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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  March 14, 2017 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill at westminster, where the bill to trigger the process of leaving the eu has cleared its final hurdle. the brexit bill will become law today, after being approved by parliament last night. i'm ben brown in edinburgh, where the scottish national party warns theresa may not try to block the first minister's plans for a second independence referendum. i'm joanna gosling. the other news at 11... the deputy governor of the bank of england resigns after failing to reveal her brother's role at barclays. new york and newjersey declare states of emergency as a huge winter storm sweeps in. children's exercise levels start to fall as early as the age of seven, according to new research.
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good morning from westminster. the bill giving theresa may the power to trigger the formal process of leaving the eu has cleared its final hurdle in parliament, and will now become law. the brexit secretary, david davis, said the uk was on the threshold of its most important negotiation for a generation. our political correspondent chris mason reports. contents, 118, not contents, 274, so the not contents have it. with those words the government achieved what the supreme court told ministers they had to, parliamentary approval to start brexit.
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the debates here in the house of lords and in the house of commons are, for now at least, done. one thing came out very clearly in all the debates. it is uncertainty that is bad for business, it is uncertainty that is bad forforeign nationals in the uk, it is bad for uk nationals resident in eu countries. i think the quicker we get on with this process the better. the house of commons had overturned two suggested changes to the plan's new law guaranteeing the rights of eu citizens living here and ensuring parliament gets a vote after the government's brexit negotiations. that meant the bill was carried down this corridor of power and back to the house of lords. but collectively they knew the game was up. as the unelected bit of parliament they decided to let the government gets its way, leaving some mps frustrated. honestly, in the 12 years i have
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been an mp i have never seen a government behave in such a dogmatic and high—handed way towards parliament. i thought the whole point of brexit, this is what the brexiteers said, was restoring sovereignty to this great place, not undermining it. the process of leaving the european union is about to begin. that flag on the left will soon come down. the big question now, as the scottish government pushes again for independence is whether the union flag will flutter for much longer too. let's speak to our assistant political editor norman smith, who is in the houses of parliament. we are going to hearfrom we are going to hear from the we are going to hearfrom the prime minister, norman, at lunchtime. the prime minister will be making a statement about last week's eu
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summit. many people will be listening for her words about last night, when the house of commons and the house of lords approved the brexit bill, paving the way for mrs may to trigger article 50, expected towards the end of this month. striking the ease with which the legislation was passed. there were just nine conservative mps who abstained on the crucial vote. that was all. in the house of lords, the liberal democrats opposed by eve ryo ne liberal democrats opposed by everyone else pretty much through in the towel. you wonder whether that isa sign the towel. you wonder whether that is a sign of things to come because of course there will be many more votes in parliament before brexit. at the same time, of course, we had nicola sturgeon throwing a hand grenade into proceedings, pressing for a second scottish independence referendum. downing street, at the moment, is insisting it has so far made no final decision on whether there will be a referendum or with
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regard to the timing. that said, it is abundantly clear that mrs may has no appetite to hold a referendum while the whole works its process is under way. that was made clear by david mundell as he was arriving for cabinet. mr mundell, will you agree to nicola sturgeon‘s timetable? people in scotland don't want another independence referendum and there shouldn't be one. iamjoined by i am joined by douglas carswell. let's talk about brexit burst. i am presuming you must support nicola sturgeon. —— first. the same arguments were taking back control but not part of a larger union and making your own way. isn't it wonderful exclamation that we won the referendum and scotland had a vote for them it is up to people living in scotland to decide whether they want to remain in the united kingdom become an independent country. last time i checked i think most people in scotland wanted to
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remain in the united kingdom and they were given a choice. it is up two people in scotland and not myself to decide these things. two people in scotland and not myself to decide these thingsm there is a vote next week to trigger section 30, with that then beat the necessary democratic legitimacy whereby mrs may should actually concede a second referendum? my view does not come into this. i represent clapton in the south—east of england. ifa clapton in the south—east of england. if a lot of people in scotland want a referendum i would suggest that should be one but not before april, 2019. we'll be leaving the european union in april, 2019. i expect if they are insisted there will be a referendum after that and i would not count on the outcome. let's talk about brexit and the legislation last night. way surprised in the end that the bill seemed to pass with some ease? not really. 0ne
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seemed to pass with some ease? not really. one or two pundits have talked it up. if you talk to the decision—makers, the mps and peers, there has been a huge, psychological shift. the british establishment is pivoting. it is aligning itself to the new reality of brexit. i think a lot of the remain noises are subsiding but that means we can build a national consensus was that ido build a national consensus was that i do not want to live in a country where people are marching on the high courts. i want to create a consensus. high courts. i want to create a consensus. there high courts. i want to create a consensus. there are high courts. i want to create a consensus. there are good people on the remain side. people in parliament recognise we would leave and wanted to make it work for everyone. we have the great repeal bill coming down and be votes on trade legislation and possibly a lot more. is it your sense that mrs may
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can expect those bills also to be passed without much opposition? there will be a lot of complex legal tapestry to unravel in some of that legislation. there is a big brexit majority in the commons. it could theoretically be held to ransom. the reality is there is a majority of 45, 50. there is a phalanx of people like myself and the ulster unionists, good, traditional socialists on the labour side who are fed up with people running their lives. erin banks, one of the pa rty‘s lives. erin banks, one of the party's the founders in years gone by and said he is expelled on the party. given what he has said about forming a separate party, given he has said he will stand against you as ukip mp, he says, should he be expeued? as ukip mp, he says, should he be expelled? it is sad when one of the 40,000 members leaves the party for
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whatever reason. fundamentally, i have no more say in these matters, whether or not it is an nec decision. i have no more say in nec decisions than in deciding who gets a knighthood. it is not something i decide. i had stood for election in clacton four times. there have been some colourful characters on the ballot paper. i am sure at the next election there will be colourful characters as well. the more the merrier. we are all looking forward to the clacton election! we should find a bit more out about the mood of mrs may round about 12:30pm when we're expecting her to make the statement on last week's eu summit. more from you later. that is coming up more from you later. that is coming up after midday. let's just test the mood in scotland. the scottish national party has warned theresa may not to try to block first minister nicola sturgeon‘s plans for a second independence referendum.
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ben brown is at holyrood. we are here at the scottish parliament. the snp is warning to reason me not to stand on its way, not to stand in the way of nicola sturgeon. a timetable which is to have a second scottish independence referendum between the autumn of 2018 and the spring of 2019. here at the scottish parliament, work on all of that begins with a vote next tuesday to request what is called the section 30 order from westminster, paving the way for a scottish referendum, a second scottish referendum, a second scottish referendum. the snp will push that through with the help of pro—independent scottish greens next week. that is only the beginning of the process. essentially then the ball is in the court of theresa may will she go along with nicola sturgeon's timetable or, if she
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agrees to a scottish referendum, will she seek to postpone it and haveit will she seek to postpone it and have it after the brexit negotiations are complete? today we have been hearing from fiona hyslop and she said that life after brexit in scotland would be intolerable. we want to make sure we can protect scotland's interests. we think continued membership of the single market is very important forjobs and for people in scotland and for our future. therefore, the choice that we want to provide for the people of scotland is whether there is clarity over what the brexit deal will be. we won't know that until the autumn of 2018, we think, at the earliest. it's important to have clarity about the brexit deal. we need to have clarity, yes, about independence but most importantly we need choice. yes, the rest of the uk apart from northern ireland voted to leave the eu but scotland voted to remain. 0ur interests must be with the continued relationship with europe. we want to provide that opportunity. this is notjust about the brexit
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orthe eu, this is about the type of country we want to be and we want to see. with a very weak labour opposition in westminster, the prospect of perhaps decades of conservative rule is just intolerable. so, that is fiona hyslop of the snp talking to us earlier on foot i am joined here by professor michael keating, professor of the centre on constitutional changeful study you think theresa may has no choice but to agree to a second scottish referendum? legally, she can say, no. referendum? legally, she can say, no. they have the right to say there will be no referendum or they can agree to it, which is rather unlikely. 0r agree to it, which is rather unlikely. or they can say there will bea unlikely. or they can say there will be a referendum on their terms and undertheir be a referendum on their terms and under their conditions, noticeably to do with the timing of the referendum. if it were outside the
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time frame of nicola sturgeon, which is next year or 2019, after the brexit negotiations, what difference would that make is to mark they want to have a referendum before we have left the eu. -- would that make? if we have to come out of the eu & all the new trade deals and go along with the uk's new relationship and is able to get back into the eu, that will be a lot more complicated. how much of a gamble is it for nicola sturgeon to call for a second scottish referendum so soon after the last one? it is a gamble to seize the initiative. the scottish government has been arguing for a special deal for scotland within the eu. the uk government has conceded no eu. the uk government has conceded no ground whatsoever on and is moving to the last option, which is the most risky. they did not want to go all the way down the list but
