the house of lords. there have now been three examinations of the options to rescue the palace and another parliamentary committee also wants the headquarters of the department of health. to have its say but the longer the delay the more the likely cost to the public purse and the longer the dangers go unchecked.
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despite the upheaval, doing nothing, the committee says, is not an option. mps and peers will soon have to decide again on whether to leave or remain. in 1952, the city of london was effectively brought to a standstill, caused by air pollution. while some may remember the great smog, more than 60 years on, poor air quality is still damaging people's health and causing thousands of premature deaths every year. as part of the bbc‘s so i can breathe series, graham satchell has been looking at how things have improved, and what else needs to be done. london has been brought to a halt by dense smog, which has descended overnight. the great smog of 1952, dramatised in the netflix series the crown. it was a difficult time. it was scary, it was unpleasant. anne goldsmith was eight in 1952 and remembers it well. we could hardly see in front of us, and when i got to school, the handkerchief would be absolutely black. it is now thought 12,000 people died in the great smog. the enemy then was coal, used
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in factories and people's homes. what followed the smog was the clean air act of 1956. it introduced smoke—controlled areas, where only smokeless fuel could be burnt. fast forward 60 years and the enemy now is nitrogen dioxide from diesel engines. so what is being done today? these are the engines that have been removed out of taxis in birmingham. the local authority in birmingham has funding to replace the diesel engines in 65 taxis. we removed 99% of the nox that taxis were producing. it is a massive reduction. but it is a small pilot project. there are hundreds of taxis in birmingham. the government's overall plan is to introduce so—called clean air zones in five cities by 2020. i will look at the evidence, and when the evidence comes through as to where the key areas of pollution are, we will take
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the action that is needed to address the need for clean air in the city. i am afraid the government has been hopeless. critics like client earth say that what we need today is a new clean air act, and a scrappage scheme for diesel cars. we have to phase diesel vehicles off the roads. it will cost a fortune. it will take time, but we have to protect people's health. if the water we are drinking was as dirty as the air we're breathing in now, we'd do something about it. back in lewisham in london, anne is meeting nine—year—old eloise, and amy, who is six. we called it smog, and you couldn't see. only this far in front of your eyes. so we had to be very careful we didn't bump into anybody. we walked along the road like that. it was terrible, really. i feel sad for you. on days when pollution is bad, amy and eloise are kept indoors at playtime,
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just as anne was in 1952. sometimes we have to do stay inside because the air is bad. because the air is bad now? amazed by anne's story, amy and eloise are recreating her walk home from school in the smog. are you 0k? yes, are you 0k? yes. can you see anything? no. more than 60 years on, air pollution is still damaging children's health and shortening people's lives. this is bbc newsroom live at 11:30. what a beautiful day yesterday but to date, we've got cloud. it has invaded across the whole of the uk. let's look at the satellite picture. you can see sunshine lingering in
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kent, a little in cornwall, the north of wales, but very limited. a cloud is bringing patchy rain across the north of scotland and one or two spots elsewhere. across the channel islands, the south coast, the welsh coast as well. if the sun does come out, 15 degrees could be on the cards. very little temperature dropped overnight. because of all the cloud and substantial ring for northern ireland and scotland. temperature is holding up, but it will be grey and murky to start. tomorrow looks at the bright day for northern ireland, later scotland, as the rain clears, beautiful sunshine. and also in the south—east. it has been quite grained damp, for northern england, parts of wales, the south—west, once mclean is away, a more unsettled day. but not a wash—out. some drier and brighter weather will be found as well. good morning, this is bbc newsroom
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live, with me, anita mcveigh. the headlines: head teachers in england have warned that funding pressures are forcing schools to scrap courses, increase class sizes and cut back on trips. 0fcom has reached a deal with bt to service its open reach service, which runs much of the broadband infrastructure. rival providers have welcomed the decision. a european negotiator suggests that britons may be able to retain eu citizenship after brexit, as european leaders meet for the last time before divorce negotiations begin. labour says the government is in disarray after the prime minister set controversial tax rises for workers... parliament's spending
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watchdog says carrying out essential restoration work is the cheapest option. the repair bill for the world heritage site, said to be in danger of suffering a catastrophic failure, could be up to £4 billion. let's get the latest sport headlines. good morning. a leaked report into british cycling has levelled serious criticism at the sport's governing body, which is admitted to failings in its world—class performance programme. the draft version of the report appears to have made these key findings. there is a culture of fear amongst staff at british cycling, some of whom are friends be carried and appeared to be bullied. it also says the former performance director, sir dave brailsford, was untouchable, two decisions by the multi million pound budget himself before a technical director shane
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sutton was said to be unsuitable for the leadership role. it alleges that the leadership role. it alleges that the report regarding sexism against shane sutton was sanitised after the grievance officer found the allegations were largely to buy british cycling chose to wear out his findings in their report. the review concludes those actions were shocking and inexcusable. british cycling has responded saying that leadership focused on metal delivery without sufficient care and attention to the staff and affluent culture. while we disagree, they say the factual accuracy at certain points, the board admits there was not adequate oversight, leading to a failure to address the early warning signs. 0wen farrell was out on the pitch today with the rest of the squad but did not take part in the session. england will mickey les dennis tomorrow and have until one hour
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before kick—off at twickenham to finalise the side. wales and ireland launch the penultimate weekend of six nations action tonight. anything other than a victory for ireland will end their bid for a third title in four years. and it is likely to mean england can claim the championship by beating scotland. former england coach graham rowntree is set tojoin former england coach graham rowntree is set to join the british and irish lions this summer. he coached australia four years ago and will join andy farrell and rob howley in warren gatland's setup. manchester united can claim they got a good result on a bad pitch... henrikh mkitaryan scored the away goal in a 1—1 draw at rostov in the first leg of their europa league last 16 tie. the next match at old trafford as next week. joe hart does not think he will play for manchester city.
