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tv   BBC News  BBC News  March 11, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. famine in parts of africa and the middle east could lead to the world's biggest humantarian crisis since 1945 according the united nations. turkey's president calls the dutch "nazi remnants and fascists" us secret service agents arrest an intruder trying to enter the white house. a retiring femalejudge is criticised for saying women can protect themselves against potential rapists by not getting too drunk. critics say her remarks blame victims for the crime. also in the next hour. the government cracks down on ticket touts. computer software which buys hundreds of tickets within seconds is to be made illegal with law breakers facing unlimited fines. and at twickenham. .. by 30—7 in their bid to win the 6 nations.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. aid agencies say the international community must not ignore a warning that the world faces the worst humanitarian crisis since the end of the second world war. the united nations under—secretary general for humanitarian affairs, stephen o'brien, says more than 20 million people are at risk of starvation in four countries — nigeria, somalia, south sudan and yemen. he warns that three and a half billion pounds is needed byjuly to avert disaster. our world affairs correspondent richard galpin has more details: for months now, it's been known that millions of people, including young babies like this, in yemen, have been starving. she was just four months old when a bbc team met her in december. and across yemen, hundreds
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of thousands more children have so little to eat they are struggling to stay alive. and the threat of mass starvation is affecting three other countries. this is a refugee camp in south sudan, which, like yemen, has been torn apart by conflict. families forced to flee their homes and left with little to eat. already a famine has been officially declared here, with almost half the population in urgent need of help. we stand at a critical point in our history. already at the beginning of the year, we are facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the creation of the united nations. now more than 20 million people across four countries face starvation and famine. without collective and coordinated global efforts, people will simply starve to death. the number of people the un says is now in dangerer is huge.
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almost two million in nigeria. the number of people the un says is now in dangerer is huge. almost two million in nigeria. nearly five million in south sudan. nearly three million in somalia. and 1a million in yemen. the un predicts without serious help 1.4 million people could die before the end of the year, unless more aid money is found. they're calling for 5.6 billion to tackle this crisis. apart from conflict, another major cause of the crisis is drought. this is somalia, which has been particularly hard hit. in this hospital, in the capital mogadishu, doctors have been treating people who've travelled almost 200 miles to get medical help. the most the cases, the death
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cause is dehydration. we are doing the rehydration of the child and we have given some antibiotic. some basic aid is reaching those in need, but nowhere near enough. so it's possible famine could be declared in all four countries, unprecedented in modern times. richard galpin, bbc news. i spoke to the executive director for unicef uk, michael penrose to get his reaction to the warnings: the things we are hearing on the ground are women unable to breast—feed because they are unable to get enough nutrition for themselves. there have only been a handful of famines since the second world war, and we're looking at ford of them simultaneously. that something we've never seen. we are
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facing to threats, the immediate threat of children starving to death. 1.4 million across the region. on top of that, children call with malnutrition for any extended period of time, the damage becomes permanent. they lose intellectual capability and their health. we need to continue to support these people or be banned as a generation. but the eight groups and organisations, the humanitarian relief operations, they have been warning about it for months. they have made appeals for money. some money has come in, but not as much as had been pledged. is this a way of trying to change that dynamic? yes, we hear which are seen, but we have other priorities. there are other problems we dealing with. the word i've heard most here about the requirement is humanity. the sheer
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scale of this problem and the impact it's having on children means we all have to come together with collective humanity. unicef has been saying for a long time there is a problem here, but when we use the word famine, it means it's critical. children are going to die. it's not something we can ignore. yes, there are priorities, but this has to be the top. simon is generally man—made, the consequence of war and instability of the mass movement of people. is enough of the international effort going into that side of thing, being an end to conflict, sustaining ceasefires, putting in peacekeeping efforts? absolutely. unicef has people in all of these countries on the ground who
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could help, he could help save these lives. but there are no humanity green solutions to what are fundamentally political problems. so guess we can save the lives and the short—term, but we need politicians to sit down and find a durable solution to these conflicts. while pa rt solution to these conflicts. while part of the conflict is related to climate change, our lack of ability to access and for farmers to plant at the moment is absolutely caused by conflict and the effect it has had on people. that was michael penn was talking about the imminent famine facing parts of north africa and the middle east. turkey's foreign minister has called a dutch decision to not allow him into the netherlands a "scandal" and says it won't be accepted. the minister had been due to speak in the dutch city of rotterdam in support of a turkish referendum giving mr erdogan greater powers. turkish people in western europe are allowed to vote in that referendum — which has led to efforts by the turkish government to hold campaign events. but the dutch authorities were concerned about a risk
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to public order and security — and the foreign minister's plane was stopped from landing in the netherlands. earlier at a rally in istanbul, president recep tayyip erdogan has described the dutch as "nazi remnants and fascists". mr erdogan also appeared to threaten retaliation — they don't know anything about politics or international diplomacy. they are very nervous and they are cowards. they are naturally remnants and they are fascists. the dutch prime minister mark rutte has condemned mr erdogan‘s remarks. he said his country had been willing to consider a planned event in a turkish building, such as a consulate. but he said it wouldn't respond to ‘threats'. this morning on television, he made clear that he threatened the netherlands with sanctions and of course we cannot negotiate under such threats.