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feel they have no choice but to go foran feel they have no choice but to go for an independence referendum. feel they have no choice but to go foran independence referendum. it isa gamble foran independence referendum. it is a gamble because scottish opinion is a gamble because scottish opinion is very much to divided and the economic circumstances are much worse than they were. the polls show that most scots do not want a referendum. that is always true with referendums. they are polarising they have to make a simple choice on conjugated issues. almost 50% of people say they would vote yes in a referendum. some of those people who do not want a referendum so they would vote for independence anyway. looking far ahead into the future, if there were an independent scotla nd if there were an independent scotland outside the uk and outside the youth how hard or difficult or easy, with scotland — an independent scotland— find it to get back inside the european union? technically it would be quite compensated. i do not see a reason why scotland would not
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be allowed into the european union. i think it would eventually get back inside the european union. the spanish do not want to encourage separatism and have said they would not let scotland in. they have said different things. they said eventually they would follow the uk lead. yesterday the spanish foreign minister said something else. ultimately they would have to have a reason for keeping scotland out and they do not think they have such a reason. they are more concerned about gibraltar now than they are with scotland. that is a whole other subject. we will not get into gibraltar now. we have enough to talk about here. that is the latest from the scottish parliament. back to you. i know we are on for 24 hours but thatis i know we are on for 24 hours but that is a whole other issue. let's ta ke let's take a look at the scene in downing street. at 12.30pm we'll be live when theresa may gives a speech after this morning's
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cabinet meeting. that is a key statement will be covering and looking out for. we are keeping an eye on all the developments politically both in london and edinburgh. in this hour we will be talking tojill rutter from the institute of government about the bureaucratic, legal and technical issues that are ahead in the coming weeks and months. that is all coming up at half past. now for the rest of the day's news. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. the bill to allow the government to trigger brexit will become law today, after being approved by parliament last night. the scottish national party warns the prime minister not to try to block first minister nicola sturgeon's plans for a second independence referendum. the deputy governor of the bank of england resigns after failing to reveal her brother's role at barclays. in sport, double 0lympic
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in sport, double olympic champion joanna arousal is shand says she has achieved everything she wants in cycling after announcing her retirement. jose mourinho says he remains chelsea's number one manager despite being called judas last night. he reminded them of the three league titles he won stop both managers were clashing on the sidelines. we are expecting to hear today that women members are expected to be admitted to muirfield golf club. we are expected to get the result of a second ballot. we will bring you that we get it. and the rest of the day's stories. 0ne crew member has been found after an irish coast guard helicopter, with four on board, went missing off the west of ireland. those on board lost contact in the early hours of this morning. a search is under way
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six miles to the west of black sod in county mayo. the aircraft was providing cover for another coastguard helicopter when contact was lost. the european union's top court has ruled that employers may ban staff from wearing visible religious symbols at work. the european court ofjustice delivered a jointjudgement in the cases of two women in france and belgium, who were dismissed for refusing to remove headscarves. the court said that an internal company rule prohibiting the wearing of any political, philosophical or religious sign was not discriminatory. the bank of england's newly—appointed deputy governor, charlotte hogg, has resigned after mps criticised her for failing to reveal that her brother holds a senior role at barclays bank. mps said charlotte hogg's "professional competence fell short" of the standards required to fulfil her role. they found that ms hogg failed over a period of nearly four years to comply with the bank's code of conduct. the bank's governor mark carney
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has given his response and issued a statement following charlotte hogg's resignation. this is part of what he said: with me is our economics editor, kamal ahmed. tell us more about what her brother does and why it was not declared what the issue has been. her brother isa what the issue has been. her brother is a director of strategy at ba rclays, is a director of strategy at barclays, relatively senior. not at cheap executive level but a senior position within the bank. the bank of england regulates the commercial banks in the uk. any breach of the rules on the bank of england side has to be a significant matter. i think that the significance of what
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has happened today is great. the treasury select committee, the mps who have criticised the appointment of charlotte hogg and lead to her resignation, very rarely say they do not back the appointment of a deputy governor in this way. i think the issue has been, not only did she not declare the fact that her brother worked for boxes in the senior role, the fact is it went on for four yea rs the fact is it went on for four years and she was the person, as chief operating officer in the bank of england, who was responsible for the rule book that she herself breached. i think those two things together have led to this position. i view together have led to this position. iview —— together have led to this position. i view —— as you have seen from the governor, mark carney, she was very well respected within the bank for the reform, new levels of transparency she had introduced into the bank as chief operating officer. she was being spoken about as a
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possible first female governor of the bank of england. mark carney will be leaving the bank of england in 2019 are many thought she would be in in 2019 are many thought she would beina in 2019 are many thought she would be in a position to possibly take that vitaljob. be in a position to possibly take that vital job. the fact that her career at the bank at least has come to an end for what she described as an oversight, a breach of the rules, has been quite shocking to the governor. he stood by her up until one minute to minute guide. she offered her resignation last week and mark carney rejected it because he felt she had done so much good work for the bank that the oversight was outweighed by the good work. that does raise less gins about his judgment. i am sure he will be questioned on matt. you think, he has gone but the issues around it... i think there are some broader issues for the governor to think about. in a report this morning there were distinct reasons why the decision was taken. the surprising
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and unusual decision to reject her appointment, which actually was made by the chancellor of the exchequer. that does not just by the chancellor of the exchequer. that does notjust a question the position of charlotte hogg but because mark carney had rejected her resignation, it does question in the minds of mps, hisjudgment. she offered her resignation last week was given what the treasury select committee said today about the breach and its importance, it is clear the treasury select committee thinks that mark carney should have accepted the resignation as soon as it became clear they had been a breach over four years. thank you very much. turkish ministers were banned from speaking dutch rallies, organised in water can —— rotterdam in a
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referendum next month. the dutch prime minister has been defending his handling of the dispute in a televised debate. 0ur correspondent is in the hague. anna, this row is continuing. less than 24-hour is before the dutch go to the polls in what is being seen as a defining moment for european politics. we're outside parliament now. i have been speaking to a pollster who says that up speaking to a pollster who says that up to half of dutch voters are still undecided. that is why these televised debates are being seen as so influential. last night, the first time the prime minister, based here in the hague, went head—to—head with his populist rival. two front runners in the polls at the moment it was competent but there were no real fireworks. we were watching the debate in rotterdam. the biggest
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applause came when the prime minister said there is a difference between sitting on your sofa and tweeting and actually the country. populist here responded by saying that the prime minister cared more for asylum seekers than he did own country. he also said that mark rutte had been using brexit to try to scaremonger the dutch voters. thank you very much. the north—eastern united states is hunkering down for the worst snowstorm of the season. 50 million people along the eastern seaboard are under blizzard warnings. schools are closed and thousands of flights and trains are cancelled. it's even forced the postponement of a visit by the german chancellor, who was due to meet president trump. neda tawfik reports. satellite images showing the scale of the nor‘easter hitting the eastern seaboard. as the snow falls, it's promised to worsen dramatically quickly. it's proven already treacherous. in wisconsin, chaos on the roadways. 40 cars involved in a crash on the interstate in
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the midst of the storm. blizzard warnings from pennsylvania to maine. in new york, where as much as 20 inches is expected by tuesday evening, a state of emergency has been declared. new york's mayor bill de blasio warned this could be one of the biggest snowstorms in recent memory and urged residents to stay indoors. if you must go out, do so for as limited a time period as possible. if you need to travel, use mass transit if at all possible. the best thing to do is to stay in if you can stay in. on monday, president donald trump gave assurances that officials were prepared for the severe storm. everybody in government is fully prepared and ready and the entire north—east it seems is under a very severe winter storm warning. so, let's hope it's not going to be as bad as some people are predicting. but the blizzard has disrupted diplomacy. president trump was due to meet the
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german chancellor, angela merkel. her trip to the white house has now been postponed until friday. just days before spring, and coming after an unusually warm winter, shoppers find themselves feeling weather whiplash. buying snowblowers and salt for one last blast of winter. smartphones and fitness trackers are being targeted by criminals to hold people to ransom over personal data, according to security experts. thejoint report from the national crime agency and the new national cyber security centre says digital crime is becoming more aggressive, with a growing risk to business. the father—in—law and other family members of the tv chef gordon ramsey have been charged as part of a police inquiry into computer hacking. chris hutcheson, who is the father of ramsay's wife tana, was arrested as part of the met police's 0peration tuleta. daniela relph is at westminster magistrates court.
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what can you tell us? this was the first court appearance for the four defendants. all four of them are related to the wife of gordon ramsay thought about her father, 68—year—old chris hutchinson, who used to work for gordon ramsay, her two brothers, adam and chris, and her sister. they have all been charged with conspiring to unlawfully access a computer system and some of the e—mail accounts of gordon ramsay holdings ltd, the company which holds the chef's business interests. no pleas were entered and the four have been released on unconditional bail. the case has been moved to the old bailey and the four defendants are due to appear on the 11th of april. the defence told the court there was a huge amount of material to go through and this was a highly technical case with a strong family dynamic. thank you.
