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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 13, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11:00. legislation that will clear the way for theresa may to begin formal brexit negotiations faces its final hurdle in parliament today. it comes as nicola sturgeon says she'll make an important speech in the next hour for her plans ahead of article 50 being triggered. also this hour, the queen is launching the commonwealth games baton relay today at buckingham palace. iamat i am at buckingham palace were in the next hour and the queen will officially mark the countdown to the commonwealth games next year. the queen's basson relay gets underway marking the start of a 380 a day journey to the other side of the world to the hostname nation australia and the gold coast. members of the rmt union employed by three rail operators in england are striking today in a dispute over whether the doors on trains should be operated by drivers or guards.
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it is not a great service as it is. when things like this happen, it only makes it worse. the diplomatic row between turkey and the netherlands shows no sign of abating, with ankara accusing the dutch of breaking the vienna convention by expelling a visiting turkish minister. netherlands upholds a general election this week. —— holds. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the queen is launching the commonwealth games baton relay today at buckingham palace. the relay marks the start of the countdown to the games which will be held in april next year. over 388 days, the baton will visit all 71 commonwealth countries, before arriving at the australian gold coast for the opening of the 2018 games. and later, members of the royal family will attend a service at westminster abbey
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to mark commonwealth day. let's join simon mccoy now, who's in canada gate. thank you very much. i'm keeping an eye on the flag behind me because we are expecting the queen to arrive here at buckingham palace any moment. she has not got long before she has to start the countdown to the commonwealth games in australia next year. the commonwealth games in australia next yea r. let's the commonwealth games in australia next year. let's talk to catherine downes of our sports department. this is quite an event. it is huge for australia, but the commonwealth games, they matter, don't they? they do. they come around every four yea rs, do. they come around every four years, just like the olympics. it is a chance but the commonwealth to get together. thinking about the likes of you same bolt competing in 2014. these are some of the biggest athletes that you see on the olympic stage. it is a chance for them to pit themselves against the best in the commonwealth. what a way expecting to happen this morning?
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this morning, the queen will arrive here from windsor castle and we will know because that flag will change. she will come out onto the forecourt of buckingham palace, a paralympic champion and multiple commonwealth medals to his name as well, you will come along bearing the commonwealth bat on and he will bring around here and into the forecourt of buckingham palace. the queen and various other dignitaries will make a speech, there are lots of schoolchildren here. all with the flags. yes. the queen will take a moment to put a message into that commonwealth bat on which it is a message of hope and friendship and it invites the athletes from around the commonwealth to come together and in peaceful and friendly competition. that is what the official paperwork says. indeed they do. 6000, six and a half thousand. it was only 5000 in
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glasgow four years ago. only big commonwealth games in terms of what we have seen in the past. we will see her hand that bat —— caen one to an australian cyclist who is a world championship, the most decorated cyclist of australia, she runs about 50 feet. it doesn't look too far from here. she hands it to her long—time rival, victoria pennington who we all know from london 2012, she pipped victoria pendleton who will... she will she pipped victoria pendleton who will. .. she will take she pipped victoria pendleton who will... she will take it to westminster abbey. talking about the friendly games, they are always described as that. those two fierce rivals at one point, now they are 0k. they are retired now. yes. i was
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talking a few hours ago to her and she was saying it is nice to see her rival now. in the 2012 olympics, that was the pinnacle of their rivalry. it rumbled on for years and years. for anna meares to pip victoria pendleton to that second goal in front of her home nation really rankled. but they have spent a lot of time together since they retired. obviously pendleton retired after the 2012 olympics and anna meares retired just after the rio games, so meares retired just after the rio games, so she is newly retired. she isa games, so she is newly retired. she is a bit sad to not be out competing in the gold coast. she said the pool of her home games were something that she kept training for, but she couldn't. if i bring in that she kept training for, but she couldn't. ifi bring in marcus taylor, you are representing the gold coast. what does it mean to host something this big?m gold coast. what does it mean to host something this big? it is significant. i suppose it is for the gold coast with a legacy of hosting
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one of the biggest events in the world and it is the history behind the commonwealth games as well. it is really something inspiring the community and it is the first time the games have been held in a regional city, so it is not a capital. it is taken on something of an extra meaning for the community there. talk us through this baton. it isa there. talk us through this baton. it is a feat of engineering. it is. a couple of young designers put it together. they spent a lot of time working closely with indigenous communities and working with the elements of what exists on the gold coast and what makes australia australia. it is half macadamia would, a traditional tree that grows through the region and the front is all from recycled plastic in the ocean, as well. it is a slightly strange colour with plastic spades. exactly right. anything that is left
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in the ocean or the beach has been captured in put inside. what did mean for a city like brisbane? for an area like the gold coast to host something like this, we're hearing other countries like durban in south africa may find robins hosting this. how difficult is it? i think the structure is the critical thing. the gold coast has a lot of pre—existing infrastructure and some of the events i been put on in brisbane. it required a sick upgrades and temporary seating. that makes hosting games easier and more for a daly affordable. anywhere when you require a new investment, that makes it more difficult. markers, look behind me, the queen hasjust arrived. the flag hasjust behind me, the queen hasjust arrived. the flag has just gone up to say that she has arrived. she will be coming out in the next half
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hour. is a beautiful day year at buckingham palace. and australian brea kfast buckingham palace. and australian breakfast nation is going live from here and that will dispel a few myths about the weather here in britain. it does look gorgeous. thank you, simon. the legislation which clears the way for the start of brexit faces its final hurdle in parliament this afternoon. the bill will give theresa may the power to begin formal negotiations on the uk's withdrawal from the european union. ministers are confident mps will reject two changes made by the house of lords. 0ne guarantees the rights of eu citizens living here, the other ensures parliament has a meaningful vote on any final deal. live to westminster and our assistant political editor norman smith. we say the final hurdle, is guaranteed? not guaranteed. it would have to be an extraordinary turn of events for the government to not get its brexit bill through the commons, through the lords by close of play tonight. david davis would have two,
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i don't know, poke tory rebels in the eye, burn down the houses, lay waste to their families to stoke up the kind of revolt needed. in the real world , the kind of revolt needed. in the real world, it is not going to happen. there are not enough tory rebels who are willing to defy the government. you may get half a dozen, ten, but you realistically need about 26 or so. that is not going to happen. i sent also there is not the mood for it. what they are after our words of reassurance, clarity from david davis that he understands their concerns and he will try and meet their worries. in particular, trying to make sure there are reassurances of mps that if mrs may is not able to get a deal, that mps will still get a deal on that. they are worried that mrs may will not give them a deal on that. why they are concerned about that. why they are concerned about thatis that. why they are concerned about that is that they think that is a nightmare to scenario. if we just fallout of the eu, that is bad. if
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david davis can give them comforting language, then in the house of lords the liberal democrats peers will fight front, this all the way. they will get stay long hours to keep voting against the government. when you at crossbenchers, i think the house of lords will also back down. which means house of play —— close of play, i think mrs may will have her bill through parliament. even though her bill through parliament. even thoutheremy her bill through parliament. even though jeremy corbyn her bill through parliament. even thoutheremy corbyn the labour leader this morning stressing that he thinks it is absolutely right that parliament should have a final vote. the vote of the referendum was a vote to leave. that means article 50 has to be triggered. those people that voted to leave, voted to leave for reasons. many, many reasons. very complex. those of voting to remain the same. everyone has a
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right to be heard about the future of europe. we can't leave the continent we are geographically, geographically part of it. that raises the question, when will mrs mabel the trigger? the honest answer is no one here knows. i think only mrs may and her absolute closest advisers has a sense of when she will do it. we know she wants to do it by the end of the month. that is three weeks away. a bit of room to do the same. my guess, and it is only a guess, is that she will move quickly. i say that because if she doesn't, we will keep pestering her whenever she is out and about at about when she was going to do it. it begins to look like she is maybe having a wobble or second thoughts. i think psychologically, she wants to get it out of the way and wants to get it out of the way and wants to show she is decisive, on the front foot, build up a bit of momentum. my gut instinct is that she will go sooner rather than later and that could even be tomorrow. thank you very much, norman. in the
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next half an hour meanwhile, in a speech in the next half hour, scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon will set out her plans for a second independence referendum unless theresa may offers scotland a special deal on brexit. live to edinburgh and our scotland correspondent lorna gordon. this has been hastily arranged, hasn't it? do you know what she is going to say? we don't know what issues and to say. nicola sturgeon has been tweeting this morning. she has been tweeting this morning. she has been tweeting this morning. she has been calling it an important speech ahead of the triggering of article 50. there has been a dance if you like going on this past few months between theresa may and nicola sturgeon in terms of scotland's role in those brexit negotiations. nicola sturgeon, scotland's first minister, saying she wants to do everything she can to protect scotland's interests and those negotiations. scotland of course voted 62% in favour of staying in the eu. every local authority area in scotland voted to stay in the eu. nicola sturgeon
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would ideally like scotland to remaina would ideally like scotland to remain a member of the eu and if that wasn't possible, to remain a member of the single market. as you can see behind me, thejournalists are massing for this speech. we expect it to last 15 or 20 minutes. we are told it is worth listening right until the end. what might it be about? it could be about how she has long indicated that she thinks a second referendum about cottage independence is highly like the —— scottish independence. she would like to get westminster‘s permission to hold a second referendum. if that we re to hold a second referendum. if that were what she were to call for today through what is called a section 30 order. but remember that alongside the greens, there is a majority in favour of independence in the scottish parliament, so if she were to call for a second independence referendum, i think it would be
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highly problematic for westminster to refuse that. they could present some challenges or debate around the timing ofany some challenges or debate around the timing of any referendum, nicola sturgeon has said her preference would be awesome 2018, but in a sense, perhaps talk of a referendum is still just getting sense, perhaps talk of a referendum is stilljust getting a little bit ahead of ourselves. today might be about giving a final warning to the prime minister to take notice of scotland's notice of those exit negotiations as she gets ready to trigger article 50. —— brexit negotiations. and stay with us here on bbc news, we'll bring you live coverage of that speech, at 11.30. stay with us for that. rail staff from three firms across england are carrying out a 24—hour strike in a dispute over the role of guards. the rmt‘s 30th strike day in its dispute with southern over
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plans to make trains driver—only—operated has spread to the north of england. guards and drivers working for merseyrail and northern are taking action over similar proposals. the headlines on bbc newsroom live: legislation that will clear the way for theresa may to begin formal brexit negotiations faces its final hurdle in parliament today. also this hour, the queen is launching the commonwealth games baton relay today at buckingham palace. members of the rmt union employed by three rail operators in england are striking today in a dispute over whether the doors on trains should be operated by drivers or guards. and in sport: manchester united will have to reach the fa cup semi finals without a striker. wayne rooney's the latest player to be ruled out of the last eight
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match tonight at stamford bridge. bournemouth's ryan frazier has been called up for the scotland squad. more sport later on. police will launch an unprecedented appeal at the supreme court, this afternoon, against a ruling it failed the victims of one of the uk's most dangerous rapists. judges said scotland yard had breached the human rights of two women because officers didn't properly investigatejohn worboys who was jailed for life in 2009 after committing more than 100 rapes. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani reports. a trusted black cab driver, but one of the country's most dangerous rapists. john worboys attacked more than 100 women over six years, hunting them down late at night
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in london with an elaborate trick. he'd show off a bag of cash claiming it was a big gambling win and offer them drug—laced champagne. few of his victims could entirely remember what happened next and police didn't take their complaints seriously. one of his victims from 2007 had her account dismissed. had the officers who looked at my case taken my allegations seriously, they would've found substantial pieces of evidence. they didn't do that, and as a result so many more women went on to get harmed. the botched investigation led to a landmark ruling by the high court that scotland yard had breached the human rights of the women, and that means police can be sued. the force is now challenging that unprecedented ruling. this case is really important because women need to be able to hold police to account when they fail as catastrophically as they failed in the worboys case. if the police had acted sooner, if they'd listened to the women, and if they had followed their own policies, it's likely that fewer women would have been raped.