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we decided it was betterfor him not to come to the netherlands. he described the dutch as nazis. what is your reaction to those remarks? crazy remarks. i understand he's angry but this is way out of line. an intruder has been arrested in the grounds of the white house, according to us media. president donald trump was at home when secret service agents arrested the intruder, who was carrying a backpack, according to the reports. the white house has yet to confirm the arrest. a female judge has warned women who get drunk that they are putting themselves in danger of being targeted by rapists. lindsey kushner qc said what she called ‘disinhibited behaviour‘ could put women in danger. the comments have been described by the campaign group rape crisis as outrageous and misguided.
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francis fitzgibbon who's the chair of the criminal bar association say‘s he agrees with the judge. it's unusual for the judge to make those kind of wide—ranging comments that go beyond the key issues dealing with, but i suppose because it was her last day in court, she felt she could do it. it seems to me she was lamenting the prevalence of attacks on young, vulnerable women by rapists. and one of the things that makes women vulnerable to that sort of attack is when they get very drunk. but she was very careful not to blame the victims of the rate for what has happened to them. she says a woman can do with her body what she wants, and man will have to adjust his behaviour accordingly. and i don't think anyone could disagree with that. it seems to me
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that what she is really saying is that what she is really saying is that when a person, any person, does something that is potentially risky, like getting extremely drunk, they need to be aware of the risks they are taking, and have some understanding of where it may lead them. i don't think she was... i think it's unfair to categorise what she was seeing is blaming the victims for what happened to them. i think she makes it very clear that the violent behaviour of rapists is the violent behaviour of rapists is the problem and that there are 100% responsible for what they do. but it seems to me, more as a parent, than asa seems to me, more as a parent, than as a lawyer, that it is just sensible to tell one's children when they start going out on their own, to be alert, to look out for danger, to be alert, to look out for danger, to stay with their friends, to make sure they can get home afterwards,
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and to look after each other as well, so that people don't get separated and isolated. that seems to mejust be plain common sense. dame vera baird is northumbria's police and crime commissioner. she told me she doesn't agree with the judges comments if you want to leave a legacy message, it would be far better be directed at the men who are raping. those predatory men who deliberately pick on a vulnerable young woman, whether it is because she is in drink, or that her wits will not be about her, they are deliberately focusing on someone because of their vulnerability. it would be overwhelmingly better to say that that predatory behaviour is well understood and will be treated with very strong sentencing. unfortunately, if you focus, and she herself acknowledged that judges are criticised for focusing too much on the conduct of the complainant and not
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on the conduct of the rapist, if you focus on the young woman, or the young man, because of course it happens to them as well, and say that if they have been drinking, they are seen to be less likely to be believed, or more likely to have consented to the individual, then it looks as if you are shifting the responsibility over to that person. more than 60 prisoners were evacuated from a jail in dorset last night after a large fire was started by an inmate. it's believed he climbed onto the roof of hmp guys marsh near shaftesbury after complaining about a change of regime at the prison. fiona lamdin reports. flames and thick smoke filled the night sky above hmp guys marsh. after an inmate thought to be drunk, wearing many layers of clothes, set light to them on top of the prison roofjust after eight o'clock last night. as firefighters controlled
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what they described as the large fire outside, inside, 64 prisoners were moved from their cells to the safety of the gym. in an unannounced inspection, two—and—a—half years ago, investigators found this place in crisis. they said staff and managers had all but lost control. they said one in four prisoners felt unsafe as gangs operate openly. from where you are here, what could you actually see? we could see out of our bedroom windows some flames. george bolton lives opposite the prison. as i understand it, he ripped tiles off the roof and set fire to his clothes and it caught the timbers of alight. that's where the fire came from. we didn't see flames, because we can't see past that house there, but we did see the glow. another blaze in another prison.