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let's catch up with the weather. another mild day and tomorrow, for many will stop the best of the sunshine is in northern ireland and scotland. some holes in the cloud across the midlands. a bit cloudy across the midlands. a bit cloudy across the midlands. a bit cloudy across the west. a different story in the northern half of scotland where it is very windy. gusts of 60, 70 miles an hour in the next few hours which could cause disruption. elsewhere largely dry and very mild way you get the sunshine. this evening and overnight it is a dry one for most of us. tadic is begin to fall over the north west of scotland. —— temperatures. a cloudy and mild night with spots of rain across the west. we will hold onto the damp weather tomorrow. the best of any brightness in central and
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eastern parts. where we see holes in the cloud it will be exceptionally mild. 17, 18 possibly in the south east. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: the brexit bill will become law today after being approved by parliament last night. peers backed down over amendments to the bill after their objections were overturned by mps. the incoming deputy governor of the bank of england resigns afterfailing to reveal her brother's role at barclays. mps on the treasury committee said she "fell short of the very high standards" required. new york and newjersey declare states of emergency as a huge winter storm sweeps into the eastern united states. schools are closed and thousands of flights have been cancelled. and children's exercise levels start to fall as early as the age of seven, according to new research. the study says sitting is replacing physical activity from the time children start school. time for a look at the sport.
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the double olympic gold medallist joanna rowsell—shand has announced her retirement from international cycling. she said she'd achieved everything she'd ever wanted to in the sport, including five world titles, four european titles, a commonwealth gold and two 0lympic golds. she said she'd enjoyed a fabulous career and would continue in cycling as a coach. we are respecting to hear that muirfield golf club have voted to accept women members following a second ballot. the first vote failed to achieve the two thirds majority needed, and the our own immediately announced that muirfield would no longer be able to host the open championship. they will overturn that if there is a positive vote, as is expected today, and women are admitted. manchester united manager jose mourinho told chelsea fans he was still their number one manager after they heckled him during their fa cup defeat last
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night, calling him a "judas". chelsea beat united 1—0 to reach the semi—finals. united had to play for almost an hour with 10 men after ander herrera was given a second yellow card for this tackle on eden hazard. n'golo kante scored the winner — only his second goal of the season. having joined rivals united after his sacking by chelsea, mourinho was quick to remind them of the three league titles he'd won for the club. they can call what they want. i am a professional. i defend my club. and until they have a manager that wins four premier league is for them, i am the number one. when they have someone that wins four premier leagues for them, i become number two. but until this moment, judas is number one. now we
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two. but until this moment, judas is number one. now we can two. but until this moment, judas is number one. now we can hand to muirfield for more news on that vote taking place. the rules of the club will be changed accordingly, with immediate effect. we look forward to welcoming women as members, who will enjoy and benefit from the traditions and friendship of this remarkable club. thank you. confirmation there that muirfield have voted to admit female members for the first time in the second ballot that has taken place. this return to the football. so chelsea will play tottenham in the semi—finals, and arsenal will face manchester city. leicester city return to champions league action this evening against sevilla,
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looking to overturn a 2—1 scoreline from the first leg. it's their first match since manager craig shakespeare was given the job until the end of the season. leicester have won both of their league games since the sacking of claudio ranieri. it will be a special occasion at the king power. the atmosphere will be electric. i am expecting the team to ta ke electric. i am expecting the team to take the momentum from the two results are to take the confidence they have gained from that and really play on the front foot. that is not saying that we are going to be open, because we know seville have got some world—class players. but it makes for an interesting game because of the away goal. speed skater elise christie says her disappointment at the winter olympics three years ago made her a better athlete. christie won three gold medals at the world short track championships in rotterdam at the weekend — an incredible turnaround, considering that she considered retiring after she was disqualified from all three of her races in sochi. it was negative in that i lost a lot
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of self—confidence as a person outside of sport. but obviously, i have learned to live with who i am now and i have adapted to it and i am happy with who i am now. but as an athlete, it was much more positive. i became much more robust. little things didn't affect me. i could have failure and success within a minute. i could switch from one to the other. i get very u naffected one to the other. i get very unaffected by things now. as an athlete, i am so much more robust from what happened. and that is all the sport for now. to remind you of that breaking news, muirfield golf club has voted to accept women members. that was previously a vote on the matter and women members were rejected. at that point, it was announced that muirfield would be taken off the 0pen muirfield would be taken off the open championship rider. there has
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subsequently been a second ballot and this time, 498 numbers have voted for women to be admitted to the club. 123 members voted against it, so it will go ahead and muirfield will be restored to the 0pen muirfield will be restored to the open championship rotor. —— rota. they said they look forward to welcoming women members. the bill giving theresa may the power to trigger the formal process of leaving the eu has cleared its final hurdle in parliament, and will now become law. the brexit secretary, david davis, said the uk was on the threshold of its most important negotiation for a generation. my colleague jane hill is in westminster. yes, and what an enormous amount of negotiation there is to be done. let's discuss what awaits negotiators, ministers, civil
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serva nts negotiators, ministers, civil servants in the weeks, months and perhaps years to come. it is what we are all going to be talking about, whether we like it or not, in the near and middle future. let's talk about the scale of the task with jill rutter, who hasjoined me from the institute for government. let's start with scale. i suppose by definition, we haven't been in this situation before. perhaps you can painta situation before. perhaps you can paint a picture of the task ahead. people say it is the biggest thing we have done since the second world war. it is on an unprecedented scale. ivan rogers, who until january was the uk's representative in the eu, described it as humongous, not a normal civil servant term. it affects all of whitehall. beyond whitehall, it will affect all of the devolved administrations. it will affect local government and most businesses, including businesses that don't even know that they will be affected. it is untangling 43
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years of increasingly entwining ourselves in the eu. it is a massive task. in terms of the untangling, there has been a cry from the civil service union that there simply aren't enough civil servants. and also that britain doesn't have enough negotiators, as it is not something we have needed thus far. the good news is that they have managed to recruit a lot of people. people have been moved into key positions. there are issues to do with when you move people to deal with when you move people to deal with brexit, what do they leave behind? there has been some backfilling. the uk has not had to negotiate its own trade agreements for 40 plus years. we are creating a new department for it to trade. they will need people with trade
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expertise to come in. they are still looking for a senior trade expert to come into that department. so there are processes of upscaling but this is on are processes of upscaling but this isona are processes of upscaling but this is on a timetable not of our choosing, a very fast timetable, with lots of gaps to fill. we will see them being filled over the years to come. where do people like that come from? when you say we need to find a skilled trade negotiator?m is interesting. we have been doing work on setting up a code department, and my colleague was talking to people who have done trade negotiations for canada and australia. a lot of them were approached over whether they would be interested in coming to work here, what is interesting because those are the countries we want to be doing trade deals with first. there will be some people who have been working in europe who may want to come back after doing jobs in the eu. that is a potential source when
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brits are no longer employed in the european commission. otherwise, there are people with negotiating skills. identifying the sort of expertise you need and finding ways of supplying it is a big task. and a quick thought on how tightly everything needs to be sewn up within that two—year period, because we hear of treaties needed in several key areas like immigration and fisheries. does every i have to be dotted and every key have to be got on those seven treaties by that two—year period, or can somethings be left fluid? the government will need to make sure that by the time of exit, and against the possibility of exit, and against the possibility of no deal, there isn't a legal hiatus, so that businesses know how they trade with the people they were trading with on the day before brexit and how they will trade the day after brexit. say you are a
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national living here from an eu country. will you be admitted by the border force when you arrive with your eu passport? before brexit, you have a right to come here. will you still be admitted? we need to make sure of those sorts of things if that transition from being in the eu to being out of the eu is to go smoothly. there are some areas where the government or ade says it wants and pigmentation phase. some of those, we can choose, whether to implement things slowly or not. in other areas, it is not our choice. it will depend on whether our eu partners agree that we can have an implementation phase. we need to be prepared for them not agreeing. goodness. i have a feeling we will be talking many times in the future. thank you for your time. we must find out the picture in scotland as well. let's return to edinburgh and rejoin ben. yes, we are at the