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as it was, he was left on the streets. the force admits it made mistakes but argues that important legal principles are at stake. if the justices rule against the met, it could have profound implications for how police chiefs prioritise serious violence and sexual crimes. dominic casciani, bbc news. the law commission has asked for... the law commission has asked for... the law allows people to be to temper their own safety such as in ca re temper their own safety such as in care homes and hospitals. many are being held without checks. just briefly, clive, what this —— who this law is aimed at. tell us more about it and how it is being used. it isa about it and how it is being used. it is a huge social problem this. it
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refers to people who lack the ability to have consent in a care home, or even in your own home. a relative who may have dementia and for whose safety you sometimes have two lock the door to stop them lock, wandering out and hurting themselves. it concerns a huge number of people. now the law relating to how they are assessed for being detained is really quite complicate it in most cases. if someone complicate it in most cases. if someone is in a care home or hospital, is mainly done by the local authority. it is a long and cumbersome problem. the law commission has had a good look at this today and in particular they have had a look because in 2014, there was a supreme court case known as the cheshire west case which massively broadened the category of people who came within this category. previously it had really been for those who are ready
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disputing their detention. actually it was for anyone who is deprived. it can be the relative is locked for the person's safety. they looked at this and impart that was because that case swamped the system. the number of applications went up 14 fold from something like 17,002 something like 200,000 in a year. the system simply wasn't coping. the law commission has looked at the system, looked at the law and said it simply isn't fit for purpose. it needs to be scrapped and it needs to be scrapped immediately. they are making a series of recommendations as to how they can be improved. what is going to happen? it is interesting. sometimes they have languished and set on the shelf. but this was paid for by the department of health because the department of health were aware that there was a real problem brewing here. the department of health has welcomed
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the report. they say they will respond in due course. the kinds of things that are being represented by the things in harms rights of advocacy and periodic checks of the ca re advocacy and periodic checks of the care and treatment of those who are detained. the law commission says is that some people's rights are simply being ridden over at the moment and that isn't good enough. greater prominence given to the issues of human rights and whether the provision of their liberty is necessary and proportionate, extending protection to all care settings. at the moment, if someone is in settings. at the moment, if someone isina settings. at the moment, if someone is in a care home or a hospital it is in a care home or a hospital it is the local authority who asked to make the authorisation. if it is a moderate home, it has to go to the court. the high court. the law commission is wanting one streamlined system which makes this whole system which makes this whole issue very difficult for the person
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and relatives. they want a easier system, a much more easy to negotiate system to care for that person. rail staff from three firms across england are carrying out a 24—hour strike in a dispute over the role of guards. the rmt‘s 30th strike day in its dispute with southern over plans to make trains driver—only—operated has spread to the north of england. guards and drivers working for merseyrail and northern are taking action over similar proposals. rail bosses argue it's about modernising services and they denyjobs will be lost. here's jan chaudhry—van der velde, managing director of merseyrail who's in liverpool. what is your take on this? they are concerned about driver only operated trains. in merseyrail, this dispute is about a new fleet of trains due
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to be introduced in 2020 and onwards. like many new trains arriving on the network in suburban ra i lwa ys arriving on the network in suburban railways and urban transit systems, these trends are operated without traditional guards. it is no different from what you see on the london underground everyday. it is no different from manchester metrolink or suburban services in london and in glasgow. this is the modern way that trains operate. what we are not doing in merseyrail is taking away all on—board staff, we will still have on—boa rd taking away all on—board staff, we will still have on—board staff of daly. we will have protection officers and the bylaw. and the cleaners. we will be supplementing that by a brand—new team of some 60 on—board staff and we really want to talk to the rmt about those staff. will anyjobs be talk to the rmt about those staff. will any jobs be lost? talk to the rmt about those staff. will anyjobs be lost? no, that is another thing to stress. anyone who works for a guard for merseyrail today. there are about 200 of them, they will have guaranteed employment
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with merseyrail. their rate of play will not be altered as a result of that. —— rate of play —— pay. will not be altered as a result of that. -- rate of play -- pay. are there enough work to employ that level of people or is just a stopgap? it is a guarantee we have given. if there are more guards who wa nt to given. if there are more guards who want to stay with merseyrail, then we will have a slightly bigger organisation and over a period of time, we will get the staffing levels to where they need to be. it isa levels to where they need to be. it is a guarantee that was made by the combined authority to the merseyrail guards when the combined authority approved the new trains to be purchase a meeting. so over a period of time you will get the staffing levels to what they need to be, what does that mean? what we have said is that on—board staffing will have 60 new untrained post. the role of the
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on—board staff, new untrained post. the role of the on—boa rd staff, the new untrained post. the role of the on—board staff, the working arrangements has opened discussed the rmt. it has to be more than 60 at the beginning accommodate all the people want to stay, then it will be. but the structural level of the staffing, we aim to be at 60. sorry to be pedantic, but it does boil down tojobs. if to be pedantic, but it does boil down to jobs. if they all want to stay, all six to guards, you really only have a requirement of 60. over how long will those jobs be guaranteed? we will need more drivers for example as the new trains introduced and in merseyrail, i don't know if it is the same with the other companies, we have tradition that the best drivers come from the ranks of the guards. many of today's's guards will be promoted to the higher paid role of driver. we will freeze all vacancies that we have in our stations. every one of the stations in the liverpool city
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region is staffed from first train to last train. we have about 400 station staff, so there are plenty of operations, opportunities there. people will be re—accommodated in those jobs. thank you very much. we are hoping to speak again on the rmt on the strike, as well. let's return to the launch of the commonwealth games basson relay which is taking place at buckingham palace. simon mccoy is there. in the sunshine, simon. -- baton. it is a beautiful day here. as a is in the gold coast. that is the theme today. the countdown begins. joining me now is marcus taylor part of the organising group. a big moment. yes. it is obviously commonwealth day so happy commonwealth day. it is a major milestone as we prepare for the games in the future. the queen is
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going to put a message in this baton. it is travelling longer and further than ever before. it is the longest relay in history. it will travel across 17 nations and territories of the commonwealth. it is spending a bit longer in some of those communities. just so people can touch it and engage with it. it carries a strong message about peace building and strong friendship as well. we really want that to be carried across the commonwealth countries. not until next april to the —— do the games begin. countries. not until next april to the -- do the games begin. yes. one time, on budget. we are well versed on hosting sports in many of those pennies. we're in a good position going into there. it gives us time to prepare and that baton will spencer and time getting to
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australia. —— will spend some time. what does it mean to australia?” think the commonwealth itself, there is the history. that is something people engage with. the fact that we are having this here today has drawn so are having this here today has drawn so much interest in the australian community because of the queen and the royal family. the reason why the games were setup the royal family. the reason why the games were set up is because it was about friendly games and building peace within those countries. that is really important. people take that on—board. there is only one of these batons. it is not like the 0lympic committee changing them. these batons. it is not like the olympic committee changing themm needs last. it is. it is being designed very well. it will be looked after very carefully. it is only ever been stolen once, in 1974 in new zealand. that was in new zealand. it was recovered. we are very careful with it. this one has
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gps in it and everything. it does. we can find it very easily through an app. it does have a gps signal embedded in it as well. what we're seeing here is youngsters representing each nation that is involved and having the figurehead there, the queen, it makes that a very important day indeed. there, the queen, it makes that a very important day indeedm there, the queen, it makes that a very important day indeed. it does. we're trying to drive a connection between the use of the commonwealth and the youth of the gold coast. that is the host city. what we are seeing this morning is obviously students coming in with the flags and also the commonwealth anthem before. it is a really strong focus on youth and connecting people with the common wealth messages. within australia, is the australia about this? yes. it carries a lot of meaning. a strong history. obviously the rivalry between australia and england and new zealand is always
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coming to the fore in terms of the commonwealth games. so people really enjoy it. i think the fact that last time england actually beat australia in the medals. there is an axe to grind there. you shouldn't let the business stay so long. what the queen is going to be doing is she is putting a message inside the baton when we first read it on the opening ceremony. when we first read it on the opening ceremony. it will be delivered to her bya ceremony. it will be delivered to her by a young girl who is from the southport over here. she will deliver that message and that will carry right around the world before being delivered to the opening ceremony in the commonwealth. we are just hearing a guitar... who is this? that is casey, he is a artist from the gold coast. he is playing a
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acoustic set for the queen. he bases himself in la now. in terms of the athletes, we mustn't forget them. next year, more than ever. guess, the biggest para programme we have ever had. we have medals for male and females. it is a really big programme. six day 6500 athletes will be on the coast for the games. very big programme, lots of sport and wonderful performances. in the meantime, you are injoint english sunshine. beautiful. idon't know what you are talking about. gorgeous. we wish you well. we will be covering that ceremony a little later on. it is a beautiful day here and we will mark the start of that ceremony in about 15 minutes or so depending on events elsewhere. federer much. morgenpost later.