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eavesdrop by pep guardiola when he took over as manager at the start of the season and then sent on loan to intervene in italy. he bears no grudge against city. a love bat, i always said, is no they wanted me, i would be there. but i was always cautious when he said that because i'm aware that at the big clubs, stuff can change quickly and opinions on people in charge, not everyone can like you, not everyone can want to play you, that is the business side of it. eoin morgan described alex hales as unbelievable, as they reached a 3—0 victory over the west indies. he recovered from a broken hand to score a century in barbados. joe root also made a hundred, making a record total of 328, and england in the end winning by 186 runs. that's all the sport. thank you. let's get more now on the eu summit taking place in brussels. and that suggestion that britons may
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if they wish retain eu citizenship rights after the uk leads the union. —— leaves the union. with me is seb dance, labour mep for london. he has been described as an ultra—federalist, so perhaps he would put something forward by this but what do you think this idea of uk citizens retaining rights? at its core, i think it's an excellent idea, namely the fact that lots of people in the uk did not vote to give up european citizenship and the idea that people who value rights and benefits of being an eu citizen should not be deprived of those rights against their will. so in principle, a very good idea. how would it work in practice? would there be any competing issues between their rights as uk citizens
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and as no longer members of the european union but having some sort of associate rights? blackwell, it would necessarily compete with british citizenship, of course, because we are, as british citizens, at the moment, eu citizens. so, in effect, eu citizenship operates as an additional benefit to the benefit of being a british citizen. the problem will come with the member states, in persuading much of the political opinion that has become very much opposed to the rhetoric coming out, certainly from this government, about the way in which we are approaching our european partners. they will see this as additional rights given to citizens not in the eu, rather than retaining rights we already had. and it is about, if you like, crossing a psychological barrier in making the point that this is about keeping an existing right. but is this idea
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really a runner? setting aside practical debates and discussions, is ita practical debates and discussions, is it a runner or is guy verhofstadt perhaps articulating very much a personal idea? it is certainly something he personally believes in, of course, but he does have a lot of sympathy, in the parliament and with member states, the key thing we have to do is represent the british people in the european parliament and make the case for the people that want to retain those rights and say that this is an issue of justice, about being deprived of something we have but we do not want to be deprived and making that point as much as can. i think there is a potential to overcome the opposition but it needs a lot of political pressure. what sort of impact will it have at home on the labour party? jeremy corbyn clearly does not see brexit as a but clearly some members of the labour party are very much opposed to it. how does this weave
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its way in to the whole brexited debate? well, the labour party has been very united in saying there are key benefits of being in the european union, predominantly economic but also social, and environmental protections and rights of citizens that we have within the european union and we have said all along we want to maintain those in the future relationship we have with the future relationship we have with the eu, whatever that looks like. key to getting this benefit is of course having good terms with our neighbours, it does not mean threatening a trade war are saying we will register foreign workers, all of that mark but are those big issueis all of that mark but are those big issue is more important than securing individual rights?m issue is more important than securing individual rights? it is all in the mix. i would argue that retaining your rights as an eu citizen is a big issue. if you value those rights and hold them dear, as many of our citizens do, it is a big issue. but of course, you cannot ta ke issue. but of course, you cannot take everything in isolation, you have to approach the negotiations with goodwill and you have to be respectful of the fact that we the
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ones leaving and the members of the clu b ones leaving and the members of the club who remain within it that will decide what benefits we are able to receive. thank you. british police specialising in football violence have been speaking to authorities in russia about how they plan to keep fans safe during the confederations cup later this year. the tournament is seen as a precursor to next year's world cup, which russia won the rights to host in 2010. 0ur moscow correspondent sarah rainsford has been finding out more. the final countdown to the confederations cup. for russia, it's a dress rehearsal for the world cup next summer and they are planning a party here. but this violence in france last year has cast a shadow over the tournament. russian football hooligans, brutal and disciplined, fought running battles in the streets of marseille then. and england fans were among the targets. so, britain's top footballing policeman has been visiting russia
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this week to check for himself how safe it is. this tour was a first step in making sure scenes in marseille are not repeated here at the world cup. it was awful violence and left people seriously injured, so i think, anyone watching that would have been absolutely appalled. what we need to do is build on a good working relationship to try to ensure anyone coming to russia for the games is safe, known hooligans will be banned from the stands here. russia and britain are sharing data to make sure of that. the security will be tight. for russia, hosting the world cup in stadiums like this one is a matter of great prestige and it doesn't want anything to mar that. so, officials are presenting the hooliganism in france as a one—off. they insist that scenes like that won't be repeated here in russia. but can officials guarantee that the hooligans will be under control? there has never been a single incident at a major sporting event in russia. that proves that we can really organise a great atmosphere.
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important thing is to strike the right balance between atmosphere and festivity and complete safety. so, russia's gearing up to greet the world's football fans like this, not with violence. it's a message they are stressing here now. that a hard—core of troublemakers won't be allowed to spoil the football party. a helicopter carrying high level business executives has crashed onto a turkish highway, killing five people on board. the helicopter is believed to have hit a television tower in an outlying district of istanbul, there were believed to be seven people on board, including two pilots, forforeigners, seven people on board, including two pilots, for foreigners, reportedly russian nationals, and a turkish national. legal challenges are
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piling up against president trump's revised travel ban on migrants amongst six mainly muslim countries. a day after hawaii launched its lawsuit, washington state is also filing a motion to block the ban — and new york, massachusetts and oregon arejoining in too. officials in hawaii say the new version is fundamentally the same as the first. when president trump and the administration changed the executive order from the first one to the second, first of all, they didn't take away the same discrimination based upon national origin and religion that is so problematic. they replaced it with a lot of neutral language but that's not going to be enough in our arguments and opinions to be able to erase a lot of the past statements that were made, but this was just referred to, in their words, in president trump's words, as a "muslim ban". it has emerged that detainees held
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at gatwick airport have been there for as long as 2.5 years. prison inspectors found children had also been detained at brook house, which holds almost 400 adult male asylum seekers, illegal immigrants and foreign nationals and is. the home 0ffice foreign nationals and is. the home office says some people prolonged attention by frustrating the removal process. more than 2500 bridges in england are not fit to support the heaviest lorries, a new study has found. the report by the rec foundation found that many of the structures have weight restrictions in place, while others have to be closely monitored. it says some have also been put in a managed decline. the cost of clearing the backlog on all bridges is estimated to be almost £4 billion. councils say they do not have the funds to repair them. patient and doctors have called for do not resuscitate notices to be replaced with orders that offer a range of treatments.
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currently, do not resuscitate orders instruct medical professionals not to use intensive or invasive treatments if a patient‘s heart stops beating or they stop breathing. a british medicaljournal article says a number of options should be discussed with patient instead. scientists in australia say the great barrier reef has been hit by widespread leaching of its corals for the second successive year ‘s. leaching happens when the water temperatures too high. the first aerial survey of 2017 shows large areas of the reef have become distressed over the strand in summer. it is the first time bleaching has returned within 12 months, fuelling concerns over the reef‘s long—term health. and for a full summary of the news, you can go to our website for further detail. head teachers and being forced to
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cut class is due to a funding crisis. he breaks a negotiator says he wants to ensure british people can retain the benefits of eu citizenship. labour claims the government is in disarray over a planned national insurance outlined in the budget. in the business news — the telecoms regulator 0fcom has told bt to legally separate 0penreach, which runs the uk's broadband infrastructure. it's the end of a two year battle after rivals including talk talk and sky complained of high charges, poor service and a failure to invest — we'll have more on that in a minute. the chairman ofjd wetherspoons has criticised the chancellor for a "dinner party" budget that favours those entertaining at home rather than going out to pubs.
