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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  March 12, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello this is breakfast, with ben thompson and rachel burden. failure to prepare for a breakdown in brexit talks would be a serious "dereliction of duty" according to mp5. the warning for the government comes ahead of a debate on the eu exit bill. the brexit secretary is calling for the house of commons not to sabotage the process. good morning, it's sunday 12th march. also ahead. riot police break up a rally in support of the turkish president in rotterdam after he described the dutch as "fascists". renewed calls for a centralised database for taxi drivers in england to avoid putting the public at risk. in sport, england are 6 nations champions once again. they win the calcutta cup after a 61—21 win over scotland — a record equalling 18th victory in a row for england.
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my my stomach and head are all over the place and that was five laps. you do that for 50 minutes! mike takes a spin with esme hawkey — the 18—year—old racer hoping to take the track by storm — and we'll meet another of motor sport's rising stars. and louise lear has the weather. good morning. it's a messy sunday morning with the weather. it's a cloudy, mild start — there is some rain around, but also some sun. i'll try and give you all the details coming up. good morning. first, our main story. an influential committee of mps has today warned that the government would be guilty of "a serious dereliction of duty" if it fails to plan for brexit talks ending without a deal. the legislation to start the exit process will be debated in parliament tomorrow. in advance, the brexit secretary david davis has called on mps to reject the amendments put forward by the house of lords. our diplomatic correspondent,
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james robbins reports. we all know what set britain on the road to brexit — last year's referendum victory for leave. but we don't know what brexit will actually look and feel like. nine months on, a cross—party committee of mps is warning that the coming negotiations could stall or be derailed. their report says a complete breakdown in the talks would be very destructive, damaging both the eu and the uk. and the mps argue that the government isn't planning sufficiently for a painful no deal outcome. as the prime minister prepares to trigger the formal start of the brexit process later this month, a government spokesperson has responded to the committee report by saying that david davis, the secretary of state for exiting the european union, had briefed the cabinet last month on the need to prepare, notjust for a negotiated settlement, but also for the unlikely scenario in which no mutually satisfactory agreement could be reached. ministers are said to be confident britain can achieve a positive
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new partnership with the eu, including a comprehensive agreement on free trade. james robbins, bbc news. ahead of tomorrow's debate, brexit secretary david davis has called on mps to leave the legislation unaltered. let's get more on this now from our political correspondent, susana mendonca. david davis's concerns, is he right to be worried that mps could seriously disrupt the smooth passage of this bill? there is a possibility it could happen, if enough tory rebels were to support the lords' amendment, and that could put a spanner amendment, and that could put a spanner in the works for the government, because they want to get this bill through unchanged from the initial bill that went through to the lords in the first place. they don't want to have to guarantee the rights of citizens from the east you
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living in the uk, they don't want to have to give the commons a right to have to give the commons a right to have a say on the bill. they have told backbench conservative mps that they would have a say at the end of they would have a say at the end of the day anyway, but they don't want it to be legislated for. there are in the position that if there were enough rebels, it could affect things. but it's not looking likely. whatever the commons decides, the lords has to have a say on it. there's a chance the lords could put forward those amendments again if they rejected. if everything goes through as the brexit secretary would like to see happen, so those amendments rejected, then potentially the government could be ina potentially the government could be in a position to trigger brexit on tuesday. but it remains to be seen whether or not that happens. what the brexit secretary has said as he doesn't want theresa may to have to
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go into those negotiations with one hand tied behind her back. a diplomatic row between the netherlands and turkey has worsened as the dutch government prevented two turkish ministers from addressing a rally in rotterdam. dutch riot police used water cannons to break up hundreds of turkish supporters who'd gathered to demonstrate against the dutch government's decision. earlier the turkish president described the dutch as "nazi remnants and fascists" as sarah corker reports. in the centre of rotterdam, dutch riot police were brought in to disperse hundreds of pro—turkish demonstrators. they are angry because the dutch government banned a rally in the city about next month's referendum to expand the powers of the turkish president. these extraordinary scenes came just hours after the turkish family minister was stopped from entering her consulate in the city. she was later detained and escorted out of the country. the netherlands had blocked president erdogan‘s supporters from holding referendum rallies because of security concerns, but deporting an official takes this row to a new level.