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let's ta ke let's take you to bute house in edinburgh where scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, will be giving you a speech in one minute. she is going to be outlining scotland's position ahead of the vote in the commons today and the votes in the lords later today on the brexit bill. what we are expecting, the daily telegraph has reportedly set an ultimatum will be given by nicola sturgeon on what she wa nts for given by nicola sturgeon on what she wants for scotland. before the end of this month and very possibly as early as tomorrow the prime minister will trigger article 50 of the lisbon treaty, setting the united kingdom on course to leave the eu in
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march, 2019. it is important, therefore, for me to report now on therefore, for me to report now on the scottish government's attempts to find compromise with the uk government and set out our plan to protect scotland's interests. right now scotland stands at a hugely important crossroads. we did not choose to be in this position. in common with most people across the country i wish that we were not in this position. but we are and the sta kes a re this position. but we are and the stakes are high, so we must have a plan for the way forward. for better or worse, depending on your point of view, the future of the uk looks very different today than it did two yea rs very different today than it did two years ago. as a result of the brexit vote we face a future, not just outside the eu, but also outside the world's biggest single market. in addition, the collapse of the labour party m ea ns addition, the collapse of the labour
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party means that we face a prolonged period of uninterrupted and unchecked conservative government at westminster. some predict that the tories could be in power now at westminster until 2030 or beyond. after a period which has seen the establishment of the scottish parliament and more recently hard—won extensions to its responsibilities, we now face the prospect of a centralisation of power at westminster. indeed, the prime minister herself has been clear that the brexit process will see the uk government reserve for its self powered in areas that are currently wholly devolved to the scottish parliament. all of this has massive implications for scotland. it has implications for our economy, forjobs, opportunities, it has implications for our economy, for jobs, opportunities, public spending and living standards and for our ability to protect and advance our vital day—to—day priorities in education, health and
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business. it has implications for our society, how open, welcoming, diverse and fair we will be in future. and it has implications for our democracy. to what extent will we be able to determine our own direction of travel rather than having that decided for us? in short, it is notjust a relationship with europe that is at stake, what is at stake is the kind of country we will become. now, at times of change and uncertainty the instinct to do nothing and just hope for the best is understandable, but in my view it is not the right one. at times like these it is more important than ever to have a clear plan for the way ahead. to dry as far as is possible to be in control
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of events and notjust at far as is possible to be in control of events and not just at the far as is possible to be in control of events and notjust at the mercy of events and notjust at the mercy of them. that is what i have always done, it is what i have tried to do since the day after the eu referendum last year, and it is what iam referendum last year, and it is what i am determined to continue to do. since lastjune, my focus has been on trying to find an agreement with the uk government, an agreement that would reconcile the uk wide vote to leave the european union with the scottish vote to remain. i was encouraged in this approach by the prime minister's commitment last line to seek agreement with the devolved administrations on a uk wide approach before triggering article 50. the scottish government's paper, scotland's place in europe, was published in good faith, our proposals represent significant compromise on the part of the scottish government. we accepted that scotland would leave the eu despite the 62% vote to
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remain, but we argued the uk should either stake in the single market or seek an outcome that would allow scotla nd seek an outcome that would allow scotland to do so. we set out how greater powers for the scottish parliament could help protect scotland's interests in a post brexit landscape. 0ver scotland's interests in a post brexit landscape. over the past few months, we have worked hard, really hard, to try to find agreement. the prime minister and her government have been given every opportunity to compromise. but today as we stand for all we know, on the eve of article 50 being triggered, not only is there no uk wide agreement on the way ahead, but the uk government has not moved even an inch in pursuit of compromise and agreement. 0ur effo rts compromise and agreement. 0ur efforts at compromise have instead been met with a brick wall of intransigence. uk membership of the single market was ruled out with no prior consultation with the scottish
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government, or indeed with the other devolved administrations, leaving as facing not just brexit, devolved administrations, leaving as facing notjust brexit, but a hard brexit. there has been talk of special deals for the car industry and others, but point—blank refusal to discuss in any meaningful way a differential approach for scotland. farfrom any differential approach for scotland. far from any prospect of significant new powers for the scottish parliament, the uk government is becoming ever more assertive in its intention to muscle in on the powers we already have. the language of partnership has gone completely. there should, i think, be little doubt about this. if scotland can be ignored on an issue as important as our membership of the eu and the single market, then it is clear that our voice and our interests can be ignored at any time and on any issue. that cannot be a secure basis on which to build a better scotland.
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but it is where we stand today. now, let me stress even at this late stage i am not turning my back on further discussions should the uk government changed its mind and decide it is willing to agree to our compromise proposals. in any event, i will do everything i possibly can to ensure that scotland's interests are represented in the ima negotiations that lie ahead. but i cannot pretend to the scottish people that a compromise agreement looks remotely likely given the hardline response from the prime minister so far. that means i have to decide on the best plan to protect our interests now. it is time for me to set out decisively and with clarity the way forward. doing nothing at this stage is in many ways the easiest thing for me to do. it would mean letting scotla nd to do. it would mean letting scotland drift through the next two
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yea rs scotland drift through the next two years with our fingers crossed simply hoping for the best. of course i do hope for the best. i wa nt course i do hope for the best. i want the uk to get a good deal from the eu negotiations. that is clearly in scotland's interests as well as in the interests of our friends in other parts of the uk. but i am far from alone in fearing a bad deal or indeed no deal. noram i from alone in fearing a bad deal or indeed no deal. nor am i alone in fearing that even a so—called good deal will be significantly inferior to membership of the single market and that it will set scotland on a course that will not only damage our economy, but change the very nature of our society and the country that we are. the problem with doing nothing now is that by the time these fears are realised it will be too late for scotland to choose a different path before the damage is done. that would not be right or fair. whatever path we take it should be one decided by us, not for
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us. should be one decided by us, not for us. let me set out the plan i intend to pursue. first, iwill continue us. let me set out the plan i intend to pursue. first, i will continue to stand up for scotland's interests during the process of brexit negotiations. second, iwill during the process of brexit negotiations. second, i will now ta ke negotiations. second, i will now take the steps necessary to make sure that scotland will have a choice at the end of this process. a choice at the end of this process. a choice of whether to follow the uk took a hard brexit, or to become an independent country, able to secure a real partnership of equals with the rest of the uk and our own relationship with europe. the scottish government's mandate for offering this choice is beyond doubt. last year, we were elected with the highest share of the constituency vote won by any party in the history of devolution on a ma nifesto in the history of devolution on a manifesto that said this: the scottish parliament should have the right to hold another referendum if there is a significant and material change in the circumstances that
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prevailed in 2014, such as scotland being taken out of the eu against our will. these conditions have, of course, now been met. i can confirm today that next week i will seek the authority of the scottish parliament to agree with the uk government the details of a section 30 order, the procedure that will enable the scottish parliament to legislate for an independence referendum. the uk government was clear in 2014 that an independence referendum should, in their words, be made in scotland by their words, be made in scotland by the people of scotland. that is a principle that should be respected today. the detailed arrangements for a referendum, including its timing, must be for the scottish
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parliament to decide. however, in my view, it is important that scotland is able to exercise the right to choose our own future at a time when the options are clearer than they are now, but before it is too late to decide our own path. let me be clear what i mean by that. the timing of the brexit negotiations are not within the control of the scottish government. however, we must plan on the basis of what we do know now and what we know is on the timetable set out by the prime minister, the shape of the brexit deal will become clear in the autumn of next year, ahead of ratification votes by other eu countries. that is therefore the earliest point at which a referendum would be appropriate. however, it isjust as important that we do not leave it too late to choose a different path ina timely too late to choose a different path in a timely way. if the uk leaves the eu without scotland indicating beforehand or at least within a short time after it that we want a