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tim martin said pubs pay 20% vat on food sales while supermarkets pay "almost nothing", enabling them to subsidise alcoholic drink prices. he believes the biggest danger to the pub industry comes from being taxed differently to supermarkets. in just a few hours, volkswagen is due to plead guilty in the us to charges of fraud and obstruction of justice by cheating diesel emissions tests. the formal plea will draw a line under the us side of the scandal however this week in europe the european commission agreed to oversee action from 22 different consumer protection authorities. telecoms regulator 0fcom has said bt has met its demands to separate itself from its 0penreach division, which runs the uk's broadband infrastructure. in november bt was ordered to legally split from 0penreach by the regulator. let's hear from bt‘s chief executive gavin patterson. i think this is a very significant decision. what we have agreed to do is legally incorporate 0penreach as a wholly owned subsidiary within the bt group
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but it will have an independent chairman, an independent board and it will be, within its articles of association, it will be enshrined to serve all customers equally. earlier i asked the regulator, 0fcom's chief executive, sharon white if consumers will see any difference. yes, they will. this is a big reform we have announced today. 0penreach isa we have announced today. 0penreach is a legally separate distinct company within bt. to be changes for consumers, firstly, that by law, open reach will have to work to the interests of all consumers. better broadband. but secondly, the decisions it takes is a company in
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terms of investment, the game, have got to work for the interests of the whole country. and we would expect to see from this both better service but also better broadband. that was 0fcom's chief executive, sharon white. we have had figures from the office of national statistics this morning but what can they tell us? it looks like activity has slowed without put—down in january like activity has slowed without put—down injanuary but over the payments up to january, growth was strong, with manufacturing expanding at its fastest pace since may, 2010. let's make sense of that. joining me now is ruth gregory, uk economist at capital economics. thanks forjoining us this morning. let's start with those manufacturing figures. 0ver let's start with those manufacturing figures. over the three months up to january, it expand at its fastest rate since 2010 but fell injanuary itself. is this good or bad news?
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confusing news? there are some positives we can take away from the data. although we did see falls in many factoring output and indeed in construction output injanuary, this reversed only part of the hefty rises we saw at the end of last year. and this suggests the sectors could contribute more to gdp growth in the first quarter of this year than they did at the end of last year. granted, the only make up around 20% of the total output in the economy. and there have been signs the service sector has lost a bit of momentum at the start of the year. nonetheless, this suggests the economy should be able to maintain a decent case of growth in the first quarter. let's talk about the trade deficit. it held steady injanuary. the ons deficit. it held steady injanuary. the 0ns are very keen to point out this was not just the 0ns are very keen to point out this was notjust because of weak sterling, although that obviously means cheaper prices for foreign buyers, but they said it was because of uk companies being more competitive. surely be a more
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competitive. surely be a more competitive because of a weak sterling making prices cheaper? yes, i think that is right. we have seen some early signs that the drop in the pound, since the referendum, is starting to feed through into higher growth in goods and export. and some of the evidence we have suggests export volume should strengthen further in the months ahead.|j wa nted further in the months ahead.|j wanted to ask about that. sterling has been down by 20% against the dollar and 50% against the euro since the great divide in the summer. surely we would've expected to have seen the trade deficit narrowing, rather than just holding steady by this stage? we have seen some revisions to the trade deficit figures. this suggests the contribution from net trade in the last quarter of 2016 might actually be stronger than we originally thought. but there are lags involved and we would expect the follow me pounds to feed through to higher
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export growth as the... thanks for your time. sandwich and coffee chain pret a manger has suggested it will struggle to staff its outlets after brexit because just one in 50 job applicants is british. they say 65% of staff come from the european union — and uk job seekers don't see it as a desirable place to work. a washing machine has been launched for the indian market, with a special mode to tackle curry stains. panasonic said the introduction of a ‘curry‘ button followed complaints from customers struggling to fully get the food off their clothes. it says development took two years, testing combinations of water temperature and water flow. the most important trial most people have never heard of kicked off in washington dc. this week. a panel of three copyright judges have been hearing proposals from stakeholders regarding the mechanical royalties paid to songwriters and publishers over the next five years for the use of music on digital platforms, cds and downloads.
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a quick look at the markets. the ftse has been driven up by bt, the biggest telecoms company in the uk. shares up almost 4.5% on the back of the newspeople separate out 0penreach. share price still about 10% lower than where it was back in january when they admitted there we re january when they admitted there were accounting errors in the italian division of the company. that's all the business news. the first ever live music census is taking place right now in cities across the uk — think springwatch — but for music! lorna gordon has been following the census in glasgow and sent us this report. buskers on the streets of glasgow, passionate about their music, drawing interest from passers—by. i love it and i do it every day and it's a way i can play with my friends and enjoy life with other people and share with other people. from classical to contemporary, from concert halls to gigs in pubs, music is part of our culture.
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in our cars, at home, on our phones, we listen to plenty of music. but how does the live scene compare? volunteers in six cities across the country are attempting to find out. we're asking them how many events they go to, why they maybe go to an event, what's the main reasons behind going to an event. and what kind of feedback are you getting from people? are they interested? i think some people are very interested in it. i think people go to a lot more live music than what they realise. there are plenty of free performances to go to but, even so, british consumers spend more on concert tickets than on physical records, digital downloads and streaming combined. and the organisers of this census say that even those who think that silence is golden should care about the state of the nation's live music. music is a huge drive economically within the creative
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industries which are, of course, a big export for the uk, where it punches above its weight. there's a lot of research to suggest that music is also important for our health and well—being but, for me, music is really important because it's part of what makes us human, it's a fundamental part of being part of the human species. glasgow has a really active music scene. there are 70 live music events in the 24—hour period this census is taking place in but here across the uk the live music scene is facing challenges. some iconic locations where famous groups honed their acts have closed down, some never to reopen. some smaller more intimate venues are onlyjust breaking even. surviving as a small venue is difficult at the moment because property prices are increasing, because of the tight regulations around licensing. this attempt to measure
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the economic and cultural benefits of live music is, census organisers believe, a world first. whatever they find out, that live music in all its glorious forms brings joy to many is already beyond doubt. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first we leave you with for a look at the weather. thank you. hello there. a different complexion today with all the clout but amongst that, i found a gem complexion today with all the clout but amongst that, ifound a gem of sunshine in cornwall. parts of cornwall doing well for sunshine but for many, a much cloudier picture. this is how the satellite is
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looking. some mottled breaks but predominantly cloudy. so much more so than yesterday. i'm hoping we will see more sunshine returning tomorrow. today, cloud is bringing some rain across the north of scotland, spits and spots elsewhere, a good chance we will see some brea ks a good chance we will see some breaks in the clout but not much across scotland today. likely to stay cloudy for much of the day. the north northern ireland might see some brightness, the north—east of wales, perhaps east of the pennines and we have already seen that breakage in the cloud across parts of cornwall. but for many of us, compared to yesterday, a lot cloudier. despite the cloud, still miles. 1314 celsius, a bit higher in the sunshine. if you're lucky enough to be heading off to cardiff this evening, wales take on ireland in the next round of the six nations. it should be dry and mild for spectators. little change overnight,
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just more significant rain for parts of northern ireland and scotland. cloud and rain, so temperatures will hardly fault. it will be another great payoff tomorrow morning as a result. some hill fog around. and improving picture for northern ireland and scotland. much brighter tomorrow. the sun comes out into the afternoon and it should be dry and feeling pleasant. we will also see sunshine in eastern and southern areas. but some areas, wales, north—west england, could be dank and grey. it peps up a bit more on sunday. and then another band of rain comes in, showery, with bright, dry spells in between. not a wash—out but it does look like the more unsettled day of the weekend. saturday a bit more positive, dry weather, sunshine, sunday, more likely to see rain. if you have plans, stay tuned. tom will have more this afternoon. this is bbc news and these are the top stories
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developing at midday: head teachers in england say a funding crisis is forcing them to increase class sizes and cut courses. bt agrees to legally separate its broadband operation 0penreach into a separate entity following pressure from the telecoms regulator. 0penreach will have to work to the interests of all consumers, better broadband, but secondly the decisions it takes for the company in terms of investments again have to work for the interests of the whole country. a european negotiator says he wants to ensure that british people can retain the benefits of eu citizenship after brexit, as leaders meet for the last time before divorce negotiations begin. labour claims the government is in "disarray" over planned national insurance changes outlined in the budget. also: a warning from mp's over the future of the palace of westminster.