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in ankara, protesters threw eggs at the dutch embassy. there were demonstrations, too, in istanbul. it all started on saturday, when another minister was blocked from landing in the netherlands. that provoked these harsh words from president erdogan. they don't know anything about politics or international diplomacy. they are very nervous and cowards. they are nazi remnants. they are fascists. the dutch prime minister described that fascist comparison as crazy. this row is intensifying, and these scenes marked a new low in diplomatic relations between turkey and the netherlands. sarah corker, bbc news. the metropolitan police have been given more money
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to continue their investigation into the disappearance of madeleine mccann in portugal ten years ago. operation grange, which was launched in 2011, will get an extra £85,000. scotland yard has refused to comment on newspaper reports that they have identified an individual they want to question. a bbc investigation has found taxi drivers who've had their licenses drivers who've had their licences taken away from them are in some cases being handed another in different parts of the country. the findings have prompted the association of police and crime commissioners to renew calls to introduce a national data base of taxi drivers in england and wales. the most urgent thing that needs to be resolved is cross—border hiring, because at the moment, a licensing authority can set whatever standard they want, and somebodyjust goes elsewhere. if we prohibit cross—border hiring, limit cross—border hiring, that goes
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some way to resolving the problem. the second thing that needs to be done is we need a good standard of licensing that must apply to all authorities, a standard that everyone has to comply with. and obviously, if certain authorities want a certain higher standard, that's great. you can hear more on that story on the bbc‘s 5live investigates at 11 o'clock this morning. the sister sledge singer joni sledge, who had a number of disco hits with her three sisters in the ‘70s, has died at the age of 60. the band was formed in 1971 — with their biggest hit we are family hitting the charts eight years later. three of the sisters have continued to record music and last performed together in october last year. they had high hopes, but lincoln city's historic fa cup run has finally come to an end. the first non—league side to reach the quarterfinals in over a century lost 5—0 to arsenal yesterday. almost 9,000 lincoln fans made the trip to north london and roared their side on till the end, and despite the heavy defeat, they weren't going home with heavy hearts,
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as adam wild reports. even when faced with the impossible... lincoln city! ..somehow some will always find a little hope. 9000 lincoln city fans making thejourney, all armed 9000 lincoln city fans making thejourney, all armed with the same simple question — "what if?" even against the superstars of arsenal, lincoln refused to know their place. nathan arnold's surge and shot so nearly the moment of which the lincoln management dreamed. but before half—time, those dreams were fading. theo walcott putting arsenal ahead, and from there, they wouldn't look back. 0livier giroud adding a second before the moment lincoln's luck deserted them altogether. luke waterfall putting the ball into his own net. arsenal added two more to make it five. lincoln's astonishing run brought to an abrupt end. well, for lincoln, this was perhaps always an impossible task. but these fans head home with their heads held high, proud of their little bit of history they've made, pleased
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with the memories they are taking away with them. we got this far and we've done well. i think maybe we could have done a bit better, but you can't blame the team. you can't blame danny. it was a great day. ijust hoped not to be embarrassed. and for 45 minutes, we managed it. arsene wenger was worried sick. that was the best team he could ever put out, which is testament to lincoln, really. it is arsenal who go on to wembley, but it is lincoln who have written this story. beaten, yes — proud, undoubtedly. adam wild, bbc news at the emirates stadium. it's not just it's notjust the it's not just the streets that turning green in to mark st patrick's day. the river is turning green as well. for over a0 years, the city has been buying its river green. it takes
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about a5 minutes for it to turn com pletely about a5 minutes for it to turn completely green. it's part of a wider celebration which sees musicians and performers parading through the streets of the city, which has a big irish community. depends on which way the wind is blowing, the river can stay green for many days. it looks so weird, like that pool in rio. a female judge's warning that drunk women are putting themselves at greater risk of rape have caused a lot of controversy over the last couple of days. during the sentencing of a man who raped an 18—year—old woman, judge lindsay kushner qc said: "girls are perfectly entitled to drink themselves into the ground but should be aware...potential defendants to rape gravitate towards girls who have been drinking." "if push comes to shove, a girl who has been drunk is less likely to be believed than one who is sober at the time." sarah vine is a criminal barrister who specialises in sexual assault
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cases. is it ever appropriate to discuss a woman's drinking, when she is the victim of rape? i think there are two issues here. the first is that drunkenness is a vulnerability, which is peculiar in the sense that it is unlike other vulnerabilities. we can control it, but it also has an almost unique quality of investing in the person who is drunk, a sense of invulnerability. i think that thejudge's drunk, a sense of invulnerability. i think that the judge's remarks, which have been described as a warning, can be seen very easily as empowering rather than blaming. certainly, there was no attachment of any kind of moral value to what
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she was saying. she was simply pointing out that this is a risk thatis pointing out that this is a risk that is real. but as you know, as you're a barrister, you deal in words. the minute you start talking about a woman's behaviour in relation to a sexual assault like that, the minute you start implicating responsibility, when all the focus should be on the person who actually perpetrated the crime, shouldn't it? of course the focus shouldn't it? of course the focus should always be on a perpetrator, however, there are certain realities we have to deal with. one of them business. in any case, it doesn't matter what the nature of the case is, someone who is a witness or complainant who has been drunk, is going to have that drunkenness scrutinise in front of a jury. is that right? think about it this way. the prosecution have to prove the case to criminal standards, so they have to make the duty sure. if the
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are going to make a duly sure, the jury are going to make a duly sure, the jury have to be able to rely war u nless jury have to be able to rely war unless absolutely on somebody‘s recall. that means when somebody has been drinking, although the jury might accept they are honest in their account, they may feel the account is not entirely reliable, because objectively, alcohol impairs yourjudgment because objectively, alcohol impairs your judgment and your because objectively, alcohol impairs yourjudgment and your recall. this is also applicable to things that mugging or robbery in the street. if alcohol is involved, that will change the way a court views that decision. it will do and it does. how decision. it will do and it does. h ow ofte n decision. it will do and it does. how often does alcohol come into cases like this? does the court to ta ke cases like this? does the court to take into account those mitigating factors, that alcohol was involved and therefore the verdict would be very different? i'm not sure i understand. when you see the mitigating factors, mitigating against what? the sense that if