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it's just one in a long string, 50 fires are reported each week in prisons in england and wales. these figures have doubled in two years, a strong indication of the problems going on behind the country's prison fences. fiona lamdin, bbc news. earlier shadowjustice minister yasmin qureshi told me that she was not surprised about the situation in prisons across the country... as we have been noting and complaining to the government for a number of months now, that there is this problem in prisons across the country, where these types of activities are happening, there are assaults on prison officers, assaults on prison officers, assaults on prison officers, assaults on prisoners by each other, assaults on prisoners by each other, a high number of suicides taken place in our prisons. and there are loads of drugs in our prison system. things had being getting out of hand 110w things had being getting out of hand now for quite a period of time. so
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why not surprised to hear about this particular incident cladding. we are taught by the ministry ofjustice that there are long—term plans, and some of them are coming in as we speak, in terms of recruitment of officers, in the end we have a prison estate that is comparatively a lts prison estate that is comparatively alts in large parts, and we have demand for prison places that is high. how would you change the balance? there are two ways of approaching this. when the government came in in 2010, be cut down one quarter of the prison staff numbers. that's one of the reasons you have these difficulties. while the government say they are trying to recruit 2500 more prison officers, they have not been able to recruit many. 0ne officers, they have not been able to recruit many. one of the reasons is that prison officers are coming in and then leaving after a short time, because the stress is actually
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tremendous. they don't want to carry on. one of the ideas we have suggested to the government is that perhaps prison guards who were made redundant should perhaps be brought back on a short—term contract to deal with the situation, because they need experienced guards to deal with this. remember, guards are not just here to log the prisoners up and put them away, and often the first person are the only person the prisoner ‘s to. so they offer informal pastoral care to them. secondly, a lot of prisons are overcrowded. we have two things going on in our country. on the one hand, there's a feeling that the number of people should be locked away for the maximum time, and if you want that kind of prison policy thatis you want that kind of prison policy that is quite often counter—productive, then you need lots of prisons, lots of prison officers and loads of the availability of rehabilitation and education programmes, so that when prisoners,, they are able to lead
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their lives. let the big news breaking news coming into us from washington, dc this evening. you may recall that i've been saying there have been reports of an attempted break—in at the white house. we've now had a statement from the secret service that reads as follows. at approximately 1130 last night, and individual skilled the outer perimeter fence by the treasury building and the e. executive ave. secret service uniformed officers arrested the individual on the south grounds without further incident. a backpack carried by individual was screened and found to be free of hazardous materials. the south and north grounds of the white house complex were searched by the secret service. nothing of concern was found. the homeland security secretaryjohn kelly found. the homeland security secretary john kelly has found. the homeland security secretaryjohn kelly has been briefed. that's an update on what
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we're being told officially by the us secret service. i should say that sources are being quoted without being named, seeing a couple of things, that the intruder was only challenged at the point where they would at the entrance to the residence, in other words, the park to the president and his family and other guests sometimes stay. the other guests sometimes stay. the other thing not mentioned is that we understand president trump was at home in the white house last night. he often isn't, he spends a lot of time at his residence in florida. so clearly there was potential for this to be in more serious incident. but it passed off peacefully and it doesn't seem there was any reason to suppose this person posed any threat to the president. the headlines on bbc news. famine in parts of africa and the middle east could lead to the world's biggest humantarian crisis since 1945 warns the united nations. a diplomatic row after turkey's president calls the dutch
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"nazi remnants and fascists". us secret service agents arrest an intruder trying to enter the white house. let's return to a story we spoke about earlier. staying with the fa cup now and there is a huge game taking place in london this evening. non—league lincoln city are taking on premier league giants arsenal for a place in the wembley semifinal at stake. lincoln are the first non—leaguers to reach the last eight since 1914 and if they win — the result is sure to go down as the biggest upset in fa cup history. 0ur correspondent adam wild is outside arsenal's emirates stadium in north london and joins us now. what are lincoln's expectations? serious fans will be convinced dean