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different relationship with europe, we could face a lengthy period outside not just outside notjust the eu, but also the single market, and that would make the task of negotiating a different future more difficult. these considerations lead me to the conclusion that if scotland is to have a real choice, when the terms of brexit are known, but before it is too late to choose our own cause, then that choice must be offered between the autumn of next year, 2018, and the spring of 2019. the third important aspect of planning ahead is this. i have already said that by the time the choice comes to be made there must be greater clarity about brexit and its implications for us. it is just as important that there is clarity about the implications of independence and there will be. we will be frank about the challenges we face and clear about the opportunities independence will give us opportunities independence will give us to secure a relationship with europe, build a stronger and more sustainable economy and create a
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fairer society. scotland's choice must be informed and up to date. there is a great deal of talk by all of us about mandates from the referendums in 2014 and 2016 and of course neither of these results can or should be dismissed. but the fact is they tell us only so much about the circumstances we find ourselves in now. in 2014 we did not know that the uk would vote to leave the eu. had we done so, it is likely that some on both sides would have come toa some on both sides would have come to a different decision. in 2016 independence was not on the ballot paper. we cannot assume that because someone paper. we cannot assume that because someone voted to remain in the eu that they would vote yes for an independent scotland. what scotland deserves in the light of the material change of circumstances brought about by the brexit vote is the chance to decide our future in a
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fair, free and democratic way and at a time when we are equipped with the fa ct a time when we are equipped with the fact that we need. it is, above all, about informed choice. we know that brexit has made change inevitable. the option of no change is no longer available. however, we can still decide the nature of that change. having scotland's referendum at a time when the terms of brexit inode will give the scottish people a choice about the kind of change we wa nt choice about the kind of change we want and it must be a choice for all of us. i know that there are some who want me to rule out a referendum completely, to delay the decision until much further down the line. i understand why some take that you and, of course, these views do weigh heavily on me. but so does this, and this for me is key consideration: if
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i ruled out a referendum, i would be deciding completely unilaterally that scotland will follow the uk took a hard brexit come what may, no matter how damaging to our economy and our society it turns out to be. that should not be the decision of just one politician, not even the first minister. by taking the steps i have set out today i am ensuring that scotland's future will be decided not just by that scotland's future will be decided notjust by me, the scottish government or the snp, it will be decided by the people of scotland. it will be scotland's choice and i trust the people to make that choice. i am trust the people to make that choice. iam now trust the people to make that choice. i am now happy to take a few questions. brian. are you assuming
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from what you say that scotland would simply take over the membership of the european union that presently exists for the uk? are you assuming that this possible? many say it is not. if it is not the case, are you saying that definitely without caveat you will seek for scotla nd without caveat you will seek for scotland to join the european without caveat you will seek for scotland tojoin the european union asa scotland tojoin the european union as a full member? what i am seeing today they clearly is for scotland today they clearly is for scotland to be ina today they clearly is for scotland to be in a position to negotiate our own relationship with europe it is important we indicate that desire and intention before the uk leaves or at the very least within a short time frame after they do so. to leave it any longer would make that process more difficult. i accept it isa process more difficult. i accept it is a process of discussion. in terms of the second clause of your question, the snp's long—standing
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commitment has been to membership of the eu. we are in different circumstances now than we have been in the past, but that remains our position. but on this issue as with other issues that people will want to consider in advance of a choice, i have said very clearly we will set out our proposition in advance of that choice so it is an informed choice. for me this is all about choice, it is about people looking at the terms of brexit and what it means for scotland and the terms of independence and having the ability to make that choice. the alternative to make that choice. the alternative to that is not being in control of our own future, of having a hard brexit imposed upon us regardless of the circumstances that would place as into and i do not think it is acceptable. colin. have youjust been playing along with the negotiations to get to what was from
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the outset your favoured position? absolutely and emphatically not. to the frustration of some people in my own party over the past few months i have been genuine and sincere about trying to reach a compromise agreement with the uk government. i stood at this very podium in this very room stood at this very podium in this very room on stood at this very podium in this very room on the 24th ofjune last year and very room on the 24th ofjune last yearand said very room on the 24th ofjune last year and said that would be my intention and i have worked over the intervening months to try to bring that about. we have published scotland's place in europe, genuine compromise proposals. i have sat in meetings and in the room with the prime minister, just the two of us, and told her i was willing to find agreement and compromise. but we have not met with a government and a prime minister who appear willing to meet as halfway in that. indeed, on the contrary at times over the past few weeks it feels as if they have
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been moving further away from compromise with language that has appeared to become harder and harder. this perhaps is a minor point. it is a minor point in many ways, but it held a bigger story. i am standing here as the first minister of scotland and i do not know whether article 50 is going to be triggered tomorrow, wednesday, or next week or the week after that. that tells its own story about how far away from an equal partnership this process has been. the morning of her lancaster house speech, i asked her a direct question, are you ruling out single market membership? she said that was not a binary choice. two hours later it had become a binary choice and it had been ruled out. we are trying to compromise, but in order to compromise, but in order to compromise their requires to be a government on the other side willing to meet halfway and that has not been the case. that has led me to
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the position i have set out today. if scotla nd the position i have set out today. if scotland is to have a general choice, it must be in the way i have set out. sarah. many people still suggest not more than 50% of the people will vote for independence. the economic circumstances are much harder. do you really believe you can win another referendum? yes, i do. sometimes you have to do what is right in politics and i think it is right in politics and i think it is right for scotland to have a choice. i believe it would be wrong for scotla nd i believe it would be wrong for scotland to be taken down a path it has no control over regardless of the consequences for our economy, our society, for our very sense of who we are as a country. that would be wrong and myjudgment is that we should have that choice. i believe that in a referendum on scottish people will opt for independence, but that will be the choice of the
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scottish people and i have been clear it must be an informed choice with the implications of brexit much clearer than they are today, but also the implications and opportunities of independence. you mentioned the economy and the reality today is the economics of staying in the uk in a post—brexit landscape are significantly more challenging than would have been the case previously. in a circumstance that we face now, the choice is not can we magic away change or magic away challenge? the question for scotla nd away challenge? the question for scotland is what puts us in the best possible position to steer our way toa possible position to steer our way to a stronger and more sustainable way to the economy and a fairer society? that would be the choice of the scottish people. peter. first minister, you have said that the people of scotland want an independent scotland, to be part of
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the single market with freedom of movement. you have said the prime minister does not want to have that. is it not inevitable there will be people north of carlisle and north berwick, and all the talk is that there will be some... it is customary for the journalist not to ask and answer the question. the usual form at these events is you ask andi usual form at these events is you ask and i get to answer, but if you wa nt to a nswer ask and i get to answer, but if you want to answer my questions for me, thatis want to answer my questions for me, that is fine! we will set out all of these propositions and options for people in the fullness of time. we have a legislative process to go through based on what i have said today. but let's be clear, there is a the islands are common travel area and there is no reason why that would and should change if scotland became an independent country. we do
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have a situation, and this is the partial answer you gave me, whereby the uk government in the form of both the prime minister and the secretary of state for exiting the eu have said that brexit does not mean the inevitability of a hard border between the republic of ireland and the rest of the uk. if thatis ireland and the rest of the uk. if that is true in the irish context, andi that is true in the irish context, and i appreciate you are acutely aware of the different history of ireland, and it is essential that arrangements are found to stop that in ourland, but arrangements are found to stop that in our land, but there is no reason at all to suggest it would be different in scotland. i ask people to reflect on the contradictions at the heart of much of what the uk government is saying right now. it claims it will be free trading with every country in the world, somehow with the exception of an independent scotland. it does not bear scrutiny. i want this choice in the fullness of time to be one that is informed.