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alcohol is involved, the case becomes entirely different, because the person subject to the assault or robbery is drunk or has been drinking and therefore, what you would expect to be the outcome of that case is very different. it can be very different, but you have to understand there are countervailing impacts of alcohol. 0n the one hand, because it has the impact that it does on your memory, new recall, on how you've behaved, a new sense of vulnerability, then that militates against the account of the complainant. 0n the other hand, a jury complainant. 0n the other hand, a jury will understand that the complainant is much more vulnerable when she is drunk. finally, briefly, the concern from victims' groups is that even these discussions will be enough to prevent women from
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reporting crimes against them. you would say that isn't the case. i would say that isn't the case. i would say that isn't the case. i would say that's not the case, not least because i do think it's fair to keep victims in a position of ignorance, where they comment caught in the first time the ink countered any knowledge that their drinking and intoxication is going to be scrutinised, is when they step into the witness box and cross—examined. i think they have a right understand what they're up against when they giving evidence. thank you very much. louise has a look at the weather for us. across the south coast, it is cloudy and miserable, buti across the south coast, it is cloudy and miserable, but i had managed to find some sunshine. this is hot off the press at chester. you really are the press at chester. you really are the favoured few, because there is a lot of cloud and rain around at the moment. the rain coming up from the south coast is going to be a
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nuisance. this weather front will ta ke nuisance. this weather front will take quite a fancy to south—east england once it arrives. not that much heavy rain, but it will be a nuisance, it will linger. a band of cloud, showery bits and pieces of rain stretching through west scotland, wales and cornwall. behind it, we should get a window of sunshine. by the middle of the afternoon, we still have been lingering and it will certainly be fresher in the south—east in comparison to yesterday. maybe some brighter spells in the midlands, showers moving their way through wales, north—west england, scotland. northern ireland, and scotland, not too bad an afternoon in prospect for you. some showers, but nothing significant. through the night, the
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rain eases away and the skies will clear. temperatures will fall away. we have had two very mild nights, so it's worth bearing in mind, it could bea it's worth bearing in mind, it could be a shock to the system. first thing in the morning on monday, we could see temperatures close to freezing in the countryside. that is worth bearing in mind if you're in the garden during the day today. as we go into monday, at high pressure will continue to build from the south—west, keeping things very quiet indeed. if we get sunshine, this time of year, there will be strengthened the sun and temperatures could be up to the mid—teens. a good bit of dry weather, showery outbreaks of rain into the far north—west. i hope you managed to dodge today's rain, bearing mind, tomorrow is better. in an attempt to cut down on street
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furniture, the government give councils the power to remove unnecessary road signs. is the attempt to de—cluttered streets leaving more drivers are unclear on what the rules of the road actually are? caroline shepherd is achieving dedicated at the traffic penalty board. there are a lot of road markings, but we have taken away a lot of street signs. if you live in a town, you know what the rules are, unless it's new. but if you are visitor, you will be aware, so if you are visitor, you will be aware, so this is where the doubt comes in will stop its getting more complicated. you mentioned preston, burgers rules about bus lanes and if people don't understand, it's complicated. so they really need to
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educate people or about how they wa nt educate people or about how they want people to use these spaces, in a sense. is it confusing? because the basics of fruit juice a sense. is it confusing? because the basics of fruitjuice should be, when you pass your driving test, he learn the theory, you do the practical about what you can encounter on the road. is it that these are specific cases, specific to certain towns and cities, and that's why you need the signage. yes, was people now are lane when they see it, it's fairly obvious. drivers are supposed to dry with ca re drivers are supposed to dry with care and attention, but as gradually, they try and mix pieces more flexible and some restrictions may apply at certain times of the day, then people have a lot to concentrate on. they have to read the sign and see if it's 11 o'clock yet or half past nine, as well as looking at other road users. so it's complicated. the first time people often realise they've been in a bus lane is when they get the penalty
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charge notice through the post week later. appeals can be successful. but i guess it is proving how you do that when that isn't adequate signage. how do you know? our appeal system is now very easy. you can go online and you quickly see the council evidence, you can see the video, seeking comment on it and you can see, i didn't see that, or i came ata can see, i didn't see that, or i came at a different angle, or by the timei came at a different angle, or by the time i reached the restriction, i couldn't go backwards and do a u—turn. people can look at it and then add their comments and if necessary top to us about it. then add their comments and if necessary top to us about itm they continually get complaints about the bus lane, then they will be able to see that the signs are not good enough. also tweets coming in. paul said these are probably the same drivers who habitually speed and don't indicate properly and probably shouldn't be on the road. if anything, we have too many signs
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repeating information drivers should be aware of. you talk about flexibility, how much flexibility is needed, so that we'll get a case you can see they didn't do it intentionally and you may grant an appeal? we docked about hotspots, that suddenly beget a large number of appeals about the particular area, with its completely clear that there are a lot of motorists not understanding it. these are not people deliberately flouting the low, they simply have misunderstood. but often, if you've been down a bus lane and it's obviously a bus lane, then the best thing is to pay, but on the other hand, if you didn't know about it, you can go and look and see if perhaps you went wrong or perhaps the route she came on, it wasn't clearly signed. it's good to top tier, i wish we could talk more. lots of you getting in touch. gareth says, yes they are being used as a cash cow, the councillors hate motorists. every driver should read,