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scottish parliament. the snp are telling theresa may not to stand in the way of nicola sturgeon's call yesterday for a second scottish independence referendum between the autumn of 2018 and the spring of 2019. i am joined autumn of 2018 and the spring of 2019. iamjoined by autumn of 2018 and the spring of 2019. i am joined by fiona autumn of 2018 and the spring of 2019. iam joined by fiona hislop from the snp, the cabinet secretary for culture, tourism and external affairs. do you think theresa may is going to stand in the way of a second referendum ? going to stand in the way of a second referendum? she would be very unwise to do so. the scottish government was elected with a mandate less than a year ago that if there was a material change in the circumstance, such as leaving the eu, we would be able to have the scottish parliament hold a referendum. so we will be voting on that next week. that will be the scottish parliament voting. i think standing in the way of an elected government would be unwise for any
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uk politician, let alone theresa may, who has not been elected personally, to stand in the way of scotland. yesterday, theresa may said in response to nicola sturgeon that the snp are playing politics. the last referendum was a once in a generation referendum, and here you are wanting another one. we have worked hard with the uk government. we have put forward compromises, recognising that the uk was leaving the eu to find a way that the position of scotland to be protected within the uk. we suggest that we should be able to remain part of the single market even if the rest of the uk didn't. that has met with a wall of a lack of engagement and we need to move forward. we can't drift for the next two years. we need to provide people with a choice and that choice will become clear when we know the terms of the hard brexit thatis we know the terms of the hard brexit that is looking increasingly likely. that will give people clarity and
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choice of a change of direction if thatis choice of a change of direction if that is what the scottish people want. we don't need to do it at the same time as theresa may's own timetable. and with other european countries having to ratify whatever the deal the uk has between autumn of 2018 and spring of 2019, that is the obvious time that that choice, once there is clarity about the kind of ha rd once there is clarity about the kind of hard brexit, 62% of people in scotla nd of hard brexit, 62% of people in scotland voted to remain. one possibility is that theresa may will say you can have a referendum, but not until we finish the brexit negotiation. it might be 2020. would that be too late for you? well, this is the same prime minister who has caused all this uncertainty is not just with brexit, but with a hard brexit, running off a cliff edge without even having the bishop of
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the single market or the customs union. some people who voted leave we re union. some people who voted leave were expecting to remain part of the single market even if we left the eu. that uncertainty has been caused by theresa may. will she want to extend that uncertainty? but would she want a fight on two microphones? would she want to negotiate on brussels over brexit and also deal with the scottish referendum? well, she has to deal with what she promised. just as the scottish government promised a scottish referendum, we want to make sure scotland's interests are not used for other purposes. for example, our fishing industry cannot be used as a bargaining chip by the uk government against the interests of scotland. this is a huge gamble for nicola sturgeon, because public opinion polls showed there was still not a majority for independence. there isn't a majority of scots who say they want a second independence referendum. well, there is a
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majority. although 23% want a referendum tomorrow, others want it before brexit. that is one opinion poll. sometimes in politics, you have to do the right thing. we are very concerned that single market membership is crucial to our economy. freedom of movement is the lifeblood of many of our industries, whether it is tourism or universities. so the bread—and—butter issues that affect people's lives and jobs and services are very important. our health service relies on eu nationals. we celebrate the contribution people make here. they pay their taxes and contribute to our economy and society. this is becoming part of a debate about what type of country we want, and! debate about what type of country we want, and i think with a very weak labour party at westminster, i think there is a lack of opposition. the
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prospect of ten years of tory government where only one mp out of 59 was elected for the conservative party, that lack of democracy and what a right—wing tory government could do, never mind just about a ha rd could do, never mind just about a hard brexit but also other issues, will lead people to want a choice about the type of country they want scotla nd about the type of country they want scotland to be. thank you, fiona hyslop of the snp. we will talk to other political parties in edinburgh throughout the day. we have some sad news to bring you now about a 14—year—old boy who has died after he collapsed during a national kick boxing competition. here's scott marsden and he had to have an urgent medical attention during an injured title fight at alexandra milind morley at the weekend. he was taken to leeds general infirmary in a critical condition, but later died. west yorkshire police have said officers are making enquires into what happened, but the death is not being
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treated as suspicious. in a moment, a summary of the business news this hour but first, the headlines on bbc newsroom live: the bill to allow the government to trigger brexit will become law today — after being approved by parliament last night. the scottish national party warns the prime minister not to try to block first minister nicola sturgeon's plans for a second independence referendum. the deputy governor of the bank of england resigns after failing to reveal her brother's role at barclays. in the business news...
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we will get reaction to the news that the bank of england's deputy governor has resigned after breaking the bank's code of conduct. the pound has fallen to an eight—week low as investors worry over the prospect of a second scottish referendum and the looming triggering of article 50, marking the start of our departure from the eu. sterling is down more than 0.6% against the us dollar, marking its lowest level since mid—january. some bailiffs are still abusing their powers, despite changes to the law three years ago. debt advice charities say that when trying to recover debts, some bailiffs are still entering homes at night, acting without proof of identity and trying to impose unauthorised fees. the laws to regulate bailiffs in england and wales were aimed at protecting debtors from unfair behaviour. let's get more on the news this morning that charlotte hogg, the bank of england's newly—appointed deputy governor, has resigned. it comes after she failed to declare a potential conflict of interest
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about her brother's role at barclays, thereby breaking the bank of england's code of conduct. she offered her resignation last week before insisting in a letter that's been made public today that she must step down from her post. joining us now is simon french, chief economist at panmure gordon. this resignation has come from charlotte hogg. she hasn't been pushed. was she right to jump? her situation was made untenable by the report this morning that said she wasn't fit for purpose for the role of deputy governorfor wasn't fit for purpose for the role of deputy governor for markets and regulation. it comes off the back of not having disclosed for about four yea rs not having disclosed for about four years that her brother worked at ba rclays. years that her brother worked at barclays. during that time, she had oversight for regulation and ba rclays was pa rt oversight for regulation and ba rclays was part of oversight for regulation and barclays was part of her portfolio.
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what does this mean for the bank of england as an establishment? is there a feeling that people working there a feeling that people working there don't feel the rules apply to them? actually, the resignation letter is well written. it reflects on the important reputation that the bank of england has. its conduct has to be seen better than the organisations it is regulating. there was also an optical problem for monetary policymakers at the bank of england, because in recent months, we had christian forbes announced her departure. and now charlotte hogg leaves no women left on the mpc. so optically, it is very bad and that voip needs to be filled. what does it mean for charlotte hogg herself, stepping down and having failed to disclose information for a number of years? asi information for a number of years? as i say, this resignation letter is well written and she does not want to give the impression that there
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was ever a conflict—of—interest. going forward, that is the end of her career at the bank of england, what had been a stellar rise. she had been tipped in many quarters to be the future governor of the bank of england. clearly, that will not now happen. she may return to commercial banking. she has a past with sa ntander bank. commercial banking. she has a past with santander bank. what does mark carney need to do next? he needs to find a better balance on the mpc. he needs to fill this deputy governor role now made absent by charlotte hogg. that candidate needs to be vetted by the treasury select committee. he also needs to make sure there is no reputational fallout, any sense that the regulator is not holding up the standards expected of the banking industry. thank you for your time. security experts have warned that smartphones, watches, televisions and fitness trackers could be used to hold people to ransom over personal data. ra nsomwa re makes devices
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unusable until their owners pay to unlock them. devices holding photos, emails and fitness information could be targeted. thejoint report from the national crime agency and the national cyber security centre says cyber crime is becoming more aggressive. just a year after marks and spencer opened its tenth store in china, the retailer is exiting the chinese high street this month. china's retail market was said to have eclipsed the us to become the world's biggest last year. but the high street favourite was not able to crack the market, partly due to sky high rents and niche shopping habits. gin—loving vegan cyclists are the new drivers of consumer spending in the uk, judging from the latest changes to the country's inflation basket, which this year has a distinctly millennial flavour. the office for national statistics reviews the goods and services that count toward its official inflation figures once a year. this year's calculations will include non—dairy milks such as soya and oat milk for the first time, while gin and bicycle helmets return to the basket for the first
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time in more than a decade. in contrast, basic mobile phone handsets were finally pushed out of the basket. it also added children's scooters to the basket, replacing swings. let's have a quick look at the markets before we go. that's all the business news. iam glad i am glad you clarified about the child on the scooter. you couldn't find a gin loving cyclist! children become less active at an earlier age than previously thought, according to new research. it was widely believed that physical exercise started to decline with teenagers. but a study, carried out over eight years in the north—east of england, showed that activity levels begin to drop among seven—year—olds, as jane dreaper reports.