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politicians say it is in danger of suffering "catastrophic failure" unless plans for a major renovation programme are approved. and british cycling admits not paying sufficient care and attention to the wellbeing of its athletes. good morning. it's friday 10th march. welcome to bbc newsroom live. schools in england are being forced to cut gcse and a—level courses in an effort to balance the books, according to a head teachers' union. the association of school and college leaders has warned budget pressures causing them to cancel things like school trips.
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this recent data from the department for education shows a dramatic rise in the number of secondary school children in england being taught in classes with 36 or more pupils. 0ur education correspondent gillian hargreaves reports. peter woodman at the weald school might be a head teacher but he still likes to work at the chalk face, partly because he enjoys it but partly because it saves money for the school. the only reason we can survive is we are carrying forward money from last year. and if the government stick to their pledges over the next five years, with the cash flow and budgets, we will be making cuts to something like 70,000 every year, year on year.
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peter is one of dozens of heads in south—east england who wrote to parents yesterday informing them of the impact of cuts. in a poll of more than 1,000 members of the ascl union almost three—quarters said they had to make cuts to gcse or vocational courses in the past 12 months. the most common subjects to have been removed were design and technology, performing arts, music and german. parents also have their concerns. i think really important parts of education will be cut. class sizes will increase and i think they are probably already at capacity, teachers' jobs will become even harder. i think it's a real concern. i think the worry is itjust places more and more pressure on the teaching staff so actually it is them that are going to have to end up working longer, harder to make this work. on average, heads said that the largest class size was now 33 pupils however the government said official statistics showed the average secondary class size has fallen over the past decade to just 20 pupils and that £40 billion is being spent on schools this year. the highest cash figure ever.
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the education secretary has been heckled as she spoke about plans for a new wave of grammar schools in england. this was after money was allocated for grammar school than free schools in the budget but there was no gas for funding pledgers facing many other schools. with me is our correspondent sarah campbell. funding pledgers, we are hearing a message from many teachers that the amount of cash they have will not go around in terms of providing all the subjects on the curriculum they want to provide, the extracurricular activities and so on. yes, this is an issue that is going to run and run. hearing from school sending out essentially begging letters to
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pa rents essentially begging letters to parents asking parents to set up direct debits to fill funding gaps they are going to have. this was a lwa ys they are going to have. this was always going to be big issue. what the government says in response that thatis the government says in response that that is they say that has been funding change but the real term funding change but the real term funding is higher than ever at £40 billion. they have reallocated funding. there was an unfurnished in the system previously were some schools got more than other years “s. schools got more than other years ——s. that means that some schools will have received a shortfall in funding but other schools, and the government argues more than half of other schools will have received a cash boost. but as with the funding issues come from. but does a lot of schools in the country going to see their budgets cut. whatever the government says if you have a funding cut you have the funding cut. justine greening the education secretary has just finished speaking in birmingham and it seems that the
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point at which there was polite applause when she came to the stage, when she was talking about grammar schools, which the government has supported, that is when there were cries of rubbish and no, when she told how grammar schools could help told how grammar schools could help to close the achievement gap. it is all coming from that area. the head of 0fsted the school inspectors is due to speak at this conference. we are being told that she will say the pressure to succeed in league tables is leading some schools to narrow the national curriculum and move out pupils who bring their results. she is calling this nothing short of a scandal. that should be a really interesting speech. amanda spielman to govern in january interesting speech. amanda spielman to govern injanuary of the head of the schools inspectorate in england. her predecessor not a man known for pulling his punches. from this first speech it looks as if she is going
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to be taking that approach to the job. is there a conflict between 0fsted than the government on this? government likes these tables. 0fsted than the government on this? government likes these tablesm 0fsted than the government on this? government likes these tables. it is going to be music to the ears of teachers who have been saying for yea rs teachers who have been saying for years there has been way too much focus on the tables. it will be interesting to see how this is received by them and the government. she said there's more to good education league tables. vitally important though examinations are we must not allow curriculum to be driven by statistics, gcses and a—levels. this is going to be a really interesting speech and will be interesting to see the action from the teachers and government. stephen tierney is chief executive officer at a catholic multi—academy
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trust. the point that the head of 0fsted is going to make to the conference in birmingham, the pressure to succeed in league tables is leading some schools to move out pupils who bring down results. are you aware of this happening? we have been aware of it for years. there is a fantastic report of 2015 led by doctor becky allen that was seeing this as a problem and we can see some of the data where about 8000 pupils are being moved of role towards the end of years ten and 11 and those pupils are likely to be the ones who might be the most challenging but also the most vulnerable. they suggested a couple of years ago and we supported that
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as heads around the table that we should in terms of the accountability measure instead of changing it from pupils on your role just on that is the injanuary of year 11 to have that pupil was educated at your school for four out of the five years you would be responsible for that. that would begin to challenge some of the practices you get from a very small minority of schools. some of these pupils not individuals moving out to apprenticeships, to technical training, that the education select committee has been talking about is neededin committee has been talking about is needed in preparation for brexit? no. these are pupils who would be in a situation where they are being moved out of the maintained sector is so they do not appear unregistered. it could be elected for medication which brings up safeguarding worries. but then these figures you lose the fact that pupils from one school to another. sometimes it is from a skill that have performed well in the league ta bles have performed well in the league tables and part of their protection has been to move schools that are
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already challenging circumstances. we have to keep it in perspective. it isa we have to keep it in perspective. it is a relatively small percentage. you are talking about 1%. every one of those pupils who deserves an education —— every one of those pupils deserves an education. we need to challenge that and use the accountability system. amanda spielman has some of that within her control in terms of being able to look at the measures because they can change the progress measure to ta ke can change the progress measure to take into account where a child has been educated throughout their school life not just been educated throughout their school life notjust that one particular date. there is means of doing this. financial pressures, talk to us about the schools you are in charge of, where or those financial pressures biting? have some aspects of the curriculum been cut? are some enrichment activities being dropped? we can look at this ina being dropped? we can look at this in a couple of different ways. although what the government is saying in terms of the fact that the
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£40 billion is actually a significant amount of money, calling ita significant amount of money, calling it a record amount, you have to realise there is another have familiar children to educate in this parliament in our schools and another half a million in the next ones. they are being slightly disingenuous because what actually happened is the amount of cash you get per pupil as did the same but national insurance costs and pension costs have significantly increased and the government has been brought to task by its select committee and the national audit office because they had not acted on the changes they had not acted on the changes they were making. there is a variety of things in terms of the amount of cash each school gets is the same but the cost so far greater to employee staff and the worry about the increase in class sizes and the pressure on school leaders as people are going to start leaving the profession in greater numbers at the time when tensions on recruitment are critically important. if you get
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are critically important. if you get a great teacher in front of your child they will excel. we are cutting short the education of some of our pupils and short—changing them. cash flat in other words because the extra money you are getting is about keeping pace with the extra number of pupils you are taking in. to get back to the point people are interested in, talk to us about the practical impact in the schools you run. in the schools we run at the minute we have reserves that we are using at as peter was talking about earlier the reserves run out at one point so we are trying to protect as much as we possibly can but we are looking at some subjects where numbers are small and beginning to suggest that maybe they cannot go ahead. such as? there are schools that have no reserves or limited reserves and who are making huge cuts. part of the