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understand and comply with road signs, that is an excuse, says another. the department for transport is road users should be put ina transport is road users should be put in a situation where they don't know the road rules. they see is up to local authorities where best to please road signs. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. ibrahim mogra is here to tell us what's caught his eye. we'll speak to ibrahim in a minute. first, let's look at the front pages. starting with the sunday telegraph, it says are furious over who's to blame for last week's budget shambles overnight. it emerged that cabinet wasn't briefed. philip hammond failed to mention that a tax
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rise on the self—employed did actually clash with the tory election promise. david davis is on the front page of the mail. he's come in for criticism from mps for not having a plan, if they don't come up with the deal during the brexit talks. david davis has said effectively, there's no point in talking about something which we have no idea what it will involve. but he says needs to be some sort plan b if the deal doesn't come off. similar story on the front of the 0bserver. the front page of the sunday times is speculating on possible interference of russian cyber attacks in the next general election here in the uk. sources at gchq said
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the political system needs to be protected from foreign hackers. let's see what has got you right inside the papers. i love the story. eight—year—old skipped lessons and happiness. top of the do this, it's all about well—being, mindfulness, relaxation. it's almost an unbelievable headline, where we have to teach children how to be happy. hopefully, they will be in situations where they are happy. this idea comes from the extra anxiety and stress that more and more young people are facing within the school environment, either from their friends the school environment, either from theirfriends or the school environment, either from their friends or people who are not being very nice to them, or workloads and other aspects. can you teach someone to be happy? that was what was baffling to me. how can you teach someone to be happy? what
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they're trying to do, rather than teach happiness, is to help them and equip them to remove bad thoughts. 0ne equip them to remove bad thoughts. one of the examples is to think about disturbing thoughts as buses that are pulling away and going away. teaching them some relaxation exercises, what are called the 7—11 exercises, what are called the 7—11 exercises, seven deep breaths in and 11 exhalations out, just to help them calm down. what we can do as pa rents them calm down. what we can do as parents and adults who have children within the family is make sure that we support them, praise them for their achievements. we support them, praise them for theirachievements. every we support them, praise them for their achievements. every child should be encouraged to do their best, but appreciate that that is their best, award them for it and commend them for it, rather than expect them to do what child abc is doing, wejust add pressure on. 0n
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doing, wejust add pressure on. on this programme, we have looked into this and parts of the country will it's worked well. i wondered if exposure to the news is a factor in making children less happy than they should be. the refugee crisis has been very prominent in recent years. this is the observer today. that is heartbreaking to read. we could have taken 100 children every week, and yet, we haven't. serious questions have to be answered by the home office, where they have rejected ongoing offers of sanctuary. they are volunteer organisations who have offered to take children, up to 100 a week, and yet the home office hasn't entertained this idea. local authorities are also claiming they have not been consulted. we were supposed to take 3000 children originally under the dubs scheme,
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and so far, we have only taken 350. councils are saying they can work with voluntary organisations and make sure we can meet the promise we have made. up to 200 places a week can be provided in conjunction with the local authorities and independent fostering agencies, and we can hopefully care for at least 1200 a year. at least coming close to what we had originally promised, with 3000. i'm going to pick this side of the observer, not something i necessarily agree with, but men are still not doing the housework, apparently. that is what the survey says, 30,000 people were surveyed in
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27 due to. and it seems like men are ducking out. strange findings. there are suggesting that generally speaking, women tend to do a lot more of the household chores, the cleaning and everything else, and men do less. men who are unemployed, they say, are less likely to do housework, because they are now overcompensating for their masculinity, where they have not got ajob, masculinity, where they have not got a job, but so nobody tried to boss around and put their feet up. what is your domestic speciality?” around and put their feet up. what is your domestic speciality? i love watching, staring pots and pans in the kitchen, dicing the vegetables before they go into the pot. i offered to do the vacuuming and earning, but my wife would let me. do you have any free time this afternoon? absolutely. it's wonderful to be part and parcel of what goes on in the home. there's no excuse not to. we have to roll model
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for children. we have four sons, if they see dad in the kitchen helping out, helping out a lending a hand, hopefully they will continue that in the room homes. that's good to see. thank you very much for coming in. stay with us, the headlines are coming up next. hello, this is breakfast with ben thompson and rachel burden. coming up before 9am, louise will have a full weather forecast for you. but first at 8.30am, a summary of this morning's main news. an influential committee of mps has today warned that government would be guilty of "a serious dereliction of duty" if it fails to plan for brexit talks ending without a deal. the commons foreign affairs committee said that a complete breakdown in talks would represent "a very destructive outcome, leading to mutually assured damage for the eu and the uk". the brexit secretary, david davis, has warned mps against attempting to change the bill for exiting the european union when they debate it in the commons tomorrow. mr davis said theresa may must be
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allowed to "get on with the job" of negotiating terms with the eu. he will ask parliament to throw out amendments to protect the rights of eu citizens living in the uk and to allow for a "meaningful" vote in the commons on the final deal. dutch riot police have used water cannons to break up a large protest outside the turkish consulate in rotterdam, as a diplomatic row between the two countries escalates. more than a thousand people gathered outside the building after turkey's foreign minister, who was due to address a rally, had his plane turned away from the city's airport because of security concerns. turkey's president erdogan responded by calling the dutch government "nazi remnants and fascists". the metropolitan police have been given more money to continue their investigation into the disappearance of madeleine mccann in portugal ten years ago. operation grange, which was launched in 2011, will get an extra £85,000.