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children are supposed to be active for an hour every day, but most youngsters don't get enough exercise, and this study suggests that bad habits start at an earlier age. more than 400 children from gateshead wore an activity monitor for a week at a time. their exercise levels were measured at the ages of seven, nine, 12 and 15. physical activity dropped off from the age of seven onwards, in boys and girls. the orthodox view is that this adolescent decline is not only something which happens at adolescence, so it coincides with puberty or with transition to high school, but also, it is something that particularly affects girls. and our study shows that that is clearly not the case. i think what that means, in terms of public health programmes, is that programmes and policies and practices all have to focus much earlier, probably around about the time children go to school. too much time looking at screens and sitting down is storing up health problems for the future,
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according to public health england. it is campaigning to try and change the fact that one in five children leaves primary school obese. the headlines are coming up on the bbc news channel. in a moment, we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. first, we leave you with a look at the weather. it is blustery across the northern half of the country. further south, it is quieter. there is a tight squeeze in the isobars further north, so the northern half of scotla nd north, so the northern half of scotland is being battered by gales. there will be severe gales across the far north of scotland, driving in some hefty showers. we have had reports of thunder and lightning and snow over the higher ground. you can imagine with the strength of the wind at the showers, it is not going to feel warm here. there will be
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some trend in central and southern eastern scotland. it is a much quieter picture for the bulk of england and wales through the afternoon. more cloud across wales and into the south—west of england and into the south—west of england and maybe some hill fog at times. central and eastern areas would be pleasant, with mild temperatures. the first day of the cheltenham festival looks mild. there will be a lot of cloud. this evening, the winds begin to ease down a bit. the shower activity also eases, but clear skies mean a chilly night to come. the further south and west you are, a quiet night. more cloud and outbreaks of drizzle, so it will be a mild night. on wednesday, a cloudy start again across the bulk of the country. some light rain in western areas feeding in towards western parts of scotland. elsewhere, it will be a dry day, with more cloud than today. there will be sunny
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spells and it could be very mild when you have the sunshine. on thursday, high pressure begins to ever way across the north and west, the weather front bringing outbreaks of rain and more of a breeze. this is when things will go a bit downhill, getting colder and more breezy. in the south—east, we could see good spells of sunshine and feeling mild. on friday, we opened the floodgates in the north—west. plenty of weather systems drive in across the country. wet and windy spells at times. it will feel cooler, and the rain may be heavy at times, but interspersed with a bit of sunshine. this is bbc news. i'm jane hill at westminster, where the bill to trigger the process of leaving the eu has cleared its final hurdle. the brexit bill will become law today, after being approved by parliament last night. it means the prime minister will be
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free to trigger article 50 by the end of the month. i'm ben brown in edinburgh, where the scottish national party warns theresa may not try to block the first minister's plans for a second independence referendum. i'm joanna gosling. the other news at midday... the deputy governor of the bank of england resigns after failing to reveal her brother's role at barclays. the ban on wearing headscarves in the workplace is legal as long as it applies to all religious and political symbols, europe's top court rules. and muirfield golf club votes to admit women as members for the first time in its history. states of emergency declared on america's used in seaboard as huge winter storms sweep in. —— eastern
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seaboard. the bill giving theresa may the power to trigger the formal process of leaving the eu has cleared its final hurdle in parliament, and will now become law. the brexit secretary, david davis, said the uk was on the threshold of its most important negotiation for a generation. our political correspondent chris mason reports. contents, 118, not contents, 274, so the not contents have it. with those words the government achieved what the supreme court told ministers they had to, parliamentary approval to start brexit. the debates here in the house of lords and in the house of commons are, for now at least, done. one thing came out very clearly in all the debates. it is uncertainty that is bad
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for business, it is uncertainty that is bad forforeign nationals in the uk, it is bad for uk nationals resident in eu countries. i think the quicker we get on with this process the better. the house of commons had overturned two suggested changes to the plan's new law guaranteeing the rights of eu citizens living here and ensuring parliament gets a vote after the government's brexit negotiations. that meant the bill was carried down this corridor of power and back to the house of lords. but collectively they knew the game was up. as the unelected bit of parliament they decided to let the government gets its way, leaving some mps frustrated. honestly, in the 12 years i have been an mp i have never seen a government behave in such a dogmatic and high—handed way towards parliament. i thought the whole point of brexit, this is what the brexiteers said, was restoring sovereignty to this great place, not undermining it.
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the process of leaving the european union is about to begin. that flag on the left will soon come down. the big question now, as the scottish government pushes again for independence is whether the union flag will flutter for much longer too. this cottage national party has warned to reason may not to block nicola sturgeon's and. angus robertson says he does not want to sit in the back of the tory brexit bus and see the prime minister drive us bus and see the prime minister drive us offa bus and see the prime minister drive us off a brexit cliff. let's head to edinburgh andjoin ben us off a brexit cliff. let's head to edinburgh and join ben brown for more on that. the snp is warning
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very forcefully theresa may not to stand in the way, not to stand in the wake nicola sturgeon and her plans for a second scottish independence referendum which she once held between your two of 2018 and the spring of 2019. let's get the view of scottish labour and their leader, kezia dugdale, who is here with me. where you taken by surprise by the announcement yesterday? nicola sturgeon has been angling for a second independence referendum and has been trying to increase the grievance elements. i am disappointed because just two years ago scotland faced and answered that question and we said a very clear now. she has said everything has changed. brexit has changed everything. the fundamental economic case for independence has not changed and if it as it is weaker now. that is what matters to scottish families who will vote in this referendum. our country is so divided. we do not want to be
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dragged into the arguments of the past. the differences in scotland between what is raised in taxes public service spending is £15 million for the back is what nicola sturgeon is arguing for, to have less money to spend on schools and hospitals. the scottish labour party is firmly opposed to independence. ie disputing she has the right to call the referendum ? ie disputing she has the right to call the referendum? there would be an independence referendum. nicola sturgeon will win? she well. she'll combined with the greens to have a vote in scottish parliament. when it is down for the section 30 process at westminster. should theresa may say there should be a referendum? ruth davidson has said clearly to the prime minister she should not block a referendum. she is in a better place than i am i think they need to move on to the other is about independence and white remaining part of the united kingdom is better for families in scotland and the rest of the united kingdom.
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if and when there is a scottish referendum, how would you see it going? public opinion polls seem to be tightening, they stood at the time of the referendum. there is something interesting at the heart of the polls. there is a firm majority of people in scotland against having another independence referendum. people do not want to be dragged into the arguments of the past so divisive. i cannot tell you how little appetite there is for people who voted yes and no to revisit the arguments. it does not matter if people want one or not, they will then have the choice of yes or no at the ballot box. the group of people are undecided and will be have to be persuaded to vote yes. it is for the yes campaign, or the leave campaign, so to speak, to talk about how to improve the economic argument of the past. i am saying clearly with the collapse in oil price and the fact that scotland is faced with a £15 billion deficit,
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it will be all the harder to do. it comes down to family incomes, how well off and secure people feel in the economic of independence have falle n the economic of independence have fallen apart spectacularly. is it a gamble for nicola sturgeon?“ fallen apart spectacularly. is it a gamble for nicola sturgeon? if she we re gamble for nicola sturgeon? if she were to lose then her political future would be injeopardy. it is not about her political future. it is about the safety and security of hundreds of thousands of scottish families and the future of the united kingdom. i'll make a strong leather case for why she —— we should remain part of the uk. thank you, kezia dugdale .net also hear from the snp, the owner hyslop, the cabinet secretary for culture tourism and external affairs. we want to make sure we can protect scotland's interests. we think continued membership of the single market is very important forjobs and for people in scotland and for our future. therefore, the choice that we want to provide for the people of scotland is whether there is clarity over what the brexit deal will be. we won't know that until the autumn of 2018, we think, at the earliest.
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it's important to have clarity about the brexit deal. we need to have clarity, yes, about independence but most importantly we need choice. yes, the rest of the uk apart from northern ireland voted to leave the eu but scotland voted to remain. our interests must be with the continued relationship with europe. we want to provide that opportunity. this is notjust about the brexit orthe eu, this is about the type of country we want to be and we want to see. with a very weak labour opposition in westminster, the prospect of perhaps decades of conservative rule is just intolerable. let's talk down to ruth davidson, the leader of the scottish conservatives. you have good communications with theresa may. which she allowed a second scottish referendum on independence question i have been speaking to
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theresa may over the past weeks and months. her position has always been, there could be another referendum that it is whether there should be. you have an snp government without a clear mandate and doesn't have a majority. the majority people in scotland saying they do not want to be dragged back to that question. even since yesterday, we have seen the proposition from the snp fall down. they are saying that europe is the reason they have to have another independence referendum. they have not confirmed whether an independent scotland could be a full member of the eu. they are asking people in scotland to vote blind on an issue. they do not know what brexit or independence looks like. there are a whole lot of issues in there. are you saying that theresa may could save no, you are not allowed a second independence referendum? eye—macro it is a detailed response in good time. let's not get away
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from the premise. this is the snp government could his answer to every question in scotland is more nationalism. people aren't where the snp are. article 50 was moved and i wonder if they have not been too clever by half. the country is not where it was. there are more people in favour of independence, according to the polls are then there were in the last referendum. according to the last referendum. according to the its source mori poll, the pollster that had the yes team ahead, the week of the referendum, when they lost by more than ten points. broad support for independence has stayed the same. significantly, poll after poll after poll, time after time after time, pollster after pollster and methodology after methodology, support for dragging us back to the referendum has gone down and down. i think nicola sturgeon will pay a
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penalty for attempting to drag scotland back to a place that does not want to be. except that everything has changed with brexit. that is her argument and that of the snp. the argument is we have to have an independence column because scotland will be out of the youth. had we had independence in 2014, we would already have been out of the eu. proposition has fallen down within 24—hour 's. not any of her senior team will tell the people of scotland whether the proposition todayis scotland whether the proposition today is that scotland would reapply today is that scotland would reapply to bea today is that scotland would reapply to be a four member of the eu or not. if they cannot even get the basics right, what right do they have to force is back to the divisive question that people in scotland have told her they do not want? thank you very much for being with us outside the scottish parliament. that is the latest from here in edinburgh. back to jane in westminster. we are going to head inside