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both sides will have to put forward their case and be subject to robust challenge. it has been put to me that i would look at the example of the eu referendum and have a fat—free referendum in scotland. i would not want scotland's future to be decided in the way that the eu referendum was decided. this is a choice in which people should have the facts and the information to have a choice. we should all start the way we mean to go on by not getting straight back into project free which we saw in the 2014 campaign. let's make it a positive debate about scotland's future. i will take david and thenjudy. debate about scotland's future. i will take david and then judy. are you stating your first minister position on this if you were to lose? i am doing what i think is right for the country and i am not planning not to win a referendum
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when that time comes. julie. what we assurance have you had from other eu members that scotland's way forward, either remaining in the eu or re—entering the eu is viable? either remaining in the eu or re-entering the eu is viable? look, we have over the past nine months been working very hard to influence the uk government's negotiating position and that has been partly as a result of some of the advice and feedback we have had from other countries across europe. if we wa nted countries across europe. if we wanted to see a differential arrangement for scotland, then europe would be open for that, but it had to come through the track of the uk article 15 negotiations. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon confirming she will be seeking a second independence referendum for scotland. she said the window for it would be between
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autumn 2018 and spring 2019. continuing coverings of this announcement is continuing coverings of this announcement is on continuing coverings of this announcement is on bbc two. that is something the eu would accept and respect and these discussions will continue in the months to come. i have a sea of hands. the choice! michael. is there anything the uk government could now say which would persuade you to rule out a referendum? they would have to come forward and say something. i am standing here after several months of trying to find and broker an agreement without having had an inch of movement as i said. it is not really for me now to say what they could have said. i do not know that there is any prospect of them trying to say anything, because if there is why have we not had it in the past? of course my door will always be
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open to discussion, notwithstanding the track that i have laid out today. there will continue to be a need for me as first minister to ensure that scotland's interests are represented in the negotiations that followed the triggering of article 15. iam followed the triggering of article 15. i am open to discussion, but the conduct of the uk government so far tells me they are not interested or are willing to compromise and that is why i find myself in the position iam is why i find myself in the position i am today potentiallyjust one day before article 50 might be triggered. when you launch the snp ma nifesto triggered. when you launch the snp manifesto in april last year you said you would have a referendum if you thought the majority of the people could be persuaded. why is it right now? if you read the text of our manifesto, but i am sure you
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will go and check, we said the scottish parliament would have the right to hold another referendum should there be evidence of a change in public opinion or a material change in circumstances such as scotla nd change in circumstances such as scotland being ta ken change in circumstances such as scotland being taken out of the eu against our will. iam i am quoting a manifesto that up we put in front of the people and were elected on with a bigger share of the constituency vote of any party of the history of devolution. that is the manifesto we were elected on. it is unequivocal an ambiguous and it provides the mandate for the steps that i have set out today. peter. you said you want to have a referendum between autumn 2018 and spring 2019, theresa may has said that scotland leaving the u with the uk. if theresa may city that i'm not going to block your referendum that you have to wait till after brexit, what recourse do you have? i do not
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think that it will be acceptable for the uk government or the prime minister to take that view. two reasons. in bristol, we set a president in 2014 for as i said the words that the uk government used back then that the referendum should be decided in scotland. that is the printable document. it should be for this cottage parliament, not incidentally the scottish government, but the scottish parliament. i set out very clearly today what i want to do, and i need the authority of the scottish parliament. if the scottish parliament. if the scottish parliament gives me that authority, i believe that should be respected by the uk government. the practical reason is this, i have set out that i think it is really important that before people in scotland are asked to make this choice, they have clarity about brexit and what brexit means. i accept that. equally, clarity about brexit and what brexit means. iaccept that. equally, i believe that if we are to have a
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genuine choice with the ability to choose a different course, then we can't leave that choice until it is too late for that to happen. that is why i have set out the window in the way that i have today. for the uk government to say that they are not going to permit that to happen in that window, broadly speaking, would be compromising the ability of the scottish element if the people of scotla nd scottish element if the people of scotland opted for this to choose a different future and to negotiate a different future and to negotiate a different relationship with europe. it would be i guess tantamount to the uk government having sunk the ship with the brexit voter trying to puncture scotland's lifeboat as well. i don't think that would be an a cce pta ble well. i don't think that would be an acceptable position for them to take. when would you have to make a decision on whether to hold a referendum? decision on whether to hold a referendum ? obviously decision on whether to hold a referendum? obviously there is a set process in advance of the country choosing, six month at the barnes of
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that, when would you make the decision? in terms of setting a date? yes in terms of the four-month regulated period. first we have to go through the section 30 process. i can't stand here and say categorically how long that will ta ke categorically how long that will take because that is a discussion between the scottish government and the uk government. i would hope that thatis the uk government. i would hope that that is not a lengthy process. in the scottish government requires to legislate and then of course we have well excepted rules in terms of timings for campaigns and suchlike. ina sense, timings for campaigns and suchlike. in a sense, the final decisions around the timing, the date, would be for the scottish parliament to set out and that would be taking some time later this year perhaps early pa rt some time later this year perhaps early part of next year. is there a contradiction between your argument that leaving the european union would be a disaster for the economy
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for the country that we are at the solution being leaving the european union is very valuable because we have close family ties? i don't think there is. a number of reasons. firstly, i am think there is. a number of reasons. firstly, lam not think there is. a number of reasons. firstly, i am not positing a choice that says choose trading in a single market instead of trading across the uk, i market instead of trading across the uk, lam market instead of trading across the uk, i am arguing that we should continue to trade within the single market in addition to free trade across the uk. of course, the sigel market is something like eight times bigger than the market across the uk. secondly, and this was an issue discussed and debated long and hard during the 2014 discussions, scotland becoming politically independent is not turning our backs on the social and cultural family ties that exist between the different parts of the united kingdom. we are sharing many links
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with our friends in other parts of the british isles and that would continue to be the case. independence for scotland would i think create a genuine partnership of equals rather than the claimed partnership of equals that has been shown in recent months to be rhetoric rather than reality. the bigger question is this one. of course, we are where we are today because of the brexit vote and therefore issues around eu membership are of course central to the discussions that are taking place around this. there is a much bigger principle at stake here and thatis bigger principle at stake here and that is what kind of country do we wa nt to that is what kind of country do we want to be and crucially who gets to decide that? right now, we are on a path, not just to decide that? right now, we are on a path, notjust to brexit but to hard brexit which will have profound implications for our economy, our society, culture, place in the world, sense of who we are. and we have no control over that. we voted
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against it, but never less that is the direction the uk government is intent on taking it in. i do not think it is right to be taken down a path that we don't want to go down without a choice. which is why the choice i think is important. at the right time, the people of scotland should get to choose. do they want to follow the rest of the uk too ha rd to follow the rest of the uk too hard brexit? in which case, that is for the people of brexit to choose. —— scotland to choose. 0r for the people of brexit to choose. —— scotland to choose. or do we want a independent scotland with our own independent relationship with europe? i will take a few more questions. will you be expecting the scottish parliament and government to decide the franchise for this referendum on the question? yes. clearly you don't think it's a cce pta ble clearly you don't think it's acceptable for the uk government to deny this, but if it does what would you do about it? i am not expecting it to. i am not therefore going to expect on what —— expected late on
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what will happen if it does. i think there would be a rather furious reaction from many people in scotla nd reaction from many people in scotland if that was the position the uk government decided to take. people have said in terms that they don't think that westminster should block a second referendum and even the prime minister i think when she has been pressed on this, my reading of this answer has been that she has been at pains not to say that the uk government would do that. of course, jeremy corbyn said it would be absolutely fine for there to be a independence referendum. perhaps that last bit is less important in the grand scheme of things. the first bud of the question, i do think it would be for the scottish parliament —— part. the question would be subject to the testing by the electoral commission if they chose to do that. these things were accepted in 2014 that these were the
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decisions. not of the scottish government, but the scottish parliament and i would see no reason why that would be different in future. you try so hard, yes. we did give you a seat, so i better give you a question. this is about how the referendum would come to pass. the choice of scotland between the uk and europe. given that, what currency do you think scotland would have at the end of it of it chooses to be independent? all in good time. we will set out our proposition on all of the issues and we will do that in due course. i have said repeatedly today that i absolutely recognise this has to be an informed choice for people. informed both by the clarity around brexit and the clarity around independence. i am not asking people to choose the uk or europe. i want scotland, whether we arejust now, or europe. i want scotland, whether
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we are just now, or as an independent country, to have as our closest revision ships those we have as our foes as friends and partners in the uk and the british isles, —— our friends in the uk and the british isles, —— ourfriends and in the uk and the british isles, —— our friends and partners. in the uk and the british isles, —— ourfriends and partners. also in europe as well. fundamentally, this is about scotland i think deciding what kind of country we want to be and what we want that contribution not just across the and what we want that contribution notjust across the uk, but across europe to be. i don't accept the characterisation of choosing between the uk or europe, it is about scotla nd the uk or europe, it is about scotland choosing itself what kind of country we will be. a question about the white paper. we will put forward as we said the detail and clarity of a range of issues of what people will want to have parity on before any choices made. we will announce in course what the form of that will be. some on your own party
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have admitted that they were less than frank or the movement was less than frank or the movement was less than frank or the movement was less than frank about some of the challenges facing an independent scotland. he said this morning that you are quite happy to engage in that going forward and you want to be frank about it. what other challengers? —— be frank about it. what other challengers? — — what be frank about it. what other challengers? —— what are those challenges? i think every country faces challenges. economic challenges, challenges around some of the global situations we face right now. we need to be frank about those. we need to be frank about how we would deal with those challenges if we were to remain about them remaining in the uk. as i said earlier on, if scotland is to have a choice about its future, it must be an informed choice. for my part, i will make sure that that is the case. and people then get to decide what they think is the best way for scotla nd what they think is the best way for scotland to address those challenges
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in the future. last couple of questions. on a practical level, have you had any discussions with the greens seeing if you connect to get the scottish parliament to agree with it? have discussed with the greens issues on a range of matters on an ongoing basis. i will let the greens speak with themselves today, but i think the greens position on independence and an independence referendum is pretty clear. i will not presume to speak for them from this podium. you said you would remain engaged with the rest of the process of brexit, whether the scottish government consider the existing rights of eu citizens. we will do everything we possibly can, legislatively, practically added every other sense to protect the rights and status of eu nationals in scotland. 0ne rights and status of eu nationals in scotland. one of the many
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reg retta ble scotland. one of the many regrettable things that have happened i think since the eu referendum has been a failure to give that guaranteed to eu nationals. i will do now and in the future everything in the bell my power to give those people certainties. can we expect scottish government is to spend the next 18 months working and frank gets support within europe for scottish mentorship? we will work across a range of different memberships and a range of different memberships and a range of different ways to protect scotland's interests. in a circumstance that we didn't ask to be in. it also make it remy go forward , be in. it also make it remy go forward, it is allowing us to advance our health, education, economy, making sure we are properly equipped at a country to face up to whatever challenges lie couple of questions. —— last couple of questions. —— last couple of
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questions. how do you square pressure independence and those who are supporters want to come out of the eu? this fundamentally about what kind of country we are. i respect the views of people across scotland. whether they are snp supporters or otherwise. the blue took a different view from what i did about the question of the eu. a million people voted to leave and as first minister i have got a duty to understand and respect those views. clearly we are where we are because of that vote. as i said, there is a bigger issue at stake here. it is an issue of democratic principle. who decides scotland's future weather on europe or any other issue? i believe that on that issue of democratic principle, with an smp support of voters remain all voted to leave, there will be strong support for scotla nd there will be strong support for scotland exercising our choice to be in control of our own future. —— s np. is it a yes no question? i don't
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see np. is it a yes no question? i don't see any np. is it a yes no question? i don't see any reason np. is it a yes no question? i don't see any reason why would be the same as last time. but i'd together have myself. in terms of reforming education? is that your divine emission? yes. that is still my defining mission. that is my day—to—day work. it will always be so. day—to—day work. it will always be so. that cannot be separated to how to advance this. if we are taking offa to advance this. if we are taking off a hard brexit cliff edge with living standards and that impacts on our ability to fulfil our ambitions on these issues. this is integral to use the colloquial phrase the day job that i do, protecting scotland's interests and making sure that scotla nd interests and making sure that scotland is in the best possible place to make advances in health or any other issue. i will take one
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final question. you have had one already. i will be fair and go to the gentleman behind you. last time you had to give running up to the independence referendum. do except that any referendum can cause uncertainty and damage the economy? how would you address that? we work every day with the business community here and those who have the ability to invest in scotland. the fundamental point made is this one. brexit made change inevitable. we cannot now make, get a position where there is no change brexit has made inevitable a degree of uncertainty. the choice that i believe scotland should have is therefore what kind of change do we want? it is about bringing greater clarity, certainty and control over the process that lies ahead of us. thank you all very much indeed.