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can win, but what are they really saying? amazingly, and it might surprise you, that the lincoln city fa ns surprise you, that the lincoln city fans have been speaking to sleep in a rising over the last two or three hours, actually feel they have a chance. this is, as you say, the first non—league sides reached a stage in the competition for over a century. it is quite literally a once in many of them neverfelt century. it is quite literally a once in many of them never felt they would ever see the day when they we re would ever see the day when they were playing the of arsenal here, with a place at wembley at stake. but they are saying they got a chance. that is a reason for that. it's not the first ever been at a premier league ground this season. who could forget the winner against burnley in the previous round? that was preceded by games against brighton and ipswich, who they also beat. and they have beaten a higher level opposition befalling this tournament. but arsenal do provide a
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wholly different proposition. but the lincoln city fans i have been speaking to see they are here with high expectations. they do believe they can do it. there are 9000 of them here behind me. many of them safely inside, soaking up a bit of atmosphere, enjoying the day. they'll do that whatever the result was afternoon. but there's certainly a note of cautious optimism. dou btless a note of cautious optimism. doubtless there will be using all the noise they can muster to really cheer on the team. and we would have failed to notice that arsenal have not exactly been on form in recent games. presumably this is another match that continues potentially to pile on the pressure for arsene wenger. i hesitate to say, if that
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isa wenger. i hesitate to say, if that is a good time to play arsenal, this might be it. they were beaten 10—2/2 legs by bayern munich. that put pressure on manager arsene wenger. he has been under pressure. but there are rumours, that are being denied by arsene wenger, by about u nrest denied by arsene wenger, by about unrest in the camp, unrest in dressing room. dissenting voices are getting louder. sorry, i'm going to interrupt you, because this is turning into a comedy sketch, we're losing every other word. we got most of what you said, and everything from your first answer. i think we got the drift about the pressure
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that arsene wenger is under. thanks for being with us from the stadium. we will keep in touch with you. adam while at the emirates stadium for that all—importa nt match while at the emirates stadium for that all—important match between lincoln city and arsenal. a driver in china has ended up on the roof of a house after trying to avoid an accident. he said that as he tried to get out of the path of a motorised tricycle and an oncoming car, he accidentally put his foot on the accelerator rather than the brake. the result was, to say the least, embarrassing. fortunately, nobody was injured in the incident and he was rescued by local police. 0nline touts who bulk buy tickets and sell them for inflated prices will face unlimited fines under new government plans. it will also be illegal to use so—called "bots" — or automated computer software — to bypass limits on the maximum
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amount of tickets that can be bought. our business correspondentjoe lynam, explained to me how the software works. about six months ago tickets for a u2 concert in new york, madison square gardens went on sale, about 25,000 tickets. they were all gone in one minute. one minute? within a few minutes of that, many of those tickets, thousands of tickets suddenly appeared on totally legitimate secondary markets, stubhub, letmein, viagogo, etc. perfectly legitimate for these secondary markets to sell these tickets, but what is not legal is, and it will be criminalised, with these bots, which is an algorithm or bit of software that hunts the availability of these tickets, snaps them up, they have a whole array of credit cards they can use, snaps them up and then puts them back on these markets at vastly inflated prices. that is the key thing. so you and i, if we stay up late at night, until one second after midnight, we're still not going to be able to buy that ticket, there is a good chance?
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this is what is making the fans livid, but the musicians themselves, they are livid their genuine fans, who really want to go, are priced out of the market. so sometimes a ticket has a face value of £50 or £60 will be for sale for 200, 300 and more. but there is clearly a demand for those tickets at those price, they are still being sold. somebody is buying them, so how much responsibility rests on customers to just say, sorry, i am not prepared to pay these ludicrously inflated prices, however much i want to see my idol. you and i might be sane consumers. some of the time! exactly. but if, for example, you absolutely must see a certain act, whatever it is, rene and renata, rolling stones, whatever it is. you are showing your age! you will pay what you need to pay. if that means this is going to cost an arm and a leg, but this is a special concert that i'm not
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going to go without, it is fine. it goes back to the point of pricing the legitimate fans out of the market because they cannot afford often to pay £1,000 for a ticket. you on your incredible salary will be able do that. maybe once in a lifetime. i am interested, you know, the rhetoric is good, the industry is saying this is great news, i can't imagine fans and musicians won't be saying the same, how enforceable is it? that is the key issue. you can come after these bots if these companies are based in britain, or the individuals are that run it are based in the uk, you can arrest them, but the vast majority are not based in britain. they could be operating out of an apartment in bangalore for all we know. the other thing to remember is, i have spoken to a few ticketing experts today, and they are saying that these bots may not be robots at all, they may be real human beings being paid a pittance in sweat shops outside the uk to make these purchases, and then put them on the secondary market. they may be paid 25 cents to buy each ticket for which the price quadruples an hour later. a specialist nanny has been called in to help look after three malayan tiger cubs at an american zoo.