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parliament now and hear more from norman smith. we will hear from the prime minister in about 15 minutes or so. i suspect you will probably be quite upbeat. that is due to last night's vote where the government passed the brexit bill, paving way for our departure from the eu. how much of a problem is nicola sturgeon's intervention in that demand for a second scottish independence referendum question i do not think we will hear anything on that from the prime minister today. the clear indications we're getting is that mrs may wants to play this long. we may not hear any further thoughts from the prime minister about the second independence referendum until after the scottish parliament has voted presumably, triggered the process to ask for that second referendum. albeit it is quite clear that the prime minister and government absolutely do not want to hold a
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referendum while they are having to go through the fraught process of negotiating britain's tool from the eu. that point was made again by the scottish secretary, david mandel when he arrived for cabinet. mr mundell, will you agree to nicola sturgeon's timetable? people in scotland don't want another independence referendum and there shouldn't be one. one of the reflections after the vote last night is how much mrs may can think parliament is in her back pocket. there was relatively little opposition. there were nine conservative mps who defied her over the idea of giving parliament a meaningful vote. only a couple defied her of the issue of guaranteeing the rights of eu nationals. one of them joins me now. clearly, most of your colleagues we re clearly, most of your colleagues were prepared to accept the assurances given by the prime minister. it would be at the top of her negotiating demands. you are not
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satisfied. i have said that ever since the referendum last year and in the vote yesterday. i say we need to give eu nationals absolute certainty. we need to set the tone. that is why i have always said, don't make them part of the initiating deal. what do you say to those who say, hang on, what about british nationals elsewhere in the eu this position would be compromised if we made a unilateral guaranteed to eu citizens here? the point is not pitting one person against another. that is why, yes, we will be negotiating about british nationals, but, if we set the tone, we are showing clearly, we respect people in our community. it is about making them feel welcome now and going for it. we do not want anyone to be leaving our communities now who are already vital. in your
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twickenham constituency, do you know of eu nationals who are leaving our thinking of leaving?” of eu nationals who are leaving our thinking of leaving? i have come across some employers saying some of the younger eu nationals who do not have so many thais are going. i have met several of them in surgeries. like many constituency mps. even though most of the people who have come to me do have right to remain, they are literally having sleepless nights. our assurances and they are literally having sleepless nights. ourassurances and my personal pledge can go some way, as can build words of david davis and theresa may. it is still extremely distressing for individuals. what happens now? we know it is mrs may's intention to get the deal. at the same time, the eu is a legalistic body and nothing may be agreed until everything is agreed. how seriously do take the possibility that those eu citizens may not get clarity until right at the end of the negotiations? i do believe the
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ministers and the prime minister have been straight with us. therefore, colleagues who did not vote with me in the lobby do believe there will be an assurance soon. i do hold onto that. it is notjust about voting, it is about pressurising and continuing to pressurise ministers and theresa may. thank you for your time. jane, we may hear more about that in the commons from the prime minister. there may well be concerned about how exactly how long it will take to get that sort of certainty for eu nationals. i expect the overall tone from mrs may will be pretty confident, having secured last night's historic vote in the house of commons and the house of lords. thank you very much. that gives a flavour of the sheer scale and enormity of the task ahead. as part of the bbc‘s reality check, chris morris has been taking a look
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at the next steps for the uk. so what is article 50? well, it's part of the lisbon treaty, which came into force in 2009 — article 50 itself isn't very long, five brief paragraphs and the crucial bit is this... in other words, this is the formal process for leaving the eu. and it will be triggered towards the end of the month by theresa may officially informing this man the president of the european council, donald tusk, by email, by text? it doesn't specify, but i suspect there will be a letter involved. when that happens, the uk will remain part of the eu — with all the rights and responsibilities that implies — for two years, while negotiations on brexit take place. can you change your mind once you've triggered article 50? is it revocable? well, legal opinion is divided, but nothing in the treaty rules it out.
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politically, though, most people think it would be pretty hard to change course, and anyway the government has made it clear that it has no intention of doing so. who'll take part in the withdrawal negotiations? well, the uk has to negotiate with all 27 remaining eu countries and it could take month or two to get things set up. but the negotiating teams will be led by david davis, the brexit secretary for the uk, and michel barnier from the european commission. the eu will have all 27 countries involved in the negotiations. others will be involved as well. inevitably though, national leaders — theresa may, the german chancellor, the french president and so on — will be closely involved — leading the debate as the politics hots up. what are we negotiating about? well, article 50 is mainly about how you leave the eu, rather than about a new relationship in the future. so that means, the divorce bill.
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how much money will change hands? the eu says the uk owes tens of billions of euros, and a big fight over money looks inevitable. then there's the future status of uk citizens in the eu, and eu citizens in the uk — everyone says they want to sort this out quickly but technically it could be very complicated. now the uk wants to talk about a future trading relationship at the same time as all this, a huge task, while the eu is insisting that the divorce needs to be settled first. that will be another point of dispute, and getting it all agreed in two years may prove impossible. that's why so many people — including an influential parliamentary committee over the weekend — have expressed fears about no deal being done. but in a couple of weeks — nine months after the referendum — the official countdown to leaving the eu in 2019 will finally begin. but, jane, it will not be easy.
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chris morris, taking us through that very long process. we are due to hear from the very long process. we are due to hearfrom the prime minister at 12:30 p.m.. who will be live back in the house of commons hearing everything she had to say to mps, now she's free to trigger article 50. that is coming up at 12:30 p.m.. more background on everything happening on the bbc website. the usual address. come back to us here in westminster. in about ten minutes we will hear from theresa may. thank you. see you later. the headlines on bbc newsroom live. the bill to allow the government to trigger brexit will become law today, after being approved by parliament last night. the deputy governor of the bank of england resigns
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after failing to reveal her brother's role at barclays. the european union's hires court says that we can have a policy to prohibit people wearing religious and political symbols. now for the sport. one of the oldest golf clubs in the world, muirfield have voted to accept female members for the first time in its 273 year history. over 80% of the club's membership voted in favour of the change. back in 2016 a first vote failed, the r&a announced then that the club would no longer be able to host the open championship. but they've confirmed today that they're back on the roster. the ladies european tour said it was extremely pleased with the vote, which they believed
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would begin to restore the reputation of the club. the double olympic gold medallist joanna rowsell—shand has announced her retirement from international cycling. she said he'd achieved everything she'd ever wanted to in the sport, including five world titles, four european titles, a commonwealth gold and two olympic golds. she said she'd enjoyed a fabulous career and would continue in cycling as a coach. manchester united manager jose mourinho told chelsea fans he was still their number one manager, after they heckled him during their fa cup defeat last night, calling him a "judas". chelsea beat united 1—0 to reach the semi—finals, n'golo kante with the winner — only his second goal of the season. having joined rivals united after his sacking by chelsea — mourinho was quick to remind them just how many titles he'd won for the club. they can call me what they want. i ama they can call me what they want. i am a professional. i defend my club. until the moment they have a manager that wins four premier league is for
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them, iam that wins four premier league is for them, i am the number one. when they have somebody that wins four premier league is for them, i become number two. until that moment, judas is number one. leicester city return to champions league action this evening against sevilla, looking to overturn a 2—1 deficit from the first leg. it's their first match since manager craig shakespeare was given the job until the end of the season. leicester have won both of their league games since the sacking of claudio ranieri. it will be a special occasion. the atmosphere will be electric. i am expecting the team to take the momentum from the two results, to ta ke momentum from the two results, to take the confidence they have gained from that and really play on the front foot. that is not saying we will be open because we know seville have some very world—class players. it makes for a very interesting game because of the away goal. that's all sport for now. i'll have more in the next hour.
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the european union's top court has ruled that employers may ban staff from wearing visible religious symbols at work. the european court ofjustice delivered a jointjudgement in the cases of two women in france and belgium, who were dismissed for refusing to remove headscarves. the court said that an internal company rule prohibiting the wearing of any political, philosophical or religious sign was not discriminatory. our correspondent, hugh schofield, is in paris for us. talus more about the reaction to this law in france. -- tell us. it was not direct discrimination. it is a very important ruling. one has to remember that this is not, in a sense, the european court deciding how the cases should be settled. this is the european court issuing guidance to the high courts in france and belgium, which went to it saying we do not quite understand
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the european directive on dissemination, give us help. the two cases are about our moroccan woman he was sacked because she was wearing an islamic headscarf. in this case, there was existence already a company policy which insisted on strict neutrality and saintly cannot wear signs of religious, political, philosophical association in the workplace. in the case of that rule being applied neutrally on everyone, this was not in itself discrimination. they are saying that is their interpretation of the rules but maybe the belgian courts will decide there was in —— indirect discrimination. in the law, in its interpretation of the law, the court says thatjust having an internal rule is enough to then go ahead and applied neutrally and
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ensure there are no headscarves in public view. in the other case, it was a frenchwoman who was sacked after a client complained about the headscarf. in that case, the court said, we don't think that was grounds for sacking. we think there was discrimination in this case. again, it is up to the french courts to rule. the belgian case will be the more interesting. if it is true that a blanket neutrality rule is enough grounds to justify an insistence that a woman not wear a headscarf, one can expect a lot of companies can start and acting these internal rules, which may well allow them in the future to say to staff members, the receptionists or people working with the outside world, you cannot wear an islamic headscarf in that position. thank you very much. the bank of england's newly—appointed deputy governor, charlotte hogg, has resigned after mps criticised her for failing to reveal that her brother holds
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a senior role at barclays bank. mps said charlotte hogg's "professional competence fell short" of the standards required to fulfil her role. they found that ms hogg failed over a period of nearly four years to comply with the bank's code of conduct. in the last half an hour, the chair of the treasury committee has said that she acted in the interests of the institution. mark carney gave his response and issued a statement following the resignation full that this is part of what he said. the north—eastern united states is hunkering down for the worst snowstorm of the season.