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scotland yard has refused to comment on newspaper reports that they have identified an individual they want to question. ‘fake news' has hardly been out of the headlines in the last few weeks, and now the creator of the world wide web, sirtim berners—lee, has waded into the debate. in an open letter to mark the web's 28th anniversary, sir tim unveiled a plan to tackle data abuse and fake news, and expressed concerns about how the web is being used. sir tim said he wanted to start to combat the misuse of personal data, which he said created a "chilling effect on free speech". the sister sledge singer joni sledge, who had a number of disco hits with her three sisters in the seventies, has died at the age of 60. the band was formed in 1971 — with their biggest hit "we are family" hitting the charts eight years later. three of the sisters have continued to record music and last performed together in october last year.
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it's 8:33am now. time for the sport now. hello. good morning. they got their hands on silverware already. they did. in the lead up to this game, many people thought scotland would win. nobody thought england would win. nobody thought england would win. nobody thought england would win by a0 points but they did. one of those games where everything went right for england, nothing went right for scotland. so yes it was a perfect day for england at twickenham. they can now look forward to next weekend's match against ireland with real confidence. a win in dublin would see eddiejones' side become the only team to win back—to—back grand slams since the six nations began. they ran in seven tries at twickenham. asjoe wilson reports. jj — two letters, two legs, too much for scotland. jonathanjoseph started the game, and he was england's finisher. jonathan josef, flying
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jonathanjosef, flying to the line. pace and angle, attacking, running. it's been the essence of rugby ever since somebody picked up a ball. england now have a team to match any in its history, a hat—trick forjonathan josef. by the timejoseph completed his hat—trick early in the second half, the game was settled. scotland persevered, hampered by early indiscipline and injuries, but as they made clear, they were not here to be plucky losers. their recent performances have merited more than that. on this day, everything clicked for england. four tries gets you a bonus point. seven makes a serious impression. so the six nations is won, and eddie jones' england is still unbeaten. we have got good players. they now have a mindset of wanting to be the best in the world. they want to keep improving. and if we keep with that mindset, keep working hard, we will be the best in the world.
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the memory of this match will linger long after the sponsors' logo is removed from the twickenham pitch. the calcutta cup is a legacy of history. eddie jones and england are looking to the future, and notjust to dublin next weekend. his project is building towards the next world cup. and he likes trophies. in the day's other game, france ran in four tries against italy to seal a bonus point victory by a0 points to 18 in rome. italy had gone in front through sergio parisse's try early on, but they now look destined once again for the wooden spoon. england's women have set up a grand slam decider with ireland next week after thrashing scotland 6a points to 0. winger kay wilson set a new six nations record with seven tries during the game as england maintained their 100 per cent record during this year's competition. ireland also maintained their perfect run of results beating wales by 12 points to 7 at cardiff arms park thanks to hannah tyrrell‘s winning try.
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leicester are through to the final of the anglo—welsh cup after beating saracens by 32 points to 10. the tigers ran in four tries at allianz park, the pick of which was this effort from freddie burns twelve minutes from the end. leicester will face exeter or harlequins who play the other semi—final this afternoon. the final takes place at the stoop on saturday. ulster ran in ten tries to beat bottom club zebre in the pro 12. the 68—21 win gives them a bonus point and takes them above scarlets into fourth in the table. non—league side, lincoln city's remarkable run in the fa cup is over. they were beaten 5—0 by arsenal who progress to the semi—finals. lincoln were the first non league side to reach this stage of the competition for over a century. and joining arsenal in the last four are manchester city, who won 2—0 at middlesbrough. tim hague reports. that fa cup run of 2016—17 finally at an end for nonleague lincoln city, with history and multiple memories made.