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blakey is a six—year—old male australian shepherd. according to keepers at cincinatti zoo he provides snuggling, warmth and a climbable body to the cubs after their mother rejected them. he also helps with their behaviour by checking them when they get too rough or aggressive. it's not the first time blakely has been a nanny for other animals, he has previously helped raise baby cheeta hs, wallabies, bat—eared foxes, and an ocelot. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's karthi. we've got fa cup action to come but we have to start with rugby union's six nations. england will retain the title if they beat scotland at twickenham and there are just a few minutes left of that game. and it's looking likely that england will be crowned six nations champions once again.
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three first half tries — jonathanjoseph scored two of them, anthony watson the other, inbetween a gordon reid try for scotland and straight after the half time break, joseph completed his hat—trick. england leading 37—7. with 20 minutes left. france still have slim hopes of winning the championship, should england lose that match at twickenham. earlier in rome they scored four tries to secure a bonus point victory over italy, who now look destined for another wooden spoon. joe lynskey reports. the first summer they are in the by the first summer they are in the rugby team that don't play rugby. england almost led to a famous success at twickenham, to france they are in the rugby team that the deer and not lose but continental rivalry brings out the best in the underdogs and italy made the perfect start. the french again have struggled to
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assert themselves on this tournament but when the flowing style of rugby does emerge, it is worth savouring. for italy, successful so close yet so far away, there are fast start so often falls apart. italy have shown they can be ingenious but this was a week of errors. a famous success in the six nations still feels some way off. england's women have set up a grand slam decider with ireland next week after thrashing scotland today 64 points to nil. winger kay wilson set a new six ntaions record with seven tries during the game as egnalnd maintained their 100 precent record during this year's competition. locked at 7—7, the only difference
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tween ireland and wales was a try just after the hour mark to keep ireland's grand slam hopes alive. kyren wilson was the inspiration for england against scotland and victory would set up a final showdown with ireland but only the score was in doubt wilson rewrote the record books. no one had managed that in the first half of a women's six nations game before. wilson missed the first couple of matches in the championship but missed nothing against scotland. she was at again in the second half, failing on the misery and making more yesterday. seven tries for kay wilson, and her welder streams she would never have thought this was possible. when she was informed that her seven tries was informed that her seven tries was a competition record, the look on herface said it was a competition record, the look on her face said it all well she remained modest. it was so much fun
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and we're really happy with the performance and it is great to be here. should and do her remit any favours, tries into the corners made only two were converted but the surpassed their biggest score in the competition by one point full stop ireland hope they will have some advantage against rampant england. england haven't won the 60s is just 2012 but there amount above ireland on the table on difference. will lincoln city are facing 12 times champions arsenal and the score is 0—0. manchester city had a comfortable 2—0 win over middlesbrough to book their place in the semi finals of the fa cup.
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city manager, pep guardiola, had said his first season at the club would be judged as a failure if he doesn't win a trophy but they are now one step closer to silverware. ben croucher reports. the modern middlesbrough fan arrives more in hope than expectation, too young to remember their last year run to wembley 20 years ago. in that time manchester city fans have become more accustomed to success and goals with 13 and three rounds today. make that 40 94—mac. goals have been harder to come by for middlesbrough and from there it was more a case of attack versus defence, a question of how many and how did he miss that. city even tried to repeat their first goal but
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not this time, push hard enough and eventually middlesbrough's rearguard caved. pep guardiola has a wembley date in his first season in charge at middlesbrough's wait to retirement goes on. there was premier league football as well as fa cup action today. an important game at the bottom of the table with hull city trying to get out of the relegation zone facing swansea. everton are continuing their push towards the top six places with a 3—0 win over west brom. romelu lukaku scored everton's third and he is now level with harry kane as the premier leagues top scorer with 19 goals each. while bournemouth fnially have their first win of 2017 thanks to a hat—trick from joshua king. there is no change at the top end of
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the table because the top six teams are not in action. at the bottom, hull city's when that moves them above middlesbrough and the dramatic win for bournemouth relieves pressure on them. in the scottish premiership niall mcginn scored the only goal of the match as second place aberdeen beat motherwell. elsewhere hearts thrashed second from bottom hamilton academical 4—0, partick drew with bottom side inverness caledonian thistle, kiolmarnock won at ross county kilmarnock won at ross county and stjohnstone beat dundee. it's the old firm derby tomorrow and rangers' new manager will be watching from the stands. pedro caixinha has been confirmed in the role on a three—year contract. the portugeuse manager will watch his new side take on the premiership's run—away leaders and arch rivals, celtic tomorrow before starting work on monday. under—20s coach graeme murty will
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take charge of the old firm match — his sixth game since mark warburton's departure last month. elise christie has become the first british woman to win a title at the world short track speed skating championships. christie claimed gold in the 1500 metres, finishing just 0.12 seconds ahead of her nearest rival. the win represents an excellent comeback for christie who was contemplating laeaving the sport after being disqualified from all three of her events at the 2014 winter olympics. to badminton and after victory against the olympic champions yesterday, chris and gabby adcock suffered a narrow defeat in the mixed doubles semi finals of the all england 0pen. the couple had a match point in the deciding set against their chinese opponents but chris broke a string as they lost the rally. lu and huang closed out the match 22—20 in the decider. the adcock‘s equalled their run to the final four at last year's tournament.