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scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon saying she is going to be seeking a second referendum on scottish independence. she said it would be for the scottish parliament to decide when that referendum would be held. her view is that it would have to be held between autumn of next year and spring of 2019. she was talking on the numbers of whether it would actually get through the scottish parliament and indicating there that the scottish greens would back the proposal for a referendum. the scottish tories have already come out while nicola sturgeon was talking saying that they would vote against a referendum, but provided the snp had the support of the greens, then it would get through that. letter to norman stress the mack. this is an issue that has been danced round for some time. with the
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government exciting this today? they have been caught flat—footed. they we re have been caught flat—footed. they were focusing on the brexit bill in the commons and nicola sturgeon has just thrown this bombshell announcement that she wants to begin the process for a second independence referendum to take place between the autumn of 2018 and before the uk leaves the eu in the spring of 20 19. that may be nicola sturgeon's wished, but she does not have all the cards. she cannot hold a second independence referendum u nless a second independence referendum unless and until to may gives her the go—ahead. theresa may still has a very strong suite of cards in her hands, but the difficulty she faces is if she says no, you can't have that second independence referendum, what kind of backlash might that fuel in scotland? might it actually just strengthen the demand for scottish independence? in other words, could backfire? against that,
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you absolutely no theresa may will not want to be fighting another independence referendum at the same time as she is trying the incredibly difficult and fraught negotiations to ta ke difficult and fraught negotiations to take us out of the eu. to be fighting on two fronts at the same time. my instinct is, we have had no official response from downing street so far, is that we will that like she will try and put this back and push the pressure back on to nicola sturgeon. two things, making the familiar argument that we have heard from theresa may that politics is not a that the snp are needing to focus on the dayjob of improving schools, the second thing they will try and put the pressure on nicola sturgeon they will say, ok, yes, we will think about it, but you will have to wait. you will have to wait until we have got brexit sorted out. then you will have your independence referendum. because they will argue it is just unrealistic to say to people you should have a vote when you don't even really know the circumstances in which you are having that vote and in which
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independence will occur. they will try and push it back until after brexit. the problem for nicola sturgeon is she does not want that because she wants scotland to still because she wants scotland to still bea because she wants scotland to still be a member of the european union if it votes to leave the eu. she does not have too have two renegotiate her way back into the eu where she is bound to get pushed back from the likes of spain. really i think it will be the public relations office. how does theresa may manage this? above all, how does she assuage concerns in scotland? how does she avoid a backlash against able rub off to nicola sturgeon pot call to a referendum between autumn 2018 and spent 2019. we given to the rounds on speculation. 0n the face of it, and the option that you outlining their about the tarmac them effectively saying it can't be an independence referendum until the
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terms of brexit are absolutely clear, if that was the option that theresa may would go down, would nicola sturgeon actually be able to do anything against that? legally, no. the section 30 order is pretty clear. it needs a vote in both the house of commons and the house of lords and the deal has to be done by theresa may. i think, lords and the deal has to be done by theresa may. ithink, if lords and the deal has to be done by theresa may. i think, if i'm not mistaken, i have not looked it up but i think the uk government also has the power over the date, the timing and the franchise. nicola sturgeon says she thought the scottish parliament should have that power, i don't think she done that they do have that power. theresa may does have a lot of power in her hands. this is what a lot of remain supporters who opposed to brexit feared. the brexit wouldn'tjust lead to brexit leaving the european
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union, it could also in the process of the fracturing of the united kingdom. there are in mind, in northern ireland we have another situation potentially developing with sinn fein pressing for another referendum on whether there should bea referendum on whether there should be a united ireland because of brexit. we are in a situation where massive change could be about to fracture the relationship we have had with europe and with other countries in the uk for generations. this is really a momentous, momentous moment. to stay with us, we wa nt momentous moment. to stay with us, we want to just play a game the moment where nicola sturgeon announced her plans for a second referendum. it is time for me to set out decisively
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and with clarity the way forward. doing nothing at this stage is in many ways the easiest thing for me to do. it would mean letting scotland drift through the next two years with our fingers crossed simply hoping for the best. of course i do hope for the best. i want the uk to get a good dealfrom the eu negotiations. that is clearly in scotland's interests as well as in the interests of our friends in other parts of the uk. but i am far from alone in fearing a bad deal or indeed no deal. nor am i alone in fearing that even a so—called good deal will be significantly inferior to membership of the single market and that it will set scotland on a course that will not only damage our economy, but change the very nature of our society and the country that we are. the problem with doing nothing now is that by the time these fears are realised it will be too late for scotland to choose a different path before the damage is done. that would not be right or fair. whatever path we take it should be one decided by us, not for us.
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let me set out the plan i intend to pursue. first, i will continue to stand up for scotland's interests during the process of brexit negotiations. second, i will now take the steps necessary to make sure that scotland will have a choice at the end of this process. a choice of whether to follow the uk took a hard brexit, or to become an independent country, able to secure a real partnership of equals with the rest of the uk and our own relationship with europe. the scottish government's mandate for offering this choice is beyond doubt. last year, we were elected with the highest share of the constituency vote won by any party in the history of devolution on a manifesto that said this: the scottish parliament should have the right to hold another referendum if there is a significant and material change in the circumstances that prevailed in 2014, such as scotland being taken out of the eu against our will.
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these conditions have, of course, now been met. i can confirm today that next week i will seek the authority of the scottish parliament to agree with the uk government the details of a section 30 order, the procedure that will enable the scottish parliament to legislate for an independence referendum. that was the moment when nicola sturgeon outlined her plans to seek a second independence referendum. let's go back to norman at westminster. norman, the reporting this morning was indicating that nicola sturgeon would effectively throw an ultimatum to westminster and the position would be wanting to keep scotland in the eu single market and therefore power is having to be devolved to scotland potentially to enable that to happen. is that something that whence minster would look at? attic
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the honest truth is no. mrs may has made it absolutely clear that we cannot remain part of the single market because migration is top of her list of fire at ease and we cannot regain control of immigration if we are part of the single market. the idea that she might allow a is bestial deal for scotland to get round any immigration curbs, i don't think is a runner. —— a special deal. the uk voted to leave so the uk will leave as the uk. i don't think there will be any special deal for scotland. it is worth stressing so for scotland. it is worth stressing so that although nicola sturgeon has as it were pressed the trigger, she too is playing with very high stakes here because it is not at all clear that she will win by any means. certainly the view amongst many folk in westminster is that she is in a
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very tight corner in large part because of the economic questions which many people feel that the scottish government has not been able to answer. in other words, what happens of levels of debt and the deficit in scotland. who is going to pick up the tab of that is if the uk is no longer around. what happens regarding their plummeting oil price and currency. these are very hard economic questions which many folk in westminster feel that nicola sturgeon doesn't have answers for. that is why they lost the last independence referendum. there is also the view that many people in scotla nd also the view that many people in scotland will just think also the view that many people in scotland willjust think not also the view that many people in scotland will just think not another referendum and will perhaps react against the uncertainty, the young people —— the people. there are mind that we will have many referendums and that there will be a referendum fatigue kicking in. the last thing that team may will be thinking is
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that team may will be thinking is that her remarks that she made saying at the scottish conservative party conference saying that she should stop talking about independent and get on with a day job, what about education where you area job, what about education where you are a world leader and is now falling that? you need to focus on that. the hope is that maybe some cottage voters will also hope that yes we need to focus on those problems. —— scottish. it really is a face—off. both have an awful lot at stake. obviously the premise for nicola sturgeon is that she would like independence and therefore scotla nd like independence and therefore scotland to remain within the new as an independent country. is there any indication or guarantee that if there were independence that scotla nd there were independence that scotland would be able to remain? where is certainly no guarantee. it depends who you talk to. many in the
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snp the connacht believe that if scotla nd snp the connacht believe that if scotland were still a member of the eu that they could say that they we re eu that they could say that they were a continuing member of the eu, they never left! that they will be able to remain a member. the real difficulties if the uk leaves and then they become a member. a lot of criteria of deficit and debt that i don't think scotland does meet. a protracted period of negotiation, many countries with their own communities of minorities pressing for some sort of independence would be deeply unhappy, above all the spanish. that becomes a much harder prospect. clearly, nicola sturgeon's view is that she has almost been backed into record in parts by herself by her rhetoric over the last weeks and months. she is left
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is very little manoeuvre unless theresa may is going to offer her this deal of scotland remaining a pa rt this deal of scotland remaining a part of the single market. and at the same time, i think she has fuelled a level of expectation in her own party and many in her own party are pushing her to go for the second independence referendum. she has been under real pressure. you could argue, maybe she just cannot hold back any longer and therefore has decided to seize the initiative, go out on the front foot, lay down the gauntlet to theresa may and say, 0k, the gauntlet to theresa may and say, ok, i'm asking for the referendum, will give give it to me? that is where we now are. as will give give it to me? that is where we now are. as i say, i am still waiting for any reaction from downing street, which leads me to believe that they are still trying to scramble some kind of coherent response because i do not think they we re response because i do not think they were expecting this. meanwhile, we arejust getting... we have orally had reaction from scottish conservatives coming out against backing the referendum, we are now
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hearing from scottish labour leader kezia dugdale say we do not want to be divided again. there's a prize, those reactions there. in terms of the numbers there have, it is likely that the greens would back the snp and it will go through likely in scotla nd and it will go through likely in scotland at least. yes. in scotland it will go through, that is almost a given. interestingly, it does need an affirmative vote, a one—off vote here in both the house of commons and the house of lords. we has a commons, i'm not sure it is a given at all. that the house of commons would approve a section 30 order. jeremy corbyn of course said he thinks it is absolutely fine, so presumably labour would vote for it. many tories, i am not sure they