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more came at arsenal. in fact, the underdogs could have gone ahead against the 12—time winners. what a chance that was. but despite losing five of their last seven games, the hosts had so much quality, and it eventually showed. commentator: theo walcott! arsenal have the lead on the stroke of half—time. relief for some, disappointment for others. it was not too surprising, really. 87 places separated the sides, and we saw it in the second half. olivier giroud made it 2—0 before an own goal and then something special from sanchez wrapping the game up. alexis sanchez, brilliantly placed! while they got five in the end, given what lincoln have done, it didn't really matter. they have changed history. there is a reason why no nonleague team in the last 100 years have been able to reach the last eight of the fa cup, and the fact that they have, that should make them mightily proud. of course we are disappointed we lost.
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but when we are able to draw breath, we are pretty proud of what we have achieved in this fa cup. and pep guardiola can be proud of manchester city's fa cup run as well. they have been away in every round, beating middlesbrough 2—0, away of course, yesterday. city are on their way to wembley again. and while there will be no appearance at the home of football for lincoln city, they found their home in the hearts of football fans all over the world. hull city kept their chances premier league survival alive with a 2—1win over fellow relegation strugglers swansea city two goals from on loan oumar niasse helped them to victory. they remain in the bottom three, one point from safety, while swansea are three points clear of the drop zone. bournemouth have pulled further away from the bottom three after a dramatic 3—2 win over west ham. josh king missed a penalty but scored a hat—trick, including
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the last minute winner! they are now six points clear of the relegation zone. west ham are without a league win in four matches. at the other end of the table, everton narrowed the gap on 6th place manchester united with a 3—0 win over west brom. kevin mirallas, morgan schneiderlin and romelu lukaku all scoring for ronald koeman's side. it's the old firm clash at midday today and new rangers manager pedro caixinha will be watching from the stands. celtic will re—establish a 27 point lead at the top with victory. second place aberdeen beat motherwell yesterday and fourth placed hearts narrowed the gap on third place rangers to five points with a a—0 thrashing of hamilton academical. there were also wins for kilmarnock and stjohnstone. partick drew with inverness. andy murray has been knocked out of the indian wells tournament in california at the second round — it's often seen as the 5th grand slam.
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the world number one lost to canadian qualifier vasek pospisil in straight sets 6—a, 7—6. after being knocked out of the australian open in the ath round, murray would've been hoping for much better as he'd just won the dubai championship. pospisi is ranked 128 places below murray. chris and gabby adcock lost in the semi finals of the all england open badminton. the married pair had a match point against their chinese opponents in the third set butjust when they least needed it — chris broke a string and they lost the rally. lu and huang won the next two points to prevent the adcocks becoming the first british pair in a decade to reach the final. it really was so unfortunate that. they were doing so well and then chris broke his string. sorry, richard, i was paying attention. it's very nice to see you. thank you very much. this is where we say goodbye to ben.
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he'll be reading the news for andrew marr after nine o'clock. first though, here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. it's all a bit all over the place, isn't it? yes, i managed to find a ray of sunshine. this is half of the press —— part off the press, this photo. it is the only sunshine i can find. send me another one if you have some but there is a lot of cloud and some rain around as well. it's a messy story. there are two weather fronts. one pushing it's a messy story. there are two weatherfronts. one pushing up from the south and the other moving in from the west. this is a very, very wea k from the west. this is a very, very weak affair but it will still bring cloud and bits and pieces of nuisance rain for us to try to pinpoint for you. so, here nuisance rain for us to try to pinpoint foryou. so, here goes. cloudy and wet across the south—east. certainly a different scenario to yesterday. the rain might not be that heavy but it's
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going to be a nuisance. it will stop temperature is becoming as warm as yesterday. we have a high before the next front moves in. around 13 degrees. we saw 18 in london yesterday, so not as warm. behind it, maybe some blitzers of sunshine in south—west wales and cornwall. northwest wales may well stay quite drab. the same across the lake district and into the borders of scotland. further north and west, dry with some sunshine. northern ireland, not bad day. through the night tonight, we will keep some clear skies and temperatures will fall away. worth bearing in mind as we haven't had a chilly night for a fee. that could be a shock to the system, particularly in rural spots. we could see temperatures down to freezing. that is worth bearing in mind. as you are starting to d head the plants for the spring, it could
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cause issues with that frost. as we head into monday and tuesday, things quietened down, a better day with more sunshine coming through. as a result, if you get decent spells of sunshine, temperatures. to lift as well. 11 to 16 degrees. just some outbreaks of sunshine —— breaks a brain in the far west. you might remember yesterday we showed you pictures of that huge 3,000—year—old statue which was found in a mud pit in a cairo? it's been hailed by egypt's antiques ministry as one of the most significant finds ever. let's find out a bit more about it. i'm joined now by drjoyce tyldesley, an archaeologist and egyptologist from manchester university. good morning. it's lovely to have you with us. for those who didn't see this yesterday, can you describe what has been found? it a statue of a king whom we think might be remedied the second. it's been discovered at a site which was the
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sight ofan discovered at a site which was the sight of an ancient some —— sun temple and it's being slowly recovered by archaeologists. when we think be dipped, we think of the pyramids. this is very different, isn't it? when we think of it as a mud pit, it really is, isn't it? yes, it really is. it's lucky that it's stone because it will have survived better. did they know what they were looking for when they were excavating this site? they were looking for the site of the temple site and it's no surprise there are large stone statues there. they are often found in temples. but the site had kind of doubt —— kind of vanished, so they weren't sure what was underground. they were very happy to find what they have found. it is interesting to see them going at it with a digger. you would think they have to be incredibly delicate.