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i think wejust i think we just got really unlucky and chris breaking a string that such a key point is not ideal and it isa such a key point is not ideal and it is a hard one to take at the minute. the difficult was it to refocus? at 20-20 the difficult was it to refocus? at 20—20 there were still lots to play for but it is terribly unlucky, this doesn't happen very often and to happen on that one point, that is sport i suppose it is really hard to look back on it at the minute and just admitted to have much point, to have been here on sunday would have been amazing. breaking a string on much point is really unfair. that's all the sport for now. you can keep up to date with all those stories on the bbc sport website and we'll have much more in sportsday at 6.30. it is still 0—0 between arsenal and
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lincoln city. the world's facing its largest humanitarian crisis since 1945. that's the assessment of the united nations which says more than 20 million people face the threat of starvation and famine in four countries in africa and the middle east. £3.5 billion are said to be needed — byjuly — to avert disaster. this report from our world affairs correspondent richard galpin contains images you may find distressing. for months now it's been known that millions of people, including this young baby in yemen have been starving. she was just four months old when a bbc team met her in december. across yemen hundreds of thousands more children have so
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little to eat they are struggling to stay alive. and the threat of mass starvation is affecting three other countries. this is a refugee camp in south sudan which, like yemen, has been torn apart by conflict. families forced to flee their homes and left with little to eat. already a famine has been officially declared here with almost half the population in urgent need of help. we stand at a critical point in our history. already at the beginning of the year we are facing the largest humanitarian crisis since the creation of the united nations. now more than 20 million people across four countries face starvation and famine. without collective and coordinated global efforts people will simply starve to death. of the huge number of people the un says are now in danger, almost 2 million are in nigeria. nearly 5 million in south sudan. nearly 3 million in somalia,
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and more than 14 million in yemen. the un is predicting that without serious help 1.4 million people could die before the end of the year. unless more aid money is found. they're calling for £3.6 billion to tackle this crisis. aid agencies on the ground say at the moment they do not have enough money to deal with the rising demand for help. a child who suffers from severe acute malnutrition, unless they are treated there is a high likelihood they will die. if they are treated then they can recover com pletely if they are treated then they can recover completely and the cost of that treatment can be as little as $80. apart from conflict, the other because of the crisis is drought. somalia has been hit hard. in this hospital alone almost 50 children
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have died in two months, most from dehydration. with the lives of so many children like these now at risk the un believes the global response must be quick. richard galpin, bbc news. a female judge has been criticised after warning women who get drunk that they are putting themselves in danger of being targeted by rapists. lindsey kushner qc said what she called ‘disinhibited behaviour‘ could put women at risk. her comments have been described by the campaign group rape crisis as ‘outrageous‘ and ‘misguided'. frankie mccamley reports. jailed for six years for what police described as a horrifically prolonged attack. ricardo rodriguez was found guilty of two counts of rape but sentencing judge lindsey kushner used herfinal rape but sentencing judge lindsey kushner used her final words before retiring to issue a rape warning to women. she said girls are perfectly
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entitled to drink themselves into the ground but should be aware of potential defendants to rape gravitate towards girls who have been drinking. if push comes to shove, a girl who has been drunk is less likely to be believed than one who is sober at the time. while many might see her comments as useful advice, others believe this is a backwards step. i'm very anxious that whatever message she meant to send, it's very clear that it is a message there is not much point in reporting. that's wrong. whatever amount of drink you've had, do report, you will be treated better than this suggests. a rape survivor herself this woman now helps others through the ordeal. it makes all of us really quite angry and not just because they're arrogant, factually incorrect comments, but it's one thing to go around making these comments when you sit in a court
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room all day and you are engaging in one aspect of society without engaging with the women who are experiencing this. judge lindsey kushner is not the first to comment on this sensitive subject. of the judges have faced criticism in the past. campaigners, though, hope this will not stop other rape survivors from coming forward in the future. frankie mccamley, bbc news. president erdogan of turkey has described the dutch as "nazi remna nts" and "fascists" after his foreign minister was banned from travelling to rotterdam to attend a rally in support of a referendum to give mr erdogan greater powers. the dutch prime minister said mr erdogan's remarks were "crazy" and "way out of line." reports from syria say at least 40 people have been killed, and dozens injured, following two explosions in the capital damascus. it's thought two suicide bombers targeted buses transporting shi'ite pilgrims near an ancient cemetery in the city. it's not yet clear who was behind the attack. 0nline ticket touts who buy in bulk and then sell tickets for inflated prices will face unlimited fines under new government plans.