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would. i think they would think, hang on, we just would. i think they would think, hang on, wejust had a referendum a few years ago, you said it once in a generation. you're not going to get one a couple of years later. i think it is much more ambiguous. but the truth is, it will probably come down to the lead of the prime minister and before we even get to a vote, so much will hinge on the way mrs may handles it. she's treading on eggshells here. conservative party and conservative prime and assist have not been for a very long time flavour of the month north of the border. so she has two tread extremely carefully not to as it we re extremely carefully not to as it were almost too nicola sturgeon's job for her by putting momentum behind referendum by offending and offending and antagonising scottish voters. that is extraordinarily difficult for a scottish tory leader. sorry, for a english tory
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leader. sorry, for a english tory leader. that may have been part of nicola sturgeon's calculation that now actually is not a bad time to go for it, you have got a tory government, set to be in power it seems for some considerable time. that may well be making people in scotla nd that may well be making people in scotland go do you know what? we have got to go for independence to end conservative government. that may have been part of a calculation. norman, thank you for now. he is going to speak to the snp in westminster. let's speak to our scotla nd westminster. let's speak to our scotland editor, sarah smith, in edinburgh. nicola sturgeon dropped quite a bombshell this morning. certainly, we knew this was going to bea certainly, we knew this was going to be a significant announcement, but they were very tight—lipped about exactly what she was going to say. we anticipated some sort of ultimatum to theresa may about agreeing to scotland staying in the single market if the rest of the uk
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leads. but she has announced she will seek permission for another referendum on scottish independence and that is pretty momentous. what is the polling in scotland in terms of whether the people would like to have another referendum ? intriguingly the last two polls have showed a slight bump in support for independence. 0ne showed a slight bump in support for independence. one had support a couple of days ago at 50% and another one today says 48%. none of them yet have showed a majority of scots suggesting they would vote for an independent scotland. i asked nicola sturgeon directly did she think she would win another referendum, given the difficult economic circumstances she would be fighting this referendum in, and she said she was absolutely convinced she could win this and she would not call a referendum if she did not have some confidence there was a very good chance she would win it. 0n the economic issues she said she
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would not want the vote on scottish independence to be carried out like the brexit vote. she wants it to be fa cts the brexit vote. she wants it to be facts based. but as you point out the economics of the situation make it quite a difficult argument. yes, and several months ago the snp set up and several months ago the snp set up what they call the growth commission which is looking at all the economic arguments and preparing the economic arguments and preparing the case for another independence referendum. this has been on their minds for quite some time and they say they are confident they can outline the case that scotland would do well as a small, independent country, that they would be able to make their own economic choices and grow their own economy. that will be the nub of the debate for the referendum over the next couple of yea rs. we referendum over the next couple of years. we will be talking notjust about the changed circumstances of brexit, but also the other changed circumstances, not least the fall in the price of oil and other things as
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they try and make the case for independence. talk us through the potential timetable. we had the independence referendum, the brexit referendum and people will be thinking, crikey, big up people, big change, another vote, so how will things change? nicola sturgeon laid out her preferred timetable and she wa nts out her preferred timetable and she wants the vote to be sometime between the autumn of 2018 and the spring of 2019. she says they need to have more clarity about what brexit will be so the voters know what they are choosing between, but she wants it to be before the uk finally leaves the eu. if the vote happens after march 2019, scotland could face a long period of time outside the eu, the single market, and she does not want that to happen. she said she would not settle on an actual date for a year
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from now, but she has that window of opportunity where she thinks it should be held. but it is not up to her and the should be held. but it is not up to herand the uk should be held. but it is not up to her and the uk government will not wa nt to her and the uk government will not want to be fighting on scottish independence referendum at the same time that she is negotiating brexit. they will ask that the vote is held after march, 2019, the very time nicola sturgeon said she does not wa nt nicola sturgeon said she does not want that vote. that is the next argument coming up. we still have no reaction from number ten. they did not know that this was not going to happen today. they are very much focused on brexit in the house of commons. 0h, we have got something. we have got some reaction out of downing street just now. we have got some reaction out of downing streetjust now. the uk government spokesman said as the prime minister set out, the uk government will negotiate an agreement, but we will do so taking
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into account the interests of all of the nations of the uk. we have been working closely with all the devolved administrations, listening to their proposals, and recognising the many areas of common ground, including the status of eu citizens in the uk and our security from crime and terrorism. 0nly over two yea rs crime and terrorism. 0nly over two years ago people in scotland voted decisively to remain part of the uk ina decisively to remain part of the uk in a referendum that the scottish government defined as a once in a generation vote. the majority of people in scotland do not want a second referendum and it would be divisive and caused huge economic uncertainty at the worst possible time. the scottish government should focus on delivering good government and public services to the people of scotland. what are the risks of westminster basically telling scotla nd westminster basically telling scotland what is good for them? that
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is very similar to the speech that theresa may made in glasgow and it did not go down well with people in scotland. she said we will be leaving the eu as a whole uk. basically number ten are saying there will not be a different deal for scotland. nicola sturgeon said quite clearly today it was not too late to avoid another referendum if the uk government came to her and said we are prepared to reach a compromise agreement over some of the proposals you have come up with for scotland staying in the single market. it sounds as if the uk government are ruling that out and will not take that opportunity to avoid another referendum on independence. but they said they we re independence. but they said they were working closely with the devolved administrations and that is not the story you hear from the scottish government. nicola sturgeon said they had been met with a brick wall of intransigence when they tried to discuss their proposals and
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it is their frustration over some of the brexit negotiations that has led to this announcement today and nicola sturgeon said she does want to proceed with a second referendum on independence. we are getting comments through from tim farron. the scottish liberal democrats stood for election last year on a platform to oppose a new independence referendum and this is what we will do. the first minister appears to state that scotland would be a full eu member under her plan. they are risking taking scotland out of the eu and out of the uk and it would be the worst both worlds. they had gone back on their word that 2014 was once ina back on their word that 2014 was once in a generation. nicola sturgeon was making the point that things have changed materially since that and it was in the snp ma nifesto. that and it was in the snp manifesto. yes, the sense that things have changed a lot since the vote in 2014 is important
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technically and politically. technically, do they have a mandate to go for another referendum when they spent 2014 telling us it would bea they spent 2014 telling us it would be a once in a generation event? it did be a once in a generation event? it d id clearly be a once in a generation event? it did clearly say in the manifesto that they would call another referendum if there was a material change, such as the uk voting to leave the eu. they think they do have a cast iron man date although the scottish tories say that is not necessarily true. then there is the political question of putting people who another referendum. we had one in 2014 and one in 2016 and we could have won in 2018. the electorate could be getting tired of this game. it is important the snp make the case things have changed so dramatically it is necessary to ask the question again about whether scotla nd the question again about whether scotland was to be an independent country. they will have to keep repeating that to get over the hurdle of voterfatigue. repeating that to get over the hurdle of voter fatigue. possibly some voters will be angry about
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another referendum. they will say this change was not of our making, we did not want it, but now it has been foisted on as it is important the people of scotland choose their own future. thank you very much. let's hear that moment when nicola sturgeon announced her plans for a second referendum. it is time for me to set out decisively and with clarity the way forward. doing nothing at this stage is in many ways the easiest thing for me to do. it would mean letting scotland drift through the next two years with our fingers crossed simply hoping for the best. of course i do hope for the best. i want the uk to get a good deal from the eu negotiations. that is clearly in scotland's interests as well as in the interests of our friends in other parts of the uk. but i am farfrom alone in fearing a bad deal or indeed no deal. nor am i alone in fearing that even a so—called good deal will be
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significantly inferior to membership of the single market and that it will set scotland on a course that will not only damage our economy but change the very nature of the society and country that we are. the problem with doing nothing now is that by the time these fears are realised it will be too late for scotland to choose a different path before the damage is done. that would not be right or fair. whatever path we take it should be one decided by us, not for us. let me set out the plan i intend to pursue. first, i will continue to stand up for scotland's interests during the process of brexit negotiations. second, i will now take the steps necessary to make sure that scotland will have a choice at the end of this process. a choice of whether to follow the uk to a hard brexit,
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or to become an independent country, able to secure a real partnership of equals with the rest of the uk and our own relationship with europe. the scottish government's mandate for offering this choice is beyond doubt. last year we were elected with the highest share of the constituency vote won by any party in the history of devolution on a manifesto that said this: the scottish parliament should have the right to hold another referendum if there is a significant and material change in circumstances that prevailed in 2014, such as scotland being taken out of the eu against our will. these conditions have, of course, now been met. so i can confirm today that next week i will seek the authority of the scottish parliament to agree with the uk government the details of a section 30 order. the procedure that will enable the scottish parliament to legislate
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for an independence referendum. we can talk to the snp's europe spokesman, stephen gethin ‘s. thank you forjoining us. reaction from westminster, a second referendum would be divisive and caused huge economic uncertainty at the worst possible time for britain. how do you respond to that? we are in a pretty bad place economically at the moment as part of the uk. this is not the situation we wanted to find ourselves in. i and my colleagues campaigned hard for us to remain pa rt campaigned hard for us to remain part of the european union and that is why you saw an overwhelming vote to remain part of the european union in scotland. we are facing up to a ha rd tory in scotland. we are facing up to a hard tory brexit and that could cost tens of thousands ofjobs and hit our economy hard and hit the opportunities for young people. the