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real frustration for head teachers as it is not that the money is not there, it is just not being spent on sensible things. we have the national citizen service which by the end of this parliament will have over £420 million a year being spent on it at the same time as schools are cutting extracurricular activities and traps. why do we not think about moving that money over? in terms of the announcement in the budget whereby we had a situation where we are going to have a number of more free schools and yet we know from the public accounts committee in parliament that £2.5 billion was spent on buying sites for free schools which in terms of their valuation was £2 billion. we have wasted £0.5 billion of taxpayers' money buying sites at inflated prices when there was no need. we are out of time. the ceo of a catholic multi—academy trust. bt has bowed to pressure
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from the telecoms regulator 0fcom by agreeing to split its 0penreach broadband operation from the main company. in november, 0fcom ordered bt to separate from its 0penreach division, which runs much of the uk's broadband infrastructure. but under the changes bt still retains ultimate ownership of the company. does 0penreach make its decisions and invest in the way that's for the whole good of the country? it is not the only reform that we're making to improve broadband. we will be setting tougher rules so that engineers turn up on time to fix your broadband, but also, if things do go wrong, for the first time, there will be automatic compensation as you get a cheque in the post if 0penreach doesn't deliver. despite coming under extreme pressure by 0fcom to make the split with 0penreach,
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bt‘s chief executive has welcomed the decision. i think this is a very significant decision. what we have agreed to do is legally incorporate 0penreach as a wholly owned subsidiary within the bt group but it will have an independent chairman, an independent board and it will be, within its articles of association, it will be enshrined to serve all customers equally. the lead brexit negotiator for the european parliament says he wants to ensure that british people can retain the benefits of eu citizenship after the uk leaves the union. in an interview with radio 4's today programme, guy verhofstadt described brexit as a tragedy for both the uk and the eu and said he hoped to convince leaders to allow britons to keep a number of rights, so long as they were applied for on an individual basis. his comments come as european leaders meet in brussels for the last eu summit before the brexit negotiations are expected to begin. 0ur political correspondent ben wright is in brussels for us. talk to us about this idea from guy
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verhofstadt and how it might work. talk to us about this idea from guy verhofstadt and how it might worklj am not sure that guy verhofstadt knows how it might work in practice if it was to be in play during the negotiations. the european parliament is not at the negotiating table. they will have a vote at the end of the process and he is a senior belgian mep you will be an intermediary between the parliament and the brexit ago shading teams in the european commission. he is perhaps the biggest federalist there is in this town, touting the idea for people in the uk who would like to remain some sort of element of the eu citizenship there might be a way of buying that, perhaps having a visa that might enable you to have the movement across the eu for a certain number of years, perhaps still having a vote in european elections. these are the sort of got
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he has sketched out and others in the european parliament, a handful, have mentioned the same. i do not think this, i might be wrong, but i do not think it is being thought about seriously within the european commission at the moment, who will be at the heart of the negotiations, but it is an old brands from somebody who is in the brexit picture and whether it takes off, whether there is enthusiasm on the eu or uk site, we will not know until the negotiations get going. eu or uk site, we will not know until the negotiations get goingm terms of the other 27, now that theresa may has left, in terms of how they are getting on, nothing significant happening in terms of brexit, but what are you hearing on the fringes of meetings? it would be lovely to have been a fly on the wall of the meeting going on this morning which wasjust wall of the meeting going on this morning which was just the meeting of the 27, theresa may has gone because they are talking about the future of the european union of which the uk will not be a part.
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talking about a big celebration in rome on the 25th of march marking 60 yea rs rome on the 25th of march marking 60 years since the treaty of rome was signed, the foundation of the modern european union. i would have thought they would have budged on brexit because the eu is trying to work out its negotiating mandate. just as whitehall is working out how britain wa nts to whitehall is working out how britain wants to approach it, they are working out about trade, the eu commissioner doing the same behind—the—scenes, and that talks will start in earnest as soon as these may trigger is article 50 which she insists she will do by the end of march. then the eu will work out its negotiating mandate because it sets the terms for how these talks will proceed, whether item number one on the agenda is the brexit bill, this figure of £50 billion that britain always, they say, because of contributions and promises made, botox will feature
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running in parallel with the divorce negotiations. big stuff which i imagine is being discussed now without theresa may being in the room. labour has accused the government of being in "disarray" after the prime minister said controversial tax rises for self—employed workers would not be put into legislation until the autumn. theresa may said the changes to national insurance, announced in the budget, were necessary and fair but said number 10 has said that the prime minister is fully committed to national insurance reform. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth reports from westminster. theresa may defended the plans to increase national insurance contributions for some self—employed workers. she said the measures would ensure the tax system was fair, narrowing the gap between what employed and self—employed people paid. the shift towards self—employment is eroding the tax base. it is making it harder to afford the public services on which ordinary working families depend. this goes some way towards fixing that.
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despite being announced in this week's budget, mps will not vote on the changes until the autumn as separate legislation is required. critics accuse the prime minister of a deliberate delay so the government could soften the proposals and stave off a potential rebellion from tory backbenchers who have expressed opposition. but mrs may stood firm saying the tax rise was necessary in light of the country's changing workforce and the timing would allow mps to consider the measures in the round. a paper detailing the full effect of the national insurance changes will be published in the summer followed by the results of a review into wider employment practices. alex forsyth, bbc news, westminster. british cycling has admitted to failures of "care"
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while pursuing success on the track. it was responding to the leak of a draft report into its handling of allegations of discrimination againstjess varnish by the technical director shane sutton. 0ur reporter david 0rnstein is at the national cycling centre in manchester — david, what does this report say? for almost a year this has been hanging over british cycling. britain was like most successful and well funded 0lympic britain was like most successful and well funded olympic sport like a dark cloud. jess varnish made allegations against shane sutton of sexism and discrimination and other riders supported her talking of the culture of fear and bullying. an independent report into the culture at british cycling is expected soon and today he leaked draft of that report was published by the daily mail which backed up many of the claims, perhaps most damningly describing the former performance director as being untouchable. it says some riders experienced trauma
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while with british cycling and confirmed that culture of fear. british cycling issued a statement admitting to specific shortcomings and death earlier to address in early warning signs of problems. it said a 39 point action plan that was announced here last week was already under way. for the first time british cycling and british sport as a whole is having to address the balance between that no compromise approach that has brought so much success and the duty of care to athletes and staff. 0wen farrell remains a doubt for england's six nations game with scotland tomorrow after missing training at twickenham today. england will make a call on his fitness tomorrow. they have until an hour before kick off to finalise their side. farrell was out on the pitch with the rest of the squad this morning but he didn't take part in the session. meanwhile wales and ireland launch the penultimate weekend of six nations action tonight.
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anything other than a victory for ireland will end their bid for a third title in four years. they're second in the table, behind england, who, if ireland don't win, are likely to claim the championship with a win over scotland. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour. the trial of the former tennis coach is continuing today. the court has been told that he tried to turn his daughters into sporting stars. he denies two counts of child cruelty. this is the second day the defendant has been giving evidence in his trial. he is accused of subjecting his two daughters, now 21 and 19, subjecting them to physical and mental abuse in his bid to try to get them to become sporting stars.