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it's very, very hard stain. it must have been incredibly hard to make. —— stone. how they made it, without the equipment that we have, is absolutely incredible. yes, in great britain, we werejust absolutely incredible. yes, in great britain, we were just about making axis and a sick tools together but ancient egypt, how sophisticated —— ancient egypt, how sophisticated —— ancient egypt, how sophisticated that time was. this is fantastic, because not only can we learn about how this was made and how it was transported, it also leads us to believe what could be there. it is very exciting and all because of one find. we are very excited to see what else comes out of it. doctor
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joyce tyldesley, archaeologist and egyptologist. the association of police and crime commissioners have renewed calls for a national database of taxi drivers to be introduced in england. it's thought this would prevent drivers banned in one area from getting a licence elsewhere. at the moment, individual councils are responsible for issuing licenses, but their requirements can be different. dame vera baird qcjoins us now. so, this seems to be like a fairly obvious move to make. would it be simple? the department for transport don't seem to be completely opposed to the idea of a national registration scheme. we think it probably could be added to the current disclosure and barring scheme and lodged with it. obviously it would have to be built up and they have made very clear that they need to consider it in the round
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cost fit benefit analysis and so on. but the concern we have at the moment is that even though councils do try to work closely together, there are six, for example, in my area, they don't always apply the same criteria. for instance, the case where a man in south tyneside crashed his taxi and hurt someone quite badly but that wasn't known to another local authority who gave him another local authority who gave him a licence when he'd been banned in south tyneside. more and more taxis of course are coming onto the roads, so of course are coming onto the roads, so it seems to us to be increasingly urgent that we get consistency in the benefit of public safety. are there instances where someone has been declined one of these licences but could still legitimately be given one in another area? when you say legitimate, it would not necessarily have been so for him, but yes, if you don't know that someone but yes, if you don't know that someone has been refused a licence in another area or it has been taken
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away, unless there is a central register, then that is the risk. another consideration is that a person has to be fit and proper in order to be given a licence but those criteria aren't really set out anywhere either. so for instance, someone anywhere either. so for instance, someone who previously had a conviction isn't necessarily com pletely conviction isn't necessarily completely banned from being a taxi driver. if it's a small trespassed on the rail when you were ten, it probably wouldn't intervene. but larger ones definitely would and, for instance, there is a complete ban on anyone who has had exposure to any form of child abuse. in other areas, there is a five to ten year exemption from a child abuse
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conviction. the fact there is no central database conviction. the fact there is no central data base makes conviction. the fact there is no central database makes it all quite chancy at the moment. so they would need to get together and agree on standards, essentially? that needs —— that has already happened in scotland, hasn't it? yes, it has. the local authorities here do work together but scotland have a system based on the pub licensing data, that they keep. it's a computer licensing —— a computer system they use and they are now in a situation where they can avoid inconsistencies that we talk about now. can i just ask you about another news story that has come up this weekend made a lot of headlines? that is the case ofa man lot of headlines? that is the case of a man who was convicted this week of a man who was convicted this week of the rape of an 18—year—old woman and thejudge of the rape of an 18—year—old woman and the judge in of the rape of an 18—year—old woman and thejudge in the case, judge lindsay krishna, he made a lot of
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comment afterwards which a lot of people are not happy with, and to recall for people who didn't see this, she said, women are entitled to drink themselves into the ground but that is inhibited behaviour could potentially put them in danger. she made many more comments but effectively it was seen by some victims groups as getting very close to victim blaming. how did you interpret her comments? yes, i did worry about that because the key thing is, surely, if those groups deal with crisis and violence against women and girls, the organisation to look after those who have been abused and those who will be future victims of sexual abuse, if they are worried that it looks like victim blaming, they are the experts, actually, and they will appreciate that that might have an impact on people being more relu cta nt to impact on people being more reluctant to come forward to make a complaint about rape because they've had a drink. that is very undesirable because we all know, i think it's pretty common knowledge
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now, that it's extremely difficult to complain about an offence like rape which requires you to stay in considerable detail the most intimate things that have happened, so intimate things that have happened, so another level of deterrence is not desired. i would like to say very strongly that whatever impression that might have conveyed, the courts, the police system and the courts, the police system and the crown prosecution service are well aware that rapists are to blame and women are not to blame for drinking. they do not cause their own rape and people who have had a drink, nonetheless, however many drinks, they should report sexual abuse if they have and they will be treated well. they will not be treated well. they will not be treated with disrespect. thank you very much. an important message to put out. dame vera baird, thank you. it promises to be a historic season for young women in motorsport mike went for a spin with an endurance racer who came