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scottish government has a mandate through the snp's manifesto, but we also have a responsibility to protect those jobs and opportunities as far as we can and it is looking likely that an independence referendum will give people the choice and looks like the only way to protect that. polling does not indicate an enormous appetite for a second independence referendum. indicate an enormous appetite for a second independence referendumm shows even less of an appetite for a ha rd tory shows even less of an appetite for a hard tory brexit. we are in a situation where we want to give people the choice. 0ver situation where we want to give people the choice. over half of people the choice. over half of people have said they would want a referendum on independence. we are faced with a choice, and increasingly isolationist uk and a ha rd tory increasingly isolationist uk and a hard tory brexit that would cost jobs, or do we want to secure a relationship with our european partners? given the referendum vote last year and the snp manifesto commitment, it is right and becoming clear that the only way to do that
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is through an independence vote. this is not the situation we wanted to be in and the scottish government did set out a compromise deal to the uk. if there is an independence vote, isn't the right time for it only after the brexit deal is com pletely only after the brexit deal is completely clear and is a done deal? no, you want to give people the choice before that final, before the uk is outside of europe. how can they have a choice if they do not know what the future will be? that is why the first minister set out having it in autumn 2018 or the spring of 2019. that gives people a lot more detail about what brexit will mean. sorry to keep interrupting, but they would not know what the shape of the deal would be and once the deal is clear, it might make people vote differently than they would vote prior to the deal? we already know parts of the deal, we know the prime
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minister wants to take us out of the single market. hold on, can i finish. we have been warned it could cost 80,000 scottish jobs finish. we have been warned it could cost 80,000 scottishjobs in our ha rd tory cost 80,000 scottishjobs in our hard tory brexit. do we want to go down that calamitous root economically, or do we want to give people the choice before we get there? this is not a situation in which we wanted to be, but the scottish government has a responsibility to give people the choice. that is what we are going to do. frankly, if the details are not clear by autumn 2018 or spring 2019, it looks like an absolute disaster. if you are falling back on to wto rules, you will have damage to trade. if we do not know anything two years on from the eu referendum, it is not a good situation in which you are leading people. nicola sturgeon said it is important campaigning would be based on
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absolute fact. you have set leaving the eu could cost 80,000 scottish jobs. what is that based on? that is based on an economic think tank's report based at the adversity of strathclyde. in terms of what would be known by the autumn of next year, you are saying if the shape of the deal was not clear by then, it would not be good enough. what we do know at the moment is negotiating positions and until a deal is done it is not clear what will be in it. i already highlighted the importance of the single market which has been rejected by the uk government. that is pretty important for universities, the food and drink industry, financial services, all thejobs industry, financial services, all the jobs that i clip critical to the wider uk economy as well as the scottish economy as well. the scottish economy as well. the scottish government set out a
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compromise and that would have been to remain part of the single market and leave the eu. given people in scotla nd and leave the eu. given people in scotland voted in favour of remaining in the eu, that was a major step. the uk government have rejected that compromise. as a result of that i do not think the scottish government have been left with much choice in this matter. thank you forjoining us. we can talk to the constitutional expert charles livingstone who joins us on the line. thank you forjoining us. talk us through the process. nicola sturgeon has said she wants to seek an independence referendum, but there is no guarantee it would happen because westminster would have the power to block it. the starting position is the scottish act 1998 reserves and number of issues, including constitutional issues, including constitutional issues, to the uk parliament and one of those is the union of scotland and england. people will recall that
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one of the earliest battles in the 20 14th referendum one of the earliest battles in the 2014th referendum campaign was whether that meant the scottish parliament had no power to hold an independence referendum without westminster consent, or if it could hold a referendum on the basis it would not be binding. this time round the scottish government has softened its position on that. i do not think they have expressly conceded that the scottish parliament has no power to hold a referendum off its own bat, but they seem referendum off its own bat, but they seem to be proceeding on the basis that the section 30 order will be required. what with the position be? there is a lot of ground to cover, but imagine an independence referendum went ahead and scotland got independence, what with the guarantee beat that scotland will be able to remain in the eu anyway? there is quite a lot of water to go under the bridge before we get to questions of that nature. but
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certainly in the previous referendum the eu status of an independent scotla nd the eu status of an independent scotland was significant issue. ultimately the eu is a political institution, so if political will was there on the part of all parties, then it is not something that we can say at this stage is impossible. but certainly there would need to be unanimity among member states. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. we can speak now to the journalist and broadcaster lesley reader who campaignfor broadcaster lesley reader who campaign for independence in 2014. shejoins us now campaign for independence in 2014. she joins us now from campaign for independence in 2014. shejoins us now from fife. do you think there is a public appetite for another independence referendum?m may not be the way people imagined it would happen. i think nicola sturgeon made some good remarks in her speech where she said that lots of people are hoping they can put their heads in the sand and come out
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again when everything is all right and there is stability. but there is no safe spot now and no stability and the choice is to change or be changed. it is who is in charge of the change process. i am sure there area the change process. i am sure there are a lot of people they who wish they could get to a semblance of normality, but now there are some fundamental decisions to take about scotland's future. whilst they might not be queueing up to have a referendum we all know deep down we need to have an informed choice and i think need to have an informed choice and ithink again need to have an informed choice and i think again her use of that phrase was a good one because last time round did we have an informed choice? people thought staying in the eu was only possible by remaining in the uk, but it turned out to be precisely the opposite.” wa nt to out to be precisely the opposite.” want to bring you some comments from jeremy corbyn. he has said there is no appetite for a referendum. he had said previously that westminster
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should not block it going ahead, but that a breakaway would be catastrophic. he is saying labour would not block it, but he is saying there is no appetite for a referendum. you were saying that when the referendum was held previously that the expectation was about remaining in the eu and the questions that were thrashed out in that previous referendum do remain, the fundamentals of scotland's economy, the issue of what would happen to levels of debt and deficit in scotland, the value of oil revenues, the economics of this make it very difficult argument, don't they? they do, but it is not as if they? they do, but it is not as if the whole of the uk is sitting in the whole of the uk is sitting in the pink. the last time round the scrutiny 100% on the case for independence. there was very little scrutiny on the case for staying.
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this time round i hope people will seek it is a choice between two less than ideal scenarios and the economic fortunes of scotland as an independent country are as good as any other country surrounded as with all the energy reserves we have got. it is the question of whether you can get people to look from a short—term price of a barrel of oil to the long—term underlying prospects of a country. when it comes tojeremy corbyn that is one of the major things that has changed. for him to talk about there being no appetite in scotland for an independence referendum is pretty rich when his own party is bumping along beneath the conservatives in scotland, which is something none of us thought we would see. they face absolute white out in the council elections in a couple of weeks. labour has not changed. the prospect of uk being run by a conservative government until 2030, that has changed. there are quite a lot of
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mechanics in the british state that look a lot clearer than they did two yea rs look a lot clearer than they did two years ago and i hope people will ta ke years ago and i hope people will take that into consideration. thank you very much forjoining us. there will be much more reaction on the news at one to the news that scotland's first minister says she will be seeking another referendum on scottish independence. let's catch up with the weather. let's catch up with the weather. it has been a beautiful day for some of us. take a look at this picture from cambridge. a little bit more hazy in argyll and bute in scotland. but overall it is a nice scene out there. a bit of cloud around the la ke there. a bit of cloud around the lake district. 0verall there. a bit of cloud around the lake district. overall it is a nice morning and afternoon out there. enjoy it if you can. let's see what it looks like in the middle of the afternoon. pressure in scotland,
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temperatures at this stage typically ten or 11 degrees. milder in northern ireland. belfast and enniskillen at 13. manchester at 13. in the south it could even get up to 16 or 17 in the south it could even get up to 16 or17 in in the south it could even get up to 16 or 17 in london. a bit more cloud around to the posts of cornwall and devon. it is not clear everywhere, there are some clouds out there and a bit of sea mist around. this evening there are changes on the way. a weather front will be advancing of the atlantic, bringing some rain to northern ireland and scotland. this is the start of a very unsettled period for scotland, particularly northern scotland. very strong winds, gusts in excess of 70 miles an hour in the northern isles and on top of that frequent showers. to the south the winds died down very quickly and in the south on
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tuesdayit very quickly and in the south on tuesday it is a nice day with a few more scattered clouds. 0n tuesday it is a nice day with a few more scattered clouds. on wednesday and thursday high pressure will be dominating and any low pressure will shoot off to the north—west. both wednesday and thursday start off on the sunnyside, but across the north west you are closer to the low pressure, so west you are closer to the low pressure, so belfast perhaps picking up pressure, so belfast perhaps picking upa bit pressure, so belfast perhaps picking up a bit of rainfall. it is all change from thursday night into friday and the jet stream and the weather systems are making a beeline for the uk. whether france, rain, you name it, so increasing from friday and all of this rain will be on top of us on saturday. scotland's first minister takes westminster by surprise as she announces plans to trigger another independence referendum. nicola sturgeon says a 2nd referendum should be held between autumn 2018 and spring 2019 once the terms of the uk‘s exit from the eu are clear. i believe that it would be wrong
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for scotland to be taken down a path that it has no control over, regardless of the consequences for our economy, for our society, for our place in the world, for our very sense of who we are as a country. it comes as mps prepare to vote again on whether to give the prime minister the power to start the brexit process. we'll be asking whether theresa may will agree to another referendum and what the implications are for the uk and the brexit negotiations. also this lunchtime. hundreds of thousands of commuters are hit by a 24 hour rail strike as union members from 3 train companies walk out.
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