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both girls were successfuljunior players. he has told thejerry that the golf themselves wanted to play tennis, he never forced the golf themselves wanted to play tennis, he neverforced them the golf themselves wanted to play tennis, he never forced them to play. he was asked by his defence team, did you both his eldest daughter to play? he replied no, that would be counter—productive. he said you cannot force a child to play is particular sport especially when that child is progressing at a rapid rate. we also heard that she had a big team around her including people from the lawn tennis association and a psychologist to help her with the pressures, the mental pleasures, she was facing when she was playing, but again he was stressing that the girls wanted to play and he and otherforced was stressing that the girls wanted to play and he and other forced them to play and he and other forced them to do so. he denies two codes of child cruelty. the case continues. in 1952, the city of
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london was effectively brought to a standstill, caused by air pollution. while some may remember the great smog, more than 60 years on, poor air quality is still damaging people's health and causing thousands of premature deaths every year. as part of the bbc‘s so i can breathe series, graham satchell has been looking at how things have improved, and what else needs to be done. london has been brought to a halt by dense smog, which has descended overnight. the great smog of 1952, dramatised in the netflix series the crown. it was a difficult time. it was scary, it was unpleasant. anne goldsmith was eight in 1952 and remembers it well. we could hardly see in front of us, and when i got to school, the handkerchief would be absolutely black. it is now thought 12,000 people died in the great smog.
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the enemy then was coal, used in factories and people's homes. what followed the smog was the clean air act of 1956. it introduced smoke—controlled areas, where only smokeless fuel could be burnt. fast forward 60 years and the enemy now is nitrogen dioxide from diesel engines. so what is being done today? these are the engines that have been removed out of taxis in birmingham. the local authority in birmingham has funding to replace the diesel engines in 65 taxis. we removed 99% of the nox that taxis were producing. it is a massive reduction. but it is a small pilot project. there are hundreds of taxis in birmingham. the government's overall plan is to introduce so—called clean air zones in five cities by 2020. i will look at the evidence, and when the evidence comes through as to where the key areas
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of pollution are, we will take the action that is needed to address the need for clean air in the city. i am afraid the government has been hopeless. critics like client earth say that what we need today is a new clean air act, and a scrappage scheme for diesel cars. we have to phase diesel vehicles off the roads. it will cost a fortune. it will take time, but we have to protect people's health. if the water we are drinking was as dirty as the air we're breathing in now, we'd do something about it. back in lewisham in london, anne is meeting nine—year—old eloise, and amy, who is six. we called it smog, and you couldn't see. only this far in front of your eyes. so we had to be very careful we didn't bump into anybody. we walked along the road like that. it was terrible, really. i feel sad for you. on days when pollution is bad, amy and eloise are kept
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indoors at playtime, just as anne was in 1952. sometimes we have to do stay inside because the air is bad. because the air is bad now? amazed by anne's story, amy and eloise are recreating her walk home from school in the smog. are you 0k? yes, are you 0k? yes. can you see anything? no. more than 60 years on, air pollution is still damaging children's health and shortening people's lives. time for the weather. air pollution, this is something you and your collea g u es this is something you and your colleagues keep a close eye on. not me personally! i do not know if it is the most desired job in the office. we have automated stations
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that monitor very important things like pollution. we do not have smog, but we have fog. it was pretty gloomy in places today. this was dorset. if you live on the south coast the fog might come and go through the course of the day. the clouds are breaking up a little bit, maybe evening more than we were expecting, so this afternoon there will be some sunshine, but overall it isa will be some sunshine, but overall it is a lot more overcast than what we had yesterday. tonight the cloud that can slow time in the early hours and the north—west, some rain on the way for belfast, glasgow, western scotland, but to the south staying dry. tomorrow not a bad day. the weather front crossing the country. spots of rain across parts of yorkshire, the north—west of
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england and wales. sunshine in the north—west. 17 or 18 degrees in the south—east. during the weekend we have weather fronts moving across so saturday or sunday, i would pick saturday. sunday is looking wet for some of us, not desperately, but a little wet. this is bbc newsroom live — the headlines: head teachers in england have warned that funding pressures are forcing schools to scrap courses, increase class sizes and cut back on trips and after—school clubs. the telecoms regulator, 0fcom,
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has reached a deal with bt to separate its 0penreach service — which runs much of the uk's broadband infrastructure. rival broadband providers to bt have welcomed the decision. one of europe's top brexit negotiators says british nationals should be allowed to keep some of the benefits of eu citizenship including freedom of travel, after britain leaves the european bloc. labour says the government is in "disarray" — after the prime minister said controversial tax rises for self—employed workers would not be put into legislation until the autumn. mps are being encouraged to make a decision over the palace of westminster renovation, following concerns the building is at risk of "catastrophic failure". the government's spending watchdog says the longer mps mull over different options to repair the houses of parliament, the greater chance that public
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money will be wasted. the splendour of the palace of westminster hides a secret — the building is decaying. crumbling stonework, ageing electrics and asbestos — mps are warning major renovations need to be carried out urgently to avoid what they say could be a catastrophic failure. the commons public spending watchdog has been considering three options. keeping mps and peers in the building while work is carried out — this would cost £5.7 billion and take around 32 years. a partial move out — taking 11 years and costing £4.4 billion or moving both houses out the palace entirely to allow six years of intensive repair costing around £3.5 billion. we're saying, get on with it. we need to make a decision. we are suggesting to fully decamp the house and do the work over a six year period and we need that decision made soon so they can work out the detail planning, costing and schedule, how we're going to move out and what we're going to do.
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mps can be housed nearby in what is currently the headquarters of the department of health. while qeii conference centre down the road could house the house of lords. there have now been three examinations of the options to rescue the palace and another parliamentary committee also wants to have its say but the longer the delay the more the likely cost to the public purse and the longer the dangers go unchecked. despite the upheaval, doing nothing, the committee says, is not an option. mps and peers will soon have to decide again on whether to leave or remain. britain's aid programme in libya could be harming vulnerable migrants, according to a new report. the independent commission for aid impact said there was a risk that britain's support was leading to more migrants being detained and denied a right to asylum. here's our diplomatic correspondent, james landale. last year some 180,000 migrants and refugees made the perilous
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crossing from libya to italy. almost 5000 died in the attempt. hundreds of thousands of others remained trapped in libya. britain's aid programme here is modest, about £9 million. but it supports the libyan coast guard and provides humanitarian support for migrants held in detention centres. but the independent commission on aid impact, which monitors uk aid spending, has concluded that uk aid could be causing unintentional harm. the watchdog says that while saving lives at sea is vital, there is a risk that supporting the coastguard means more migrants and refugees are returned to indiscriminate and indefinite detention. and when they are back in the detention centres, the commission says the refugees there are denied any chance of claiming asylum, something that is not recognised in libya. and they are also vulnerable to extortion and people trafficking by libyan officials. the international development
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department says it had considered the potential harm of any age, but insisted it protected —— aid migrants' human rights and improved their conditions. it added that since may 2015, british vessels had saved more than 13,000 lives in the mediterranean. after months of scandal, south korean president park geun—hye has been removed from office over corruption allegations. the constitutional court has upheld pa rliament‘s vote to impeach her and she could now face prosecution after being stripped of her immunity. her opponents have taken to the streets to celebrate — but there's been anger among her supporters — and police say two people have been killed. 0ur correspondent stephen evans reports from seoul. the moment a president was ousted. the head of south korea's highest court says president park committed a grave breach of the law. it was against the constitution and the trust of the people. outside the court pro—park
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protesters clashed with police. two died, one apparently by falling from the top of the bus he had climbed onto. the central allegation is that the country's biggest companies paid money to the president's best friend in return for favours. so top business leaders now face awkward questions which may yet put them behind bars. the police have been out in force because feelings run so high. families are split on the issue. there will be a general election in 60 days. one of the consequences of that may be a move to the left. if the government here moved to the left, there would be a different attitude towards north korea, probably more cooperative. every saturday night for three months, there have been huge
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demonstrations against president park. but what pushed her from office was a constitutional court finding her guilty of crime in a country which has only been a democracy for 30 years. injured people in dusseldorf last night is suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, according to police. prosecutors say there is no evidence ofa prosecutors say there is no evidence of a terrorism background. the attacker, the officer said in the his victims's heads and other bodies, is currently in surgery, having been badly injured himself as he fled. caroline davies reports. crowds gather outside duesseldorf central station, in germany. it was cordoned off after a man with an axe attacked commuters.