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second when she made her debut in the gt cup championship last season, and is aiming to go one better this time round. esme hawkee is also only 18. let's see her in action. another day at the office for trainee accountant esmee hawkey, on her way to work in the city of london. but there is another side to this 18—year—old, another world, in which she uses those accountancy skills to keep her alive. it is hard to believe she is still only 18, and now she is putting those angles and sums to good use at all the major motor racing circuits around the uk, and some in europe as well, as she blazes trail for young women in the gt cup championship. at least this season she doesn't have to worry about her a—levels as well. you are always working out where you need to be for the corner, how fast you are going into a corner to make the corner. the guys don't like it, to say the least. they don't like a girl
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coming past them. but yes, i think once you show who is boss, you just become a competitor, at the end of the day. as she goes for the gta title in endurance racing, no—one can believe she is made her debut last season only a decade after first go—karting on her ninth birthday. the fastest female i have seen in a long time, esmee wins in fine style. that karting experience, age nine, had transformed her life. i was doing ballet and tap dancing and things like that. i love the speed and the adrenaline. esmee passed the test for the first time last year, and i got a taste of her extreme, on—the—edge handling skills. speeds of over 150 mph, while being thrown around by the g—forces. i don't really get scared. i think the adrenaline just builds up so much, you just get on with it. believe it or not, esmee
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is a smooth, careful driver. not too aggressive, and wearing the tyres, and make sure they last until the end of the race. it gets really hot, and you need to be able to cope with the steering, because it gets quite tiring on yourarms, and things like that. my stomach, my head, my senses are all over the place, and that was five laps! you do that for 50 minutes. yep, 50 minutes. i have eight—year—olds, nine—year—olds, same age as me, coming up and speaking to me and saying it is great, what you do, and i would love to get into this. and i say to them, i started karting. you can, too. mike bushell reporting there. jamie chadwick won a british gt championship before she passed her driving test. she was just 16 when she won the title in 2015 and she's about to become the youngest woman
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ever to race in formula 3, how does that feel? it's great. for me, it's more about being able to race in formula 3 than being able to race in formula 3 than being the youngest woman ever to do that. you knew as me, didn't you? you used to compete against her. yes, it is great to see what she achieved last year. she's one of the women i have raced against. it is great to see what she is doing, even though we have split the paths we are on. please can you explain where formula 3 split —— fits into the structure of racing. the way it now works, it really follows formula 1, then formula 2, then formula 3. there's british formula 3, which i am racing in, then european formula 3. if you look at my career progression as i was looking at formula 1, i would probably go
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british formula 3 for two years, then european formula 3 and then f1 is the step after that. these are the cards you are racing in. what are the big difference is between formula 3 and formula 1? those are the gt cars that i raced last year. the formula 3 cars are more similar to formula 1. they are purpose—built racing cars. these are sports cars built by the manufacturers. so the formula 3 cars are faster? they are incredible cars, yes. the engineering behind them is incredible. the downforce and speedy can carry. you have just done your a—levels, you did them last year. so this is a gap year," —— essentially, for you? yes, i have been lucky to balance racing and my education. i am in the lucky position where i have the backing to do this year on
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a full campaign. so there is a bit of money behind you to help you? yes, unfortunately racing is a money game so if i didn't have the backing behind me, it would be a no go not only for me that any young driver. to say it's male dominated would be an understatement. in a typical race, would you be one of the only women now? yes, as i said earlier, esme is one of the only women i have raced against. it doesn't make a difference to me because once the helmet is on, you are all the same. i have never noticed any prejudice. one of the beauties of getting into it at one of the beauties of getting into itata one of the beauties of getting into it at a young age is that you are so focused, you just get on with it. i've been very lucky to never noticed any sexism in the sport and the sport is changing. for young females coming through and getting into it, this board is changing. females coming through and getting into it, this board is changinglj into it, this board is changing.” think we have seen the mad test drivers then f1 but not the mad
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drivers then f1 but not the mad drivers competing? will we still see that? will that be you? that have got to be be plan and the aim, i think. we have seen female test drivers and see them do test straits in the car, so we know they are physically strong enough to do it. we will keep our fingers crossed for you. i hope we will see you back on the sofa in a formula 1 car in a couple of years' time. that would be amazing. that's it from us this morning, but breakfast will be back with dan and louise tomorrow from six. they'll be joined by the writer of the thriller everyone's talking about — ‘the replacement‘. for now though, goodbye. this is bbc news. i'm maxine mawhinney. the headlines at nine. failure to prepare for a breakdown in brexit talks would be a serious "dereliction of duty" according to an influential group of mps. dutch riot police use water cannon to break up a large protest outside
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the turkish consulate in rotterdam — amid a deepening diplomatic row. a bbc investigation finds taxi drivers still on the road despite being banned, prompting calls for the creation of a central database. also in the next hour — a shock defeat for andy murray at indian wells. a sluggish performance from the world number one saw him sound the beaten in straight
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