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it will also be illegal to use so—called bots, or automated computer software, to bypass limits on the maximum amount of tickets that can be bought. our business correspondent joe lynam reports. when it comes to seeing your idols up close people will sometimes pay large sums. but increasingly fans are being priced out by robots or bots that snap up tickets in seconds and resell them at inflated prices. and fans are often squeezed out. it stops youth from going to these places, from seeing these shows. it's not really fair. it's not necessarily fraud but if people are making money out of something that you, it's kind of a bit like you shouldn't put such a premium on something. the rise of the internet has enabled touts to use software known as bots touts to use software known as bots to automatically buy up thousands of tickets in seconds and that's what
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the government wants to make a criminal offence with unlimited fines. we think it's unacceptable that fans are being ripped off by these computer bots buying up all the tickets and then selling them at inflated prices. so we're going to make that illegal so that people can buy tickets more easily and fans can get to the concerts, the sports venues that they want to. but can we ever fully remove illegal ticket touts? there's always more that can be done. as long as there are people out there wanting to profit on the back of tickets there will be people wanting to buy those tickets as well. the important thing is to sort of distil it to a good market, a market that works well for the industry and a market that works well for consumers as well. and that might mean that official ticket sellers for popular shows will have to be far more vigilant when someone tries to suddenly buy or suddenly sell a lot of tickets. criminalising these bots which snap up tickets which fans otherwise want could work but if they're overseas then there's very
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little the government could do. also, ticketing experts say that the bots might in fact be real human beings, paid paltry sums of money by the illegal ticket touts to do their work, criminalising them would be fraught with problems. joe lynam, bbc news, in the west end. england look to be on the verge of retaining their six nations title. they are playing scotland at twickenham where victory today means they'll win the championship. 0ur sports correspondent joe wilson is there. england very much in the lead with just a few minutes remaining. absolutely. we note strange things happen in sport but with england 54-21 happen in sport but with england 54—21 ahead here we can assume the match is theirs and therefore the six nations title. this wasn't the type of game we expected. scotland have been in good form themselves, so why has this happened? jonathan joseph in the england backline has been the catalyst, two tries in the
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first half for him and another one early in the second half, those three tries, his running, scotland could not match it. england have won their games in the six nations without excelling but this is the kind of performance the coach eddie jones always wanted. scotland not helped by a number of injuries in the first half in their back line. england on the point of retaining the six nations title but their resources financially and the number of players available should always be competing for this title. remember how bad they were in the world cup? what is the difference? it has to be that man, the coach, eddiejones, it has to be that man, the coach, eddie jones, about to it has to be that man, the coach, eddiejones, about to win the six nations again with england. much more on that to come throughout the evening and the rest of the news on the bbc news channel. i will be back with the late news on bbc one a labour mp is calling for abortion legislation to be updated. the rules that say a woman must have the consent of two doctors
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to end her pregnancy have been unchanged for fifty years. critics say a change in the law could pave the way for sex selective abortions and terminations on demand. jayne mccubbin reports. my first reaction was, i don't want to have a baby. straightaway, how am i going to care for this being when i can't even care for myself? emily tells me why she had an abortion. she was broke, she had depression, she couldn't cope. she had to wait one month for a termination. that was the worst month of my life. i was googling ways to induce miscarriage and i think that in itself proves it's too long. you're risking women's lives because i could have really hurt myself during that time. you could have faced a jail sentence. i don't have any words for that. to punish a woman who is already in such an unstable and vulnerable position, what do you think you're doing to that woman's life? just under 200,000 abortions were carried out in the uk in 2015,
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most in rooms like this. the nhs says women should wait around two weeks, but it can be more than twice that. figures indicate these tablets used to miscarry are increasingly being bought illegally online by women who refuse to wait. two doctors sign off every abortion. now, this is unlike any other medical procedure. but no other procedure involves ending a life and that's what's key here, isn't it? we're in the 21st century. we trust women to make decisions about their lives, about their healthcare, and abortion should be no different. but others say the delay that comes with not one but two gps is essential when deciding the fate of not one but two lives. many women go for that initial consultation and by the time they come back they actually change their minds. it's an important step in the process to make sure women are making the right decision for them.