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the random assault took placejust before 9pm. translation: as far as we know one attacker approached one person in the s—bahn — the s28 direction cars and hit him with something, apparently an axe. then there were two injured on the platform, platforms 13 and 14, and at the station hall. one person was seriously injured and had to be treated in hospital. in total, seven people were injured, one seriously, although none are in a life—threatening condition. the assailant, a 36—year—old man, described as being from the former yugoslavia, then jumped off a nearby overpass. he suffered serious injuries. the police have said that he had a history of mental problems. armed police patrolled the scene. and witnesses we spoke to said that they heard helicopters overhead. germany is on high alert for terror attacks. memories are still fresh of the lorry that drove into a christmas market, in berlin, in december. but the authorities have been clear not to describe this incident as terrorism. the man has been arrested
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and police are investigating, as the station and the city start returning to normal. caroline davies, bbc news. let's look at some of today's other developing stories: a helicopter carrying high—level business executives has crashed onto a turkish highway, killing five people on board the helicopter is believed to have hit a television tower in an outlying district of istanbul. there were believed to be seven people on board, including two pilots, fourforeigners — reportedly russian nationals, and a turkish national. it's emerged that some detainees held at an immigration removal centre near gatwick airport have been there for as long as two and a half years. prison inspectors found that children had also been detained at brook house, which holds almost 400 adult male asylum seekers, illegal immigrants and foreign national offenders. the home office says some people prolong detention by trying
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to frustrate the removal process. more than 2,500 bridges in england are not fit to support the heaviest lorries, a new study has found. the report by the rac foundation found that many of the structures have weight restrictions in place, while others have to be closely monitored. it says some have also been put in a managed decline. the cost of clearing the backlog of work on all bridges is estimated to be £3.9bn. councils say they don't have the funds to repair them. patients and doctors have called for "do not resuscitate" notices to be replaced with orders that offer a range of treatments. currently, "do not resuscitate" orders instruct medical professionals not to use intensive and invasive treatments if a patient‘s heart stops beating or they stop breathing. a british medicaljournal article says a number of options should be discussed with patients instead. scientists in australia say the great barrier reef has been hit by widespread bleaching
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of its corals for the second successive year. bleaching happens when the water temperature is too high and the coral expels the algae that lives in its tissue and turns completely white. the first aerial survey of 2017 shows large areas of the reef have become distressed over the australian summer. it's the first time bleaching has returned within twelve months, leading to concerns over the reefs long term health. for a full summary of the news you can go to our website, where you'll be able to get more details. parents are being urged to cover prams and pushchairs during the school run to protect their babies from air pollution. that's according to researchers at the university of surrey who say that particles from exhaust fumes are particularly high at bus stops and traffic.
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i always thought if they had chest problems i would consider moving because we live on the main road.|j think pollution is because of the construction, cars and everything going on here. have you ever thought of putting the roof up because of pollution? sometimes i put the raincoat on the pushchairjust for her to avoid getting the, how do you say, the fumes of the cars? the research was led by surrey university's dr prashant kumar. earlier he spoke to my colleague joanna gosling about what the study tried to discover. we were trying to assess a typical
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route that when parents are carrying babies, so they passed through a different part of the road which might include traffic intersections, a roads section for the traffic flow is continuous, as well as a bus stop. it found that during the morning hours, you get higher exposure to find particles and ultrafine particles, as compared to the afternoon. and interestingly, in the afternoon. and interestingly, in the afternoon, you get higher exposure to bigger particles, as compared to the morning hours. so, this was quite interesting because it seems to be the effect of the morning dew, when the particles are less in the morning and in the afternoon hours, you might see that influence and that could have increased their concentrations. how dangerous is that environment for a
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baby? how much of a risk? we say that our body is a doctor, so, it can deal with a certain level of pollutants. but the body has limitations. adverse effects can happen. if you look at the chemical composition of the particles, there we re composition of the particles, there were traces of aluminium, and other components which looked like they're coming from vehicles. definitely something which is not good. what could adverse affect the? a number of studies, we didn't look into the toxicology side of this, which is an important area,
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toxicology side of this, which is an importantarea, and toxicology side of this, which is an important area, and i think further research should focus on that. but the studies in the past have found that if you have exposure to these particles, it could lead to cardiovascular problems as well as respiratory diseases in children. right now, i am sitting in one of the worst places for pollution. statistics show that one out of three children has some sort of asthmatic problem because they are inhaling the pollution. why a toxic particles so concentrated in a pram? so, because what happens is normally that, in the pram, you know, prams are ata that, in the pram, you know, prams are at a lower height, and this is pretty close to the height of the tailpipe, so, where the emissions
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are, and babies are basically sitting at the same height, so you might expect a higher concentration at those heights, as compared to the breathing height of an adult person. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: head teachers in british schools say they're being forced to increase class sizes and cut courses due to a funding crisis. as european leaders meet for the last time before article 50 is triggered, a brexit negotiator says he wants to ensure british people can retain the benefits of eu citizenship. labour claims the government is in "disarray" over planned national insurance changes outlined in the budget. british police specialising in football violence have been speaking to authorities in russia about how they plan to keep fans safe during the confederations cup later this year. the tournament is seen as a precursor to next year's world cup, which russia won the rights to host in 2010.