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50 million people along the eastern seaboard are under blizzard warnings. schools are closed and thousands of flights and trains are cancelled. forecasters are predicting up to 60 centimetres of snow in some areas by later today for the people have been urged to stay indoors. we are in massachusetts where they are preparing for worse to come. we are just beginning to feel the winds. what is of concern along the coast is what happens over the next few hours, specifically this afternoon. there will be high tide. if the timing is right and the high tide hits right when you feel the strong, north easterly winds, that could be a recipe for disaster or the long the east coast. you have the storm surge possibility of about three feet. in delaware, all from delaware, all the way to massachusetts, we are seeing coastal flood warnings and waves as high as
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15 feet. a lot to keep our eye on. it can happen anywhere along east coast. lets just it can happen anywhere along east coast. letsjust show it can happen anywhere along east coast. lets just show you it can happen anywhere along east coast. letsjust show you pictures we have right now of the weather picture in new york. as you can see, very heavy snow. they are having a considerable impact. more than 5000 flights have been cancelled by us airlines will stop it is causing difficulties at airports and on the roads everywhere. those various areas which are affected on the eastern seaboard of the united states. new york and newjersey declaring states of emergency. no storms and no significant snow heading our way. unsettled
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conditions in time to the weekend. we are seeing some breaks in the cloud developing. the best of the sunshine is further north. here it is windy, especially in the far north of scotland. in the north of scotla nd north of scotland. in the north of scotland this is where we are seeing most of the showers. the wind is taking the edge of the temperatures. further south, 15, 16 degrees possible. the cloud will return across england, wales and northern ireland. maybe light drizzle on the hills. with their winds dropping and maybe a pinch of frost. early sunshine in the north of scotland and north east england. the cloud comes back up and a different look to the weather. largely dry elsewhere. a lot of cloud around. some breaks in the cloud to the west of high ground. the temperatures could peek at 17, 18 degrees. this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines:
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the brexit bill will become law today after being approved by parliament last night. peers backed down over amendments to the bill, after their objections were overturned by mps. the scottish national party warns the prime minister not to try to block first minister nicola sturgeon's plans for a second independence referendum. the deputy governor of the bank of england resigns after failing to reveal her brother's role at barclays. mps on the treasury committee said she "fell short of the very high standards" required. the ban on wearing headscarves in the workplace is legal, as long as it applies to all religious and political symbols, europe's top court rules. the decision triggered complaints from rights groups and religious leaders. muirfield golf club has voted to admit women as members for the first time in its history. more than 80% of members of the privately—owned club backed the decision to update its membership policy. new york and newjersey declare
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states of emergency as a huge winter storm sweeps into the eastern united states. schools are closed and thousands of flights have been cancelled. theresa may is due to make a statement to the house of commons on last week's european council meeting which was held in brussels. the summit was the last that mrs may will attend before formally launching the two—year brexit process later this month. the legislation went through the houses of parliament yesterday, so royal assent can now be given. we can cross live to the commons. we may hear from john we may hearfrom john bercow, announcing that royal assent has been given for the legislation. we
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are expecting to hear from theresa may. let's go live to jane hill at westminster. yes, we are waiting to hear from theresa may. this is the first statement we will hear from the this is the first statement we will hearfrom the prime minister since it became official that she now has the freedom to trigger article 50. as you see, this is officially a statement to mps, her report back to members of the commons about the eu council meeting last week. that is the official nature of her statement. but of course, we know she now has the freedom to trigger article 50, the formal process of this country leaving the eu and the beginning of a very long process, of course. there had been some
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suggestions recently that article 50 might be triggered today. but unless everybody is caught on the back foot, we don't think that will be happening. theresa may is working to her own self—imposed timetable of triggering article 50 by the end of this month. she hasjust a few triggering article 50 by the end of this month. she has just a few weeks left. it has to be triggered by the end of march. so there are a few more weeks in which the government can make that decision to trigger article 50 and then the negotiation process begins. for now, we wait to hear from the process begins. for now, we wait to hearfrom the prime minister in process begins. for now, we wait to hear from the prime minister in the commons for her statement to mps, officially about the eu council meeting last week.
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iam i am trying to double check whether the prime minister is actually in the prime minister is actually in the commons, otherwise we may have a long! we were told it was scheduled for 12.30. let's go back to the commons. thank you, mr speaker. i would like to make a statement on la st would like to make a statement on last week's european council and the next steps in preparing to trigger article 50 and beginning the process of leaving the european union. the summit began by re—electing donald tusk as president of the european council. i welcome to this because we have a close working relationship with president to sit and recognise the strong contribution he has made in office. in the main business of the council, we discussed the challenge of managing mass migration, threats from organised crime and instability in the western balkans, and the measures need to boost europe's growth and competitiveness, which will remain important for us as we build a new relationship between the eu and a self—governing global britain. in each case, we were self—governing global britain. in each case, we were able to show how
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britain will continue to play a leading role in europe long after we have left the european union. first on migration, i welcomed the progress in implementing the action plan we had agreed at the informal eu summit in malta last month. this included italy strengthening asylum processes and increasing returns, and greece working to implement the eu turkey deal where the uk is providing additional staff to support the interviewing of iraqi, afg ha n support the interviewing of iraqi, afghan and eritrean nationals. at this council, i argued that we must do more to dismantle the vile people smuggling rings who profit from the migrants' misery and who are subjecting many to unimaginable abuses. with coordinated uncommitted action, we can make a difference. just last month, a meeting between the national crime agency andy halilovic coastguard led to the arrest of 19 members of an organised crime group increase. as i have argued before, we need a managed, controlled and global approach, and
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thatis controlled and global approach, and that is what this council agreed. we need to help ensure that refugees claim asylum in the first safe country they reach, and help those countries support the refugees so that they don't have to make the perilous journey to that they don't have to make the perilousjourney to europe. and we need a better overall approach to managing the economic migration, one which recognises that all countries have the right to control their borders. engaging our african partners in this global approach will be crucial, and this will be an important part of the discussions at the somalia conference which the uk will be hosting in london in may. turning to the deteriorating situation in the western balkans, i made clear my concerns about the risks that this presents to the region and to our wider collective security. organised criminals and terrorists are ready to exploit these vulnerabilities, and we are seeing increasing brazen interference by russia and others. in light of the alleged montenegro coup plot, i called on the council to do more to counter destabilising
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russian disinformation campaigns and to raise the visibility of the western commitment to this region. the uk will lead the way. the foreign secretary will visit russia in the coming weeks, where i expect him to set out our concerns about reports of russian interference in the affairs of the government of montenegro. we will provide strategic communications expertise to the eu institutions to counter disinformation campaigns in the region, and we will host the 2018 western balkans summit. in the run—up to that summit, will enhance our security cooperation with our western balkan partners including on serious and organised crime, anti—corruption and cyber security. more broadly, ialso anti—corruption and cyber security. more broadly, i also reemphasised the importance that the uk places on nato as the bedrock of our collective defence. and i urged other member states to start investing more in line with nato's target so that every country plays
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its full part in sharing the burden. it is only by investing properly in our defence that we can ensure that we are equipped to keep our people say. turning to growth and competitiveness, i want us to build a new relationship with the eu that will give our company is the maximum freedom to trade with and operate in the european market and allow european businesses to do the same here. a successful uncompetitive european market in the future will remain in our national interest. at this council, i called for further steps to complete the single market and the digital single market. i also welcomed the completion of the free trade agreement between and canada and pressed for an agreement withjapan in canada and pressed for an agreement with japan in the canada and pressed for an agreement withjapan in the coming months.