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do you have any statistics to back that argument up? we do know that about 30% of women who go for initial consultations never go through with the process. the difficulty with the termination is once you have done that, if it's a rushed process, you can't change your mind. her office later said this figure had been given by a leading clinician. we could find no evidence of it. abortion is an emotive subject. but while the royal college of midwives has backed the proposal, more than 1,000 midwives have joined a "not in my name" petition. they fear it could pave the way for sex selection abortions on demand. we didn't achieve what i always believed was what women needed, which was choice. diana monday was a key figure calling for change in the ‘60s, just as she is today. i was a lone public voice, but i was not a lone person who had had an abortion.
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they were all there, the voices, but they were unheard and unfortunately they still are unheard. i am appalled. 50 years later on, we are still fighting for this. oh, my goodness. this is the hate mail? yes. she shows me the hate mail her campaign attracted in one file. but letters from women who begged for help in another. that fine line between the rights of a woman and the rights of an unborn child will be scrutinised again on monday. experts have revealed that the author, jane austen, was virtually blind towards the end of her life, possibly because of arsenic poisoning. tests on her glasses show that medicine she had been taking could have contained arsenic, which may have contributed to her early death. ben moore has this exclusive report. for one of history's greatest writers, just reading her own novels would have been very difficult without these. jane austen's specs have been
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at the british library for 20 years, but only now can they bring focus to her life. back in the early 19th century there were prescriptions, similar to what we have today. so what we did was have somebody bring in a portable lensmeter so we could very, very carefully have it examined. austen was longsighted. firstly low prescription, but her eyesight deteriorated. the final pair revealed that she would have had great trouble reading and writing. this could help reveal the mystery of why she died so young. the possibility of her being poisoned accidentally with a heavy metal such as arsenic. we know now that arsenic poisoning can cause cataracts. arsenic was often put into medication for other types of illness, so potentially for rheumatism, which jane austen suffered from. using modern optometry, we are able to see just what jane austen's eyesight
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would have been like. that is 475. i cannot see your face at all. i can only see my hand when it's about there. so that's what she needed to correct her vision. the british library wants optometrists to get in touch and offer their professional opinions. a rare chance to see things through the eyes of one of our best—loved authors. time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. it's a fairly quiet day on the weather front, i fear bit of cloud that he had been breaking in one or two areas across the south—east where temperatures are around 17 degrees. a lot fresher in the north and these are the ten which is around 6pm. this evening and overnight little bits of pieces and
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rain crossing the country, a weather front here and another a little farther east and the cloud and spots of rain, not cold around six to 10 degrees. changeable tomorrow with some rain around the south east lincolnshire and a bit of a break in the weather and another light band of cloud and rain and more sunshine and a bit of a changeable day on the way. on monday and tuesday, mostly dry weather and the week ahead will be pretty dry with variable amounts of cloud. this is bbc news. in the last few minutes — england win the six nations tournament after beating scotland at twickenham. scotland at twickenham 61—21. famine in parts of africa and the middle east could lead to the biggest humanitarian crisis
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since 1945 according the united nations. a diplomatic row after turkey's president accuses the dutch of behaving like nazis. also in the next hour... the government cracks down on ticket touts. computer software which buys hundreds of tickets within seconds is to be made illegal with law breakers facing unlimited fines. a retiring judge is criticised for saying women can protect themselves against potential rapists by not getting too drunk. critics say her remarks blame victims for the crime.
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