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0ur moscow correspondent sarah rainsford has been finding out more. the final countdown to the confederations cup. for russia, it's a dress rehearsal for the world cup next summer and they are planning a party here. but this violence in france last year has cast a shadow over the tournament. russian football hooligans, brutal and disciplined, fought running battles in the streets of marseille then. and england fans were among the targets. so, britain's top football policeman has been visiting russia this week to check for himself how safe it is. this tour was a first step in making sure scenes in marseille are not repeated here at the world cup. it was awful violence and left people seriously injured, so i think, anyone watching that would have been absolutely appalled. what we need to do is build on a good working relationship to try to ensure anyone coming to russia for the games is safe, known hooligans will be banned
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from the stands here. russia and britain are sharing data to make sure of that. the security will be tight. for russia, hosting the world cup in stadiums like this one is a matter of great prestige and it doesn't want anything to mar that. so, officials are presenting the hooliganism in france as a one—off. they insist that scenes like that won't be repeated here in russia. but can officials guarantee that the hooligans will be under control? there has never been a single incident at a major sporting event in russia. that proves that we can really organise a great atmosphere. important thing is to strike the right balance between atmosphere and festivity and complete safety. so, russia's gearing up to greet the world's football fans like this, not with violence. it's a message they are stressing here now. that a hard—core of troublemakers won't be allowed to spoil the football party.
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while police maintain a zero tolerance approach to migrants in calais — another camp seems to be developing 40 miles away at the town of steenvord on the belgian border. it has doubled in size in recent months, becoming a magnet for people trying get to england, after the so called jungle camp was dismantled. 120 migrants are now being turned away from calais each day — and the authorities have brought in a ban on food being handed out by charities in some areas. 0ur correspondent peter whittlesea has been to the camps. 0n the edge of the motorway, this would is home to around 100 migrants. the camp has been closed twice in the last six months. when the police leave, the migrants return. those living here told us to get out. the landowner said the french authorities are failing to act. translation: i can no longer
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use the wood. i bought land in the countryside for my children to enjoy. the authorities do what they can. the migrants come backjust as quickly. one local charity says since the calais jungle was closed, the number of migrants in this area has doubled, there are no official hostels, so migrants camp where they can. in the daytime, you see they can. in the daytime, you see they can sleep, take rest, but at night, they are in the field, in the wind, everywhere. the increased security and the decision of the mayor to ban meals from distribution in certain areas of the city is, according to charities, forcing migrants to steenkamp smiles from the channel port but won't solve the problem that more and more migrants are still determined to get to britain. it is not a food bank, it is a ban on distributed food within a certain
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zone of the city. outside of that same, we can still distribute food but at the numbers increase, it is going to become a visible problem and wants is, you know, what will happen whena and wants is, you know, what will happen when a critical mass appears backin happen when a critical mass appears back in calais? how will be the those people? back in calais? how will be the those people ? where back in calais? how will be the those people? where will be the those people? where will be the those people? where will be the those people? back in britain: the zero tolerance approach to migrants living in calais is being backed by dovehs living in calais is being backed by dover's mp. the french government needs to make sure the jungle does not reform, that they stop migrants getting into calais before the first tent is pitched, helping to reception centres far from calais. with the french police union saying hundred and 20 migrants are still being arrested each day in calais, charities are calling for a solution to the migrant crisis, rather than moving it deeper into france. the first ever live music census is taking place right now in cities across the uk — think springwatch — but for music! lorna gordon has been following the census in glasgow and sent us this report.
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buskers on the streets of glasgow, passionate about their music, drawing interest from passers—by. from classical to contemporary, from concert halls to gigs in pubs, music is part of our culture. in our cars, at home, on our phones, we listen to plenty of music. but how does the live scene compare? volunteers in six cities across the country are attempting to find out. we're asking them how many events they go to, why they maybe go to an event, what's the main reasons behind going to an event. there are plenty of free performances to go to but, even so, british consumers spend more on concert tickets than on physical records, digital downloads and streaming combined. and the organisers of this census say that even those who think that silence is golden should care about the state of the nation's live music. music is a huge driver economically within the creative industries which are, of course, a big export for the uk, where it punches above its weight. there's a lot of research to suggest that music is also important for our
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health and well—being but, for me, music is really important because it's part of what makes us human, it's a fundamental part of being part of the human species. glasgow has a really active music scene. there are 70 live music events in the 24—hour period this census is taking place in but here across the uk the live music scene is facing challenges. some iconic locations where famous groups honed their acts have closed down, some never to reopen. some smaller more intimate venues are onlyjust breaking even. surviving as a small venue is difficult at the moment because property prices are increasing, because of the tight regulations around licensing. this attempt to measure the economic and cultural benefits of live music is, census organisers believe, a world first. whatever they find out, that live
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music in all its glorious forms brings joy to many is already beyond doubt. now you know that saying about how showbiz and children don't mix? here's possibly why. my colleaguejames menendez on bbc world news were interviewing renowned professor robert kelly live from his home about the impeachment of south korea's president. then one of his children decided to make a guest appearance. as you can see, professor kelly made a valiant effort at keeping the show on the road, and completed his interview, despite the unexpected interruption... scandals happen all the time, the question is how do democracies respond? what would it mean for the
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wider region? i think one of your children has walked in! shifting sands in the region? would relations with the north change?” sands in the region? would relations with the north change? i would be surprised... pardon me. my apologies! what will this mean for the region? my apologies. sorry. erm, south korea's policy towards the north has been severely...m just gets funnier! a fantastic bit of professional child wrangling by his wife as well. in a moment the news at one with reeta chakrabarti. first the weather with tomasz schafernaker. let's see what the weather is up to for the rest of the day. not a lot has changed. grey skies and mist
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will stick around through most of the day. hardly any clouds, just a layer of grey colour. this is much nicer, more spectacular in hull. a lovely sunrise. overcast conditions across lovely sunrise. overcast conditions a cross m ost lovely sunrise. overcast conditions across most of the uk. some breaks across most of the uk. some breaks across parts of east anglia, the few brea ks across parts of east anglia, the few breaks earlier across the south—west, the welsh hills, so, not everywhere is completely overcast, we're getting some sunshine but also some drizzle. around 3pm, in the north, fresher and temperatures of only 6 degrees in inverness. single figures through the lowlands to maybe a bit more light drizzle in the north. some spots of rain dotted around randomly across the uk. overcast across northern ireland, wales and england. some mist along the south coast which will move further east. for the six nations,
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wales v ireland, that will be 10 degrees, overcast, so, no change in the weather for you here. degrees, overcast, so, no change in the weatherfor you here. the degrees, overcast, so, no change in the weather for you here. the skies remain overcast tonight, so temperatures will hover around nine or eight. rain pushing into the north—west of the uk heralds a change, cloud will start to break up tomorrow. when a weather front moves through, quite often, clouds will break up. some sunshine for scotland and northern ireland. some rain across the north west and north. in the south—east, if the sun breaks through the clouds on saturday, we could get temperatures up to 17 degrees. here is the weekend. the wind is pushing through the weather front. some fresher air coming wind is pushing through the weather front. some fresherair coming in, so, sunday, not quite so nice. rain but not particularly heavy. you might be caught out if you do not
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ta ke might be caught out if you do not take your brolly. saturday will be the best day. should be some sunshine, a mostly dry day. then come sunday, but is when that rain comes along. have a good day. plans for more cuts get the cold shoulderfrom head teachers. they say a funding crisis is forcing them to increase class sizes and cut courses. we will be live at the head teachers' conference in birmingham. also... eu leaders meet in brussels — without theresa may — in what's billed as the last european summit before brexit talks are triggered. bt bows to demands to run a legally separate broadband operation, to cheers from its competitors. british cycling admits not giving enough care to staff and athletes
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after ongoing claims of sexism and bullying.
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