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these agreements will lay the foundation for our continued trade arrangements with these countries as we leave the eu. at the same time, we leave the eu. at the same time, we will also seize the opportunity to forge are new trade deals and to reach out beyond the borders of europe to build relationships with old friends and new allies alike. this weekend, we announced a two day co nfe re nce this weekend, we announced a two day conference with the largest ever trade delegation to visit the uk, building on the £5 billion of trade we already do with qatar every year. we will also strengthen the unique and proud global relationships we have forged with a diverse and vibrant islands of the commonwealth, which we celebrated on commonwealth bay yesterday. finally, last night, the bill on article 50 successfully completed its passage through both houses and changed. it will now
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proceed to royal assent in the coming days, so we remain on track with the timetable i set out six months ago. i will return to this house before the end of this month to notify when i have formally triggered article 50 and begun the process through which the united kingdom will leave the european union. this will be a defining moment for our whole country as we begin to forge a new relationship with europe and a new role for ourselves in the world. we will be a strong, self—governing, global britain, with control once again over our borders and our laws. and we will use this moment of opportunity to build a stronger economy and a fairer society so that we secure both the right deal for britain abroad and a better deal for ordinary working people at home. the new relationship with the eu that we negotiate will work for the whole of the uk. that is why we have been
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working closely with the devolved administrations... laughter. including the scottish government, listening to their proposals and recognising the many areas of common ground that we have such as protecting workers' rights and our security from crime and terrorism. this is not a moment to play politics or create uncertainty. it isa politics or create uncertainty. it is a moment to bring our country together, to honour the will of the british people and to shape for them a better, brighter future and a better britain. i commend this statement to the house. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. i thank the prime minister
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foran speaker. i thank the prime minister for an advance copy of this statement. the passing into law of the eu notification of withdrawal act marks an historic step. later this month, the triggering of article 50, a process that will shape this country's future. there is no doubt that if the wrong decisions are made, we will pay the price for decades to come. so now, more than ever, britain needs an inclusive government that listens and acts accordingly. however, all the signs are that we have a complacent government, complacent with our economy, complacent with people's rights and complacent about the future of this country. i urge the future of this country. i urge the prime minister to listen to the collective wisdom of this parliament and to give this house the full opportunity to scrutinise the article 50 deal with a meaningful final vote. the people's
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representatives deserve better than ta ke representatives deserve better than take it or leave it. if we are to protect jobs and take it or leave it. if we are to protectjobs and living standards and if we are to protect the future prosperity of this country, the government needs to secure tariff free access to the single european market. mr speaker, the prime minister has already made the threat to our negotiating partners to turn britain into a deregulated tax haven. is that what she means by global britain? when the foreign secretary says no deal with the eu would be perfectly ok, it simply isn't good enough. farfrom taking back control, leaving britain to world trade organisation rules would mean losing control, jobs and frankly, losing out. so when the prime minister says a bad deal is better than no deal, let me be clear. no deal is a bad deal. such a
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complacent strategy would punish business, its jobs and complacent strategy would punish business, itsjobs and devastate public services on which people rely. the prime minister says she is seeking to secure a future free—trade deal with the eu after initial negotiations are completed. but if that is the strategy, it is essential that this government stops being complacent and focuses on securing a transitional agreement with the eu at the earliest opportunity. that would at least give the british people and businesses some short—term clarity in this period. the prime minister said she wanted to provide certainty on eu nationals as soon as possible. so why have they voted down every labour attempt to bring certainty to
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eu nationals who make such a massive contribution to our community and society? these people are not bargaining chips, they are mothers, fathers, wives, husbands. they are valued members of our community. the government could and should have acted months ago. i agree with the prime minister that now is not the time to create uncertainty or play politics. she should tell that to the eu migrants in britain who have no idea what the future holds because of decisions made by her government. on refugees, is the prime minister saying that she is content prime minister saying that she is co nte nt for prime minister saying that she is content for refugees to remain in camps in libya? is that a safe country? orfor camps in libya? is that a safe country? or for greece, italy camps in libya? is that a safe country? orfor greece, italy and malta to shoulder the entire burden of refugees from north africa and the middle east? whilst we welcome the middle east? whilst we welcome the conference she is proposing on
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somalia, we need to know what support britain is offering to all of those countries. does the prime minister still believe we have a collective responsibility on the issue of refugees? the prime minister said that she argued about tackling while smuggling rings and people being subject to unimaginable abuse. does she not agree that argument would be so much stronger if her government had been prepared to a cce pt if her government had been prepared to accept of the victims of that unimaginable abuse, for example the children who should have been accepted through dubs amendment? mr speaker, as we move towards the triggering of article 50, there is much uncertainty about britain's future. irresponsible government would set a positive tone with our negotiating partners and would move to protect our economy, workers and citizens at the earliest opportunity. instead, we have a
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reckless government playing fast and loose with the british economy. we will fight forjobs loose with the british economy. we will fight for jobs and the loose with the british economy. we will fight forjobs and the economy using every parliamentary mechanism thatis using every parliamentary mechanism that is available, and the government should welcome that scrutiny. prime minister. thank you, mr speaker. the right honourable gentleman mentioned a range of issues. he spoke again leg about the issues. he spoke again leg about the issue of eu nationals. as i have said in this house and has been said by others this dispatch box, we do wa nt to by others this dispatch box, we do want to ensure that the issue of the status of eu nationals who are living in the uk is dealt with at an early stage in the negotiations, but we also have a consideration for the uk nationals who are living in the european union. he said the eu nationals living here are individuals who have contributed to our society. indeed they are, but so are the uk nationals living in
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member states of the european union. i want to ensure that their status is also ensured. we hope and expect that this will be an issue we can address at an early stage. he talked about the need to come forward and be clear about the need for a transitional period. i him refer to the speech i gave in lancaster house injanuary the speech i gave in lancaster house in january to the white the speech i gave in lancaster house injanuary to the white paper we published. there is the need for an implementation period which is one of the objectives that will set out in that speech and that document. he talked about refugees from north africa and the middle east. we want to ensure that people don't feel the need to make the often dangerous, life—threatening journey across the central mediterranean. more than three quarters of the people doing this are not refugees, there are economic migrants. we need to ensure that we provide facilities and work
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with countries within africa, which the european union is itself doing, to ensure that the circumstances are such that people don't try to make a life—threatening journey. but we also need to be able to bring about also need to be able to bring about a distinction between refugees and economic migrants so that we can give better support to those who are refugees. he talked about the vile smuggling rings and appeared to suggest that the uk government was doing nothing to break the smuggling rings. in my statement, i quoted the recent example of the work of the national crime agency, which i might say, it is a conservative—led government that set up the national crime agency, that the dubbed the organised immigration crime task force and that is dealing with these issues. while he talks about abuses and the movement and trafficking of people, it is this government that brought in the modern slavery act andi brought in the modern slavery act and i am proud that we did it. finally, you referred to global britain and what it means. i will
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tell him. it is about a strong, self—governing britain, a britain thatis self—governing britain, a britain that is trading around the world with old friends and new allies alike. it is about a britain that is proud to take its plate on the world stage. studio: so, theresa may making that statement to the commons, saying that we will be a strong, self—governing, global britain even outside the eu and saying that britain will continue to play a leading role in europe even after we have left. some very striking comments following from what nicola sturgeon announced yesterday. theresa may was very strong when she said the new relationship we negotiated will work for the whole of the uk. she very much dressed the word whole. she said this is not a moment to play politics and create uncertainty, a nod to comments yesterday from
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scotland's first minister. finally, theresa may made the point that as far as she is concerned, everything is still on track and article 50 will be triggered by the end of march. that is the latest from the prime minister, officially her statement to update mps on the eu council meeting last week, but strong comments there article 50 and the weeks and months ahead. article 50 will be triggered, says the prime minister, by the end of march. we will have more from westminster on all of that throughout the afternoon. now, some breaking news. three members of police staff at devon and cornwall police have in the past few moments been found not guilty at bristol crown court of the manslaughter of thomas orchard, who died after being restrained in exeter in 2012. let's go tojohn k
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at the court. bring us up to date? this case goes back to 2012, nearly five years ago. a young man called thomas orchard, 32 years old, worked asa thomas orchard, 32 years old, worked as a church caretaker. he had mental health problems and was suffering with paranoid schizophrenia. he was arrested in the centre of exeter after reportedly shouting at passers—by. he was taken to a nearby police station where he was restrained and put into custody cell. a few minutes later, it was discovered that he had stopped breathing and he died in hospital a week later. three members of devon and cornwall police staff were subsequently charged with manslaughter. they were the custody sergeant and two civilian custody detention officers. the prosecution claimed that the way they had restrained him a particularly the way they used an emergency restraint
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belt around his head and had carried him with that around his face could have meant that he was unlawfully killed as it prevented him breathing. but after deliberating for nearly 23 hours, the jury have just returned a not guilty verdict. all three members of devon and cornwall police staff were acquitted in this manslaughter case. the family of thomas orchard, the man who died, have just said that their campaignfor who died, have just said that their campaign for justice will go who died, have just said that their campaign forjustice will go on. but for three three men who have had it hanging over them, this uncertainty, for nearly five years, they walk free and can return to work, i guess. thank you. in a moment the news at one with sophie raworth. first the weather. it is going to remain dry for the rest of the day. we have more cloud across england and wales today, but across england and wales today, but a few holes. this is where we have
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the warmest air, so that will boost the warmest air, so that will boost the temperatures if you do see the sunshine. further north, the sunshine. further north, the sunshine is tempered by a strong wind across the north of scotland and the northern isles. a few showers in scotland, mainly to the north of the central lowlands. sunshine for northern ireland, and more cloud across other parts of england and wales. through the midlands and east anglia, more sunshine here and temperatures will bea sunshine here and temperatures will be a few degrees higher. staying cloudy across south wales and the south—west of england, some of that cloud feeding into cheltenham. staying dry here notjust today, but into wednesday as well. probably starting with a lot of cloud on wednesday. cloud amounts will increase overnight. we start with clear spells and then the cloud comes back. maybe a bit of drizzle around the western hills and coasts, with cloud pushing into northern
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ireland. much of scotland should be dry. a pinch of frost in the north of the country. the winds will continue to ease on wednesday. a great start, with rain and drizzle moving away from northern ireland to scotland. a few breaks in the cloud could boost temperatures again. pretty mild if you are stuck under the cloud, as most of us will be. this weather front is arriving on thursday. not much rain around on thursday. not much rain around on thursday. it will determine whether from the north—west across scotland and northern ireland, with drizzle around the hills in northern england and wales. drier and warmer in the south—east of the uk. things changed towards the end of the week. the winds pick up again on friday, the cloud increases and we will see rain and maybe some snow over the hills
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of northern scotland. temperatures will drop off a bit in time for the weekend, when it will be somewhat cooler. the winds will be stronger as well. dry at times, but also some spells of rain.
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